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(Download) The Latent Powers of Dylan Fontaine

The Latent Powers of Dylan Fontaine April Lurie ebooks | Download PDF | *ePub | DOC | audiobook

#5857514 in Books Delacorte Books for Young Readers 2008-05-13 2008-05-13Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 8.56 x .85 x 5.94l, .69 #File Name: 0385731256224 pagesGreat product! | File size: 69.Mb April Lurie : The Latent Powers of Dylan Fontaine before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Latent Powers of Dylan Fontaine: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. A Real Story, Starring Real TeenagersBy M. BensonThis was a lovely read. I am a huge sci-fi and fantasy fan, and was instantly attracted to the title of this book thinking I might be reading the next Harry Potter or Artemis Fowl. I didn't get that; but I was not disappointed.What I did get was a story


about a young man dealing with odds that are realistic and could easily happen to any youth; and a story about the insecurities and frustrations about what his future may hold.Ms. Lurie has a fantastic "voice." She instantly sucked me in and had me rooting for Dylan every step of the way.Thank you, Ms. Lurie, for sharing this tale with me. I loved it!0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. GreatBy ChrisThis is a great book about a teenager of modern times going through the 'coming of age' period in his life. Dealing with a brother with wasted talents, a mother who ran away, and a father who is never there. Mrs. Lurie does a beautiful job at portraying the ups and downs of a male teenage. I recommend this to all teenagers.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Wonderful book about a teenager.By Anna LaGroisI can't even describe to you how much I loved this book. April Lurie has described the life of a teenager excatly how some of us feel. Dylan feels like he isn't as good as his brother, he doesn't understand why his mom left his family for another man, and he just wants to find out who he is. He is going through love issues - with his best friend, of all people - and his dad is never around because he is always working.Even though I, personally, can't relate to all of the things that happen to Dylan in the book, I felt like I knew who he was, and I could relate to him still. I'm trying to figure out who I am and sometimes I feel like I'm not as good as my sibling, like Dylan. Even if you don't have siblings, or your parents arn't split up, you can still relate to the main character, and April Lurie does a great job of writing so that you feel every emotion that Dylan does.The Latent Powers of Dylan Fontaine was released today and I would suggest you go to the bookstore right now and buy it. A MOTHER WHO split for another man.A father who works 24/7.An older brother who excels at everythingand smokes a lot of weed.A best friend, of the feminine persuasion, who only wants to be a friend, and whos shooting a film set in cool Greenwich Village, New York.Dylan Fontaines life seems to be full of drama he cant control. But when he stars in his best friends movie, Dylan discovers that, sometimes, lifes big shake-ups force you to take risksand to step into the spotlight. From Publishers WeeklySibling relationships form the core of Lurie's (Dancing in the Streets of Brooklyn) busy novel, but with so much diffuse action and so many half-sketched characters, readers might have trouble finding a focal point. Dylan Fontaine, the 15-year-old narrator, lives in chaos: his mother has moved out to live with Dylan's art teacher; his older brother, Randy, gets stoned all the time and might drop out of school to tour with his band, The Dead Musicians Society; his father, an obstetrician, is never around, making their Brooklyn house the 24-hour gathering place for the band and, maybe, a spot to stash drugs. Dylan also struggles with girls-the one he wishes were his girlfriend has tapped her ex-boyfriend to help her shoot a documentary about Dylan, and the one in the band flirts with both Dylan and his brother. By the time Dylan steps out of the little brother/sidekick role to take center stage in his own life, the author wraps up remaining conflicts so tidily that she seems to cheat (Why would the boys have thought their mother had left for another man? Didn't they know the art teacher was just a friend?). Ages 14-up. Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.From School Library JournalGrade 9 UpThis story opens with 16-year-old Dylan Fontaine in a Brooklyn police station being held for shoplifting a package of tighty-whities underwear while holding a bag of marijuana in his pocket for his older brother. The shoplifting was merely an accident; Dylan ran out of the store when he thought he saw his mother, who left their family weeks ago. Though he wants to get bailed out of jail, what he really wants is for his mother to come home (she ran off with her art teacher), his brother to act responsibly, and his dad, a doctor, to begin living at their home instead of the hospital. As Dylan reels from the effect of all these events, his best friend and love interest, Angie, decides it is the perfect time to make him the subject of her summer school movie project, capturing the teen's struggle with chaos and control with a quirky, film-school flair. Lurie tells this story from Dylan's point of view, in the voice of a responsible, but confused, teen. As he sorts through his issues with his brother, father, mother, and Angie, he gains confidence and courage, and his voice becomes stronger and more defined. Brooklyn and Manhattan's West Village settings are appealing. The story successfully walks the fine line of blending humor and drama, and the cinematic ending is sure to please.Emily Anne Valente, New York Public Library Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.From BooklistAccording to a girl he hopes his brother will date, 15-year-old Dylan is angry and insecure. But he has good reasons. His mother has left the family to live in Greenwich Village with her former art professor, his obstetrician father is always at work, his talented older brother is inhaling a steady diet of marijuana, and his best friend, Angie, doesnt share his romantic feelings. Worse, she wants to make a movie starring him. The strong first-person narrative opens in a Brooklyn police station, where Dylan, the familys good boy, has landed after a shoplifting incident. Over the following five months, he learns to take chances with his food, his art, and his relationships. The banter among Dylan, his brother, and their friends is believable without being obscene, although readers may be surprised by Dylans fathers willingness to be addressed by his kids as Vagina Head. Other characters are sufficiently developed, and the healthy doses of humor balance this well-crafted story of a family in pain and a boys self-discovery. Grades 8-12. --Kathleen Isaacs

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