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w e i v e r P The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes es by R. Andrew Gilchrist

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I

Contents 

THE BASICS…… 1

w e i v e r P Clothes Do Make The Man!…… 2 Cracking the Dress Code Code…… 10 lor Matching…… …… 16 Color Coordination…… ordination…… 37

47 How to Look Your Best!…… 4 The basics Body type typ

49 52

How m Ho men see colors 59 How women see colors 64 Ho What colors say! 67

Andy Gilchrist Bio …… 70

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THE SPECIFICS…… 73 Belts…… 74

w e i v e r P Guide

75

Kinds of belt leather 75 Leather categories by quality 78

Parts of a belt 81 Styles 83 Fit 85 Care 86 History ory 87

Blazers…… … 90 Guide ide 91 9 Fitt 97 Care 99 History 100

Boots…… 101

G Guide 102 StyleS 107 Parts and terms 109 Fit 111 Lace length 112

Break in your hiking boots 113

Care 114 Shine 115 History 117

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Braces …… 121 Guide 123 Fit 123 Care 124 History 124

w e i v e r P Briefcases…… 126 Guide 127 Styles 130 Care 131 31 History story 131

Buttons…… …… 132

Men en vs Women 133 136 History 13

Caps and Hats…… 14 143 Terminology 144 Guide Gui to t caps 145 Styles of caps 145 S

History of baseball caps 148

Guide to hats 150 Hat fit 152 Hat care 153 Styles of hats 154 History 161

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Casual Coats…… 168 Guide 169 Styles 172 Care 176 History 177

w e i v e r P Cuff Links…… 179 Guide 181 Styles 182 History 183

Dress Shirts…… …… 185 Guide 186 Fabric Weaves 188 Collar styles 189 Fit 198 Coordination 204 Care 204 Historyy 2208

Eyewear…… 213 Ey Professionals 218 Lenses 219 Frames 220 Fit 221 Care 224 History 225

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Formalwear…… 230 Guide

233

How to tie a bowtie 236

Color 242 Fit 244 Care 246

w e i v e r P Invitation terminology 246 Proper formalwear by event 246

History and styles

247

Gloves…… 253

Dress gloves 254 Active/sports orts gloves oves 260 Fit 261 Care 263 26 History ory 264 2

Grooming…… 265 Shaving Fragrance ance Skin care Hair care Ha Dental care

266 271 27 277 281 285

Jackets…… 288 Styles 289 Fit 293 Care 294 History 295

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Neckties…… 297 Parts of 298 Tie terms 300 How to tie: 308

w e i v e r P Ascot 308 Bowtie 309 Four-in-hand 310 Full windsor 311 Half windsor 312 Pratt (shelby) 313

Coordination on n 314 Care 315 History 3166

Overcoatss and Topcoats…… 32 322 Guide 324 Fit 326 Styles 328 Caree 329 32 History 330 Histor

Pajamas…… 333

Guide 335 Popular types 336 History 337

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VII

Contents

Pocket Squares…… 338 Guide 339 Fit 340 The folds 341 Care 356 History 356

w e i v e r P Raincoats…… 358 Guide

359

Weather protection n 360

Styless

360

Robes…… … 363 Styles les

365 36

Sandals…… 367 3 Styles 368 History ory 369

Shoes…… 373 Sh Sho

Kinds of leather 376 Shoe terms 383 Styles 389 Fit 394 Lace length 399 History 400

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Contents

Shoe Care…… 416 Shoeshine Shoe trees Shoe racks

420 424 426

Shorts…… 429

w e i v e r P Guide 430 Fit 431 Styles of shorts 432 Care 433 History 434

Socks…… …… … 436 Guide 438 History ry 441 4

Sport Jackets…… 444 Guide 445 Patterns 457 Fit 462 Care 467 History 469

Sport Shirts…… 473 Guide 474 Styles 479 Fit 485 Care 485 History 486 Polo shirt history 488

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Suits…… 490 Guide 491 Construction 494 Styles 503 Suit fabric 510 Suit patterns 512 Color 517 Fit 519 Care 525 History 528

w e i v e r P Sweaters…… … 535 Guide Styles

536 5399

By neck design 539 By pattern 541

Fit 545 Care 546

Moths!! 548

Sweater history

550

Sweatshirts…… 551 Sweat Sweatshirt Guide 552 Styles 553 History 555

Swim Trunks…… 557 Guide 558 styles 558 History 560

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Trousers…… 564 Guide 565 Styles 574 Fit 575 Care 579 History of 581

w e i v e r P Trousers 581 Zippers 585 Khaki / chino 587 Jeans 588 88

Umbrellas…… mbrellas…… 591 Guidee 5592 How ow to Furl 593 History 594 59

Underwear…… 596 Guidee Style Styles

59 598 600

Underpants 600 Undershirt 601

Underwear terms 602 Care 602 History 603 T-shirt history 607

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w e i v e r P Vests…… 609 Guide 610 Styles 612 Fit 6133 re 614 Care

Wallets…… …… 616 Guide de

617 61

Watches…… 6 623

Guide 627 Rule of Seven 632 History Histo 650 Jewelry 650

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Contents

SPECIAL INFORMATION…… 651 Fabrics…… 652 Fiber production

655

Weights and measures 657

Fabric production

660

w e i v e r P Felt 660 Weaving 661 Knitting 663

Linen 665 Cotton 666 Wool 670 Silk 676 Man-made fibers bers ers 678 6 Blends ends 685

Leather…… r…… 686

Leather grades 687 Common kinds 688 Tanning leather 690 Care 691

Clothes Care…… Clothe Ca 692 Laundry 693 Drying 701 Professional 703 Laundry 703 Dry cleaning 703

Ironing

705

Irons 707 Ironing board 710

Starch 711 Storage 714

Hangers 716 Moths!! 720 Closet cleaning 722

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Contents

w e i v e r P How To Remove Stains…… …… 723 General

725

Cleaning ng solutions tions 726 72 Stain removal al 728

Foreign Size Conversions…… nversions…… 738 Shoes

739 73

Suits and overcoats overcoat 740

Shirts 741 Trousers ousers 742 Hats 74 742

Fabric tran Fa translations 742

Travel…… 743

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w e i v e r P THE BASICS

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The basics / Coordination

The Color Spectrum or Wheel

w e i v e r P Sir Isaac Newton developed eloped the first circular diagram m of colors in 1666.

Color Value: (also called Saturation, Intensity ityy and Chroma)

Value is the degree of lightness orr darkness in a color. lor. It’s the quality by which a pal pale pa or light color is distinguished from a deep or dark ark one. Valuess can be expressed by shades, tints, and tones. A visual presentation on of some color olor terms:

HUE

The pure color (for example RED)

TONE Hue + small amount of gray or opposite color (will mute or tone down the color

TINT Hue + White (will lighten the color)

COMPLEMENT TINT Tint + small amount of gray or opposite color (will mute or tone down the color)

SHADE Hue + Black (will darken the color)

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The basics / Coordination Dark and dull colors recede thus making you look thinner, and smaller. Light and bright colors project, which tend to bulk you up and make you look larger.

ANDY’S ADVICE: If you’re trying to look slim, save the bright colors for accents. With a gray or navy suit a red or yellow tie will draw favorable attention to your face. Dark colors are more formal than light. Bright colors in large amounts become tiresome to the eye. Want to emphasize your shoulders and de-emphasize your hips? Wear a lighter colored sports jacket with dark trousers. (You can also apply this principle to a polo shirt and trousers).

w e i v e r P

Men with muted or softer coloring look better in "dusty or hazy" colors that have a touch ch of gray or are faded. For example, light hair and skin would pair well with powder blue.

ch colors thatt pop out. N Nav Men with darker complexions and hair look better in bright, crisp, clear, rich Navy blue would be an example. Color contrast: Another "rule" says one of the three elementss should be light, the other two dark. h two lights. For examTry one light element with two dark, or one dark with ed tie (dark), dark), or tan suit (light) ple, a charcoal suit (dark), white shirt (light) and red nts and a dark blue with yellow shirt (light) and green tie (dark).). Or Khaki pants ook best when they contrast. And unshirt. Even on Regis the tie and shirt look less you’re a cast member of the Sopranos, the tie should be darker than the shirt! ng contrast of a navy suit and white shirt works we w with The traditional strong well ike the great look of classic black b aand white in every skin and eye color. Just like formalwear.r.

(a we w discussed in the body If you are tall you may (as styles) want to contrast tth the top

bot y and bottom of your attire (dark sports jacket and light olored trousers) ttrou colored to give a break to the eye thus makg a horizontal h ing line that makes you look shorter.

If you are short do the opposite and try to more closely match the color and intensity of the top and bottom of your ensemble. Short or heavy gentlemen look great in suits since the matching top and bottom produce a “taller, thinner” image.

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The basics / Coordination Two principles guide the choice of colors: matching and contrasting.

A dark blue tie with a pale blue shirt and a blue or gray suit is an example of color harmony. Substitute a red or maroon tie in this getup, and you have color contrast. There is much to learn in color coordination. Too close a color harmony results in a monochrome effect and can be boring. And too much contrast can be harsh.

w e i v e r P

Andy’s Tip: The buttons of sports jackets are usually contrasting with a range of colors. Choose your trousers from one of those colors!

FABRIC WEIGHT

Traditionally heavier weight fabrics (such as 11 to 16 ounce nce wool suit fabrics, corduroy, suede, and leather) leathe leath eight fabrics brics (seersucker, and linen) are more co com are worn in the fall and winter while lighter weight common in the spring and summer.

Take the tie for example, silk is correct rect all year round, d, but in winter you can add a w wo wool tie to the ensemble. Now you have introduced ed a heavier fabric bric element must be careful to bala balance. Heavier fabrics give the he impression n of a heavier body. (Tweed, flannel, bulky b sweaters) Light to medium ium weight fabrics abrics visually remove pounds. (cotton, (co (cotto twill, linen)

FABRIC TEXTURE

You can use the quality of roughness or sm smoothness in fabrics to help coordinate your attire and present the appropriate image. Texture xture makes a statement.

Smooth oth paral parallels dar dark as being dressier, giving authority and power, but you can be too smooth or slick projecting ing a cold, col elusive, distrustful appearance. co

Rough textures parallel lighter colors, projecting an accessible and friendlier image. Silk ties are dressier than wool, smooth suit fabrics are dressier than tweed.

You can contrast (smooth with rough) or match (smooth with smooth, rough with rough) textures. Balance between textures also should be considered. Oxford cloth shirts are the most textured dress shirt and call for a smooth tie and suit for the most dressy business situations, but an oxford shirt and a wool tie with corduroy pants are a great casual winter look. A wool cable knit sweater can add a component of texture to your attire.

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The basics / Coordination

Fabric sheen, shiny vs. dull, is also significant. Shiny is more appropriate for evening social functions and can look "cheap". Both Fabric Weight and Texture come in to play with seasonal clothing. Be careful to wear items appropriate to the season. A heavy ski sweater doesn't work with linen trousers!

ADDITIONAL DETAILS Think about the situation you’ll be in, and your image when you choose your clothes. You don’t always want to project a power authority image. Sometimes you want to appear as a friendly, “let’s work together” person.

w e i v e r P

Playing with Matches (and Mixes)

The word match comes from an Old English word "gemaecca" which hich was shortened ened to "macche" meanmea ing mate or companion! Color Black shirt

Pattern Pin Stripe pe suit

Texture Gabardine pants

Weight Flannel el shir shirt

Black pants

Striped tie

Silk shirt shi

W Woo Wool tie

Contrast

Navy suit uit

Striped ed shirt Plaid d shorts

Corduroy rduroy pa p pants

Tweed pants Broadcloth shirt

(Mix)

White shirt

Stripe shirt

Cott Cotton shirt

Silk tie

Match

Camel hair sports jacket

Burgundy undy tie

Sock colors match or can be slightly darker darke than trousers. Solid is more dressy than patterns. Shoes and belt belts match ch each othe other in color, and texture.

h Navy, or gray suits and a trousers, black or cordovan color (the name for a reddish-black shoe color With also called burgundy, bu burgundy or oxblood even when the leather isn’t Cordovan) shoes work best, but a dark ca add a sophisticated look. Tan, brown, olive and other earth tone suits and trousers look brown shoe can best with h brown or cordovan shoes. Some circles think that brown shoes are not dressy enough for wearing in the evening. With Jewelry, belt buckles, etc., silver is considered dressier and works best with navy, blue, black or gray, while gold matches brown, olive, and other earth colors.

Traditionally gold was appropriate for day, and silver for evening, but with the advent of a more casual approach, both are interchangeable.

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The basics / Andy gilchrist bio

The Basics

w e i v e r P ANDY GILCHRIST IST BIO

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The basics / Andy gilchrist bio

My interest in clothing came from my father who even in the middle of Kansas wanted to know the latest fashion. Degrees in Sociology and Journalism from Kansas State University got me started in a diverse professional career. Serving corporate America, I developed a strong sense of how fashion influences others. I put my fashion hobby to the test working part time at a Polo/Ralph Lauren store, and filled an educational need by producing handouts for customers on all aspects of men’s clothing. I was consistently the number one salesman even though I only worked part time!! I have written for ModernMan.com, AMansLife.com, Men’s Healt Health, Greg ed in Mone Norman’s website Shark.com and have been published Money and d by the GQ Magazines. One of my travel photographs was published ter to tthe Los Angeles Times where you’ll also see an occasional letter editor!

w e i v e r P boutClothes.com m website started. How the http://www.AskAndyAboutClothes.com

As I meet more and nd more of the members of the Ask Andy Forums and those of you kind enough to own my book there ere seemss to be a common question. How did you ever start the website? Here’s the answer! wer!

I was connected to modernman.com man.com as their eir men’s fashion forum monitor. I ttried to get the owner to post more of my articles,, and add some advertising dvertising so that maybe I could cou get g paid something! Those reted upon. So I though maybe I can do this myself, mysel the way I’d like to do it. quests were not acted Men’ Me Clothes. I also had begun writing my book, The Encyclopedia of Men’s

friends Bob McConnell McConnel , (a tennis and golf buddy) worked for IBM and I apOnee of my longtime friends, McConnell, proached him about doing a website. Bob sa said “Sure, it’s easy!” And we went out and bought some Front Page software. The next few weeks was a real learning lear experience for a non-tech person (me!). But Bob worked with me d got me through setting up u some pages. and

ovember 2, 20 ovemb On November 2001 we were “on the air” and it looked great. I kept adding to the site and a week later I had ad received receiv rece a total of 14 hits! Most of those were me looking at the site.

For some reason (maybe a real need for this kind of information) in a few weeks we started getting noticed. In a couple of months Google had found us.

Then I talked Bob into putting up a Forum. He was a little hesitant. I’m not sure he was too enthused, and it was a lot of technical work. Plus I don’t think that he saw any value in a site on men’s fashions. The Forum went up on or before August 24th, 2002. And the hits started increasing.

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The basics / Andy gilchrist bio

The big break came with a story about the site and Forum in The New York Times, September 29, 2004 and the hits shot up to 160,000. They dropped a few days later, but leveled off and then began to climb to 250,000 hits a day most recently we’re getting over 700,000 hits a day! Playboy Magazine has recommended this site as have The London Financial Times, MSNBC, Classic Style Magazine, London Times, New York Sun, Esquire and Menswear Magazine. My vision for the website was that men of all ages had not gotten the basics about men’s clothing in the last couple of generations and they were starting to realize that those basics were very important. From my part-time job in men’s retailing I knew men wanted to know which jacket buttons to button, what color socks to wear, how and when to wear pocket squares, etc.

w e i v e r P

shed in GQ and I have written for Esquire, and Men's Health magazines, been published one radio rra Money, and contanstly quoted in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, done interviews and was featured in a Wealth TV national program. hark.com. Plus I've written for ModernMan.com and Greg Norman’s website Shark.com. boy and Menswearr magazines. The site has been featured in MSNBC, recommended by Playboy aless training. train And I'm a Consultant to JC Penney for menswear sales

ed by the Los os Angeles Times where you’ll also see se an occaOne of my travel photographs was published sional letter to the editor! g better and better. bet And I hope we just keep getting

And Gilchrist Andy

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w e i v e r P THE SPECIFICS S

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The specifics / Formalwear

The Specifics

w e i v e r P FORMALWEAR EAR R

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The specifics / Formalwear Looking your best when the occasion calls for formalwear. “In a tuxedo, I’m a star. In regular clothes, I’m nobody.” Dean Martin

w e i v e r P

Owning your own formalwear instead of renting is a joy. oy. The fit is better, the attitude more confide confident and the cost may be less if you wear it only a couple of times a year. Formalwear marks our transition tra to manhood. Adulthood is tying a bow tie. themselves in us. e. We become our fathers and they can see them You’ll feel powerful and look your best.t. And that’s all the reason we need.

The word “formal” comes from m the Latin “formalis” rmalis” and French “formel” meaning “of the form, appearance or organization of something” hing” or “within the he rules of fixed form”. It’s no wo wonder men look great when our appearance is so well ell organized.

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The specifics / Formalwear

w e i v e r P Dinner Jacket (Tuxedo), left and White Tie and Tails, right

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The specifics / Formalwear

GUIDE The emphasis here is on the tuxedo or dinner jacket (with matching trousers!) since that will be the most frequently worn formalwear for most of us. •

Tuxedo Jacket: Peak lapels in satin, silk or grosgrain, single breasted, one button* is traditional, piped or double besom pockets (avoid flap pockets), no vents or minimal side vents. *Even “more traditional” is a double button. The button has a thread link (like cuff links with chains) to a second button; this second button gets buttoned into the buttonhole. Therefore the buttoned jacket closes edge-to-edge and will not overlap.

w e i v e r P Dinner jackets are the same length as suit jackets, but Tailcoats have tails that should bee no n longer than back of your knee.

neve Leave the jacket unbuttoned, unless it’s a double-breasted dinner jacket, and then you never ed to be buttoned ned so for them as well unbutton it. Double breasted tailcoats are not designed istcoat are required quired to cover the waist of the as single breasted tuxedos a cummerbund or waistcoat trousers and the bottom of the shirt pleats.

re fashioned ed after the Navy Pea coat and rose to a height Double-breasted dinner jackets were ingle-breasted formalwear was produced, prod of popularity by 1932. During the war only single-breasted as ld by the World War II effort to co cons double-breasted jackets were put on hold conserve fabric, but by 1948 DB’s were backk strong.

Barathea – An indistinct twill or broken rib (usually a twilled h hopsack weave) with a fine texnd slightly pebbled bled surface, usually silk, silk and wool wo blend or rayon. ture, and

ked or shawl lapels are both appropriate, appropr approp Lapels: Peaked the notched is not.

The peaked lapel, single-breasted dinner din jacket is the most correct since it’s derived directly ssh from the original tailcoat, and the shawl has origins from the smoking jacket.

The notched lapel has its origins o in the common business suit and thus is never, or less acceptable for formal dre dress. N lape appearing on formalwear is an effort by modern manufacturers to profit by Notched lapels using daytime jacket forms and simply facing the lapels in satin. usin standard sta

TThe shawl lapel is a traditional look and is most popular on the summer white dinner jacket. You may want to avoid the shawl if you are on the heavy side since it accentuates roundness.

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The specifics / Formalwear

w e i v e r P Peak

Shawl wl

Notch N

The fabric on the lapel should match the fabric of the button covers, cummerb cummerbund, and the trouser stripe. oices are: Traditional choices • • •

lk k -- shiny fabric bric from the fiber produced by silkworms. silkw sil Silk Sat -- a smooth, glossy fabric (often silk, o Satin or polyester)

Grosgrain -- (pronounced “grow g grain”) is a heavy fabric woven in a twill or ribbed finish. The name is from Mid-16th cen centrury French gros grain meaning “coarse grain”. The ribs are more rounded than Faille (pronounced “file”) and made with several filing yarns used together. Originally m made of silk, it now is also made of all cotton, or rayon or acetate warp and cotton or rayon co rayo filling. In ribbon form it can be used as the leg seam for formal trousers, and be belts. S Shirt: White or Ivory with wing or straight collar and French cuffs, and pleated front with studs. You’ll use studs that match your cuff links to close the front of the shirt. Wing collars are more appropriate for tailcoats but are acceptable for any formalwear.

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The specifics / Formalwear

The formal shirt will have a pleated front (to the waist only, so that it doesn’t buckle when you sit down) – that’s the reason the waist is always covered with either a cummerbund or waistcoat or double-breasted dinner jacket which is never unbuttoned in public. The other reason (see below under Waist Cover) is dictated from the practice of wearing the jacket of White Tie open. Covering the waist band has nothing to do with holding up your pants. The shirt pleats (not ruffles!) will be refined; ¼ to ½ inch pleats will do nicely. Fewer pleats are more sophisticated than many. An alternative is pique or waffle weave fabric on the front of the shirt.

w e i v e r P Like any dress shirt, ½” of “linen” should be exposed beyond the jacket sleeve. This finishes off the look plus gives guests a chance to check out your fabulous cuff links.

Wrong!!

Right!: Richard Benjamin and son Ross at the Palm Springs Film Festival.

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The specifics / Formalwear •

Fashion Fundamental: with the wing collar - points are worn behind the tie, just like any shirt. The wing collar was standard with the white tie and tails and went though a high degree of popularity during the 1980’s and early 90’s but the straight collar is being seen more these da ys.

Cuff links and matching Studs - not buttons are used to close the front. When you buy the formal shirt you’ll notice that the shirt is kept closed by buttons sewn on a ribbon. When you open the shirt remove the buttons on the ribbon. You’ll use your matching studs. Cuff links ime and and studs should be quiet and elegant in style. Traditionally, pearl is worn for daytime black or gold for evening.

w e i v e r P elf!!! Tie: Black silk or satin in either thistle or batwing style and tied yourself!!!

HOW TO TIE A BOWTIE

Start with end in left hand extending 1½” below that in right hand.

Cross longer nger end over shorter and pass up through t loop.

Remember the motion is simila similar to tying your shoelaces!!!

For front loop of bow by doubling up short end (hanging) and placing across collar Form points.

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The specifics / Formalwear

Hold this front loop with thumb and forefinger of left hand. Drop long end down over front.

Press right forefinger, pointing up, on bottom half of hanging part. Pass up behind front loop and...

w e i v e r P ee illustration). Even ends and Poke resulting loop through knot behind front loop (see tighten by pulling on the loops.

•

Trousers should match the jacket, b plea be pleated, held up by braces only, with a stripe (also strip, band or braid) up the outside leg l on the seam (derived from military formal dress from the officers’ leg braid) of satin, sil silk or grosgrain. One leg stripe for black tie, and two for white tie and tails. The braid b shou match the fabric on the dinner jacket lapels. should And NEVER cuffed!

En ten English tennis players and country folk would turn up their trouser legs at the bottom to avoid mu walking mud w around their country estates. English gentlemen and Royalty followed and the ffashion caught on around 1880 for city suits and tweed shooting outfits. Since there is never a chance at getting near mud or other soil at a formal function the straight leg has always been the custom for formal trousers.

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The specifics / Formalwear •

Shoes Patent leather slip-ons are the most traditional, but oxfords (lace up) are fine, especially in an emergency. If you’re going to wear oxfords, the best choice would be a plain toe or cap toe. These are not work shoes!!! No wing tips or loafers, or any other style that might be considered business shoes. The oxford shoe can be shined as you would any dressy shoe. Black calfskin dancing pumps with ribbed silk bows are the most acceptable. The word pump may have come from either the word “pomp”, or “pump” (from men that the application of a foot brake by the coachmen century m the 16th ce wore this shoe style). Pumps date from g dress. Originally ally tthey and are the oldest part of evening hes and silk stockings. ngs. were worn with knee breeches

w e i v e r P stomarily patent nt leather, but can be Formal shoes are customarily eather or velvet.t. Velvet pumps are most mos highly shined leather te when you are hosting a formal evening at appropriate e! home!

Patent leather is from New Jersey by way off France. The art of varnishing woods an and metals rly 1800’s in France ance for pumps, which were all the rage r was used on leather in the early then. In wark, New Jerseyy developed leather based on the EEuropean method 1922 Seth Boyden of Newark, atent” for the process. and applied for a “patent”

ces Braces

Formal trousers ousers are held up by (the only cho ho choice) braces (aka suspenders in American), but always the kind that attach to buttons button inside in the trouser waistband! Sometimes the use of “suspenders” is used to describe th the clip on type!

Choose white or black bl and the kind that button on. There are no belt loops on formal trousers, but all should h ha have brace (suspender) buttons. Use them. Do not use clip-on suspenders!! Braces should shou be black for black tie, and white for tails, but you can have a little fun here and go with wild, decorative braces - no one should ever see them anyway! an

Waist Cover: The waistband of formal trousers must always be covered! This is dictated from the practice of wearing the jacket of tailcoat (White Tie) open. The formal shirt will have a pleated front (to the waist only, so that it doesn’t buckle when you sit down) – that’s the other reason (as we discussed in shirts above) the waist is always covered with either a cummerbund or waistcoat. The choices are cummerbund (has nothing to do with holding up your pants), a vest or a double breasted dinner jacket which is never unbuttoned in public!

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341

Special information / Pocket squares

THE FOLDS There are many different styles of folds. Try for a casual not too studied look for your pocket square: Special THANKS to David Hober of Sam Hober Neckties and Pocket Squares for these pocket square folds!

w e i v e r P Click on the Pocket Square Style you would like to try:

One Point Pocket Square

Puff and Point oint *

Four Point Crown Pocket Square q Fold

Two Point are Pocket Square

Flat Pocket Square q Fold ((TV Fold))

One Point Roll Pocket Square Fold

Three ee Point Pocket Square q

Double Point Doub R Roll Pocket Square Fold

Rolled Puff Pocket Square Fold

Fourr Poi Point Po Pocke Pocket Square

Dunaway Pocket Square Fold

Three Stairs Pocket Square Fold

Puff Pocket Square Fold

Four Mountains Pocket Square Fold

Winged Puff Pocket Square Fold

* Combination of the Point and Puff. You just fold the pocket square over in the center to show both points and puff! (not illustrated below)

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Special information / Pocket squares

One Point Pocket Square

w e i v e r P Lay your pocket square flat with one corner facing up and one corner facing down down.

Fold the bottom corner up to meet et the he top corner.

Fold d the left corner ner to the right.

Repeat and fold the right corner cco in to the left.

Tuckk as needed nee and place your pocket square in your jacket pocket.

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Special information / Pocket squares Two Point Pocket Square

Lay your pocket square flat with one corner facing up and one corner facing cing dow down.

w e i v e r P Fold the bottom corner up and just to thee left of the top p corner.

Fold the leftt side in towards rds the right.

Fold the right side in towards the left. Tuck as needed and place your pocket square in your jacket pocket.

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623

The specifics / Watches

The Specifics

w e i v e r P WATCHES S

The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes Library of Congress Copyright Office Registration TX 6-429-994

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624

The specifics / Watches And other Jewelry (see below)

Watches are timepieces small enough to carry on a person. They not only give you accurate time to properly plan your busy day, but provide a fashionable expression of your personality. Other kinds of timepieces are generally referred to as clocks. Jewelry is any personal adornments worn for ornament, to show rank or wealth, or to follow custom. Jewelry is the oldest art form. Jewelry predates clothing !! Pocket Watches: b Try a pocket watch for a personal statement with your business attire.

w e i v e r P ain or ribbon connecting nnectin it The pocket watch usually has a short chain and at the other end a fob, which was originally a seal used to ssea seal letters and documents.

h the chain draped beThe watch and/or fob could be placed in pockets with bon (connecting necting the watch and tween. This practice of wearing a chain or ribbon me an essential part of Victorian dress, fob) worn across the front of a vest became rince consort (husband husband of Queen Victoria). and was called an Albert, after the Prince See the History section.

acc This classic look is accompli accomplished by placing the watch in one o of the front pockets an running runni the chain through the buttonhole that is at the of a vest and a the top of the opposing pockets, and then into a pocksame level as th opposite side. The chain should sag equally on both sides et on the t button. You can attach a Phi Beta Kappa key to the chain if of the appropriate! You can also wear a pocket watch in the breast pocket of a suit or sports jacket and insert the fob though the buttonhole on the lapel.

Or you can wear it in a side pocket of your trousers and keep the fob in the Fob Pocket, which is a small pocket at the front waistline of trousers or on a vest front designed to hold a watch or fob. See photo on right.

The Encyclopedia of Men's Clothes Library of Congress Copyright Office Registration TX 6-429-994

Contents

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Copyright Andy, Inc. 2001- 2011, All Rights Reserved

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