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BONNIE NETEL

bonnie.b.netel@gmail.com


CONTENTS SPATIAL SUBVERSION_6 SYNQ_14 Recycling Cities_16 Bushwick Inclusive_20 Visualizing the NYC Budget Process_24 reViewing the Parkway_26 [CINE]City_30 Freedom by Design | Mrs. Bailey_32 Harvesting the Future_34 Living Paradox_38


TIMELINE OF WORK

Freedom by Design | Mrs. Bailey

Freedom by Design Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Completed Fall 2012

Living Paradox

ACSA Steel Competition Entry Semester Studio Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Spring 2011

Reviewing the Parkway

Undergraduate Thesis Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Fall 2011-Spring 2012 Harvesting the Future Comprehensive Studio Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Fall 2011

[Cine] City

John Stewardson Memorial Competition Honorable Mention Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Spring 2012


Visualizing the New York City Budget Process Fall 2012

Bushwick Inclusive Semester Studio Bushwick, New York Spring 2013

Recycling Cities

Atlantis Educational Program Lido, Venice, Italy June 28-July 8, 2013

Spatial Subversion Master’s Thesis Queens, New York 2013-Present SYNQ

ENYA Ideas Competition Queens, New York 2014


SPATIAL|SUBVERSION AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Suite, Quantam GIS

We do not see something unless it has been brought to our attention first. (Legal) street food vending is limited to the standard stainless steel cart because it has to meet food handling criteria and has to be a certain size on the street. However, we only see the cart. We don’t see that a vendor will be fined if they have stepped away for a moment to use the restroom. We, as passerby, don’t see at first glance that a vendor can be fined $1000 for being within ten feet of a crosswalk. Is it simple to say that empowerment for the vendor would be obtained if the general public were strategically informed of such instances? Or, should we continue to watch videos of carts being seized and crushed by the Parks and Recreation Department because a vendor didn’t have a permit?

Applies for

Restricted Permit to vend

Department of

Parks and Recreation Office of Administrative Trail and Hearings

STREET FOOD

VENDOR Applies for

Permit for the Cart

License to Vend Food

if a No ven tic do eo rr f V ece iol iv ati es on a :

one of the 4 Tribunals of: “enforced” by:

Department of

Police

Health Tribunal

through Processed by: mitigates process to make sure vendor has tax clearance Department of

Finance

Department of

Department of

Health and Mental Hygiene Sets guidelines for permit and license

contest in court through the:

Consumer Affairs 1996 Intra-City Agreement set to connect DOHMH & DCA

Mimics DOHMH regulations

Diagramming the agents and processes required in order for a vendor to vend food on the street.

I will use the same laws that restrict street food vendors as the means of highlighting authoritative control of the vendor and his or her practice. The hope is that awareness and empathy are created amongst the happenings of people and everyday to place pressure on those political decisions. However, the first step is to highlight that street food that we see and pass by on a daily basis is the product of someone else’s story.

3-part storyboard to highlight the matrix of control in which the vendor is entwined.


7

History of street food vending, as organized by Mayoral decision and the development of mobile vending laws over time.


DECONSTRUCTING MOBILE FOOD VENDING PROCESSING A

B

NON-PROCESSING C

D

FOODS INCLUDE: prepackaged frozen desserts, prepackaged sandwiches, and prepackaged and presliced fruits and vegetables

FOODS INCLUDE: grilled or fried meats, sausages, poultry, shish kebab, hamburgers, eggs and gyros.

E

FOODS INCLUDE: only non-potentially hazardous uncut fruits and vegetables are sold or held for sale or service.

FOODS INCLUDE: sandwiches prepared on the unit, raw fruits, vegetables and salads, breads, bagels and rolls buttered or topped with cream cheese on the unit, smoothies and soft serve ice cream.

FOODS INCLUDE: brewed coffee and tea, donuts, pastries, rolls and bagels buttered or topped with cream cheese at a commissary, popcorn, cotton candy, nuts, candied nuts, soft pretzels, and chestnuts, regardless of whether such foods are heated for aesthetic purposes.

Matrix of classifications for food vending, highlighting the dffierences between processing and non-processing vendors.


9

SPATIAL VIOLATIONS

A

Article 17-307: Judge determines the fine for carts that are in bus stop, w/in10 ft. of crosswalk/subway/driveway

B

Article 17-307: Judge determines the fine for carts that are against a building or structure

C

Article 89: $1000 fine for failing to have a permit decal on the cart

D

Article 89: $1000 fine for the cart not abutting the curb

E

Article 89: $400 fine for the cart taking up more than 10 feet of linear space on the sidewalk

F

Article 17-307: Judge determines the fine for carts that are on a sidewalk less than 12’ wide.

*

Chapter 6.01 24R RCNY- $200-$400 fine for non-processing cart selling processing food

*

Article 17-307: Judge determines the fine for carts that are vending at restricted time or place

12

F B

C: $1000

’-0

E: $400 ”

’-0

10

D: $1000

A

Laws regarding the construction of the cart specifically.

Visualizing law violations and fines for a misplaced cart in public space.


Environmental Control Board Promulgation of Rule July 3, 2013

hearing s public

Rules of the City of New York (RCNY) FOOD CONTACT SURFACES NON-FOOD CONTACT SURFACES

OATH: Office of Administrative Trials & Hearings

Street Ve Proje (SVP Vamos Unidos

Proposed Rule October 16, 2013

Vending Prohibited Within 20 Feet of Residential Building Exits Vending Prohibited Next to No-Standing Zones at Hospitals and Health Facilities Changes to Multiple Offense Schedule Vending in bus stop, sidewalk next to a hospital or health facility no standing zone or within 10 ft. of driveway, subway, crosswalk, [etc.] Green Cart umbrella not opened while vending 24 RCNY [6-01 (m)] 6-07(b) Green Cart umbrella not safely secured or in good condition or repair 24 RCNY [6-01 (m)] 6-07(b) Stand or goods against display window or within 20 ft. of entrance of any building or within 20 feet from exits, including service exits, to buildings that are exclusively residential at street level Admin. Code 20-465(d) Vending in bus stop, taxi stand, sidewalk next to a hospital or health facility no standing zone, or within 10 ft. of drive/subway/corner Admin. Code 20-465(e) Vending within 20 ft. of sidewalk cafes; within 5 ft of bus shelters, newsstands, public telephones, disabled access ramps Admin. Code 20-465(q)

Permit decal not visible and/or obstructed. 24 RCNY 6-04(b)(3)

$500

Using mobile unit for sleeping or residential purposes 24 RCNY 6-04

Vending non-food items 24 RCNY 6-03(f)

Unit exceeds length or width restrictions or longer side of unit not placed parallel to curb 24 RCNY 6-06(a)

$200

Food contact surfaces not maintained in good repair, or not clean 24 RCNY 6-04(a) Non-food contact surfaces not maintained in good repair or not clean 24 RCNY 6-04(b)

$200

Insufficient ventilation 24 RCNY 6-04(d)

Insufficient lighting or unshielded light bulbs 24 RCNY 6-04(c)

No partition or a partition without a self-closing door installed in truck 24 RCNY 6-04(b)(4)

$200

Insufficient or no potable water 24 RCNY 6-04(f) Handwash sink inaccessible or unobstructed 24 RCNY 6-04(i)(1)(A)

$500

No "wash hands" sign posted. 24 RCNY 6-04(i)(1)(F)

No soap, paper towel/other hand drying device 24 RCNY 6-04(i)(1)(E)

Insufficient or no potable running water for handwash sink. 24 RCNY 6-04(i)(1)(B)

$200

Commissary contract not kept on unit or made available for inspection 24 RCNY 6-11(g)

Unit unsecured when left unattended more than 30 minutes. 24 RCNY 6-04(p)

No thermometers in cold or hot storage units 24 RCNY 6-04(l)(1)

$500

$200

$500

$500

$500

$275

$200

$275

Promulgates the following rule that amends Section 3-107 of Subchapter G of Chapter 3 of Title 48 of the Rules of the City of New York (“Food Vendor Administrative Code Penalty Schedule”) and Section 3-109 of Subchapter G of Chapter 3 of Title 48 of the Rules of the City of New York (“General Vendor Penalty Schedule.

$200

Visualizing all thesis research topics in one space to determine the inherent connections between them. This also assists in pinpointing areas for action and opportunity.

gives vendor a ticket

PHYSICALITY

tend tative at represen

Police Officer E

provide legal assistance to advocate against and fight tickets

NON-PROCESSING

LAWS & REGULATIONS Health Code Chapter 6

Multiple Offense Schedule (MOS) 17-325: Penalties Legislation: Int. No. 434-A

Local Law to Amend Section 17-325

D

Laws of New York PROCESSING C

B

Intro 324

Permit regular inspections Provide to the commissioner or officer name of commissary Do not use unauthorized food Surrender license upon revocation, suspension or expiration 17-314: Duties of licensees and permittees. Loc

Am w to al La

City Council Committe on Consumer Affairs A

Committe on Immigration

License must be worn on being Permit must be fixed to the cart 17-311: Display of license or plate. New York City Administrative Code (NEW) end

Sec

tion

07 17-3

17-307: Licenses, permits required; restrictions; term. Subchapter 2: Food Vendor

17-308: Fees

17-315: Restrictions on the placement of vehicles and pushcarts


11

Community District 3 $500,000 discretionary funds

NYC Plaza Program

$2 Million

Andy Wiley-Schwartz, an assistant commissioner

Councilman Daniel Dromm

Department of Transportation

DIVERSITY PLAZA (37th Road Pedestrian Plaza)

Jackson Heights Beautification Group

SUKHI NY: Social Uplift through Knowledge & Hope Initiatives

TAKES CARE OF PLANS EVENTS FOR

PRODUCED

Department of Consumer Affairs

VENDOR

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT Department of Health and Hygiene

US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

endor ect P)

Hibridos Collective Jackson Heights Arts Festival

Commissary/ Food Manufacturer Cart Manufacturer

World Health Organization (WHO)

Restaurants

Queens Council on the Arts

OPPOSITION

F

RO

DE

UN

FO

Political and Communal Programming Work around immigration rights and reform for the neighborhood

FOUNDER OF

Restricted Streets

Neighborhood Plaza Partnership Advisory Board

NYC Gov.

Bronx River Alliance HR&A Advisors NYC Department of Parks New York Restoration Project Trust for Public Land Horticultural Society of New York Institute for Transportation & Development Policy New Yorkers for Parks MIG Planning & Design Capalino+Company Time Times Square Alliance Day NYC DOT Location

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Queens Agha Saleh Internet Café owner

Shazia Kausar Bombay Chat café owner

new crime

business dropped

Mohammed Pier president of the Jackson Heights Bangladeshi Business Association customers come to shop, not sit

Shiv Dass Jackson Heights Merchants Association hurting businesses

http://www.streetsblog.org/2012/08/20/jackson-heights-turnaround-business-owners-will-help-maintain-plaza/ http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20131014/jackson-heights/diversity-plaza-get-more-seating-improved-lighting


Heat map of ticket violations in Manhattan.

Mapping all vendors and points of infuence around Diversity Plaza.


13

Overlaying multiple lenses for viewing one Halal vendor in Diversity Plaza.

Recognizing unpermitted vendors in public space in Queens.


SYNQ |“Queensway� Ideas Competiton Rhinoceros, AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Suite

SYNQ, formerly known as the Ozone Park Station, draws upon the characteristics of a vibrant and diverse neighborhood to reinvent the abandoned railway. Since the closure of the station, the site houses multiple businesses that provide services for the community. Therefore, preservation is just as important as the design intervention. SYNQ proposes activating the ground plane by introducing a continuous pedestrian artery (path) beginning and ending on grade at 101st Avenue between 99th and 100th streets. The path provides two modes of entering SYNQ. It will climb the exterior of the old station for a more direct access to the top or you may enter through the multilevel marketplace. The marketplace is unified with the path thus allowing unrestricted natural circulation. Upon arrival, the topography rises to form spaces & surfaces for evolving program such as open lawns, community meeting spaces, theater, performance, and other cultural [recreational] activities. The canopied porous skin, which encloses the path climbing the exterior of the old station, exposes the movement of people as they continue to traverse through SYNQ. A double height green space is embedded along the way where an orchestral seating area overlooking into the space converges and harmonizes with an integrated water collection system to sustain the trees. This vision for the abandoned railway will serve as a commons in which business owners, families, and visitors take co-ownership of the space. The evolution of this design will allow the community to control the space based on immediate needs. SYNQ represents the initial spark for more imaginative uses for the cultural greenway.

Above: Initial sketches for blending infrastructure, water collection, and public gathering spaces. Right: Competition board submittal for ENYA Ideas Competition with David Flecha, Nickolas Batis, and Ruben Ramales.


Water Collection System through Landscape Pieces

Landscaped Stair Leading from 103rd Avenue

15

A

Section through Outdoor Orchestral Green Space

Native Species Used in SYNQ Baptisia Alba

Asclepias tuberosa

B

A

Nassella tenuissima

Section through Cultural Landscaping and Existing Business

B Carex pensylvanica

C

View from Ramp , Transgressing the Side of SYNQ

99th Street and 101st Avenue

MACRO STRATEGY:

SYNQ links to the larger cultural greenway initiative in Queens, connecting and drawing from Forest Park

LOCAL STRATEGY:

Preservation of businesses, inserting program on grade for the community

INTERNAL STRATEGY: LOOP wrapping businesses with circulation to provide access to the top of the railway

CULTURAL LANDSCAPING:

providing spaces for people in the community within landscape coves above the rails

C Section through Market Space, One Point of Entry to SYNQ

99th Street and 103rd Avenue

Above 99th Street and 101st Avenue

SYNQ, formerly known as the Ozone Park Station, draws upon the characteristics of a vibrant and diverse neighborhood to reinvent the abandoned railway. Since the closure of the station, the site houses multiple businesses that provide services for the community. Therefore, preservation is just as important as the design intervention. SYNQ proposes activating the ground plane by introducing a continuous pedestrian artery (path) beginning and ending on grade at 101st Avenue between 99th and 100th streets. The path provides two modes of entering SYNQ. It will climb the exterior of the old station for a more direct access to the top or you may enter through the multilevel marketplace. The marketplace is unified with the path thus allowing unrestricted natural circulation. The vision we have for the abandoned railway will serve as a commons in which business owners, families, and visitors take co-ownership of the space. The evolution of our design will allow the community to control the space based on immediate needs. SYNQ represents the initial spark for more imaginative uses for the cultural greenway.

SYNQ

006


Recycling Cities Adobe Creative Suite, Film, Interviewing

How can the term “embodied energy� be stretched in all its capacities in particular to the Veneto region? Embodied energy often refers to the harnessing of energy, its use for the manufacture of a product and the return. We latch onto the characterization of this term, mulling over the idea that the present ingenuity of people is a resource that needs to be further highlighted as that--energy that propels movement. Specifically, the fate of Ospedale al Mare, a derelict hospital complex off the coast of Venice, Italy’s Lido Island is currently undetermined. There is a lively community of musicians, architects, experimental gardeners, students, housewives, unemployed and migrant persons currently using the site and creating social and cultural value there every day. Many of these individuals come to the Ospedale for shelter, and the majority use it as a communal space to collectively try out new ideas, to share stories, create works of art and reimagine the present and future of Lido and greater Venice.

Matrix of images that include people interviewed to learn about Lido, the theater space, the model from recycled materials, and sociogramming workshop.


17

LAVORI MANUALI ACQUA PIPES TO ALL FLOORS FERRO REPAIR RUST

LAVORI QUOTIDIANI

LAVORI CANTIERE

[Che possono fare tutti]

erbacce WEEDS pulizie vaprie CLEANINGS riempire secchi xl wc FILL BUCKETS FOR WC bere piante WATER PLANTS spese varie SHOPPINGS

EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

MURI WALL

ESTERNI [out]

INTERNI [in]

PAVIMENTI TILES VETRI GLASS

MAGAZZINO WAREHOUSE

PORTICO PORCH

organizzare

impalcatura

sigurezza

pulizia

inventario

CLEAN + REPAIR GROUND

legna

SPIAGGA [Giardino] PROJECT TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO MANAGE

TEATRO APERTO

RISCALDAMENTO HEAT ENTRATA

sigurezza CHECK STRUCTURE + MAKE SAFE

legna WOOD ENTRANCE

TRANSFORM TO BE CLEANER & MORE ORGANIZED -NOT A MUSEUM BUT AN INCLUSIVE INVITING PLACE

Work schedule drawn by a member of the community at the abandoned hospital in Lido, then visualized and translated from Italian. CLOSING OF THE UPPER FLOORS


Sociogram of identified agents in the community related to the theater, their relationships, and points of opportunity.


19

Analysis of hospital complex, completed by architectural team.


BUSHWICK INCLUSIVE Adobe Creative Suite

There is a chronic housing crisis in New York City that is founded in limited access, unaffordability, a speculative real estate market, and the precariousness of tenure for both renters and owners. The effects from this crisis reverberate throughout the wider community and influence health, economic vitality, educational opportunities, and other social capacities. The Brooklyn community of Bushwick represents both acute and extreme cases of these conditions, and therefore provides a fertile opportunity to co-design inno- vative solutions that drive social change.

WHAT DOES THIS NEW ECOLOGY OF HOUSING LOOK LIKE? 3rd

2nd

Floo

r: S

hor

Floo

t Te

rm

r: Lo

Ren te

rs -

ng Te

6U

rm R ente

rs - 4

Ground Le ve

l Social En

nits

Units

terprise Sp

ace

385 Woodbine Street, NY 11237

HOUSING TIERS

FINANCIAL MODEL

This framework is based on the belief that if a more inclusive community of stakeholders have access to socially innovative tools, resources, and networks that take into account their skills while engaging their participation, community projects will have a greater impact leading to overall systematic change instead of just local interventions. This project’s end goal is to create an innovative and sustainable social impact venture to build affordable housing alternatives. These alternatives will be fundamental in generating a variety of transformative and developmental experiences to spur economic development, educational growth, and community engagement. This proposal’s flexibility means the model can extend beyond housing to generate opportunities throughout the community, improving the overall quality of life for ALL.

Extremely Low Income 0% to 30% of MFI = $0 to $11,456 Very Low Income 30% to 50% of MFI = $11,456 to $19,094 Low Income 50% to 80% of MFI = $19,094 to $30,551 REMEMBER 100% of MFI is $38,189 Moderate Income 80% to 120% of MFI = $30,551 to $45,826 Middle Income 120% to 250% of MFI = $45,826 to $95,472 High Income 250% of MFI and up = $95,472 to ?!?!?!?

$3,667,300

Policy and Legislative Routes: Hybrid Model & Beyond HPD, UHAB, or New Body formed from Activists & Bureaucrats Charge an Effective Class 4 Tax Assement for a Vacant or Partially Class 1 or 2 Property

Reform NYS Property Taxes to Correct the Inherent Flaws that Sustain Structural Vacancy

[

Landlords & Developers

Vacant Apartments

Penalize Landlords for Vacancies Beyond Six Months

Either Through Law Passed in City Hall or by Legal Precendent

Scaling Slide of Penalties

[

Deliquency Confiscation of Property

Ignoring the Maintenance of the Structure to Ensure a Low Assessment Rate or Reduction of Assistance to Tenants

Occupied Apartments Commercial Business

Commission a Multi-Organizational Investigation into the State of Housing Court As to Prevent the Developers or Landlords From Skirting the Law

Residents & Renters

Make Renters Realize that 30% of Tax Bill Goes to City Yet, Unlike Homeowners, They Cannot Deduct that from their Federal

Vacancies Need Accounting & Submission to Independent Agency

Formation of a NYC Land Bank with Dedicated, Sustainable Affordable Housing Community Land Trust Renters, Occupants take Ownership of Property

}

Collaborative with : Charles Wirene, April De Simone, Gabrielle Andersen, Charles Chawalko, Ferhat Topuz

12

Ensure Equitable Treatment of Tenants and Landlords

[

Location of Property should not dictate whether or not a vacancy is overlooked or not... In Manhattan, there are clauses that prevent vacancy from occurring, while the outerborughs do not.

Final product for the studio was a gazette to share proposal with general public.


21 “While there is nothing wrong with people moving, in our feeling is that it is wrong if it displaces the long term residence”. Sister Kathleen Maire director Bushwick Housing Independence Project “What the city is calling affordable is ridiculous. Working people, people on fixed income people unemployed, public assistance; they are out of the picture”. Howard Brandstein Sixth Street Community Center

Above Images were used in gazette to tell the story of vacancy and gentrification in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

“There is more people exactly like me who said: "Oh this is a better place I could live".. and there is a fast subway to and from the city, so they thought exactly like I did and they moved here and more and more and more, and now, as you can see, it's filled with white people. It is terrible, but it is true”. Anonymous Bushwickian Barowner in Bushwick

“More and more white people are coming too, they pay higher rents, and this is affecting us, and I don't like this”. Anonymous Bushwickian English Student at Make the Road New York

“You are passing by and leaving the rest behind and leaving the problem behind. Why don't you be part of it while you staying here, and help us." Gladys Puglia, member of Make the Road New York


SOCIODEMOGRAPHICS GOALS & TACTICS CONSTRUCTED ENVIRONMENT VALUES

COMMUNITY STAKEHOLDERS LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS RESIDENTS GOVERNMENT AGENCIES LOCAL STATE FEDERAL ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS PHILANTHROPIC ORGANIZATIONS SOCIAL INVESTMENT COMMUNITY LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS RESIDENTS NON-PROFIT CORPORATIONS

SOCIAL IMPACT CAPITAL SOCIAL IMPACT BONDS SOCIAL IMPACT INVESTMENT CROWDFUNDING

PHILANTHROPIC GRANTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUNDS GREEN FUNDING RESOURCES

GOVERNMENT INITIATIVES AFFORDABLE HOUSING TAX CREDITS NEW YORK STATE COMMUNITY OPPORTUNITY & RE-INVESTMENT INITIATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL

Overall step-by-step plan for the proposal of a new, socially conscious corporation as a resource for the community to acquire property and maintain affordable living.

STRATEGIC DESIGN MODEL

CERTIFY BENEFIT CORPORATION B-LAB IRIS GIIRS

CHALLENGES

IDENTIFY INVOLVEMENT

DRAFT CORPORATE CHARTER BY-LAWS, ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION

COMMUNITY ANALYSIS

STATE CORPORATE MISSION

RESOURCES

COLLECTIVE ACTION AGREEMENTS

FORM B-CORPORATION

APPR SW


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ACQUIRE PROPERTY/PROPERTIES

BUNDLE PURCHASE GOVERNMENT INITIATIVES

NATIONAL STABILIZATION TRUST TENANT INTERIM LEASE PROGRAM (TIL)

REHABILITATE

IMPLEMENT HOUSING APPLICATION PROCESS

SLIDING SCALE OF PENALTIES ON TAXES FOR VACANCY

TENANT SELECTION & PLACEMENT

IMPACT HOUSING TIERS

FEDERAL TAX DEDUCTION FOR RENTERS- GIVE THEM SIMILAR TREATMENT TO HOMEOWNERS

HOUSING COURT INVESTIGATION

ASSESSMENT & TRANSPARENCY

TAX CLASS REFORM

7A PROCEEDING

LAND BANK

VACANCY ACCOUNTING OFFICE

FORM A RESIDENT COUNCIL COMMUNAL LIVING LONG TERM RENTALS LEASE TO PURCHASE

COMMUNITY STEADING AGREEMENT

SKILLSHARE

RENTICESHIP WEAT EQUITY

POLICY

LAND DONATION

RESIDENTS

COMMUNITY LAND TRUST

PURCHASE KITCHEN COMMUNAL AMENITIES

WORKSHOP LEGAL WORKSHOP

COMMUNITY KITCHEN INNOVATION LABS CREATIVE TRADES CARE SPACES

REVENUE FROM B-CORP OPERATIONS

BATTLE SPECULATION DECOUPLE PROPERTY VALUES REJECT GENTRIFICATION/ DISPLACEMENT

MIXED USE

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SPACES

LONG TERM LEASE AGREEMENT BETWEEN TENANTS/OWNERS

PAY INVESTORS BACK (ROI) RETURN ON INVESTMENT COVERS OPERATIONAL COSTS


Visualizing the NYC Budget Process AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Suite

As an initial methods course in the MS Design and Urban Ecologies program, “Visualizing the NYC Budget Process” was a quick assignment to realize a few things. First, we were given the text in regards to this process, and one learns to not only sift through the information but pull out the points that are important to know. How is this information then translatable in a way for the general public to gain access to this process? How can the knowledge and policy be shared in a more efficient manner? Next, this graphic was developed to do just that-pull out key points in the process and highlight what people have agency in those decisions. This was a collaborative project with Luisa Munera to translate the decision making process for the New York City budget to facilitate public involvement.

September: Community boards hold public hearings and release budget priorities to the Mayor and Borough Presidents By September 17: Mayor releases the Final Mayor’s Management Report By December 15: The Comptroller issues report on city finance By January: IBO releases Fiscal Outlook Report By January 16: Mayor releases Preliminary Budget for the upcoming fiscal year January 16-February 15: Community Boards evaluate evaluate preliminary budget. Send the report to the Mayor, the City Council, their Borough President and President Board January 30: Mayor releases the Preliminary Mayors Management Report By February 25: Borough Boards hold public hearings and submit proposals to Mayor and City Council By March 10: Borough Presidents send Mayor and City Council proposal By March 15: IBO issues an analysis on Preliminary Budget By March 25: City Council hold public hearings and make recommendations to Mayor By April 8: City Council hold public hearings on Preliminary Mayor’s Management Report April 26: Mayor releases Exexcutive Budget By May 6: Borough Presidents May 6- May 25: City Council holds public hearings By June 5: City negotiates and votes July 1: New Fiscal Year Begins


25

Public Hearings

Community Board

Community Boards are required under the Charter to hold public hearings, at which time residents of the community may express their opinions as to the service and capital needs.

Mayor

The Mayor of the City of New York is head of the executive branch of NYC’s government.

Borough Boards + Presidents

The Office of Borough President was established with a functional administrative role derived by having a vote on the NYC Board of Estimate.

Council

It is up to this office to produce a timely analysis of both the preliminary and the executive budgets, and the assumptions and methodologies used by the mayor in making the revenue estimates that are contained in each budget.


reViewing the Parkway Rhinoceros, AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Suite

THE STORY

The Benjamin Franklin Parkway was intended to revitalize the Philadelphia fabric by becoming a connector between Center City and Fairmount Park to provide additional green space beyond William Penn’s plan for five green parks. However, in order to become realized, the Parkway disrupted and destroyed residential neighborhoods. Intersections where the Parkway meets the Philadelphia street grid have become problematic locations for the pedestrian, cyclist, and motorist, and architecture has since receded from the Parkway to avoid confrontation of the transportation corridor. By inserting commercial catalysts at these intersections, systems of movement will merge and the edge of the Parkway will be stimulated to activate the Benjamin Franklin Parkway as a public place integrated with the urban fabric. SCHUY LK IL L

EA S

RIV

T

T AS CO

GR

Y WA N E E

T ER

RA

Street grid

BFP breaks grid

BFP as connector

Repairing the grid

Axial visibility

Cars below BFP

People above BFP

Pedestrian bridge

IL Gathering place

Layers of Movement

Maintaining Connections Above: the Benjamin Franklin Parkway as connector Upper right: Philadelphia residential neighborhoods in 1870. Lower right: Present day plan, with street breaks due to BFP.

New Visibility


27

Project implemented, shown during an event such the July 4th Welcome America Event


29

1/ The Overlook

1 2 3 2/ Crossing Paths

3/ 22nd Street Stage


[CINE]CITY Revit Architecture, AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Suite

The current urban condition staggers between the historical origins of the city and the need to accommodate change in the future. This flux creates a tension that requires sensitivity toward the modification of the urban fabric. Linguistically, the term cinema is derived from the Greek word for motion but often now refers to a favorite past time. However, when thinking of the term architecturally, the term “cinema” describes the urban tension between past, present and future. The book Recombinant Urbanism by David Graham Shane describes this era as “cine citta,” or “the world of physical flows, of flows of people and goods on rail, road, and in the air (72). Cine Citta is wedged between the industrial era and modern reformism, hesitating to progress urban development. Therefore, [Cine]City is an exploration to utilize the Reading Viaduct at Spring Garden Street and 9th Avenue in Philadelphia as an element that weave improvement into the city. [Cine]City addresses the need to revitalize the Reading Viaduct to integrate green performative systems into Philadelphia’s infrastructural grid. *One of three honorable mentions after the evaluation of 33 applicants in the final submission round. Competition called students to design an urban cinema, park, and streetscape within 10 days without assistance.

Process diagram series to determine approach to entering and developing the Reading Viaduct in Philadelphia, PA.


31


Freedom by Design | Mrs. Mary Bailey PROJECT COMPLETED FALL 2011 AIAS Freedom by Design is the community service organization affiliated with the American Institute of Architecture Students. The Freedom by Design program at Philadelphia University began in 2007 helping those limited in mobility in the Philadelphia community. After being involved with Freedom by Design since 2007, I have risen to the position of Team Captain to lead others to design, fund and build a kitchen renovation for Mrs. Bailey, a Germantown resident of Philadelphia. Mrs. Bailey, being bound to her wheelchair, struggled with circulating her kitchen due to cracked ceramic floor tiles and inappropriate entry widths. To address these issues, my team removed the floor tile and replaced the flooring with a PERGO tongue-and-groove wood that is durable and easy for Mrs. Bailey to clean. In addition, the team replaced the island countertop to become part of a storage system with easy access drawers. Finally, we widened the entryway for Mrs. Bailey. The work was done over three build days in November. Leading a team of fifteen people to complete this project challenged my ability to communicate with a client, design for a particular need, and manage an economy of materials.

Promotional material to share this project and encourage others to get involved.


33

Promotional material to share this project and encourage others to get involved.

Conditions of the space prior to intervention.

Conditions of the space post deign and construction.


Harvesting the Future Rhinoceros, Revit Architecture, AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Suite

The project for Harvesting the Future serves as the model for urban growth by blending technology with natural growing methods. According to the Urban Age Project,75% of the world’s population will be living in a city by 2050, a leap from the 10% in 1900 and the 25% in 2007. Based on the consumption of 300 calories a day of only fruits and vegetables, one can a feed 375 people, or 150 households, a year. Growing vertically provides social, environmental, and economical benefit to the expanding urban community, and as each element evolves, Harvesting the Future challenges the limits of technology to accommodate the increasing need for farming in the city. The concepts of shifting density and the subsequent need for interweaving spaces have emerged to inform the design approach for Harvesting the Future. Because the incorporation of the public into the program of this building is essential, a market space carves itself into the grade plane to lend itself to become owned by the community through allocated vendor spaces. In the levels above, interior parks are created by weaving planes of hydroponic planter systems with light and with circulation of people. Harvesting the Future integrates seamlessly with the site conditions while setting itself apart visually to state its futuristic addition to the community. This project was a collaborative project with Gary Carnevale & Daniela Rodriguez over the course of the semester. Left: Diagrams shaping of the building based off of plant and required light. Right: Model of project, approaching from the Delaware River from east to west. Adjacent page: Rendering from the grade level market space.


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Grade level plan of market space.

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Axonometric visualizing hyrdoponic systems on the first level.


LIVING PARADOX Revit Architecture, AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Suite

The objective of prison design is to provide secure conditions for the prisoner and civilian. Rather than considering the prison as a place of punishment, the prison needs to be recognized as a place of reform to help reduce the rate of recidivism. A microcosm of the city, the prison provides its residents with work experience and educational opportunities to prepare them for a productive life beyond prison. Helping to integrate the facility into the urban fabric, Upper 30th Street contains retail space, a cafe, visitor’s center, and rooftop park. At the spatial intersection of the overhead residential volumes with the street level public volume is a visitation space for prisoner and civilian. An articulated perforated metal panel system allows each prisoner to control the amount of daylight and visibility into their cell. The changes in aperture of these panels allow the public to engage in the transformational experience of the prisoner, and to view the prison as a collection of individuals vs. a monolithic institution. The limitation, intersection and separation of space, challenge the difference and level of comfort between the prisoner and public space.


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Bonnie Netel | Portfolio | Spring 2014  
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