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(Mobile library) Toning the Sweep

Toning the Sweep Angela Johnson audiobook | *ebooks | Download PDF | ePub | DOC

#18528717 in Books 1995-11Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 #File Name: 1860392032112 pages | File size: 41.Mb Angela Johnson : Toning the Sweep before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised Toning the Sweep: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Cute book, great for class conversationBy KatrinaThis is a short, but beautifully written story. Anyone who has ever experienced a sudden or traumatic loss can find insight here.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Toning The SweepBy A CustomerThis was a good book because it show some values that you can find on the family, and how emily try to understand why her mama didn't like the desert. After she start to find answers at her questions she also get to know better her grandmama Ola by making a videotape where she get to know better Ola's friends and learn to get along with people. This Book show the way that this people were traveling scaping from something that is call saness going through different places, the real reason that Ola was runing away from alabama was to save Diane from the ugliness deth like it say on the book but this wasn't the good way because you have to get infrom of your problems to solves them. That is why I agree with Diane that ola wasn't suppose to run away fron something she shouldn't. By the time Emily find the reason Diane didn't like the desert was because she didn't want to get away from the pain of her father that she found dead near a field of kudzu. That was the day that Emily really felt for her mama and understand her loss. It say that Diane won't ever forgive her mother from ripping it away. Because I think that the only things that where attach to Diane and that she remember about her father were gone and the only memory she has about her father were in her heart and that is okay because she will never forget her father even that she don't have any oject that may remember her him. I think that Emily realize that it really don't take that long to get to know someboy if you really want to know them. I think Emily haves a positive change


because she learn to appreciate more her family and to understand the situation they hava passe. I think Ola and Emily really like the desert because there they really felt free like a bird and freedon if one of the most important value in the world. If you don't think like that I do. I really like this book even that it show all the pain this people have and or their loss. But at the end it really teach you that family is very important If you haven't read this book do it because it can help you to apreciate it more. That all I have to say I hope you like what I have done.1 of 1 people found the following review helpful. Isha's Book ReviewBy A CustomerToning The Sweep is a great book by Angela Johnson. The main character of this book is a girl names Emily. Her mother's name is Diane, and her grandmother's name is Ola. Ola and Emily are very close. Throughout this entire book, you can tell that the mother is somewhat jealous of the relationship that Emily and Ola share. She wishes that her and her mother were like that. After the funeral of Emily's grandfather, her and her mother move to Little Rock, California. Towards the beginning of the book, Emily and her mother find out that Ola has cancer. They then move to Cleveland so that Emily and Diane can take care of Ola. Throughout the book, Emily decides to videotape Ola and her friends. There are a lot of happy moments in the videotape, as well as moments where she filmed her grandmother sitting under a Joshua tree. Later in the book Emily finds out what really happened to her grandfather. The name of this book means to hit a plow and make a really loud noise to show that someone has just died. In chapter 19,Emily and Diane finally "tone the sweep" of their grandfather.At the end of the book, Emily, Diane, and Ola move back to Ohio so that they can spend the remaining time with Ola before she dies. This book has taught me that faimilies should always stick together no matter what. I'm glad that I have a family like that. I would recomend this book to everybody. Set in the California desert, this is a stor y about three generations of black women: Emily, the 14-year old narrator; Ola, her eccentric grandmother, who is dying of cancer; and Diane, Emily''s mother. ' .com Fourteen-year-old Emily learns the ritual of "toning the sweep," a way of drumming a plow to create a sound that honors the deceased, in this tale of mourning and healing. Emily, her mother and terminally ill grandmother, Ola, meet at Ola's home in the desert to pack her up for a move to Cleveland, where Ola will live out the rest of her days. The three extraordinarily strong females reveal stories of grief and hardship--including the lynching of Ola's husband in 1964 Alabama--that have undoubtedly fostered the inspirational resilience in each of their personalities. Narrated by all three, this bittersweet tale offers hope, humor and insight. It won the 1994 Coretta Scott King Award.From Publishers WeeklyWith several picture books already to her credit, Johnson ( When I Am Old with You ) makes an especially promising foray into YA fiction with this thoughtfully nuanced and penetrating novel. Emily, the 14-yearold who serves as the principal narrator, spends a bittersweet few days with her much-loved grandmother, Ola, who lives in the California desert. Ola has been diagnosed with cancer, and Emily and her mother are helping to pack up the house so that Ola can move into their home in Cleveland. Ola, Mama and Emmie, all three African American, are almost extraordinarily resilient and independent, but Johnson portrays them believably. Traits that might have come across as quirky instead seem well integrated as Johnson delicately and gradually unfolds the past events that fostered such inner strength--events including the lynching of Ola's husband in 1964 Alabama. Although plagued by occasional moments of self-importance ("You can't get away from the things that make you sad, Mama says. I believe that. Sad can be bigger than happy sometimes"), the prose is generally understated, gaining added texture from passages narrated by Ola and Mama. Depicting a heroine who learns to balance the most urgent feelings of love and loss, Johnson herself balances powerful themes with poise and skill. Ages 11-up. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.From School Library JournalGrade 6-9-Before Emily's grandmother leaves her beloved desert home, possibly for the last time, the sensitive teen sets out to record the memories of the woman, her friends, and relatives on video. While documenting the reminiscences, she learns about her African American family's past and gains the strength to say good-bye. A powerful story about connections and coping. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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