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BOOKWATCH

VOL. 21.

NO. 3.

message of the

NBDB Governing Board FLOR MARIE STA. ROMANA-CRUZ Chair National Book Development Board ATTY. NEPOMUCENO A. MALALUAN NBDB Vice-Chair Assistant Secretary, Department of Education   CEFERINO S. RODOLFO Undersecretary Office of the Industry Development and Trade Policy Group (IDTPG), Department of Trade and Industry   VIRGILIO S. ALMARIO Chair National Commission for Culture and the Arts   DR. JOSETTE T. BIYO Director Science Education Institute Department of Science and Technology   RONALD L. ADAMAT Commissioner Commission on Higher Education   DR. ANI ROSA S. ALMARIO Vice President Adarna House, Inc.   MARIA KARINA A. BOLASCO Director Ateneo de Manila University Press   DR. ISAGANI R. CRUZ President Manila Times College   RUEL S. DE VERA Chair Manila Critics Circle   MR. ALFREDO C. RAMOS Chairman and President National Book Store, Inc.

chair Dear Readers: Philippine literature for children and young adults has always been a site for diverse innovations and creative endeavors. From the very beginning, cultural heritage and local color pervade our books for young readers, giving them an edge over the English language fare that foreign publishers have to offer. Sure, hatted cats and wizard boys are extremely popular, but the classic folktale of the bitter gourd or the adventures of Janus Silang comes so much closer to the Filipino experience. It’s a pity that the general audience has relegated children’s literature to the realms of either pedagogy or mere whimsy. Not everyone realizes the effect that book reading can have on the development of a child’s character or why stoking a child’s curiosity about the world can make her a fine individual. To quote the late Ursula K. Le Guin: “I believe that maturity is not an outgrowing, but a growing up: that an adult is not a dead child, but a child who survived. I believe that all the best faculties of a mature human being exist in the child…that one of the most deeply human, and humane, of these faculties is the power of the imagination.” Being of the same persuasion, I find it essential that we not let imagination remain an ember in the fettered mind. Going into 2018, we hope you encounter the pleasures of children’s literature not simply to pass these volumes on to younger readers, but to rekindle your own creative fervor as well.

Read well, Read PINOY.

http://nbdb.gov.ph F National Book Development Board L NBDB_PHIL I nbdb_phil

FLOR MARIE STA. ROMANA-CRUZ Chair

BOOKWATCH is the official publication of the National Book Development Board. It is not for sale. All rights reserved. No article or visual material may be reproduced or altered without permission from the authors and artists. NBDB retains the sole printing rights of the journal. However, the journal may be freely copied digitally and shared. Copyright of the commissioned and solicited articles and visuals are owned by the NBDB until publication, whereupon copyright reverts back to the authors and artists.


editor's note

WHAT LESSONS DO WE WANT TO TELL THE WORLD?

Welcome to Bookwatch 2018, the Children’s Literature Issue. This is more than the usual issue that publishes status updates of the entire publishing industry of the Philippines. This issue pushes Filipino Children’s Literature front and center to global publishers, authors, illustrators and readers. Just as the world gets smaller and fits in the palms of our children’s hands, it’s about time the world knows our stories—appreciate our daily experiences, understand our culture differences, and recognize how we approach problems and find solutions. Through our shared stories, we share lessons learned from this side of the world.

GRATITUDE ATTITUDE

Much gratitude to Debbie Nieto and Nina Lanciola, who are instrumental in arming me with the right writers, and magically turned this vision into print. I first met the NBDB through Debbie, who welcomed me with bright-eyes and an open smile in the 2014 Manila International Book Fair. She is still one of the most dedicated, passionate and firm believers in Philippine Literature. I hope this issue does justice to the industry you humbly serve. Much gratitude to all the writers who collaborated to build this issue together. And to my Art Director Alex Paredes, may all your creative dreams come true. Nurture the children, nurture the child inside us.

PAOLO ALESSANDRO HERRAS is Co-Founder of KOMIKET,

contents

The Filipino Komiks Art Market, a children’s book and graphic novel author, advertising Creative Director and Film Director for full-length films and branded content.

Uniquely Filipino Values

“Sources of Content for Filipino Children’s Books Today”

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by M.J. CAGUMBAY TUMAMAC (Xi Zuq). MJ is a writer for children and reading advocate from the Cotabato region.

Filipino Approach to Sensitive Issues

“The Underside of Sunshine: Filipino Children’s Books that Deal with Difficult Subjects”

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by CARLA M. PACIS. Carla is a writer and scholar of children’s books and young adult novels, currently setting up a college for public school teachers in Laguna.

“How Difficult Stories are Told with Pictures”

by LIZA FLORES. Liza is an award-winning illustrator of over 20 children’s books and a member of Ang Ilustrador ng Kabataan (Ang INK).

NATIONAL CHILDREN’S BOOK AWARDS Winners 2016-2010 Children Who Write

“Children’s Literature Through the Eyes of Pinoy Child Writers”

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by VIDA CRUZ. Vida won first place of the 2017 of the Future Contest and a graduate of the 2014 Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers Workshop.

Children's Literature from The Regions

“Children’s Literature on the CORDILLERA: A Sketch”

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by SACHA GARAH W. JASMIN. Sacha is a poet, member of Ubbog Cordillera Writers and currently researches on children’s literature on the Cordillera for her Master’s thesis.

NEW RELEASES 2017-2018

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Alternative Storytelling

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“Reading Groups and Storytelling Troupes in the Regions”

by ZARAH GAGATIGA. Zarah is a blogger, librarian, author, storyteller, teacher and board member of the Philippine Board on Books for Young People (PBBY).

Master and Mentor, Children's Book Writer “Rene Villanueva: Remarkable Writer”

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by ALVIN DACANAY. Alvin is a published writer, member of the Writer’s Block and works as assistant business editor and literary editor at The Manila Times.

ILLUSTRATORS' SHOWCASE

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PHILIPPINE BOOK PUBLISHERS

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Sources Content for Filipino Children’s Books Today of

M.J. CAGUMBAY TUMAMAC

This decade has seen the continuous growth of the children’s book industry in the Philippines. An influx of new writers and illustrators joins the field, while more publishers are dabbing in the creation of more books for kids and teens. There is a major drive to fill in the gaps in the local market of children’s books as creators  look for new ways of repackaging longestablished themes and developing novel content. From mining our rich traditional literature to articulating silenced voices, the children’s book scene has never been more alive and exciting! 

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Repackaging Traditional Literature Folk literature has always been a staple source of content for children’s books. The goal is to pass on this intangible heritage to the next generations. Creators are making the most out of these readily available materials from over a hundred ethno-linguistic groups by retelling, adapting, modernizing, and finding new platforms for children who learn best through sensory stimulation and play. Traditional songs, for instance, are accompanied by illustrations in the board book versions of Bahay Kubo by Pergylene Acuña and Sampung mga Daliri by Hubert Fucio. Spot illustrations by various artists also appear in Piagsugpatan, a collection of Mandaya tales abridged by Marcy Dans Lee. Meanwhile, Tahanan’s collections of familiar and newly-crafted riddles  Aba! Ano ang Bunga? Mabubungang Bugtong by Ompong Remigio and Mon Pineda and the two volumes of Bugtong,

Bugtong by Rene O. Villanueva and Daniel P. Tayona are illustrated and designed to be interactive. Classic literary works usually for older readers are inspirations in books for the very young. Adarna House’s board book  Ang Ibong Adarna retells the first section of the lengthy corrido, while Tahanan’s Bulilit Board Books set utilises elements from Ang Alamat ng Ibong Adarna, Florante at Laura, and  Noli Me Tangere to introduce the concept of numbers, colors, and shapes. This trend has also been done in other countries, with parents wanting to expose their children to literary preferences at the earliest possible time.

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Exploring the Unreal A bulk of the trend of using our traditional literature is the re-imagination of elements from mythologies as part of the speculative fiction movement. The protagonists, for instance, in the following contemporary young adult novels are descendants of mythological creatures: the Janus Silang series by Edgar Calabia Samar; the Moymoy Lulumboy series by Segundo Matias, Jr.;  Girl Between Two Worlds by K.M. Levis; and the Trese  series by Budjette Tan and Kajo Baldisimo. Lampara House’s Modernong Alamat series is also an intriguing borrowing of the legend as a form. Written mostly by Segundo Matias Jr. and illustrated by various artists, the series treats readers with new takes on the origin of things around them.

Beyond using fantastic elements from traditional literature, however, speculative fiction also covers a wide range of topics, and is a hit amongst kids and teens as it taps their natural trait to imagine and be curious. Horror and science fiction, for instance, are the themes of the first two instalments of the anthology series, Fantastic Filipino Fiction for Young Adults. Meanwhile, fantasy and science fiction are the main selling point in the short story collection Stars in Jars by Dean Francis Alfar and Sage Alfar; zombie apocalypse in the novel Sombi by Jonas Sunico; and the unusual superhero in the graphic novel Sixty Six by Russell Molina.

Featuring Our Past and Traditions Identity formation as Filipinos is one of the aims of publishing books for children. Through books, for instance, children can learn about historical figures and events. The challenge for creators, of course, is to make these relatable to contemporary readers. One solution is through historical fiction, such as the storybook Znork by Mark Angeles and Pergylene Acuña, Adarna House’s  Kasaysayan storybook series, and the novel Woman in a Frame—all set around the Philippine Revolution. The grim of the Martial Law period is also a popular topic as seen in the novel  Salingkit by Cyan Abad-Jugo, the graphic story  12:01 by Russell Molina and Kajo Baldisimo, and the storybook  Isang Harding Papel by Augie Rivera, Jr. and Rommel Joson. Biographies and real accounts of events told in a manner digestible by children have also been produced. Notable works include the Modern Heroes for the Filipino Youth, Women of Science, 6

and Ramon Magsaysay Awardees storybook series by The Bookmark Inc., and  Good Night, Lala! by Corazon Ordoñez-Calica (edited by Maya O. Calica), a collection of stories about a girl’s experiences during World War II. Another way of presenting historical and cultural facts is through entertaining reference books. The three titles under Adarna House’s  What Kids Should Know series feature the life of Andres Bonifacio and the Katipunan, Filipino food, and Filipino architecture with incorporated activities. Meanwhile, Tahanan’s Halo-Halo Histories series tackles prehistory and Philippine money in a humourous and interactive way. Plus, Intramuros: The Walled City Cut-and-Build Your Own Model Fort book engages children to learn history hands-on by making their own model of the place.


Telling the Truths of Our Time The changing shift in the view on childhood has a huge impact in the creation of books for children. Before, children are viewed as simple-minded creatures that mature as fully realised adults. Now, children are seen in a more complex manner with unique experiences, skills, interests, and contexts. More books that celebrate various aspects of childhood—from playing to exploring the depths of children’s imagination— are found in contemporary realistic fiction works for children. Examples of these are Kayang-kaya by Alyssa Judith Reyes and Liza Flores, Maghapon Namin ni Nanay by Genaro Gojo Cruz and Nicole Lim, Naaay! Taaay! by Kristine Canon and Vanessa Tamayo, Araw ng Kabaligtaran by Jomike Tejido,  Ang Nag-iisa at Natatanging si Onyok by Eugene Y. Evasco and Jomike Tejido, Idea Jungle by Pam Marie Ang and Bru Sim-Nada, and the Shy Shelly chapter book series by Justine Hail. On the other hand, when it comes to books for young Filipino adults, romance and coming-of-age themes are the most popular. A bulk of the books recently published that cover these themes are from the Romance Class, a group of authors who have gone through the workshops conducted by Mina V. Esguerra. Some of their titles include the  I Heart Iloilo series by Clarisse David, Choco Chip Hips by Agay Llanera, the Interim Goddess of Love trilogy by Mina V. Esguerra, Only a Kiss by Ines Bautista-Yao, What About Today by Dawn Lanuza, and Kids These Days: Luna East Arts Academy anthology.

Another group of realistic works include those that tackle topics that are usually considered as sensitive, radical, and non-conventional. For instance, the collection Moving Onwards and Upwards by Hanako tells the stories of how three children cope with the separation of their parents. On the other hand, coping with the loss of loved ones are the themes of the storybooks Ang Lambing ni Lolo Ding by Michael M. Coroza and Maurice Risulmi,  Keyk Paakyat ng Langit by Norico Chua, Salusalo para kay Kuya by Ergoe Tinio and JC Galag, and  Dump Truck in My Heart by Grace D. Chong and Dominic Agsaway. There are also books that explore gender and sexuality, such as  Ang Bonggang-Bonggang Batang Beki by Rhandee Garlitos and Tokwa Peñaflorida, Sanday Tay Alib kag Tay Amar by Noel G. de Leon and Marrz Capanang,  Ang Ikaklit sa Aming Hardin by Bernadette Neri and CJ de Silva, Uncle Sam by Segundo Matias, Jr. and Jason Moss, and Another Word for Happy by Agay Llanera. There are also books that try to enlighten readers on social problems, such as Si Kian by Weng Cahiles and Aldy Aguirre which recounts the death of a victim of the national police’s war on drugs, Si Betchay at ang Sacred Circle: Ang Lihim ng Nakasimangot na Maskara by Rogelio Braga which touches on political and economic history, and Nadia and the Blue Stars  by Francesca Nicole Chan Torres and Liv Romualdez Vinluan which narrates the effects of war on a community.

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Empowering the Regions One of the landmark events in the history of the Philippine education system— and in turn, the production of children’s books—is the implementation of the Mother Tongue-Based Multilingual Education Policy. This program requires the use of the school children’s first language in teaching them from Kinder to Grade 3. A result of this is the demand for books and other reading materials written in the different Philippine languages. Works that were published before in the regions are also being revisited now and are given more importance in the classrooms.  Books for children in the Ilokano language, for instance, include the collection of short stories Dagiti Napili a Kapipintasan a Kabukbukodan a Sarita a para Ubbing by some members of GUMIL Filipinas, one of the largest literary organisations in the country; the comic book Agdan by Sherma Benosa and Bianca Fuentes; poems for children found in the guidebook  Makasuratka met iti Daniw a para Ubbing kas Maibatay iti Kurikulum by Johmar R. Alvarez; and the autobiography Ballesteros iti Panunotko: Ti Ilik diay sa Pilipinas by Rey E. de la Cruz and Tenni Magcase. There have also been independent publications in the Cordilleras and one of these is the Kalanguya storybook  Shelah Goes to a Dang-ah by Padmapani Perez, Shiela N. Aniban, and Mika O. Song. Meanwhile, the short story collection An Poon Kan Pili asin iba pang Osipon Pan-aki by Kristian Sendon Cordero, Christine Bellen, and H. Francisco V. Peñones Jr. is one of the few books for children in Bikol. 8

The independent publishing house Kasingkasing Press, online literary journal Balay Sugidanun, and the literary group Hubon Manunulat, on the other hand, lead the publication of works in the languages of Western Visayas. Some of their titles for children are the storybook Si Bulan, si Adlaw, kag si Estrelya by Early Sol Gadong and May Isa ka Kuring nga Hari kag iban pa nga Sugilanon para sa Kabataan, a collection of Hiligaynon short stories by Alice Tan Gonzales. In Central Visayas, two noteworthy works for children are Matod pa sa Lola ni Noy Kulas, a retelling of Cebuano folktales published by SunStar Superbalita, and the storybook Si Kalipay ug ang Kinagamyang Tiktik by Christina Newhard, Jona Bering, Edgar Godiva, and Happy Garaje. Lastly, Susmatanon: Mga Kwentong Pambata is a collection of short stories written by political detainee, Eduardo “Ka Edong” Sarmiento of Eastern Visayas.

Photo provided by Sacha Garah W. Jasmin


In Mindanao, the Chavacano storybook Si Amina y el Ciudad de maga Flores by Christina Newhard, Floraime O. Pantaleta, and Robbie Bautista is one the recent additions of books for children. Another is Birang ug uban pang Sugilanon sa mga Bayaning Lumad sa Mindanao, which features the resistance of indigenous leaders against the outsiders’ encroachment on their culture and domain. As the oldest and largest publishing house of children’s books outside of Metro Manila, ABC Educational Development Center of Kidapawan City, on the other hand, continues to produce titles that reflect the culture of Mindanao. One of their recent publications is the picture book Malong by Mary Ann Ordinario and Pepot Atienza.

Just The Tip This survey of books for children in the Philippines is just a taste of the literary richness of what the country can offer.

Only a few titles were given as examples under each trend, and movements in terms of translations of foreign titles and local titles into the different Philippine languages, as well as certain book types and forms are not included. Also, with the diversity in culture, society, and history that the country has, more titles are expected to be produced and creators to be included in the near future.

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THE

UNDERSIDE of SUNSHINE:

Filipino Children’s Books that Deal with Difficult Subjects

CARLA M. PACIS

As a Third World Country, the Philippines is beset with problems, many of which affect children the most. Some, like parents who are separated, are common to all countries regardless of status, while others, like street children, are peculiar to the Philippine situation. The picture books that I will discuss are for children from ages 6 to 9 years old and are about parental separation, poverty, man-made conflict, traumatic experiences, and lastly being effeminate.

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These books will be discussed under a framework that prominent Filipino psychologist, Dr. Lourdes A. Carandang, has created which is the Seven Basic Psychological Needs in particular the need for personal significance; for love that is unconditional, total acceptance, and affirmation; and the need for transcendence that are present in all the books. The other psychological needs are: clear and consistent limits (discipline); a sense of competence; the need for affiliation; a wide scope of self-expression; and the need for beauty. Children’s literature, if it is to make an impact on its readers, should address at least one of these needs. Personal significance is simply the feeling of being important, of being loved. Unconditional love is being received just as one is without any conditions or strings attached. It affirms a person’s uniqueness and giftedness and acknowledges one’s individuality. Transcendence, according to Dr. Carandang, “is the ability to look beyond what is physically there, to know that there is “a light at the end of the tunnel,” to believe that there is something or someone greater or bigger than we are. To have faith, to hope, and to dream.” To transcend is also to be resilient. To transcend is to be compassionate—to honor human dignity and help those in need.

How

D I F F I C U LT STORIES

are told with

iP ctures LIZA FLORE S

Picture books are an excellent tool to present difficult topics to children. Hand-in-hand with simple words, illustrations can help make complex ideas easier to understand, and difficult things easier to talk about. On the following pages are some examples of how illustrations help tell difficult stories to young readers. 11


P A R E N TA L S E P A R AT I O N The Philippines, to our misfortune, does not have a divorce law. So when a couple decides to end their marriage, it can get very messy and their children caught in the mess. Papa’s House Mama’s House written by Jean Lee Patindol and illustrated by Mark Ramsel Salvatus is about parental separation and is recommended for children from six to seven years old which also seems to be the ages of the three daughters in the story—the Narrator, Ana, and Bianca. At the core of this book is the need for personal significance. Despite their parents “irreconcilable differences”, the girls are loved and cared for. Through her text, Patindol tries to help the

child reader understand this situation and manages to turn an unhappy situation (“But sometimes it makes me tired going back and forth. It makes me confused too. Sometimes, it makes me sad too.”) into a palatable one, where living in two houses is not such a bad thing. The story begins with a very positive tone. “I like it when I live in Papa’s house. I like it when I live in Mama’s house,” (Patindol) and ends with acceptance with the repetition same two lines from the first page – “Ana, Bianca, and I live in two houses. There is Papa’s house. And there is Mama’s house.” (Patindol)

Papa’s House, Mama’s House

What is most striking about this book is its cover-to-cover red background color. Red is the color of love, as well as the color of hate or anger; two intense, but opposing emotions are magnified when a marriage falls apart. Red is also a color that demands attention. Published in 2004, Papa’s House, Mama’s House was the first children’s book in the Philippines that acknowledges parental separation. The color itself is like a bold call to conservative, Catholic Philippines to recognize and address this reality.

Mark Ramsel Salvatus, Mixed Media

Mark Salvatus’ illustrations for Papa’s House, Mama’s House are playful, like children’s chalk drawings. The first pages of the book show the physical differences of Papa’s and Mama’s houses. But as the story progresses, Salvatus creatively incorporates Papa and Mama into each of their houses, with the children—small and vulnerable—being caught up in the mess.

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P A R E N TA L S E P A R AT I O N Jenny is separated from her mother, a political prisoner during the time of Martial Law in the book Isang Harding Papel (Paper Garden) by Augie Rivera and illustrated by Rommel Joson. Even as the young girl visits her mother in jail and tries to understand why she is there, this difficult experience is dulled by her mother’s gift of paper flowers every week. The flowers are the symbol of her mother’s love and even in her mother’s absence, Jenny knows she is loved. After seven years, the mother is released and comes home to a garden of paper flowers that Jenny has made for her. It is the mother’s turn to know how much Jenny knew she was loved and has loved her

despite her seven-year absence. This is definitely a happy ending. This story by Augie Rivera is based on a true story. Jenny Cortes, the child in this story, is a very successful sculptor of primarily, flowers.

A Paper Garden (Isang Harding Papel)

The play in the illustrations is in the use of flowers as a recurring motif, either as part of the story or as a decorative element to reinforce or create a mood. Offered to soldiers during the People Power revolution, the flower is a symbol of love and peace.

Rommel Joson, Mixed Media

A Paper Garden is set in a very specific time and place in our history. Rommel Joson’s illustrations is an example of how illustrations can establish and illuminate a setting. His figures are drawn like real people in period costumes. Newspaper and magazine clippings from the time are mixed in, taking the reader to the Martial Law period to the People Power Revolution.

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P OV E RT Y Street children are the subject of Nemo, Ang Batang Papel (Nemo, The Boy Made of Paper) by Rene Villanueva and illustrated by Haru S. Sabijon is about street children and lack of educational opportunities that are a result of poverty. Here is an example of children who are considered non-enties, who are not deserving of parental or communal care. A definition of street children found in a study by Henry R. Ruiz, National Research Coordinator for Childhope Asia Philippines is “children and youth who live and/or work on the streets and other urban spaces.” For these children, the streets are their home, their workplace and their playground. They may or may not be supervised by an adult (Ex. a shelter), they may or may not return to some home or family. Some may have been abandoned by their parents but certainly all have been neglected by their parents and society. It is estimated that there are about 45 to 50 thousand street children in 22 cities in the Philippines who

engage in trivial work such as vending small items, in playing, and in risky behavior such as sniffing glue and gambling.

Nemo, A Boy Made of Paper (Nemo, Ang Batang Papel)

Her children are cartoonish—flat like paper and colorful like stained glass windows. And like rose-colored glasses, her illustrations allow the child-reader to look at poverty through a different lens, and softens the hopelessness of the story.

Haru H. Sabijon, Watercolor and colored pencils

Haru Sabijon’s naive and whimsical watercolor illustrations mask the very sad and tragic story of Nemo, A Boy Made of Paper.

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Author Rene Villanueva has not chosen to sugar coat or hide the dire situation of these children where their only escape from a world of “unhappy families, cruel schools, and dangerous streets” (Villanueva) is to wish to turn into paper and fly off. I can only interpret this as death. Street children are a common sight in major Philippine cities and therefore often seen by other children in the comfort of public or private transportation, alongside their parents or a significant adult. More than an attempt to explain this man-made situation, a sense of transcendence is necessary – to have faith, to hope, and to dream that someday these children will return to their families, that they can go to school and need not work, that they can play as children do, and be and feel safe.


MAN-MADE CONFLICT Man-made conflict like war is not so easily explained and much more difficult to find the good. Mindanao in the southernmost part of the Philippines is unfortunately often besieged by this problem, the most recent being in 2016. The war between government troops and terrorist groups displaces hundreds of families, many with children who have to flee the war zone. In 2002, the government sent troops to Jolo and Basilan to fight the terrorist group Abu Sayyaf. Out of this conflict appeared a children’s book titled War Makes Me Sad written by Mary Ann Floresta and illustrated by Biboy Royong and is about children caught in a military conflict. The sole purpose of this book was to literally show how war has affected the children and mothers in these areas (“We will leave our small hut, my kite, ball and book. I wonder will I still see my doll when I come back? Sometimes I cry? I can’t stop myself? I don’t understand.”)(Floresta) Caught in this hopeless situation over which

War Makes Me Sad

Biboy Royong, Watercolor

Like the title and narrative, Biboy Royong’s illustrations are literal and straightforward. His figures are realistic. His color palette is somber and serious, mostly greens like

he has no control, the child turns to prayer. “I will pray that peace will reign in the hearts and minds of all humankind.” (Floresta) A strong belief in God’s love and in the power of prayer is another form of transcendence. Prayer as conversation with God presupposes the divine presence in man’s world and the possibility of contacting Him. (Larkin, E.E.) It is, according to Susan Abraham, “a practice that uses the language of transcendence to yield understanding and knowledge “otherwise.” It is a discipline of receptivity to the sacred and yields the fruits of compassion, humility, hospitality, and love.” Despite all the evil and hardship this child has endured, he shows a compassion and love for humankind in his prayer. As can the real children caught in this very real conflict.

camouflage fatigue uniforms. The whole book has a feel of Vietnam war movies. We are after all in the same part of the world.

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T R A U M AT I C E X P E R I E N C E S These two books are probably the most difficult to write and painful to read as they are about child abuse, in particular incest and verbal abuse. Both these stories are tools of different advocacies to spread a particular message and therefore must have an appropriate and positive solution. Mantsa (Stain) written by Augie Rivera and illustrated by Jason Sto. Domingo is about verbal abuse and was commissioned by an organization called Plan International Philippines that has as its advocacy positive discipline. Positive discipline is a discipline model that teaches important social and life skills in a manner that is deeply respectful and encouraging for both children and their significant adults. In today’s culture, words like gago or bobo are not considered hurtful and have become normal adjectives often said without thinking.

The author expertly uses language and a little bit of fantasy to expose the problem of verbal abuse, its effect on the character, and an appropriate solution without being didactic.

Stain (Mantsa)

her to go through rooms and doors. These offer a way in for Jason Sto. Domingo and Ghani Madueño to extend the storylines into fantastical illustrations.

Jason Sto. Domingo, Watercolor

In both Mansta and Lea’s Secret, Augie Rivera describes the effects of abuse on a child with very visual language. In Mantsa, hurtful words—visualized as tattoos—leave marks on the body like a bruise or stain. In Lea’s Secret, Lea copes with sexual abuse by detaching herself from her body, allowing

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Obet is physically marked by the angry, hurtful, unkind words hurled at him by his parents and teacher. They are oblivious to the fact that these words do leave their mark in a person’s psyche. The words they have hurled at Obet appear on his skin like tattoos. Parents and teacher are shocked by their behavior and become remorseful. His mother realizes that her son only needs to know he is important to her and becomes a more loving mother. She attends a workshop on positive discipline to help her raise her son. Obet, on the other hand, shows transcendence by forgiving his parents and teacher.

Sto. Domingo illustrates his characters multiple times on a spread, visually adding noise to his pages and amplifying the abused child’s despair in the story.


T R A U M AT I C E X P E R I E N C E S Ang Lihim ni Lea (Lea’s Secret) written by Augie Rivera and illustrated by Ghani Madueno is about incest and requires great sensitivity (and a little humor) from the author not only in the development of the character but also in consideration of its child readers. This book was commissioned by Soroptimist International Baguio under their project HOPE. It is not available in bookstores and can only be bought directly from the publisher or the organization as this is a singular situation. According to the author, he was not allowed to interview the victim of incest but was allowed to observe a counseling session through a two-way mirror. In very sensitive issues such as these, writers find a way to present the subject by using figurative language. To do this, research is necessary and Rivera discovered that for victims of incest, body dissociation is a strong survival mechanism. It is a feeling of detachment from the body following trauma.

Lea lives in an apartment complex and discovers she has the power to go through doors to see what her neighbors are up to. She tries this in school to appalling consequences that bring her to the attention of her teacher who with gentle probing is able to extract the truth from Lea—her own father has been sexually abusing her.

Lea’s Secret (Ang Lihim ni Lea)

Madueño repeats the image of doors and passageways through out the book, symbolizing escape. He also ends the book with a door, as to show closure.

Ghani Madueño, Digital

Therapists (and books) can provide a safe environment where the truth can be told no matter how painful. Psychiatrist Judith Herman says that the only way out of a traumatic situation is through it. “To transcend is also to see the resilience, the hidden strength in another person.” “As advised by the psychologist, Lea undergoes regular therapy sessions to help her gradually recover and heal. Before long, with the constant support and unconditional and affirmative love of her mother, Lea begins to feel something extraordinary.” (Rivera)

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BEING DIFFERENT Ang Bonggang Bonggang Batang Beki (The Fierce and Fabulous Boy in Pink) written by Rhandee Garlitos and illustrated by Tokwa Peñaflorida is probably the most delightful of all the books discussed as it unabashedly paints a rosy picture (pun intended) of a young boy who is different. In an interview, the author very clearly states that this book is not about homosexuality but about effeminate boys. This story is about being unconditionally accepted by family, friends and the community and is told from the point of view of older brother Mico whose love and affection for the bunso of the family is evident. He narrates how Adel’s favorite color is pink, how he loves to do housework rather than play with the other kids and that Adel is “mahinhin at pinong kumilos (soft-spoken and dainty)” (Garlitos) just like their late mother. Adel reminds everyone of Mama and that is why he is beloved. Adel, on the other hand, knows he is unconditionally loved and that he matters.

But not everyone accepts Adel for what he is. Tito Braulio, Papa’s younger brother disapproves of Adel’s mannerisms. His twin sons, Bruno and Berto bully Adel whenever they come to visit. But one day, Adel proves to Tito Braulio, Bruno and Berto that being effeminate does not mean one cannot, for example, be brave. And that being effeminate is fine.

The presence of books that bring these difficult situations to light are very important.

While we would like to protect our children from the negative aspects of society, this is becoming more difficult particularly with the omnipresent technology. It is, in a perfect world, the child’s parents’ responsibility to try and explain these situations but this is not always the case. Books, like those discussed, bring hope that these difficult situations can be solved and overcome.

The Fierce and Fabulous Boy in Pink (Ang Bonggang Bonggang Batang Beki)

The use of symbols and colors is not unique to the Philippines, but its meanings are very much tied to our culture and to the time these books were created.

The Fierce and Fabulous Boy in Pink is one of the first LGBT children’s books in the Philippines. The title itself is a declaration. It is straight to the point and has no qualms about confronting the subject as it is. The illustrations are the same, echoing the narrative in a light, pink, and playful way.

An illustrator’s use of visual devices and metaphors can echo and expand a writer’s words. His point-of-view and illustration style also plays a role in storytelling, expressing a mood or illuminating feelings in ways words cannot do.

Tokwa Peñaflorida, Watercolor

I N S U M M A RY

Words and pictures provide different layers of meaning to a story.

In the right authors’ hands—authors being both writer and illustrator—a difficult story can become a forum for understanding, compassion, and reassurance.


National Children's Book Awards winners

2016

Mang Andoy’s Signs

Written by Mailin Paterno and illustrated by Isabel Roxas. Published by Ilaw ng Tahanan Publishing, Inc.

Si Janus Sílang at ang Tiyanak ng Tábon

Written by Edgar Calabia Samar. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

Dumaan si Butiki

Written by Gigi Constantino and illustrated by Ray Nazarene Sunga. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

Salusalo para kay Kuya

Written by Ergoe Tinio and illustrated by JC Galag. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

Haluhalo

Illustrated by Eli Camacho. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

KIDS’ CHOICE AWARDEE

Made Perfect in Weakness Written by Didith Rodrigo and illustrated by Patricia Lascano. Published by The Bookmark, Inc.

Supremo

Written by Xi Zuq and illustrated by Al Estrella. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

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National Children's Book Awards winners

2014

Hating Kapatid

Written by Raissa Rivera Falgui and illustrated by Fran Alvarez. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

The Little Girl in a Box

Written by Felinda Bagas and illustrated by Aldy Aguirre. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

Bahay Kubo

Illustrated by Pergy Acuña. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

Ngumiti si Andoy

Written by Xi Zuq and illustrated by Dominic Agsaway. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

KIDS’ CHOICE AWARDEE

The Day of Darkness

Written by Gutch Gutierrez and Zig Marasigan, and illustrated by Zig Marasigan. Published by The Bookmark, Inc. 20

What Kids Should Know About Andres and the Katipunan

Written by Weng Cahiles and illustrated by Isa Natividad. Published by Adarna House, Inc.


National Children's Book Awards winners

2012

Ang Sampung Bukitkit Written by Eugene Evasco and illustrated by Ibarra Crisostomo. Published by LG & M Corporation.

Ay Naku!

Written by Reni Roxas and illustrated by Sergio Bumatay III. Published by Ilaw ng Tahanan Publishing, Inc.

Written and illustrated by Robert Magnuson. Published by OMF Literature, Inc.

The Secret is in the Soil

Doll Eyes

Written by Eline Santos, translated by Augie Rivera, and illustrated by Joy Mallari. Published by CANVAS (Center for Art, New Ventures & Sustainable Development)

The Great Duck and Crocodile Race

Tall Story

Written by Candy Gourlay and illustrated by Yasmin Ong. Published by Cacho Publishing House.

Written by Gidget RocelesJimenez and Flor Gozon Tarriela; and illustrated by Liza Flores. Published by Conquest for Christ Foundation, Inc.

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National Children's Book Awards winners

2010

Tagu-taguan A Counting Book in Filipino Araw sa Palengke

Written by May Tobias-Papa and illustrated by Isabel Roxas. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

Lub-dub, Lub-dub

Written by Russell Molina and illustrated by Jomike Tejido. Published by The Bookmark, Inc.

Tuwing Sabado

Just Add Dirt

Written by Becky Bravo and illustrated by Jason Moss. Published by Adarna House, Inc.

Can We Live On Mars? A Book About Space

Written by Gidget RocelesJimenez and illustrated by Bru. Published by Adarna House, Inc. 22

Written and illustrated by Jomike Tejido. Published by Ilaw ng Tahanan Publishing, Inc.

Written by Russell Molina and illustrated by Sergio Bumatay III. Published by Lampara Publishing House, Inc.


Ch

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re u t a r

through the eyes of

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has e r u t litera ortant s ’ n re mp Child een an i ng b i long develop eativity, . o r key t nation, c children i n imag mpathy i and e In fact, the books of Roald Dahl, Dr. Seuss, and J.K. Rowling, to name just a few, were written with very smart, fun-loving children in mind. Often, such books feature a story from a child’s perspective. It is a testament to the skill of the adult writer that children can relate to such characters. But nowhere is the child’s perspective on so full a display as when the same children who read those books pick up their pens and write stories of their own.

Speculative worlds, minority perspectives “I think that having an intense love for storyreading often turns right into a love for storytelling

before you even notice it,” said Sage Alfar, 15. “I’ve been making up stories for as long as I can remember, but the earliest story we have on record is The Zombie Mommy, from when I was about six.” The eldest daughter of writers Dean and Nikki Alfar, Sage has grown up surrounded by words and books. Stars in Jars, a collection of speculative fiction authored with her father, is her first book. 23


In it, young boys and girls save the world, fight monsters, fall in love, and deal with their parents. With regard to future plans, Sage has said, “I dream of creating and publishing a collection of stories about kids like me with disorders and psychological difficulties in fantastical worlds and situations. I’d also like to write and promote more stories with LGBTQ+ protagonists that are not centered on the struggles of coming out or self-acceptance.”

Societal and cultural issues If there is a place to find young Filipino writers, the Philippine High School for the Arts is it. Its Creative Writing program requires a thesis of its students. It also regularly releases a literary folio called Dagta, which is a word that refers to the sap from a tree. Ma-I Entico was 16 when she wrote and drew her two-story comics thesis, Emla & Bugan. Both stories are set in the rice terraces of northern Philippines in pre-colonial times. Emla features a woman who fights against gender expectations while becoming warrior and healer. Bugan is about a mother who will do anything to keep her mute daughter close to her—even if it means tampering with the guardians of their village, whom her daughter tends. “I like writing fantasy—especially if it’s based on reality. There’s just so much you can play around with,” said Ma-I, who is now 18, in an interview. “But if I were to give a certain aspect I pay attention to a lot, it would be the relationships between characters. I think showing these is as important as telling the story since characters give the story meaning for me.” Meanwhile, Danielle Castillo and Margaret Mil, both 15, are regular contributors to Dagta. Margaret stated that she loved writing speculative fiction while Danielle explained that she was drawn to children’s literature. “I enjoy talking about and showing actual problems in our world through the lens of fantasy and sci-fi. It’s like showing our world from another perspective,” said Margaret.

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However, reading the work of all three girls reveals a streak of tackling social and cultural issues.

The young writers of the Where the Write Things Are anthologies

“I want to write more stories about our culture—us as Filipinos. Even though there are already a handful of these kinds of stories about this, I still want to go deeper into the subject,” said Ma-I. “I want to make people question our culture just as much as I want to enlighten them about it.” “I say all that because I think that acknowledging our past is just as important as looking ahead into the future,” she added. “To be able to do the best for our fellowmen and country, we must know from where we came from. I also believe that there is more to be proud of than our scenic spots or famous half and half Filipinos. This thing that we can be proud of is not tangible, but it is powerful. This thing is culture.” Margaret’s two contributions to PHSA’s literary portfolio Dagta discuss abandoned children and young boys in love with one another. Meanwhile, two out of three of Danielle’s poems in the same portfolio deal with poverty brought about by capitalism and blindly following religious dogma. As befitting a creative writing program, Danielle and Margaret are still finding their voices and trying new genres while Ma-I is pretty much set on what she wants to do in the future. Danielle has currently developed an interest in plays; she believes that she will keep writing about societal issues. She also dreams of opening her own children’s literature publishing house someday. Meanwhile, Margaret simply keeps submitting her work to different venues. Nostalgia and pollution are potential topics for future works, but her goals for her writing are solid as early as now.


world e h t w writing as a way to remember the characto sho as the t n ters and adventures he acted out with his a w h “I e n o y r r o Lego minifigures. e that ev o see things f “I realized that I did not want to waste the power t an they are, ideas that I had thought of while playing h t with my minifigures, so I decided to write e r o m stories with my characters, so the ideas that everyone can create their own stories and worlds,” she said. “I want to tell the world that it is full of differences, some of which should be eliminated, while others celebrated.”

Ma-I plans to release another comic and some animations in 2019, and perhaps work in a game design studio or put one up herself someday. She also wants to raise the profile of both culture and comics through each other. She said, “I want to tell people that comics can be sophisticated and can carry heavy and important things. I also want to tell them that there are more things we can be proud of, and that our stories are just as interesting as the Greek’s or the Mayan’s or the Nord’s.”

Young, precocious, and encouraging The child writers of the Where the Write Things Are anthologies are even younger than Sage, Ma-I, Danielle, and Margaret. But that doesn’t mean that they have less to say, or that what they write isn’t as important. Nate Gumba, 12, is interested in fantasy and science fiction. He first started

wouldn’t just fade away as I grow up,” he said. When he asked what he wanted to tell the world through his writing, he said, “Conflict is constant. There will always be struggles, both internal and external, but how you look at it will determine your approach in handling it.” Bubbly nine-year-old Yelena Delena stated that she wanted to be a writer to help her mom get her dream Subaru car. Her range is wide: from humorous fantasy stories to realistic fiction for children. In the future, she would also like to write about ancient history, a fairy tale about “what’s up in the crazy Philippines right now,” and a hundred kiddie to teen stories all compiled in a single book. Her short story Cinderella (From the Stepmother’s POV) was published in In Our Own Worlds vol. 4. Her message through her own writing is exemplified in her range.

children e h t l l e t "I want to d that if they l of the wor ig box of b open that n, they can do imaginatio s, no matter g great thin ey are," h what age t

she said.

With these examples of the young writerstars of tomorrow, the future of Philippine children’s literature looks bright.

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REGIONAL

CHILDREN'S

LITERATURE SACHA GARAH W. JASMIN

children’s literature on the cordillera: a sketch

The oral tradition is often regarded as the beginnings of children’s literature such that many of the early books for children on the Cordillera and elsewhere were based on folklore. These works mostly appear as collections with a few illustrations, though there are some which are illustrated individual storybooks.

Cordillera Tales (New Day Publishing, 1990) and The Origin of Tapuy and Other Cordillera Tales (IGOROTA Foundation, 1998) are among the earliest compilations of folklore for children. The Benguet State University also compiled stories about origins of rituals and places and about people’s way of life in the mythical past in Stories of Alapu: Mountain Province Edition (2007) and Ul-ulit Danun/ Dad-at ed Nabaon/ Stories from a Long Time Ago (2010). Meanwhile, Cordillera Green Network published The Golden Arrow of Mt. Makilkilang and other Cordillera Folktales (2013) which include stories about people’s interactions with nature and with print works by artists who facilitated community art workshops. Perhaps because these oral tales are rapidly disappearing, the need to preserve these narratives for the younger generations through the printed form becomes ever more pressing. Indeed, the title speaks volumes in the book From Elders to Children: Stories of Wisdom from Cordillera Philippines (Maryknoll Ecological Sanctuary, 2016) which include stories ranging from living simply to caring for the land. In addition, Long Time Ago in Ifugaoland: Timeless Folktales for Children (2015), self-published by Edith Mamanglo, includes two original stories by the author. 26


Clearly, the work of academic institutions and NGOs as well as efforts of individuals is vital in the creation and promotion of children’s literature in the regions. The Department of Education Order No. 16, Series of 2012 or the Mother Tongue-Based Multilingual Education, which came later than some of these works, is also instrumental in the drive to produce more indigenous materials for learning.

to its UNESCO World Heritage status. The Boy Who Touched Heaven (Canvas, Adarna, 2007) is the story of a boy who aims for the sky and sees his village with fresh eyes while Hagdan sa Langit/ Stairway to Heaven (C&E Publishing, 2010) tells the story of two childhood friends who were separated as one left to study in the city. The Ifugao epic, hudhud, a Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity also figure in many works, such as in HALIKPON: A Retelling of an Ancient Ifugao Chant and PUMBAKHAYON: An Origin Myth of the Ifugao Hudhud. Both were produced by NCCA in 2006. Interestingly, The Song of the Ifugao (Museo Pambata Foundation, 2010), interweaves the life story of one of its youngest living chanters with excerpts from the epic.

In Ap-apat di Y-Malaya/Stories from Malaya (Australian Aid and DepEd, 2013), the stories, poems, riddles and songs were written in Kankana-ey, a language spoken in Cervantes. On the other hand, in 2009, 21 illustrated individual storybooks written in Chinananaw, Filipino and English came out of a project initiated by two Australians, in collaboration with the Ichananaw community in Kalinga, volunteers from the Ateneo and Ang Illustrador ng Kabataan.

Writers went beyond re-telling folktales to writing about indigenous knowledge and tradition in other creative ways. In Shellah Goes to a Da-ngah. (Alam-am Publishing, 2015), the child heroine gives new meaning to the da-ngah, the Kalanguya’s version of a bayanihan. In another book, Of Jars and Weaves, Terraces and Beads: Icons of our Living Culture (HSBC, 2006) two contemporary stories introduce the ubbu (Ifugao bayanihan) and the process of mummification through its child characters. In Ang Magic Bahag (Lampara Books, 2014) the hero is a Kalinga boy with a newfound confidence.

Outside the region, children’s literature on the Cordillera are also being produced. Some of these stories are set in the Ifugao Rice Terraces owing

Other stories dealt with social and environmental issues: Halimaw sa Bundok /Monster in the Mountain (C&E Publishing 2010) tells of an evil that is 27


looming over their land while Moonbeams (CGN, 2006) is a story about nature spirits. Ang Pangat, Ang Lupang Ninuno at ang Bundok, (Lampara Publishing House Inc, 2013) and its English version The Pangat, the Mountains and the River (Bookmark, Inc. 2013) narrates the story of Macliing Dulag of Kalinga who led the fight against the damming of the Chico River during the Martial Law years. Dumaloy ang Ilog Chico/ And so the Chico River Flows (GABRIELA and Raintree Publishing Inc, 1996) is another take on the Chico Dam struggle. Many of these works, unfortunately, are out of print. Most do not reach the shelves of bookstores because they are not for sale but rather given for free to schools and libraries in the communities. This is great because access to books, especially about one’s own culture, addresses issues on literacy in remote communities. However, it is equally important that these books travel outside the communities for whom they are written. While there is a growing body of CL on the Cordillera, improving the quality, availability, and diversity of these works remains a challenge. Nevertheless, mainstream publishers and private individuals and institutions can support the development of CL in the regions by providing technical assistance through workshops on storytelling, writing, reading, illustration and bookmaking.

western visayas MJ TUMAMAC

A number of recent books for children in the Visayas are translations of English and Filipino titles produced by creators based in Metro Manila. This is an initial response to address the lack of reading materials in the Mother Tongue classrooms. For instance, many children’s books in Binisaya, a language spoken in Central Visayas and some areas in Eastern Visayas, are translation projects funded by private organisations. Most of these books are distributed for free to schools and only a few—such as Espesyal na Adlaw ni Mario (Mario’s Special Day), Ikaw ba ang Akong Inahan? (Are You My Mother?), and Ang Buotang Kabaw (The Good Carabao)—are commercially available. The situation is different in Western Visayas, where children’s literature has been flourishing for years. Several groups and initiatives produce and promote the creation of children’s books in the various languages spoken in the region. One of

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these is Balay Sugidanun, a literary platform for Kinaray-a and other Visayan languages established by Genevieve Asenjo. Asenjo, who is more known for her fiction and poetry for general audience, has translated a storybook into Hiligaynon—Ang Bukid nga Nagpalangga sang Pispis (The Mountain that Loved a Bird)—and actively supports children’s literature. One of Balay Sugidanun’s publications is Early Sol Gadong’s Si Bulan, si Adlaw, kag si Estrelya (Moon, Sun, and Star), a retelling of the origin of the moon, sun, and stars. (The storybook edition is illustrated by Mark Lawrence Andres, while a forthcoming picture book edition is illustrated by Sophia Demanawa.) Literary works in Kinaray-a are also championed by the organisation Dungug Kinaray-a through its annual writing contest Padya Dungug Kinaray-a. In 2013, the short story for children category was added to the contest and, so far, the winners in this category include Bryan Adato, Norman Darap, Early Sol Gadong, Jesus Insilada, Gil Montinola, Mark Anthony Orquejo, Edison Otañes, Jessie Valenzuela, Rufema Vegafria, and Marie Villojan-Abando. Their stories are compiled into three volumes

entitled Antolohiya ka mga Sugidanun Pangbata (Anthology of Stories for Children). The Peter Solis Neri Foundation for Hiligaynon Literature and the Arts has also sponsored a contest on writing for children. The foundation is established by Palanca Hall of Fame awardee Peter Solis Neri in 2012. Besides the usual short story for children category, the Peter’s Prize for Excellence in Hiligaynon Literature has a poetry for children category. The most active organisation, however, that promotes children’s literature in Western Visayas is the writers collective Hubon Manunulat. Many of its members’ books have works for children and these are May Isa ka Kuring nga Hari kag iban pa nga Sugilanon para sa mga Bata (The Cat-King and other Stories for Children), a collection of animal tales 29


by Alice Tan Gonzales; Sanday Tay Alib kag Tay Amar (Father Alib and Father Amar), a storybook by Noel G. de Leon that features a family with two fathers; Magsugilanonay Kita (Let’s Tell Stories), an anthology of short stories edited by Leoncio P. Deriada; Mga Pabula ni Aesop sa Akeanon, a translation of Aesop’s Fables into Aklanon by Melchor Cichon; and Si Kilat ag si Daeugdog, a folktale retelling by John Barrios. Together with the Guimaras-based independent publishing house Kasingkasing Press (which carries many titles authored by the members), Hubon Manunulat also holds the biennial Magsugilanonay Kita: West Visayan Mother Tongue Children’s Books Summit.

SOCCSKSARGEN Creators from outside of Mindanao author a bulk of the children’s books about the island region. It seems that the primary audience of these creators are children outside of the cultural group they based their stories on, and this observation is evident in the language they use, their manner of retelling the group’s oral literature, and the presentation of the elements of the group’s culture in their works. Three of the titles that fall under this category are Piagsugpatan (The Horizon), Marcy Dans Lee’s retelling of folktales of the Mandaya of eastern Mindanao; Anina ng mga Alon (Anina, Girl of the Waves), Eugene Y. Evasco’s novel about the plight of the Sama of Tawi-Wawi; and Naging Pintor si Tominaman sa Rogong, a tale by Felice Prudente Sta. Maria inspired by the Meranaw myths. This is also the case in SOCCSKSARGEN (or SOX), a region in southern Mindanao where cultural and linguistic diversity is high. This diversity is one of the reasons why there are a number of children’s books about the region’s cultural groups authored by non-local writers. Examples of these books include Naglakbay si Tulalang sa Araw at Buwan (Tulalang’s Journey to the Sun and Moon), Eugene Y. Evasco’s take on a story of the Ilianen Manobo; A Dream and a Melody, Becky Santos-Gerodias and Maria Bernadette Solina-Wolf’s storybook about how a Tboli girl helps solve a problem faced by her clan; and 30


Gustong Mag-aral ni Sula (Sula Wants to Go to School), Nieves Lemlunay and Nestor Castro’s story that features a Tboli child who at the end of the story was taught by her parents to read and write the alphabets.

have produced the books of children’s games, Dad Snagwas Ngà, Danga na Mangayse’, and Sen-gwas Kem Nga, and the picture books I Ktagah Abuh (Cooking the Dish Abuh), Pangapog (Thanksgiving), and Kmo Ktool Lieg Mimet (Making Bead Necklaces).

In partnership with non-governmental organizations, some publishers in Metro Manila have also produced translations of some of their titles into languages spoken in SOX. For instance, Adarna House has a version of the following books in Hiligaynon (Mindanao variety), Maguindanaon, Tboli, Blaan, or Tagakaulo: Ikaw ba ang Nanay Ko? (Are You My Mother?), Ang Bilog na Itlog (The Round Egg), Tiktaktok at Pikpakbum (Tiktaktok and Pikpakbum), amongst other titles. Tahanan Book’s Bahay Kubo (The Nipa Hut) and Tagu-taguan (Hide-and-Seek) are also translated into Tboli, Blaan, and Tagakaulo. Though translations contribute to the provision of reading materials in these languages, contextualization of the culture embedded in the original text and illustrations is still an aspect that needs to be done.

What separates SOX from other regions, however, in terms of children’s literature is the presence of ABC Educational Development Center in Kidapawan City, Cotabato Province. Established by Mary Ann Ordinario in the early 2000s (though the school attached to it was founded in 1993), it is the oldest publishing house solely devoted to the creation of children’s books outside of Metro Manila. A trademark of its books (mostly are authored by Ordinario) is that these are all about Mindanao. Some of their titles include War Makes Me Sad, a story of a child’s war experience; The Smelly Fruit, a legend of the durian fruit; Diola, a story about the Philippine eagles; The Crying Trees, a legend of rubber trees; My Muslim Friend, a true story about the friendship between a Muslim and a Christian; The Hairy Fruit, a legend of the rambutan fruit; and Malong: The Magic Cloth, a picture book about the different uses of the malong tubular skirt. This year, ABC Educational Development Center is holding Sulat Tayo, Mindanao, a contest on writing short stories for children in English, Filipino, and Binisaya open to writers from Mindanao.

On the other hand, some private initiatives are shifting into a more sustainable way of helping their beneficiaries in the region in terms of book production. Save the Children, for instance, has been training individuals from select cultural groups in SOX in different skills involved in developing books. Through its First Read project, in particular, writers from the ethnic groups Blaan, Tagakaulo, and Tboli

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N E W

RELEASES summer 2018

1 Kuya Enzo Finds a Way

by Becky SantosGerodias. Published by Vibal Group. Released October 2017.

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2 FIREEE! by Aaron Randy. Published by Anvil Publishing, Inc. Released December 2017.

3 The ABCs of Jesus’ Birth written

by Vince Burke and illustrated by Dom Ochotorena. Published by Hiyas Children’s Books. Released November 2017.

4 Insoy, The Timid Bawa by Glory Moralidad and Daniel Tinagan. Published by RRH Publishing. Released March 2018.


5 Cinderspectarella written

by Anj CP. Published by Brilliant Creations Publishing, Inc. Released October 2017.

6 Oki Dok#3 Checkup Time, Adam at Audrey!

written by Luis P. Gatmaitan and illustrated by Cy Vendivil. Published by Hiyas Children’s Books. Released January 2018.

7 Gumagapang, Lumulukso, Lumilipad by

Eugene Y. Evasco. Published by Vibal Group. Released October 2017.

8 Cooking 101: For Kids and Kids-at-Heart by Golda

Lynn Zamuco. Published by Kahel Press (Imprint of St. Matthew’s Publishing Corporation). Released October 2017. 33


N E W

9 Nasaan si Perlas? by Mark

Norman S. Boquiren. Published by Vibal Group. Released October 2017.

10 Diego Meets the Pope by Meanne Mabesa Mijares. Published by Vibal Group. Released October 2017. 34

11 Sampaguita by Randy

Valiente. Published by Vibal Group. Released October 2017.

12 Harana ng Kuliglig by

Eugene Y. Evasco. Published by Vibal Group. Released October 2017.


13 A Boy of Buhi by Raisa

Rivera Falgui. Published by Vibal Group. Released October 2017.

14 Duck And Croc Cannot Swim by Robert Magnuson.

Published by Anvil Publishing, Inc. Released March 2018.

15 Duck And Croc’s Magnificent Race by Robert

Magnuson. Published by Anvil Publishing, Inc. Released October 2017.

16 Duck And Croc: Fowl Friday Feast by Robert

Magnuson. Published by Anvil Publishing, Inc. Released October 2017. 35


N E W



17 1…2…3…RUUUN! by

Aaron Randy. Published by Anvil Publishing, Inc. Released March 2018.

18 Bantay – The Cat Who Wants to Be a Dog by Alvin

Gale Tan. Published by Kahel Press (Imprint of St. Matthew’s Publishing Corporation). Released October 2017.

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19 The Legend of the Cagayan River by Anna Liza

Gaspar. Published by Kahel Press (Imprint of St. Matthew’s Publishing Corporation). Released October 2017.

20 The “Small” Big Book of Dogs by Ransom Rogers.

Published by Kahel Press (Imprint of St. Matthew’s Publishing Corporation). Released October 2017.








21 Meow and Furever: Growing Up with Your Cat by Dr. Ma. Rosario S. Racho.

Published by Kahel Press (Imprint of St. Matthew’s Publishing Corporation). Released October 2017.

23 Giggling Gigi and the Babbling Bat by Glory

Moralida. Published by RRH Publishing. Released March 2018.

22 Where Did All the Fireflies Go? by Renee Juliene Karunungan. Published by Kahel Press (Imprint of St. Matthew’s Publishing Corporation). Released October 2017.

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news

Filipino illustrator gains recognition in Thailand Joffrey Z. Atienza bagged the ASEAN Children’s Book Illustrator Best in Fiction for the book written by Mary Ann Ordinario entitled: Malong: The Magic Cloth. The contest was one of the highlights of the recently concluded International Children’s Content Rights Fair (ICCRF) in Chiang Mai, Thailand on December 6-9, 2017. Born on 23 April 1990, Joffrey or “Pepot” spends most of his time as a Children’s Book Illustrator and a Freelance Multimedia Artist. He was also recognized as People’s Choice-AFCC (Asian Festival of Children’s Content) in 2016, winner of Lampara Book Illustrator’s Prize in 2015 and one of the awardees of PBBY Alcala Prize in 2014. Malong: The Magic Cloth is a children's book that portrays the journey of a little boy with his family while they unveil the mystery behind the cloth. Author Mary Ann Ordinario is the founder and Director of ABC Educational Development Center, a school for children located in Kidapawan City, Cotabato. She has written 30 children books and gained recognition even abroad. Malong: The Magic Cloth is her latest book.

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NBDB’s Booklatan sa Bayan 2017: Picture Book Writing Workshop in GenSan and Read Aloud in Saranggani On September 28-29, 2017, the National Book Development Board through its Booklatan sa Bayan program, conducted a Picture Book Writing Workshop in Notre Dame of Dadiangas University, General Santos City. National Children’s Book Award (NCBA) winner, Mr. Michael Jude Tumamac aka Xi Zuq, and Ms. Tarie Sabido, Chair of Philippine Board on Books for Young People (PPBY) were the great minds behind its success. Guided by NBDB’s mandate to encourage the production of original content and development of literary systems, this program aims to promote local authorship in SOCCKSARGEN by developing young writers’ skills in content creation. The resource speakers gave opportunity for the aspiring picture book writers to share their ideas. They were also encouraged to look at children’s book writing as a huge challenge especially because it requires carefulness in crafting stories suitable for the taste and needs of the young readers. Participants were mostly students from different parts of SOCCKSARGEN determined by NBDB with the help of its partners especially Save The Children. NBDB also held a storytelling session and turnover of books as part of the Booklatan sa Bayan at the Upper Alabel Elementary School, Saranggani on September 30, 2017. 50 students from Upper Alabel participated and various volunteer storytellers composed of youth and children’s book authors. Beng Alba’s Ang Batang Ayaw Maligo and Jomike Tejido’s Ma-Me-Mi-Mumu! were some of the books used during the event. This storytelling session is considered as a learning activity. It aims to enhance the listening skills of children, amplify their love for reading and help them remain connected with their cultural roots.

39


READING GROUPS and STORYTELLING TROUPES in the regions ZARAH C. GAGATIGA

Storytelling and reading aloud are techniques used to impart a message, teach a skill, communicate an idea and touch the hearts of listeners, young and old alike. Both are effective strategies to promote oral tradition and the printed book. Schools, libraries and even malls in Metro Manila jump in the storytelling and reading aloud bandwagon for its educational and entertainment value. During Book Week celebration and Literacy events, these venues never cease to host and organize storytelling and reading aloud sessions. In the National Capital Region, families and their children as well as the people who teach and care for them have access to resources for reading and storytelling. The Museo Pambata continues to be a home for storytellers and read aloud advocates. One of its exhibit rooms features storytellers who have inspired and made an influence in the communities they serve. This exhibit room can be found beside the writers and illustrators exhibit areas. Collectively, this space is called the Paglaki Ko Room, where children can role play, write and draw their stories alongside interactive exhibits of well-known Filipino writers, illustrators and storytellers today. The National 40

Library of the Philippines (NLP) runs a Book Mobile with librarians who are trained storytellers and puppeteers. The librarians in the NLP’s Children’s Library Services conduct storytelling workshops for public librarians all over the country. The Philippine Board on Books for Young People (PBBY) staged a Storytelling Festival during the National Children’s Book Day last year. It featured an array of storytelling techniques and strategies that go beyond book-based storytelling. The Batang Sining Program of the Cultural Centre of the Philippines (CCP) fuses the three skills of reading, writing and storytelling integrated with art activities, as a three to five day workshop for children, youth groups and teachers in Manila and in provinces in the regions. Individual reading aloud and storytelling campaigns are evident too. Kuya Rey Bufi, storyteller and cultural worker


founded The Storytelling Project where he started out in the greater Manila area telling tales in schools and barangays. Now, it has a pool of storytellers who tell tales and read books to children in the different regions of the country. If this news of a growing community of tale tellers excites you, there is more to be happy about!

Pilar Reading Centre The Pilar Reading Center (PRC) is an alternative learning hub for Tulay Kids and other youth residing in the Tulay Community at Purong Batya, Banuyo, Pilar, Sorsogon. It started its service on July 25, 2010 on its first location, a bamboo hut appended by the seashore of the coastal community. Now, PRC is located at Purok 1, Purong Batya, Banuyo, Pilar, Sorsogon. Its vision is to be an arm of the town and schools in creating awareness about reading and encouraging PilariĂąos children and youth to read. It aims to help schools and other reading centers in the town in instilling the value and love for reading.

Reading groups and storytelling troupes in the regions are growing! Led by book lovers, avid readers and storytellers, they form a community where they share a love for books and reading. In the process, they help the community raise consciousness on the relevance of stories, literature and the creation of their local books that showcase the art and culture of their province and region.

Founder: Mr. Lowel Andrian M. Solayao is a Physics teacher at Pilar National Comprehensive High School, Pilar Sorsogon. Major Activities: PRC has many activities for children and youth in Pilar, Sorsogon. These include the conduct of literacy programs like Reach Out and Read and Progress Check Up for the improvement of reading and writing skills; summer reading camps for regular PRC readers who are achieving and underachieving or under-performing; and Sagip Batang Tulay Project, an outreach activity with neighboring communities. PRC partners with the Local Government Unit (LGU) and other organizations for activities and sessions related to literacy skills development.

Facebook: pilarreadingcenter Website: http://pilarreadingcenter.org/ 41


Bata Ako Ph Bata Ako Ph is comprised of individuals whose primary mission is to create stories for children and bring these original tales to different communities around the city of Iloilo. The group promotes storytelling in all its forms by hosting activities that encourage children to participate and help develop awareness of literature. While many think books, like cars, are luxuries, Bata Ako Ph believes that books are necessities. Through storytelling, books can aid in the improvement of children’s’ reading behavior and skills.

Founder: Ms. Glory Moralidad is a writer and illustrator of children’s stories. She founded Bata Ako Ph (known before as Traveling Tales), to bring back the lost art of storytelling to children in different schools and communities. She has been awarded as a ‘Children’s Hero’ in Iloilo City for her five-year service in children’s Non-Government Organizations. Major Activities: Bata Ako Ph has monthly book donations and storytelling events. Other than that, the group mostly celebrates in November for National Children’s Month. They have workshops for kids and other kinds of storytelling activities that make use of media and animation.

Facebook: BataAkoPH 42


VALORÆX VALORÆX is the book readers club of Mindanao State University-General Santos. Its name came from two words, valour meaning ‘worthy’ and loræx meaning ‘guardian’ based on the movie The Lorax. The club is an academic, social, non-political, non-religious, and non-profit reading and literary organization. VALORÆX aims to foster the love for reading, specifically promoting the reading of local and regional literature from Region 12 and Mindanao. It equips its members with knowledge regarding classic and contemporary literature.

Founder: Ms. Rossel M. Audencial is a teacher from Mindanao State University, General Santos City. She is currently one of the advisers of VALORÆX. She actively participates in the advocacy for reading and writing in Region 12 in collaboration with the advocacy group SOX Reading Advocates, the schoolbased storytellers group The Story Book Project, and the writers group SOX Writers. Major Activities: VALORÆX holds regular BOOK TALKS or book discussions with members scheduled once a week. For every book talk, a discussion director is assigned who takes charge of listening, speaking, and writing activities for the members. Once a month, they have BOOK SHARE wherein invited a guest, a teacher or a writer, to talk about his or her favorite books. There are also BOOK SWAP events in the city and meet-ups with other book lovers and readers from other schools.

Facebook: valoraexbookreadersclub

The Philippines has 7,641 islands.

This archipelago is a rich treasure trove of stories that mirror the diverse identities of every Filipino community and indigenous groups, their culture and art. Books, both local and foreign, have found their way into communities and groups in the

regions. As a result, readers, tellers and book lovers come together and share this love. Stories and storytelling bring people together. This growing awareness of one’s self amidst the bigger society and this enduring love for stories and literature will fuel the book industry into the future. 43


Rene Villanueva:

Remarkable Writer

ALVIN I. DACANAY If you ask creative writers, especially those who started their careers before the turn of this century, who among their peers are the most celebrated and the most influential, chances are that many of them would include Renato “Rene” Villanueva. They would have good reason to. In his almost three-decade career, Rene wrote prodigiously in three genres: drama, fiction for children, and creative nonfiction. Not only that, he helped educate an entire generation of Filipinos with the children’s television show Batibot, which reached its peak in the 1980s, when he was its head writer and creative force. Rene also established two notable dramatists’ groups: the Telon Playwrights Circle in the early 1980s and, with the late playwright Carlos “Charley” de la Paz Jr., what’s now known as the Writer’s Bloc in 1989. The latter group is one of the driving forces behind the Virgin Labfest, an annual festival of one-act plays that has introduced a new generation of talented playwrights—and helped revitalize Philippine theater in general—since its launch in 2005. For his astounding contributions to Philippine literature, Rene received numerous accolades. He won an impressive 27 awards at the Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature, regarded as our country’s counterpart of the Pulitzer Prize. Of these, 12 are first prizes—more than enough for him to be among the first to be inducted into the Palanca Hall of Fame in 1995. He also received five National Book Awards from the Manila Critics Circle, for the play collections May Isang Sundalo: Limang Maiikling Dula and Apat na Dula, the children’s books Nemo, Ang Batang Papel and Ang Pambihirang Buhok ni Lola, and the essay collection Personal: Mga Sanaysay sa Lupalop ng Gunita.

44

The Junior Chamber International named Rene as one of the 10 Outstanding Young Men of the Philippines in 1991 and one of the Outstanding Young Persons of the World in 1993. The Unyon ng mga Manunulat ng Pilipinas bestowed on him the Gawad Balagtas for lifetime achievement in 2000, and the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP) named him its Gawad CCP Para sa Sining recipient for literature in 2004. The list of his accomplishments is endless. All these are being remembered 10 years after Rene passed away on December 5, 2007 at the age of 53. Those unfamiliar with him as an individual may get to know more about him through Personal and  [Im]personal: Gabay sa Panulat at Pagmamanunulat. But those who did know him—those he had mentored and befriended—remember a Rene whose intellect and personality were as sharp and vivid as his works, if not more.

Continued influence One of them, prize-winning poet and Telon member Romulo “Joey” Baquiran Jr., attested to Rene’s continued influence, particularly in creative nonfiction. He said Rene’s “Personal is an ideal I strive to emulate,” noting “the grit, the truth, the honesty, [and]even the casual tone” of the book. The playwright and children’s book author was especially known for his cutting remarks, a fact that wasn’t lost on Joey, who said the late writer’s “evaluation of one’s talent is harsh, but it’s the real one.” Another Telon (and Writer’s Bloc) member, acclaimed playwright and poet Nicolas “Nick” Pichay, remembers Rene as “a generous teacher; an engaging raconteur; a person with genuine,


thought-out insights; and a trusting friend” whose “legacy is not confined to his literary output.” For his part, Nick’s fellow dramatist and Palanca Hall of Famer Jun Robles Lana—now best-known as the director of such films as Bwakaw (which was dedicated to Rene and whose cranky protagonist was named after him), Barber’s Tales and  Die Beautiful—said “Rene was my writing mentor. And as a writer who directs—because I’m a writer first—ultimately my work as a filmmaker is inspired by the core values Rene had instilled in me.” He also said “screenwriters today can learn about characterization, voice and motivation from reading Rene, since most of his plays are brilliant character studies.” As examples, Jun cited Hiblang Abo, about four men spending their twilight years and being haunted by their past in a home for the elderly;  Kumbersasyon (for which Rene won his first Palanca award), which focuses on a college professor’s subtle attempt to seduce a student; and Botong, about the celebrated National Artist for Painting Carlos Francisco that’s set in the afterlife. Joey said what made Rene’s works, like the abovementioned plays, distinctive was how “well-made” they were, adding that the themes he employed “were almost always relevant to contemporary Filipinos.” Nick noted the speed in which Rene penned his works, as well as his “gift for snappy dialogue.” “[Rene’s] plays were usually realistic [and] dealt with contemporary dilemmas. He was very good at encapsulating the political concerns of society reduced to personal situations,” he said.

Great impact Among fellow writers whom Rene had influenced, it’s novelist and essayist Luna Sicat-Cleto and children’s book author and essayist Dr. Luis Gatmaitan whom the playwright seemed to have made the most impact. “Si Rene ang nagturo sa akin—sa amin—na sumulat ng dula,” Luna said. “Malaking bagay ang ibinigay niyang mga leksiyon. Panahon iyon na hindi ko pa talaga alam kung ano’ng gusto kong isulat, pero nagabayan niya ako at nabigyan ng hamon.” Like fellow Telon member Joey, Luna also noted Rene’s brutal frankness, describing it as

“nananampal,” or like slaps to the face. She added, however, that you would understand why he would say things that way, and that is to wake you up. “First real critique sa akin ‘yung simple niyang tanong na: Ano ba ang vision mo? You may have the talent, but without vision, para ka ring bulag, Luna,” she recalled. “Marami raw akong mga linya na malulutong, maangas. Pero tulad ng blusang ginantsilyo, hindi mo ito isusuot dahil sa butas-butas. In other words, kailangang magkasangga ang dialogue at plot. Kailangan rin na may sense ka of a bigger story, of a bigger picture, ‘yung discourse na tunay na source ng dula.” “Orihinal ang kanyang sense of humor. Dark— perverse—pero natatawa ka,” the novelist-essayist said when asked what set Rene apart from other writers. “May ruthless honesty siya. I mean, wala siyang romantikong nosyon sa mga ugnayan ng tao. Pero minsan ubod siya ng corny, ubod ng sentimental. Kaya siya epektibo bilang mandudula kasi marami siyang nakikita sa tao, lalo na sa mga kalilibliban ng mga emosyon at iniisip ng tao. Walang masama na ubod nang sama, walang mabuti na santa/santo.” “Hate  niya ang mga ipokrito. Mahilig rin siyang magbasa, makipagdebate sa history, sa culture. He’s extremely well-read, pero hindi pedantic,” she added. “Nakilala ko siya noong 18 ako, pumanaw siya na 42 na ako. Twenty-four years ko na siyang kaibigan, at kaibigan pa rin. Hindi lang siya mentor ng dula. Life coach rin siya,” Luna said.

45


For Luis, Rene’s name is always synonymous with Philippine children’s literature. “Just the mere mention of his name would evoke images of Batibot, theater and children’s books. He had written some of the most interesting stories in local children’s books, like  Ang Unang Baboy sa Langit, Nemo, ang Batang Papel and  Ang Pambihirang Buhok ni Lola. He had created some of the most memorable storybook characters in the country: Emang Engkantada, Butsiki, Carancal, Nemo, Tiktaktok and Pikpakbum,” he explained.

46

“Malawak ang naging kontribusyon ni Rene sa larang na ito, patunay ang higit 50 aklat-pambata na nasulat niya. Pero ayon kay Rene, aksidente lang na nagustuhan ng mga bata ang kanyang mga ginawang libro. Actually, he was writing for the child in him who died young because of life’s harsh realities,” Luis said. “Naging editor ko si Rene noong ginagawa namin ang isang set  ng librong pambata na kinomisyon ng Unicef (United Nations Children’s Fund) Philippines sa Tahanan Books. Doon ko narinig sa kanya na kapag gagawa ka ng dialogue, ang dapat ay maiigsi lamang ang mga linya,” the writer-pediatrician recalled. “‘Para mas interesante, mas biting! Isipin mo ang mga linya sa isang palabas sa entablado. Hindi mahahaba


ang pangungusap nito. Sa totoong buhay, ganyan naman mag-usap ang mga tao,’” he quoted Rene as saying then. “Hanggang ngayon, kapag gumagawa ako ng dialogue sa aking mga kuwento, naiisip ko ang mga payo ni Rene.” “Among the books he had written, my personal favorite is Ang Unang Baboy sa Langit. Nandoon lahat ang mga elemento ng isang mahusay na akdang pambata: may siste (humor), maganda ang ginamit na mga salita, nakaaaliw,” Luis said. “Paborito ko rito ang chant na sinabi ng mga anghel habang umaakyat sa langit ang kaluluwa ni Butsiki: ‘Walang silbi ang baboy na di naging litson. Walang halaga ang baboy na di naging chicharon. Ipahayag sa lahat, si Santa Butsiki ang unang baboy na patron!’ Klasiko na itong maituturing,” he added.

He inspired a lot of writers to take writing for children seriously,” Luis said. “Karapatdapat parangalan si Rene bilang Pambansang Alagad ng Sining sa Panitikang Pambata,” he asserted. With such testimonies from some of those who knew him best, it’s only a matter of time—and luck—before Rene would be proclaimed as such. And it would be so well-deserved. First published in the December 17, 2017 issue of the Sunday Times Magazine of The Manila Times.

“Maraming manunulat ang sumunod sa yapak ni Rene. Binuksan niya para sa amin ang genre na ito,”

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illustrators' showcase Domz Agsaway

3 o Clock Merienda domz.agsaway@gmail.com behance.net/domzagsaway I domzagsaway F domzagsawayillustration

Rex “Dasig� Aguilar

Si Makahiya Nasa Cactus Garden, Nagmumuni-muni. dasig.studio@gmail.com

Aldy Aguirre

Sampayan aldywalks.tumblr.com I aldywalks

Fran Alvarez

Taho www.francesalvarez.com 48


Jamie Bauza

« Big World by Little People « Ang Sabi ni Nanay, Ang Sabi ni Tatay wave@jamiebauza.com jamiebauza.com

Robbie Bautista

« Manong Sorbetero « Byaheng Langit robx.bautista@gmail.com I T robxbautista

Yas Doctor

Paghahanap at Pag-aantay (Alamat ng pagtaas ng tubig sa karagatan) yas.doctor16@gmail.com I heypatatas 49


Liza Flores

« Ang Maliit na Kalabaw « Study for But That Won't Wake Me Up www.liza.ph

Rommel Joson

Tagpuan (page 5) hello@rommeljoson.com rommeljoson.com I rommeljoson 50

Hannah Manaligod

Pula at Puti (Alaala ng Digmaan) behance.net/HMManaligod

Tippy Go

Ang Mga Dumagat ponggo@googlygooeys.com GooglyGooeys.com I GooglyGooeys F TheGooglyGooeys


Harry Monzon

Kabutehan harry.monzon04@gmail.com I harrymonzon

Jill Arwen Posadas

Pintaditos jill-arwen-posadas.weebly.com

Borg Sinaban

Calm borgdraws.tumblr.com I T F borgdraws

Brent Sabas

Indigenous Animals Series: « Askal « Maya « Pusakal brentsabas@yahoo.com brentsabas.tumblr.com I brentsabas

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Jomike Tejido Maglalako jmtejido.com

Isa Somera

Street Eats cargocollective.com/lamonera I lamonera__

Kuki Ulpindo

ÂŤ Honor Student (Tiyaga) hello@kukiulpindo.com kukiulpindo.com I kerkerkler

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Ara Villena

Ang Bakunawa aradevillena@gmail.com augustinspirations.carbonmade.com I aravillena


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24

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info@chambershell.com; jamie@ bautista.com

35

CHILDREN’S ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS AND ACTION FOUNDATION INC.

0917-8151513

info.ceaaf@gmail.com; civ_1748@yahoo.com

36

CHRISTIAN LIFE COMMUNITY OF THE PHILIPPINES, INC.

T: 426-0074

secretariat@clcphilippines.org

www.clcphilippines.org

37

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE CRUSADE, INC.

T: 291-5005/ 2779159

info@clcphilippines.com

www.clcphilippines.com

38

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY OF THE PHILIPPINES, INC. (NEW DAY PUBLISHERS)

T: 928-8046

finance@newdaypublishers.com

www.newdaypublishers.com

39

CLARETIAN COMMUNICATIONS FOUNDATION, INC.

T: 921-3984

ccfi@claretianpublications.com

-

40

CONSYSTENT SOLUTIONS, INC.

T: 503-5324

team@consystentsolutions.com

www.consystentsolutions.com

41

CORDILLERA STUDIES CENTER

(074) 442-5794

cscpub.upbaguio@up.edu.ph

http://cordillerastudies.upb. edu.ph

42

DANRIO ENTERPRISE

T: 585-5247

43

DARKLAB PHOTOGRAPHY

924-1642

44

DE LA SALLE UNIVERSITY PUBLISHING HOUSE

T: 523-4281

dlsupublishinghouse@dlsu. edu.ph

45

DE LA SALLE-COLLEGE OF SAINT BENILDE, INC.

230-5100

46

DIVINE WORD PUBLISHING HOUSE INC.

47

MR. MICHAEL LIBERATORE

President

MS. MARIECOR G. MILITANTE

Executive Director

MR. VICENTE TAN

Marketing Head

MRS. ROSALINDA MACINAS

Accounting Head

MS. BEZALIE B. UC-KUNG

Publisher

FR. DENNIS G. TAMAYO, CMF

Executive Director

MA. THERESA E. ROMALES

Admin and Finance Manager

MS. MADONNA P. DOMINGO

Business Development Manager

MR. WILFREDO V. ALANGUI

Head, Publications Office

MS. PAULA PAMINTUAN-RIVA

University Researcher

danrio_enterprise@yahoo.com

MS. DORIS ALONZO

General Manager

pclabrador@gmail.com

URSULA PRISCILLA C. LABRADOR

Author

-

DR. DAVID JONATHAN Y. BAYOT

Executive Publisher

maryannjosette.pernia@benilde. edu.ph

https://www.benilde.edu.ph

MS. MARY ANN JOSETTE PERNIA

Head of Education & Special Projects-MCAD

T: 411-5475; 2477058

bethfabis@yahoo.com

-

DREAMBOOKS PUBLICATION

T: 587-0299

dreambookspub@yahoo.com

-

48

EPHESIANS PUBLISHING INC.

T: 927-2965

ephesians_publishing@yahoo. com

-

49

FABI’S ENTERPRISES

T: 559-5008; 2477058

bethfabis@yahoo.com

-

50

FASTBOOKS EDUCATIONAL SUPPLY, INC.

T: 743-1547; 5162585

fasteducsupply@gmail.com

-

54

MS. ELIZABETH C. FABILLARAN

President

MS. MARIA BERNADETTE R. CARRASCO

Corporate Secretary

MS. KATRINA INEZ J. CASTRO

Proprietor

MR. DANILO SORIANO

Accountung Head

MS. GINALYN ALIGANGA

Printing OIC

MS. ELIZABETH C. FABILLARAN

Proprietress

MS. JULITA M. CONCEPCION

President

MS. MENALENE P. CONCEPCION

Finance Head


No.

Company Name

Telephone

E-mail address

Website

51

FILIPINOS FOR A BETTER PHILIPPINES, INC.

506-6554

filipinosforabetterphilippines@ gmail.com

52

FLIPSIDE DIGITAL CONTENT COMPANY INC.

570-9255

admin@flipsidecontent.com

http://flipsidecontent.com/

53

FNB EDUCATIONAL, INC.

T: 926-1512

fnb.educational@yahoo.com

-

54

FORESIGHT BOOKS PUBLISHING & DISTRIBUTING CO., INC.

T: 361-7491 to 98

dlciimpex@limtuaco.com; ola@ asiandragonmagazine.com

www.asiandragonmagazine. com

55

FUTUREBUILDER PUBLICATIONS, INC.

T: 559-2015

future_builder@yahoo.com

56

GABAY ESKWELA PUBLISHING HOUSE

T: 432-9189

eskwela_publishing@yahoo. com.ph

57

GAYO PUBLISHING

958-3316

gayopublishing@gmail.com

58

GEORGESEPT PUBLISHING

364-5875; 09151182082

joylives_132@yahoo.com; mail@ georgesept.com

59

GINTONG ARAL PUBLICATIONS, INC.

T: 02-563-8673

gintong_aral@yahoo.com

60

GOANDTELL PUBLISHING INC.

531-7953; 5160799

noelbartolomegarcia@gmail. com

61

GOD-TALKS PUBLICATIONS

T: 0917-5114314

President

MS. BRENDA COLLADO

Admin Officer

MR. ERICSON JAMES PACABA

Chief Finance Officer

MR. JAN MICHAEL F. BALGAN

President President

MR. JHON JEFFREY MAGALLANES

President

-

MS. RHODORA A. DE LEON

Managing Director

-

MS. EUFRECENIA T. CEREZO

Owner

MS. MARY JOY REBOSTO

Proprietor

-

MS. JOSEPHINE R. HECITA

Acctng Manager

-

MR. NOEL B. GARCIA

Managing Director

godtalks2013@gmail.com

-

MS. REBECCA MINA N. PALOMO

President

MR. EDUARDO M. RIVERA

President

MS. EMMA A. CABABAN

Staff

REDENTOR T. GUINGAB

CEO/Managing Partner

AYUNIE V. VILLAFLOR

Managing Director

418-5551

goldencronicapub@yahoo.com

63

GOOD GOVERNANCE BOOKS

T: 430-5666

governancebooks@yahoo.com

-

gpvprint@yahoo.com.ph

65

GPV PRINTING VENTURES, INC.

T: 922-0532 / 34

gpvinc2001@gmail.com

-

66

GREAT BOOKS TRADING

T: 371-9083

greatbookstrading@gmail.com

greatbookstrading.com

67

GREAT MINDS MEDIA, INC.

288-8588

mpascua@gadgetsmagazine. com.ph

www.gadgetsmagazine. com.ph

68

HARVEN PUBLISHING HOUSE INC.

02 453 1718

harven@graymark.com.ph

HOLY ANGEL UNIVERSITY, INC. (CENTER FOR KAPAMPANGAN STUDIES)

T: (045)888-8691; 888-2902

kapampangancenter@gmail.com

70

HOPE PUBLISHING HOUSE INC.

874-1266

hopeph.ed@gmail.com

71

HUNT PUBLISHING CENTER

T: 501-6984

huntpublishingcenter13@ yahoo.com

-

72

IBON FOUNDATION, INC.

T: 927-7060 to 61 loc.301

admin@ibon.org

73

ILAW NG TAHANAN PUBLISHING, INC.

T: 813-7165

74

IMPRINT PUBLISHING

75

69

Corporate Secretary

Corporate Secretary

GOLDEN CRONICA PUBLISHING INC.

T: 920-8181

ATTY. RAMON E. RODRIGO MR. RICARDO A. SOBREVINAS

OLIVIA LIMPE-AW

62

GPV PRINTING VENTURES, CO.

Designation

EUGENIA B. POLICARPIO

www.customerservice@ goldencronicapublishing.com

64

Name of Representative

hau.edu.ph

MR. REDENTOR T. GUINGAB

CEO

MS. AYUNIE V. VILLAFLOR

Managing Director

MS. VIRGINIA P. GAPUZ

General Manager

MR. RAMIL ALMOJANO

Liaison Officer

MS. MARITESS C. PASCUA

Accounting Manager

MARILOU SUPERIO

President

MR. ROBERT P. TANTINGCO

Director, Center for Kapampangan Studies

MS. MYRA P. LOPEZ

Staff, CKS

MR. ERIC VAN Y. ZAFRA

EVP-Sales

MS. DELINA Y. ZAFRA

Business Devt Manager

MR. RAUL B. BOLANTE

Proprietor

MS. BIANCA GUTIERREZ

Clerk/Helper

www.ibon.org

MS. MELISSA F. SAN MIGUEL

Admin Officer

fran@tahananbooks.com

www.tahananbooks.com

MS. FRANCES A. ONG

Managing Editor

0917-6240196

imprintmnl@gmail.com

http://imprintmnl.wix.com/ imprint

MS. ROMINA SELINA JOSEFINA SR. CRUZ

Owner

INNOVATIVE EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS, INC.

T: 562-0819; 5635425

innovative@iemi.ph

-

76

INSTITUTE FOR INNER STUDIES PUBLISHING FOUNDATION, INC.

T: 376-5651

acctg@globalpranichealing.com; iispfiaa@gmail.com

www.iispfi.com

77

ISA-JECHO PUBLISHING, INC.

T: 922-6935; 9218289

isajecho@yahoo.com; kalayaan_ press@yahoo.com

-

78

J.C. PALABAY ENTERPRISES, INC.

T: 942-4512 to 13

jcpalabayenterprises@yahoo. com.ph

-

MS. GLORIA E. MENDOZA

President and CEO

MR. JAY E. OCAMPO

Corporate Secretary

MS. CATHERINE CHOACHUY

President

MR. CHARLES JORDAN ESPAÑA

Editor/Graphic Artist

MS. MARVA M. KWA

President

MS. CARMELITA L. PALABAY

Consultant

MR. DANTE L. BONIFACIO, JR.

General Manager

55


No.

Company Name

Telephone

E-mail address

Website

79

J.C. SOUL WINNERS PUBLISHING CORPORATION

650-5617

buena_cuy@yahoo.com

-

80

JAN CARISSE ENTERPRISES

T: 942-4512 to 13

palabayjc83@gmail.com

-

81

JEDIGAR ENTERPRISES INC.

T: 531-1212

jedigar_ent@yahoo.com

-

82

JEMMA, INCORPORATED

T:212-4503; 8554201

jemmainc@yahoo.com; mendoza_divine@yahoo.com; astorfd@yahoo.com

http://www.jemmainc.com

83

JERICOPIM PUBLISHING HOUSE

(044) 806-5207; 806-6071

jericopim@yahoo.com

-

84

JFC PUBLISHING HOUSE, INC.

(02)939-9063

jfc_publishinghouse@yahoo.com

-

85

JICA ENTERPRISES

T: 942-4512 to 13

palabayjc83@gmail.com

-

86

JO-ES PUBLISHING HOUSE, INC.

T: 291-9706/ 07

accounting@jo-espublishing. com.ph

www.jo-espublishing.com.ph

87

JOHNNY & HANSEL TRADING

518-5879; 09568417078

johnnyandhanseltrading17@ gmail.com

88

KAISA PARA SA KAUNLARAN, INC.

T: 527-6083; 5266796

kaisa.org.ph@gmail.com

89

KINGKONG ART PROJECTS UNLIMITED INC.

0920-9197024

90

KMS PUBLISHING HOUSE

91

Name of Representative MRS. BUENA CORAZON C. UY ATTY. JOSE TAN RAMIREZ MS. JEMELLIE P. GONZALES

Designation

Corporate Secretary

Owner/Proprietress

MS. BETHEL G. GARCIA

General Manager

MS. MARJORIE ANN NAVAREZ

Authorized Representative

MR. DIONISIO EDWIN PASTORFIDE

Operations Manager

MS. DIVINA MENDOZA

Procurement Officer

MS. ROWENA M. MINA

Owner/Manager

MS. CONCEPCION C. PALARCA

Vice President for Administration

MS. JEANELITA LLENES

Accounting Head

MR. DANTE L. BONIFACIO, JR.

General Manager

MS. CARMELITA L. PALABAY

Consultant

MS. MA. SOCORRO M. LUTAO

President

MS. MARY ANN M. TAN

Vice-President

MR. LOUISE CONRADO F. MARASIGAN

Owner

www.kaisa.org.ph

MS. CARMELEA ANG SEE

President

info@kingkongartprojects.com

www.kingkongartprojects.com

MS. ANGELICA BUNOAN

President

T: (045)470-8837

kmspublishing@yahoo.com

-

MS. KRISTINE ANGELA S. REDOBLE

General Manager

LAMPARA PUBLISHING HOUSE, INC.

T: 367-6222

lamparabooks@hotmail.com

www.lamparabooks.com.ph

MR. SEGUNDO D. MATIAS, JR.

General Manager

92

LAPIS PUBLISHING HOUSE

T: (063) 221-8348

lapispublishinghouse@gmail. com

MR. FORTUNATO CHRISTIAN S. GOCHUICO III

General Manager

93

LORIELLE EDUCATIONAL SUPPLIES AND MATERIALS (LESM)

T: 654-4511

lesmgalvez@yahoo.com

MR. LORENZO G. GALVEZ

Proprietor

94

LORIMAR PUBLISHING, INC.

T: 721-2715

publishedbylorimar@yahoo.com

-

95

MAGALLANES PUBLISHING HOUSE

T: 781-3423

magallanespublishing@yahoo. com

-

96

MAXCOR PUBLISHING HOUSE INC.

T: 921-1857; 4470092

info@maxcorpublishing.com

www.maxcorpublishing.com

97

MEDIA WISE COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

T: 922-7583

mediawise02@yahoo.com

98

MEGATEXTS PHIL., INC.

T: (032)253-3391

99

MERRYLAND PUBLISHING CORPORATION

100

101

102

Admin Officer Asst. Admin Officer

MS. CECILLE R. BUAN

Office Staff

MS. JOANN DELFIN

Exec. Secretary

MR. MAXIMO LUTAO (0917-5238561)

President

MR. JEROME KATIPUNAN (09228180642)

Vice-President

http://mediawise.ph

MR. RAMONCITO O. CRUZ

CEO/Publisher

inquiries@megatextsphils.com

www.megatextsphils.com

MS. JEAN TIU LIM

Chief Executive Officer

T: 531-3501

merrylandpc@gmail.com

-

METROPOLITAN BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH PUBLISHING HOUSE MINISTRY INC.

561-0822

mbbcpublishing@gmail.com

mbbeintl.com

MIGUEL P. DE LEON PUBLISHING

T: 724-2637

auapiado@yahoo.com

MINDWORX MULTIMEDIA ENT. INC.

T: 376-1989

localecityguide@gmail.com

103

MISSIONBOOK PUBLISHING INC.

T: 712-4818

bookman.missionbook@gmail. com; bookman.editorial@ gmail.com

104

MKG PUBLISHING

T: 332-7824

maryanncruzmaoy@yahoo.com

105

MUSEO NG KAALAMANG KATUTUBO, INC.

858-1000 loc. 7021

csalvina@muskkat.org; marvin. cesario@unilabfoundation.org

106

MUTYA PUBLISHING HOUSE INC.

T: 365-3405; 3653239

mutyapublishing@yahoo.com

56

MS. JULIET C. ERQUIZA MS. FRANCISCA GUARIN

-

-

MS. BETHEL G. GARCIA

General Manager

MS. MARJORIE ANN NAVAREZ

Authorized Representative

MS. RHODA ALEGRE

Corporate Secretary

MS. AMELIA APIADO

Secretary

MS. TERRY ILAGAN

Chief Marketing Head/Editor

MS. RACHEL PARCON

Admin/Bookkeeper

MS. ELIZABETH E. TARRONAS

Executive Assistant to the President

MS. MA. KATRINA C. DEL CASTILLO

Owner

MS. MARY ANN C. MAOY

Secretary

MS. CORAZON ALVINA

Museum Director

MR. MARVIN CESARIO

Finance Manager

MR. JEROME M. KATIPUNAN

VP for Operations


No.

Company Name

Telephone

E-mail address

Website

Name of Representative

Designation

107

NATIONAL HISTORICAL COMMISSION OF THE PHILIPPINES

254-7482

publications@nhcp.gov.ph

www.nhcp.gov.ph

MS. CHRISTINE G. DULNUAN

Senior History Researcher

108

NEO ASIA PUBLISHING, INC.

T: 461-7739; 4613090

neoasiapublishing@yahoo. com.ph

-

109

OMF LITERATURE, INC.

T: 531-4303 loc. 406; 532-2132

gladyscalalang@omflit.com

www.omflit.com

110

OPTIMUS PUBLISHING, INC.

522-8754; 7112518

optimus_publishing@yahoo.com

-

111

OVT-GRAPHIC LINE INC.

T: 882-4119

gline862003@yahoo.com

-

112

PAGEJUMP EDITORIAL SERVICES

0917-8609623

projects@pagejumpmedia.com

www.pagejumpmedia.com

MR. CARLITO H. ALCODIA

President

MS. VIRGINIA C. ALCODIA

VP/Mktg Director

MS. MYRNA S. REYES

Publishing & Corporate Communications Director

MS. GLADYS CALALANG-DORONILA

Distribution and Supply Chain Director

MS. JULIE S. SAMSON

Business Devt Officer

MS. SHERYL ANN TANTIANGCO

Business Devt Officer

MS. ARLENE T. BESMONTE

Corporate Secretary

MR. RAYMOND CALBAY (0938-0388210)

Executive Publisher

ANNE QUINTOS (0917-8609623) MS. TERESITA FABIONAR

Managing Director

113

PETWINDRA MEDIA INC.

742-5749

petwindramediainc@yahoo.com

Admin

114

PHILIPPINE BIBLE SOCIETY, INC.

T: 526-7777; 9847054

info@bible.org.ph

www.bible.org.ph

115

PHILIPPINE CENTER FOR INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM, INC. (PCIJ)

T: 431-9204

pcij@pcij.org; admin@pcij.org

-

116

PLATINUM PUBLICATIONS

044-3222572

publications.platinum2017@ gmail.com

117

PLL PUBLISHING HOUSE

T: 930-9833

pllpublishinghouse@gmail.com

-

MS. PURITA L. LUCZON

General Manager

118

PRECIOUS PAGES CORPORATION

T:367-6222

phromances@hotmail.com

www.phr.com.ph

MR. SEGUNDO D. MATIAS, JR.

President/General Manager

119

PSICOM PUBLISHING, INC.

911-3196

psicom@psicompublishing.com

www.psicompublishing.com

MS. JENNIFER GABRIEL

VP Operations

120

REX BOOKSTORE, INC.

T: 857-7777

wecare@rexpublishing.com.ph

www.rexpublishing.com.ph

121

RLI GALLERY SYSTEMS, INC.

T: 632-821-7181

gallery@gop.com.ph; ceo@ lietz.com

122

SAINT JUDE CATHOLIC SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, INC.

242-0192; 09178170099

secretariat@sjcsaa.com; maleencsia@gmail.com

123

SALINLAHI PUBLISHING HOUSE, INC.

893-1993

sphi.hr@gmail.com

124

SEDPI FOUNDATION, INC.

433-8795

info@sedpi.com; roafallas@ gmail.com

www.sedpi.com

125

SENTRO NG WIKANG FILIPINOUNIBERSIDAD NG PILIPINAS DILIMAN

924-4747

swf@upd.edu.ph

sentrofilipino.upd.edu.ph

126

SIBS PUBLISHING HOUSE, INC.

T: 376-4041; 3751640 loc 107

service@phoenix.com.ph

127

SMARTBOOKS PUBLISHING

361-4650

smartbooks04@yahoo.com

128

SOLINE PUBLISHING COMPANY INC.

(032) 414-0736

129

ST. ANDREW PUBLISHING HOUSE

130

ST. AUGUSTINE PUBLICATIONS, INC.

MS. NORA G. LUCERO

General Secretary

MS. LAURA M. VALLEDO

Production Manager

MS. MARIA LOURDES C. MANGAHAS

Executive Director

RODINDO G. CABINTA

General Manager

MS. MARY JANE POLAN

GMD Officer

MR. IAN KEITH BASAN

PDO Manager

-

MS. ELIZABETH S.P. LIETZ

President

www.sjcsaa.com

MS. STELLA SIA

Treasurer

Mr. FERNANDO L. PASCUAL

President

Ms. ROVIELYN BALAGBAGAN

HR Officer

MR. REZ S. OAFALLAS

Finance Liaison Officer

MR. ROMMEL B. RODRIGUEZ

Director

MS. MA. EVANGELINE O. GUEVARRA

Admin Officer

www.sibs.com.ph

MS. TINA DEL ROSARIO

Purchasing Manager

-

MS. SALUD B. VILLA

Proprietress

solinepublishing@gmail.com

MS. IRIS NIKKI OGUIS 0923-9034552

Business Unit Manager

(044) 794-1020

st.andrewpublishinghouse15@ gmail.com

TEODY C. SAN ANDRES

President

T: 749-7889

st.augustinepublicationsinc@ yahoo.com

-

MS. NANCY B. CLEOFE

Accounts Coordinator

MR. MANUEL T. MACARAEG

Sales Operation Mgr.

MS. REMIE V. CAGUETE

Circulation Head

131

ST. BERNADETTE PUBLISHING HOUSE CORPORATION

T: 413-5957

sbphc_editorial@yahoo.com;

MS. VIRGINIA AGAPITO

HR Department Head

132

ST. CLARE PUBLICATIONS CORP.

T: 413-5957

sbphc_editorial@yahoo.com

-

MS. VIRGIE AGAPITO

HRD-Head

133

ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI PUBLICATIONS

T: 731-9872

sfap95@yahoo.com.ph

-

ENGR. RENATO V. MARIANO

Manager/Owner Bookkeeper

134

ST. MARTIN DE PORRES PUBLICATION

T: (046)781-0841

lucycarrasco_59@yahoo.com

-

MS. LUCIA RAS CARRASCO

Owner

135

ST. MARY’S PUBLISHING CORPORATION

T: 822-3543; 8230017

stmaryspublishingcorp@smpc. com.ph

www.smpc.com.ph

MR. JOSEPH H. SEBUA

Admin Officer

136

ST. MATTHEW’S PUBLISHING CORPORATION

T: 426-5611

stmpcorp@yahoo.com;

stmatthewspublishing.ph

MR. RAYMUND S. CATABIJAN

President/General Manager

MS. RUTH VALORIE D. CATABIJAN

Business Development Manager

57


No.

Company Name

Telephone

E-mail address

Website

Name of Representative

Designation

137

STA. TERESA PUBLICATIONS, INC.

T: 410-0700

remiecaguete@yahoo.com

-

MS. REMIE V. CAGUETE

Circulation Supervisor

138

STUDIO 5 DESIGNS INCORPORATED

T: 895-4040

marilyo@yahoo.com; odetharbas@yahoo.com

-

139

SUNRISE PUBLICATION HAUZ, INC.

T: 386-6574

sunrisepublicationhauz_inc@ yahoo.com

-

140

SUNSHINE INTERLINKS PUBLISHING HOUSE, INC.

T: 425-1015; 4251040

sunshine.publishing@yahoo. com; production_siphi@yahoo. com

http://www.sunshineinterlinks. com

141

THE BOOKMARK, INC.

T: 895-8061 to 65

bookmark1945@gmail.com

bookmarkthefilipinobookstore. com.ph

142

THE CROWN BOOK GROUP, INC. doing business under any of the following names and styles: THE KITCHEN BOOKSTORE, ANAHAW BOOKS, THE FICTION BOOKSTORE, AND RPD PUBLICATIONS

465-9254

info@thecrownbookgroup.com

www.thecrownbookgroup.com

143

THE FOOKIEN TIMES YEARBOOK PUBLISHING CO., INC.

T: 722-9622

philsyearbook@gmail.com

-

355-4099

theinteligente.information@ gmail.com; theinteligente. editorial@gmail.com

144

THE INTELIGENTE PUBLISHING INC.

145

THE LIBRARY PUBLISHING HOUSE, INC.

T: 961-4911

librarypublishing@gmail.com

-

146

THE PHOENIX PUBLISHING HOUSE, INC.

T: 375-1640

service@phoenix.com.ph

www.phoenix.com.ph

147

THE PRESIDING ELDER OF THE PHILIPPINE BIBLE BROADCASTERS APOSTOLATE, INC. (BACK TO THE BIBLE BOOKSTORE)

T: 372-1775

marketing@backtothebible. org.ph

www.backtothebible.org.ph

148

THE PROVINCIAL SUPERIOR OF THE PIOUS SOCIETY OF THE DAUGHTERS OF ST. PAUL, INC. (PAULINES PUBLISHING HOUSE)

832-2100 local 1405

pscpmpt@paulines.ph

149

TOUCHLIFE GLOBAL FOUNDATION, INC.

MS. MARILY Y. OROSA

President

MS. LOURDES P. ARBAS

Admin Officer

MS. IRMA SORIANO

President

MS. JOAN M. PINEDA

Sales and Marketing

MS. ABIGAILLE ENRIQUEZ

Production

MS. ANA MA. T. DELFIN

General Manager

MS. MA. SOLEDAD G. AQUINO

HR Manager

MR. JOSE MIGUEL ANGELES

President

MR. RAJIV DASWANI

Vice-President

MS. GRACE GLORY GO

Chairperson & CEO

MS. LERMA EBIO

Sales Supervisor

TYDING F. MALAÑGEN

President

JENNIE BELLE PADILLA

Textbook Editor

MS. BERNARDITA Y. NAGUIT

President/CEO

MS. LUCY S. YAMAT

Accounting Clerk

MS. TINA DEL ROSARIO

Purchasing Manager

MS. DIGNA CAMACHO

Managing Director

MR. DANIEL RAMOS

Marketing Supervisor

SR. PURIFICACION BARIENTOS, FSP

Councilor on Apostolate

MS. RUBI T. LIM T: 287-1754

a.flores@touchlifeglobal.com

www.touchlifeglobal.com

MS. CECILIA CALIXTERIO MR. ALEXANDER FLORES

150

UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES PRESS

T: 928-2558

UNLIMITED BOOKS LIBRARY SERVICES & PUBLISHING INC.

T: (02) 502-2017

152

UST PUBLISHING HOUSE

153

up_press@yahoo.com; press@ up.edu.ph

press.up.edu.ph

unlimitedbooks2014@yahoo. com

www.unlimitedbooksph.com

T: 731-3522

publishing@ust.edu.ph

ust.edu.ph

VIBAL FOUNDATION, INC.

T: 580-7400

inquire@vibalgroup.com

www.vibalgroup.com

154

VIBAL GROUP, INC.

T: 580-7400; 1-800-1000-Vibal (84225)

inquire@vibalgroup.com

www.vibalgroup.com

155

VICARISH PUBLICATIONS AND TRADING INC.

T: 564-7844

vicarish@yahoo.com; vicarish. hr@gmail.com; vicarish.bdrd@ gmail.com

-

156

VISPRINT, INC.

T: 845-2703

book_inquiry@visprint.net; bestbookproposal@visprint.net

www.visprint.net

151

WEST VISAYAS STATE UNIVERSITY

T: (033)320-3508

urgp@wvsu.edu.ph

wvsu.edu.ph

158

WIZARD PUBLISHING HAWS, INC.

(045)491-3696

wizadpublishing@gmail.com

-

159

WORK OF MARY OR FOCOLARE MOVEMENT FOR MEN, INC. (CATHOLIC BOOK CENTER)

T: 524-6347 ; 527-4757

cathbookcenter@gmail.com

-

160

YOUNIQUE PUBLISHING

T: 0998-5770248

info@jaysonlo.com

-

Senior Account Executive Deputy Director

MS. ANNA JHORIE P. ARCIGA

CBM III

MS. CAROLINA F. CUADRA

Manager

MR. ROLDAN A. RODRIGUEZ

157

58

MR. GERARDO T. LOS BAÑOS

President & CEO Publication Coordinator/ Acct Exec.

Office Staff

MR. JOHN JACK G. WIGLEY

Director

MR. GASPAR A. VIBAL

Executive Director

MS. ROSALIA E. EUGENIO

Managing Editor

MS. CORAZON F. MARASIGAN

VP for Sales and Acquisitions

MS. GLENDA J. TORIO

Head of Acquisitions for Govt

MS. LEONOR V. MODINA

President

MS. FLORNIDA G. RAMIREZ

Publishing Manager

MS. KYRA BALLESTEROS

Managing Editor

PROF. JENNY C. CALABIO

URGP Director

MR. RAMON D. ISIDORO

President

MS. LEOH KRISTEL T. ISIDORO

Corp. Secretary

MR. NATHANIEL M. ASPRER

Operations Manager

MR. JAYSON L. LO

Proprietor


59


http://nbdb.gov.ph F National Book Development Board L NBDB_PHIL I nbdb_phil

Bookwatch Vol. 21 No. 3  

This issue of Bookwatch puts a spotlight on Philippine literature for children and young adults.

Bookwatch Vol. 21 No. 3  

This issue of Bookwatch puts a spotlight on Philippine literature for children and young adults.

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