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(Mobile library) The Giver (illustrated; gift edition)

The Giver (illustrated; gift edition) Lois Lowry *Download PDF | ePub | DOC | audiobook | ebooks

#4479203 in Books 2011-10-25 2011-10-25Format: Bargain PricePDF # 1 8.75 x 6.00 x 1.00l, #File Name: B00BQE5T14208 pages | File size: 27.Mb Lois Lowry : The Giver (illustrated; gift edition) before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Giver (illustrated; gift edition): 189 of 198 people found the following review helpful. "I have great honor. So will you. But you will find that is not the same as power."By E. A. SolinasDystopian teen fiction is pretty hot right now, with blockbusters like "The Hunger Games" and "Divergent." But the grandaddy of them all was "The Giver."And long before it became chic, Lois Lowry produced a hauntingly memorable quartet of stories set in a world where emotions are suppressed and people with gifts are imprisoned. The four books are loosely tied together -- the first and last most tightly -- and mingle fantasy and science fiction, with haunting prose and some very strong characters, as well as a message of compassion and acceptance.In "The Giver," Jonas lives in a rigid, joyless community where people use emotion-deprivation pills and adhere to insanely strict rules -- they have no conflict, poverty or discrimination... but they also have no love, no fun, and no creativity. When Jonas is selected as the Receiver of Memories, he is suddenly flooded with feelings and memories of both the good and the bad from humanity's distant past.And as he comes to realize what his people have lost in their quest to be the same, Jonas begins yearning for the world he knows must exist outside the Community. But his quest becomes a more personal one when he discovers another price for the Community's existence: the "release" of babies that they don't deem good enough. The only one who can change the Community is Gabe."Gathering Blue" introduces us to Kira, a young girl born with a deformed leg in another community that leaves disabled or sickly people to die in the Field of Leaving. She is only kept alive because of her skill with embroidery and


weaving, so she can make the Singer's robe. As she comes to realize the horrible flaws in her village's way of life, Kira must make an important decision -- stay and try to improve things, or leave for a place that would welcome her?"Messenger" was somewhat controversial upon its release, since some fans of "The Giver" felt that it "ruined" the bleak ending they had imagined for the first book. In takes place in Village, a community made up of outcasts, misfits and disabled people, ruled by the kindly Leader. But the Village is surrounded by Forest, a terrifying and deadly forest that kills those who venture into it -- and though the awkward teen boy Matty has been able to go there, it is now growing darker and twisted. As the Village begins to close itself off from the outside world, Matty finds that he may be the only one who can save them all."Son" takes us back in time to Claire, a young woman whose entire purpose is to produce babies for the Community -- and her child is the sickly baby boy known as Gabe, who vanishes with Jonas into the great unknown. Her desperation to find her son inspires her on a years-long quest to find him -- and a Faustian pact with a terrible figure who only wants suffering.Pretty much all young-adult dystopian fiction owes a debt to the Giver Quartet -- it has young people discovering the cruelty and callousness of their societies, and finding different ways to rebel. But Lowry doesn't shy away from asking the serious questions in her story, such as lack of respect for life (if it's inconvenient or doesn't fit in), kindness, compassion, and the good AND bad roots of what it means to truly live.Lowry's writing is simple but poetic, winding through with some quietly eloquent language ("Now, on this shattered morning, he felt nothing but knots and snarls under his fingertips"). And she fills the stories not with bombast and battle, but with tragedy and quiet triumph -- and while the story is in a future world fragmented into multiple civilizations, there's a hint of the fantastical as well. Think special powers, the mysterious Trademaster, and whatnot.And she creates a varied collection of characters. All of them are tied together into a story that culminates in "Son," and they all have the theme of seeking to improve the cruel, callous worlds they were in -- Jonas by leaving the Community to the memories they are trying to avoid, Kira by staying and working, and Matty through self-sacrifice. Claire is the odd duck out, a young woman adrift in the world, desperate to find her baby."The Giver Quartet" is a haunting memorable collection of novels, some of which inspired the current widespread dystopian novels. Rich, haunting and well-written.1 of 1 people found the following review helpful. The Giver by Lois Lowry in one word is fantastic!By BC ArroyoThe Giver by Lois Lowry in one word is fantastic. By the end of the story, I was overcome with the conclusion that I do not appreciate the beauty of life as I should, and I was also made aware of the dangers concerning a life abounding in conformity. I do not wish to lie, from the very beginning of chapter one, I was troubled with an unsettling eerie feeling of restlessness thanks to Lowrys cleverness in illustrating a demented controlled bureaucracy. The entirety of the book is both dreary and burdensome, but so worth the read; such an eye-opener.One day, in retrospect, the years of struggle will strike you as the most beautiful. Sigmund Freud3 Things I Liked:1. The simplicity of the story conveyed through the chapters; a positive message for everyone to read2. The Giver! His meekness, the respect and honor he holds towards the memories he has been entrusted to carry despite how burdensome the task may be3. The ending. Which reminded me so much of Peter Van Houtens Imperial Affliction; the ending has infinite possibilities!3 Things I Did Not Like:1. The book is recommended for children 7+ I personally would not recommend this book to any child as I feel that it supports sensitive issues such as: suicide, genocide, selfmedication to suppress general feelings2. I know this is totally unrelated to the book, but I have not liked the negative reviews the movie trailer has received; I am choosing to stay optimistic about the movie.3. Not enough chapters! Way too short! Give me 400 pages worth of reading! XDMy Favorite Quotes:' The worst part of holding the memories is not the pain. Its the loneliness of it. Memories need to be shared.' You will be faced, now, with pain of a magnitude that none of us here can comprehend because it is beyond our experience. The Receiver himself was not able to describe it, only to remind us that you would be faced with it, that you would need immense courage.' Today is declared an unscheduled holiday.' I dont know what you mean when you say the whole world or generations before him.I thought there was only us. I thought there was only now.' Gabe? The newchild stirred slightly in his sleep. Jonas looked over at him. There could be love, Jonas whispered.' If everythings the same, then there arent any choices! I want to wake up in the morning and decide things!' For the first time, he heard something that he knew to be music. He heard people singing. Behind him, across vast distances of space and time, from the place he had left, he thought he heard music too. But perhaps, it was only an echo.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Very Thought ProvokingBy The Kid Book ReviewersMy Thoughts: I've finally decided to review this book. I read it first six months ago, and since then, have reread it three times. Since my most recent reread, I've also read Son, the last book in the series, and told myself that I had to review this or I probably would never do it.The thing about The Giver is that my opinion on it has changed every time I read it. When I first read it, I rated it only two stars. The story, though meaningful, was a little too plain and short for my liking - I felt like it didn't meet my expectations. However, after reading the second book, Gathering Blue, which I LOVED, I felt I should reread this book just in case I had missed something. With my lowered expectations, I found a new appreciation and love for this book, and bumped my rating up to five stars. Having said this, The Giver is hard to review, because, like I said, you see something new in the story every time.Personally, I liked the character of Jonas. He's a strong, thoughtful main character for a powerful, thoughtprovoking series. The concept of this book is very fascinating - I have to applaud Lowry for this, I never thought I would read a dystopia with such an outgoing, terrifyingly realistic future for our world. The whole Releasing thing


(actually, spoiler alert, killing) kept me on the edge of my seat, and, like every book in the Giver Quartet, I shed a few tears. Because the thing I've really realized about this series is that it really is a metaphor, in every way possible, of our world. I won't elaborate, all I'll say is that I would definitely give this book a try - and that I agree with the first sentence of the summary: "The Giver, the 1994 Newbery Medal winner, has become one of the most INFLUENTIAL novels of our time." (Oh, and the word haunting, and in the last book, chilling.) A Newbery Medalwinning classic is reinvented in a gift edition format with illustrations from the acclaimed artist Bagram Ibatoulline. Since winning the Newbery Medal in 1994, Lois Lowrys The Giver has become one of the most influential novels of our time.This new illustrated edition, a celebration of the books standard of excellence and of Lowrys illustrious writing, makes a perfect gift. The text is complemented by thirteennew illustrations from the acclaimed artist Bagram Ibatoulline. Also included are a new introduction by the author and her inspiring Newbery Medal acceptance speech. The new content and gift packaging now make it easier than ever to introduce young readers to this riveting modern classic, and provide a fresh edition for its legions of fans. The story centers on twelve-year-old Jonas, who lives in a seemingly ideal world. Not until he is given his life assignment as the Receiver does he begin to understand the dark secrets behind this fragile community. The Giver is the first in the trilogy of books that includes Gathering Blue and The Messenger. A powerful and provocative novelThe New York Times Wrought with admirable skill -- the emptiness and menace underlying this Utopia emerge step by inexorable step: a richly provocative novel.Kirkus, starred review Lowry is once again in top form raising many questions while answering few, and unwinding a tale fit for the most adventurous readers.Publishers Weekly, starred review The simplicity and directness of Lowry's writing force readers to grapple with their own thoughts. Booklist, starred review The theme of balancing the values of freedom and security is beautifully presented. The Horn Book Magazine, starred reviewAbout the AuthorLois Lowry is known for her versatility and invention as a writer. She was born in Hawaii and grew up in New York, Pennsylvania, and Japan. After several years at Brown University, she turned to her family and to writing. She is the author of more than thirty books for young adults, including the popular Anastasia Krupnik series. She has received countless honors, among them the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award, the California Young Readers Medal, and the Mark Twain Award. She received Newbery Medals for two of her novels, NUMBER THE STARS and THE GIVER. Her first novel, A SUMMER TO DIE, was awarded the International Reading Associations Childrens Book Award. Ms. Lowry now divides her time between Cambridge and an 1840s farmhouse in Maine. To learn more about Lois Lowry, see her website at www.loislowry.com.

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