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5 Things You May Not Know About Tagaytay City On your way to One Tagaytay Place Hotel Suites, you might have caught a glimpse of the Taal Lake while on the road, and maybe wondered about its origins. Or maybe you're just generally curious about this city. To satisfy your curiosity, here are 5 unique facts that you may not know about Tagaytay City: Taal Lake was once a part of Balayan Bay. Everyone knows that Taal Lake was the former crater of an old volcano. But do you know that this freshwater lake was once considered an arm of Balayan Bay in Batangas? It only became a separate lake due to multiple explosions in the 18th century. Now, only the Pansipit River connects it to the sea. The only freshwater species of sardines in the world is in Taal Lake. Known locally as just “tawilis,” Sardinella tawilis is only member of the sardine family that can live in freshwater. It is said to have gradually evolved from the saltwater species of sardines that were trapped in Taal Lake after it got separated from Balayan Bay. Today, it is fished for food from the one Tagaytay place that they're found in, despite the threat of overfishing. Tagaytay came from “taga itay,” according to local legends. While the volcano inside the lake has always been named Taal since the Spanish colonial era, the name for this town comes from something else entirely. According to a local legend, the name “Tagaytay” came from two words that formed the phrase “taga itay!”: “taga,” meaning chop; and “itay,” meaning father. The phrase was supposedly yelled by a boy, after a wild boar charged towards his father while they were out hunting. As the phrase was heard by other nearby hunters, the name stuck and the place eventually became known as “Tagaytay.” Tagaytay was a strategic spot during wartime. Because of its proximity to Manila, Tagaytay was a strategic spot in two wars fought in the country. First was the Philippine revolution in 1896, as many Filipino revolutionaries sought cover in its lush forests and many ridges. Then came World War II, where Filipino and American soldiers wrested control of the town from the Japanese, guaranteeing the smooth flow of supplies and troops to liberate Manila. To commemorate this, a marker was installed in front of the Tagaytay City Convention Center. People's Park in the Sky was originally developed as a guest house for former US President Ronald Reagan. Back during the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, US President Ronald Reagan was scheduled for a state visit. Instead of billeting him at a hotel in Tagaytay, however, Marcos decided to build him a guest house by leveling the side of a nearby mountain. But the visit didn't push through and Marcos was kicked out of power by the EDSA Revolution. Construction in this area halted, and it was turned over to the local government instead. Today, it is now open to the public, and guests can just enjoy a great view of the Taal volcano here before returning to their room at One Tagaytay Place Hotel Suites.


5 Things You May Not Know About Tagaytay City