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(Download free ebook) The Neddiad: How Neddie Took the Train, Went to Hollywood, and Saved Civilization

The Neddiad: How Neddie Took the Train, Went to Hollywood, and Saved Civilization Daniel Manus Pinkwater ePub | *DOC | audiobook | ebooks | Download PDF

#1305230 in Books 2007-04-23 2007-04-23Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 1.09 x 5.84 x 8.67l, 1.10 #File Name: 0618594442307 pages | File size: 65.Mb Daniel Manus Pinkwater : The Neddiad: How Neddie Took the Train, Went to Hollywood, and Saved Civilization before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Neddiad: How Neddie Took the Train, Went to Hollywood, and Saved Civilization: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Think PinkBy watchitWhat a refreshing memoir! It's written with a


child's innocence and an adult's perspective. If you read it with Pink's voice in your head it's like being tucked in by a favorite uncle.0 of 1 people found the following review helpful. Illiad and soon Odyssey - I was amused by the book, entertained...By DelaneyI like Mr. Pinkwater and I like Ned's adventures. I just couldn't get into the rhythm of the book and anticipate the next page. In all fairness I decided to take Mr. Gaiman's suggestion to read the book aloud and that did increase the hilarity of the prose quite a bit.There is no city of Illiad, and Achilles wrath comes from Sandor Eucalyptus and Sholmos Bunyip. And I didn't count but I'm pretty sure that there were not 15,693 lines or dactylic hexameter. And I'm not skilled enough in dactylic hexameter to pinpoint hexameter when I see it. And instead of beginning our tale at the end of the Trojan War we begin at the end of World War II.The story is told in short chapters almost episodic or episodial (if those are words). So you will have 79 episodes in Neddie's journey.Anyhow the nuts and bolts are that Neddie is going to take a train, he'll go to Hollywood and he will save civilization. And you will meet Iggy (otherwise thought of as Odysseus). So Iggy's journey will be continued in the Yggyssey.Oh - and you should read it aloud - it does have a rhythm, and all great epics were meant to be read aloud - even to music.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. What a fun read out loudBy Burnt SiennaWhat a fun read out loud, laugh out loud book. My kids have read it over and over again. The old powers try to come back, and the planet is plunged into chaos, and civilization is destroyed, and it gets all violent and evil...the old legends tell that a hero...with the sacred turtle, always...Los Angeles, California.Neddie Wentworthstein is the guy with the turtle.Sandor Eucalyptus is the guy with the jellybean.Sholmos Bunyip wants the turtle...and he'll stop at nothing to get it.This is the story of how Neddie, three good friends, a shaman, a ghost, and a little maneuver known as the French substitution determine the fate of the world. From School Library JournalGrade 59A bright and breezy adventure with a smart and funny narrator, this story is part historical travelogue, part Saturday matinee, with bits of turtle lore and Catskills stand-up comedy. Los Angeles in the late 1940s is a magical place of swashbuckling movie stars, restaurants shaped like hats and doughnuts, tar pits, fancy private schools, and Neddie Wentworthstein. His eccentric, wealthy father has decided to relocate the family from Chicago to L.A. On the journey, a shaman named Melvin gives Neddie a turtle carved from a meteorite, possibly the rarest and most precious one in existence, and the only thing standing between humanity and the destruction of all civilization. Accidentally left behind in Flagstaff, AZ, Neddie is befriended by Seamus Finn, his movie-star dad, and Billy the Phantom Bellhop. The four visit the Grand Canyon and are held up at gunpoint by Sandor Eucalyptus, who is looking for the turtle. When they make it to Los Angeles, well, then things get even weirder. The ending is a little abrupt and kids may not get all the references, but they'll get the mystery, the excitement, the friendships, the aliens from outer space, the battle between good and extraordinarily awful evil, and the live woolly mammoth that performs circus tricks in a replica of the Roman Forum (told you things get pretty weird). Fans of Sid Fleischman will find much to like in this goofy and lovingly nostalgic historical fantasy.Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.From BooklistIn the 1940s, young Nedworth Wentworthstein is traveling across America with his family when he meets an Indian shaman, who slips him a sacred stone turtle. Ned soon discovers that bad guys are after the turtle, and he enlists the help of newfound friends (including the ghost of a bellboy) to help him protect his treasure. Eventually, though, the turtle falls into the wrong hands, and Ned is forced to confront terrifying, magical beasts. There are actually two novels here: one centers around the supernatural world, where Ned's epic battles play out; the other details 1940s America, from the pleasures of riding the Super Chief to the slightly off-kilter culture of postwar Southern California. The two parts don't really come together into a cohesive whole; the plotline that includes observations of late 1940s America provides the stronger narrative. There are plenty of funny lines and scenes, though, and fans of Pinkwater will probably enjoy this messy, entertaining enterprise. Todd MorningCopyright American Library Association. All rights reserved ...plenty of funny lines and scenes, though, and fans of Pinkwater will probably enjoy this messy, entertaining enterprise." Booklist, ALA"The author creates secondary roles as interesting as the starring characters. Even if there were no quest at the heart of the tale (and there is a good one) this would be a highly entertaining road tripthanks to Pinkwaters oneof-a-kind comic sensibility and his uncanny ability to access the language and mindset of boys." Publishers Weekly, StarredThis amiable, old-fashioned adventure saga by the droll and prolific Pinkwater is a lot of fun to read, full of unexpected plot twists, LA atmosphere, and goofy names.KLIATT"Ned's compelling sense of wonder and delight at each new sight or encounter positively propels his account of the cross-country journey along." Kirkus sThe firstperson narrative's relaxed pace leaves ample room for Pinkwater's affectionate descriptions of the old movie house, the doughnut shop (where certain extraterrestrial fat men make a cameo appearance), the La Brea tar pits, and other interesting landmark of Neddie's L.A. neighborhood. Readers looking for a nail-biting thriller won't find it here; but those who do get drawn into Pinkwater's portrait of old Hollywood, embellished with loopy supernatural intrigue, will devour it like a double-chocolate doughnut.Horn Book"The title of this book ought to give you an idea of its goofy wonderfulness....What makes this book so delightful-apart from the zaniness of the storyline--is the author's lively, humane wit." The Wall Street Journal"Pinkwater, master of nostalgia-tinged satire (or is it satire-tinged nostalgia?),


sets this very funny encomium to the '40s in a swath of America stretching from Chicago to L.A....Neddie's pitchperfect rendition of that '40s voice-- a tad formal, a smidgen hardboiled, faintly tongue-in-cheek -- should charm even the most jaded 12-year-old." The Washington Post"Fans of Daniel Pinkwaters laugh-out-loud fiction will savor the tale of Neddie Wentworthstein, whose family moves to Los Angeles from Chicago. Invite kids to check out the novels Web site (www.pinkwater.com/theneddiad) for a peek at original draftsperfect for a lesson on revision." Instructor, Scholastic, Inc.

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