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[Ebook free] The Divine Wind

The Divine Wind Garry Disher ebooks | Download PDF | *ePub | DOC | audiobook

#5338662 in Books 2004-07-01Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 .43 x 4.16 x 6.88l, #File Name: 0439369169160 pages | File size: 69.Mb Garry Disher : The Divine Wind before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Divine Wind: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. A delightful story!By Brenda TelfordMichael and Ita Penrose had lived in Broome, Western Australia a lot of years their two children, Hartley and Alice were friends with Mitsy


Sennosuke, the Japanese daughter of Zeke and Sadako. Michael was a pearling master, running six luggers which were crewed by a mixture of nationalities, but always with a Japanese diver aboard each lugger. Zeke worked for Michael as the diver on his leading lugger, the Ita Penrose - the love of Michael and Ita preserved by words but Ita wasnt happy in Broome; she missed her home in England and her elderly parents.Mitsy was born in Broome, but the fact that she was of Japanese descent irritated Ita the children played anywhere but each others homes, often spending time in the darkness of the movies together. Hart fell in love with Mitsys beauty and good humour during that time and the two of them became very close.When Hart was seventeen, Ita returned to England to be with her dying father it was 1939 and World War II followed shortly afterwards. And so began the prejudice and hatred toward the Japanese many who had lived in Broome their whole lives; been born in Australia; hadnt even been to Japan. But the internment started and friends of long standing were locked up and looked upon with suspicion.In an Australia devastated by war, the lives of Mitsy, Hart and Alice were destined to change they grew up fast; adapted to the changes quickly though not seamlessly. As they left their childhoods behind, their futures looked increasingly bleak would they remain friends? And would they survive the horrors of war?The Divine Wind by Aussie author Garry Disher was first published in 1998 and has been republished many times since. Its a wonderful little book which looks at friendship and the changes that occur through no fault of our own. I thoroughly enjoyed looking at the Broome of WW2, the historical aspect of it and the coming of age of three young people. I have no hesitation in recommending this novel highly.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Informative on the social setting and life on Australia's hot homefront in WWIIBy keetmomI know Garry Disher as a writer of crime caper novels so was surprised to see a more sentimental side to his output in "The Divine Wind". This is not a polished literary work, but I found the historical setting and details fascinating. As a primer on working class life in Western Australia in the 1930s, the outbreak of WWII, the Japanese bombings of Darwin and Broome, war panic and the incarceration of Japanese residents of Australia, the book made very interesting reading. I also enjoyed Disher's little dig at Ernestine Hill's publications on the wilder aspects of early settlements in WA, doffing his cap in a humourous way in tribute to this intrepid journalist of the 1930s.2 of 2 people found the following review helpful. Richie's Picks: THE DIVINE WINDBy N. S.THE DIVINE WIND: A LOVE STORY is a tense and riveting read set on the northwest Australian coast at the dawn of the Second World War. I don't care that its fiction--I will be clenching my fists for days as I recall the results of the havoc wrecked by the insanity of the adult world upon the story's three young central characters: Hart, who narrates the story, his sister Alice, and Alice's best friend Mitsy Sennosuke--a girl of Japanese parents.Before moving to California as a young man, I had never heard of the Japanese internment during World War II--nope, it wasn't ever mentioned in the history books they used back on the East Coast in my youth. So, I am not at all surprised to learn from THE DIVINE WIND that a similar "procedure" took place in Australia. Nor am I shocked by the manner in which the Australian white supremacists in the book treat individuals of the various nonwhite groups. But the way in which those prejudices and the War engulf the three young people and totally screw up what should have been their idyllic young lives brought me to the verge of utter despair as I read page after page of Hart's touching love story:"I fell in love with Mitsy in the darkness of the tinwalled cinema in Sheba Lane, where cowboys roamed the range and airmen spies slipped away from foreign countries in the light of the moon, and great white hunters saved beautiful women from maddened rogue elephants."In the daylight, Mitsy was a separate being, slim and restless and full of jokes and mischief like Alice, but when the lights were dimmed and the screen glowed with lovers and heroes, she would grow quiet and still, and settle in her seat, and imperceptibly shift until her shoulder and knee touched mine. Alice, on the other side of her, would crane her head around and meet my gaze, but never say anything, or tease, just as Mitsy would never acknowledge the intimacy when the lights came on at the end but simply treat me as one of the gang again. I sometimes thought that I dreamed of her."In stark contrast to the other white adult characters, Hart and Alice's father, Michael Penrose, is the one that I'd want to know. A complex, good-hearted guy who makes one awful mistake, he repeatedly stands up and speaks loudly for what is right. In addition, the colorful, multiethnic supporting cast is a lively crowd that had me smiling despite the horrors that they frequently bore the brunt of.THE DIVINE WIND: A LOVE STORY takes us to a rugged and beautiful place at a tough time in history and introduces us to three young people who I hope are still out there somewhere--old and at peace.Richie Partington[...] Like "Snow Falling on Cedars," a beautifully written and deeply moving love story set against the racial tensions of a small Australian pearl-diving town on the eve of World War II.On the eve of WWII, suspicion runs rampant in Hartley Penrose's small town. Even though they've done nothing wrong, the town is turning against its native Japanese residents - including Mitsy Sennosuke, the girl Hart loves despite himself. The result is a wrenching, unforgettable story of romance, betrayal, and the turmoils that rock both the world and the heart. From Publishers Weekly"You could say that this is a story about friendship, and the betrayal of friendship, and friendships lost and regained," notes the narrator of this often elegant but just as often elusive novel from Australia. Set in the seaside town of Broome in northwestern Australia, it opens in 1946, when Hart Penrose son of a pearl lugger and a race-conscious Englishwoman begins looking back at his complicated relationship with Mitsy Senosuke,


daughter of Japanese immigrants. He thinks about the years before the war, especially his 17th birthday, when he falls in love with Mitsy and worries about Jamie Kilian, a rival for Mitsy's affections. Disher offers plenty of drama: Hart's mother returns to England; Hart is almost lost at sea in a cyclone but is saved by Mitsy's father, who drowns; an Aborigine is framed for assault; the war breaks out; Jamie enlists but Hart, injured from the accident at sea, cannot. The Japanese residents of Broome come under suspicion as the Australians increasingly fear invasion, and Hart's loyalties are tested, especially when his sister Alice, an army nurse, is reported missing after Japanese bombers attack her ship. While Disher (The Bamboo Flute) does a superb job of recreating the tensions of the period, the central bond between Hart and Mitsy feels flimsy, more stated than demonstrated, and Mitsy herself doesn't come to life. Despite the subtitle, this is less likely to engage readers looking for a love story than those with a strong interest in the setting. Ages 14-up.Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.From School Library JournalGrade 9 Up-Winner of a young adult literature prize in Australia, this novel tackles mature themes of love and prejudice against the backdrop of World War II. Its circular structure begins and ends in 1946 as Hart is waiting for Mitsy, the young JapaneseAustralian woman he loves, to return to him following the war. As he backtracks and describes their life in the small coastal town of Broome on the eve of and during the early years of the war, readers grow to understand how complicated Hart's life is. Mitsy is his sister's best friend and the daughter of one of his pearling-master father's divers; despite the ups and downs in their relationship, her family remains closely connected to his even as they experience loss, racism, and internment. Notable for its vivid sense of place, its complex characters, and an abundance of action, this book will be most appreciated by readers familiar with history, who will notice the many similarities between the way that some people in the United States and Australia thought of and treated their native peoples, and in the treatment of the Japanese during the war.Ellen Fader, Multnomah County Library, Portland, ORCopyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.From Booklist*Starred * Gr. 9-12. Set in a small northwest Australian coastal town, this WWII story is about friends and enemies close to home. It's also about love and family heartaches and discovering personal courage and betrayal. After the war, Hartley Penrose tells his story, looking back to 1938 when he was 16, and he and his sister, Alice, were best friends with Mitsi Sennosuke, who was born of Japanese Parents and raised in Australia. With a big cast and an action-filled plot, Disher creates a vital, physical sense of the place as well as the secrets of the community. Even before the war, the official and personal racism is clear, toward "Japs" and also toward Aborigines, who are looked on as black "impurities" in the way of the white immigrant settlers. The characters are drawn without sentimentality. Mitsi is angry as well as loving; submissive at home, raucous with her friends. For a brief, rapturous period, Hartley and Mitsi are lovers, but then he's torn between loyalties. Readers will recognize the political parallels with the U.S., as well as the personal truth of how feelings can change from friendship and love to hate and indifference--and maybe back again. Hazel RochmanCopyright American Library Association. All rights reserved

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