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(Ebook free) The Lonely Hearts Club

The Lonely Hearts Club Elizabeth Eulberg DOC | *audiobook | ebooks | Download PDF | ePub

#69529 in Books 2011-01-01Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 8.25 x 5.25 x .50l, .53 #File Name: 0545140323304 pages | File size: 73.Mb Elizabeth Eulberg : The Lonely Hearts Club before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Lonely Hearts Club: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. All you need is loveBy Heidi (YA Bibliophile)This book is actually the reason I read Prom Prejudice (my first Elizabeth Eulberg book AND one of the first books I reviewed when I really started blogging!) But... I had never actually read The Lonely Hearts Club! I bought it for my middle school library when it came out. I put it on my "New Books!" shelf and a student checked it out. She loved it and told a friend


to check it out. They did. Then they had another friend read it and so on and so forth. Pretty soon it had a hold line. That has never happened with a book I didn't book talk before (or since!) I knew I had to read it... and I finally have!First, I feel like I should mention that I am a huge Elizabeth Eulberg fan. She is a Wisconsin girl like me (check back for more on that tomorrow!) I've met her a number of times and she is super fun to be around. Plus, her books are awesome. The Lonely Hearts Club is no exception. I would have adored it even if I'd never met the author.I think one of my favorite parts about Elizabeth Eulberg's books is the humor. This one was no exception. I loved the main character's Beatles obsessed parents (and how the obsession was past to her, too!) I loved the jokes and banter between the girls. I loved the idea of the nondating club! It was all so fun! It really made the story fly. I read it in one sitting, almost without stopping. Eulberg's writing is fresh and I just really enjoy her style. It left me feeling very content when I read the last page (not that I wouldn't love more Penny Lane and company!)The friendship between the different girls in the story was another aspect I loved. High school can be so mercurial. Friendships and relationships can change by the hour. Who didn't know someone who dropped plans with her friends for a guy? Or someone who was just doing what everyone expected of them? I liked seeing how the events of this book and having the support of The Lonely Hearts Club helped the girls really focus on who they wanted to be and what they wanted in their lives. Be who you want to be, not who others want to see! That's a message I want my students to walk away with!If you're looking for a delightful read full of friendship, romance and everything that comes with the two, The Lonely Hearts Club is for you. Also, how awesome is that cover?!?!?0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Had a problem with the feminist message...By Jude~2.5/5I tried starting this book a long while ago, and stopped because I didn't like it. I started it again, thinking to at least get through it, and found that what I didn't like about it before didn't bother me, but something else did.At first, I didn't like the writing. I thought it sounded very immature teenager. I didn't think so on my second read. What bothered me the second time, though, was the message being sent.So, Penny gets her heart broken and decides she's done with boys. And then she pushes her friends into joining her in a club that is very antiboy, named after a Beatles song. At first, some of her friends are wary, but then they get hurt in one way or another by a boy, and so they join. Because, of course, boys are horrible creatures, right? Not even human, really. They're the problem to everything.Okay, so there isn't actually very much boy-hate talk going on. But, while this sounded like it could have turned into a `go girls!' feminist type of book, or even one where the message is that women don't need men and can feel completely whole without them, that message wasn't really pushed, nor did it really even come to a head. The only thing that seemed to last, was that the girls decided that they weren't going to choose boys over their friends anymore. And I don't really think that's quite as powerful or important. I understand that not choosing a boy over your friends is important, but I don't think that's as important to push as not to choose anyone over yourself, which wasn't really even mentioned.And, yea, it really annoyed me the way some of the girls jumped to the conclusion that men are horrible, devil-spawns, to blame for everything. Especially when some of the girls jumped to that conclusion much too quickly. For instance, when one of the girls decides that this boy she likes doesn't like her, without even having a conversation with him, she gives up and joins the club, deciding that boys aren't worth it. And I just didn't understand her reasoning, or believe it, and I thought that it was dumb. A lot of their talk and reasons, to me, were kind of dumb. And kind of pissed me off at times.Also, the club gets very big, and we met a lot of different girls. And I guess we were supposed to actually remember a lot of them, know who they are, get the hints about their personal lives. I didn't. There were too many with too little time shown to them.Then there was the fact that a lot of the boys were complaining, and Penny got in trouble with the principal at one point because of what she was doing, even though it was none of their business. Her mother stuck up for her at that point, though, which was very nicely done.The only reason the rating isn't as low as it could have been, is that I did like the ending. And I liked the boy. Also, I liked Diane, an old friend of Penny's, who starts finding herself after breaking up with her long-time boyfriend. I actually liked Diane and her relationship with everyone, including her old boyfriend, more than I liked Penny.I don't have a whole lot else to say. The feminist part of me just raged a bit at this book. But I liked some of the characters, and I liked the ending. I'm not very eager to read any of Eulbergs' other books, but I might pick one up at some point.[This review is also available on my blog, among many others.]0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Beatle Bonanza!By BeatleBangs1964"Think for yourself 'cause I won't be there with you." -- George Harrison, 1965You've just got to love the cover, which is a spoof of the Beatles' 1969 Abbey Road album cover. They say you can't judge a book by its cover, but I think I did when I judged that this would be one I would like! It's a riot!Penny Lane, who shares her name with a 1967 Paul McCartney with the Beatles classic is so over boys. (Her two sisters are Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds and Lovely Rita. I'm surprised one wasn't named Michelle). After a traumatic breakup with her former boyfriend Nate, she forms The Lonely Hearts Club minus Sgt. Pepper. She swears off high school boys as she feels they don't show proper respect for women. Other girls join her club in droves. Her school principal, who is a man naturally chafes at the club as do the male students. Penny Lane does have a change of lonely heart when she meets a boy with a Beatle haircut. Something in the way he moves, perhaps? "I left you far behind/The ruins of the life that you have in mind./And though you still can't see/I know your mind's made up/You're gonna cause more misery." George Harrison, 1965 from "Think For Yourself"Penny and her Hearts are in-your face and live by John Lennon's credo in "Instant Karma" about how Instant Karma's gonna get you, gonna knock you right in the face.


She is somewhat Lennonesque with her in-your-face rebellion and delightfully zany wit. Like John Lennon, she and her fellow Hearts refuse to compromise their true voices and identity and swear off pretending to agree with someone just to win them over or pacify them. Any time somebody gives up their honest voice by pretending to be something they are not and by saying they agree with something they do not, they are stifling their identity. I hate that kind of toadying behavior and Penny and her Hearts wisely empower themselves to dodge that self-defeatist behavior. John Lennon's 1971 "Crippled Inside" is a good anti-toady song. At no time do the Hearts sacrifice their voices. That makes one think of John Lennon's greeting, "John here, speaking with his voice!" from the 1963 Beatles' Christmas album. What an empowering statement!The Hearts' theme song could be Paul McCartney's late 1977 hit, "I've Had Enough! (I can't put up with any more)." All Long Winding Roads lead to the Beatles and that is what makes this book such a treat."Although your mind's opaque, try thinking more if just for your own sake.The future still looks good and you've got time to rectify all the things that you should." -- George Harrison, 1965 from "Think For Yourself"The sheer genius of this book, with its empowering story, strong characters and WONDERFUL plethora of Beatle references will delight readers, whether they are Beatle fans or not. Beatle fans will especially enjoy this because not only will they "get" the Beatle references, they will love them! Aspie Beatle fans will love Penny's parents who, while the word is never mentioned are plainly Aspies with the Beatles as a special interest.Penny is delightfully funny and she bravely shares some horrific experiences. To make a good thing even better, she was born on Beatles' Day, February 7, the anniversary of the day the Beatles came to America! The daughter of two ardent inveterate Beatle fans, Penny develops a love for the Beatles early and even wants a Hey Bulldog for a pet. The social dynamics and social hierchy are given in plain terms and the story is one that pulls you in right away. You will travel down the Long Winding Road with Penny Lane and her fellow Hearts as they get by with a little help from their friends as they learn that in the end the love you take is equal to the love you make. The Hearts convert "A Hard Day's Night" into a "Good Day Sunshine" and soon are singing "I Feel Fine." The Beatles remain a comforting presence throughout the book and a driving force that impels Penny and her fellow Hearts as well.A heartfelt kudos and thank you to Elizabeth Eulberg. These delightful characters are wonderfully empowering and the Beatle humor brings big smiles to readers' faces. No doubt readers will take some ideas away after having read this book. If you listen to the Beatles while reading this work by this gifted Paperback Writer, you will increase your reading pleasure.John Lennon's 1970 "Instant Karma," Paul McCartney's 1977 "I've Had Enough" and George Harrison's 1965 "Think For Yourself" underscore a good portion of this book. So do these Beatle classics: "I'll Be Back," "She Loves You," "This Boy," "It Won't Be Long" and "The Long Winding Road" which are the soundtrack of this book together with "I Want to Tell You," a 1966 George Harrison classic. This gets a high endorsement and a hearty yeah, yeah, yeah from me! I love this book!Beatles Forever! Love is all you need... or is it? Penny's about to find out in this wonderful debut.Penny is sick of boys and sick of dating. So she vows: no more. It's a personal choice. . .and, of course, soon everyone wants to know about it. And a few other girls are inspired. A movement is born: The Lonely Hearts Club (named after the band from Sgt. Pepper). Penny is suddenly known for her nondating ways . . . which is too bad, because there's this certain boy she can't help but like. . . . From School Library JournalGr 7-10-Penny Lane Bloom, the daughter of two Beatles fanatics, has sworn off boys for good following a disastrous summer romance with her long-time friend, Nate. Tired of the drama and heartbreak surrounding boys and dating, Penny forms "The Lonely Hearts Club," with herself as the sole member. Soon she recruits her best friend, Tracy, and recently dumped Diane, a former friend of Penny's who ditched her years ago for a boy. As Diane and Penny repair their friendship, girls begin flocking to the club seeking refuge in the boy-free zone while developing strong bonds of friendship with one another. Penny is overwhelmed by the group's influence and popularity, and impressed with the club's positive impact on its members. The girls soon realize, however, that the club's strict anti-dating rule may be a bit too harsh, especially when one of the cutest boys in school shows an interest in Penny. Along with accurately demonstrating the ups and downs of high school dating, Elizabeth Eulberg's novel (Point, 2009) is a reminder of the value of friendship and staying true to oneself. Khristine Hvam does a fine job of portraying Penny and her large cast of girlfriends, but her voicing of the male characters often sounds cartoon-like. She occasionally sounds too old for some of the teen characters, but this could be due to Eulberg's writing. Overall, the well-paced, upbeat narration mirrors the positive feeling of the novel.-Amy Dreger, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Beachwood, OH(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.From BooklistAfter a devastating betrayal by the boy she thought she was destined to be with forever, Penny Lane Bloom (who fortunately inherited her parents love of the Beatles to go with her name) swears off guys and quietly starts the Lonely Hearts Club. To her surprise, many of her girlfriends are also sick of high-school guys and want to joineven Diane, Pennys former best friend and one-half of the schools power couple until a recent, amicable breakup. The club grows and becomes an influential social force as members meet every Saturday night, go to dances together, and support one another in their academic and extracurricular pursuits. But conflict arises when the


school administration fears the group is getting too powerful and making the boys feel bad, and Penny finds herself torn between her no-boy pledge and the courteous advances of one of the nicest guys she knowswho happens to be Dianes ex-boyfriend. This first novel will be a draw for readers looking for an upbeat take on friendship, empowerment, and finding romance without losing yourself. Grades 7-10. --Heather Booth Praise for The Lonely Hearts Club "A must-read for anyone who's ever fallen in love-or sworn it off completely. A funny, fantastic debut!" Stephenie Meyer, author of The Twilight Series "It's hard not to get caught up in this good natured revenge fantasy." The New York Times Book "The Lonely Hearts Club turns the world of teen dating upside-down, proving that a girl can ignore 'the rules' and still land squarely, happily, and hilariously on her feet." -Lauren Myracle, author of ttyl "Why oh why weren't Penny Lane Bloom and her Lonely Hearts Club around when I was in high school? Penny is a terrific voice-smart, sassy, and full of girl power - just like author Elizabeth Eulberg. I can't wait to see what she comes up with next." -Jen Calonita, author of Secrets of My Hollywood Life "A delightful coming-of-age story about learning to define yourself without shutting the door on love." -Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games trilogy

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