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The Chieftain

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THURSDAY | FEBRUARY 9, 2012 | BONNER SPRINGS, KANSAS | VOL. 114, NO. 33

fyi

Officials face decisions: what to do with casino revenue?

DEALING OUT A FULL HOUSE

Library seeks bookmarks The Bonner Springs City Library is accepting entries for its National Library Week bookmark contest. Artists from preschool to age 18 may tell their story about the library in pictures using crayons, watercolors, markers, charcoals or paint to create an original bookmark. Computer generated images will not be accepted. Details and entry forms will be available at the library beginning Wednesday, Feb. 1. All entries are due by Wednesday, Feb. 29. Library patrons will vote on their favorites March 8-28, and winners will be announced during National Library Week, April 8 to 14.

BY CAROLINE BOYER CBOYER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

major tourist destination. “I think it’s one of a kind; I think it’s going to be the envy of everyone in the business,” she said. Peter Carlino, Penn National Gaming chairman and CEO, said combined with the Kansas Speedway, The Legends, Nebraska Furniture Mart and Livestrong Stadium, the casino was set to outperform its competitors in Kansas City, Mo.

The casino doors have opened, and an agreement has long been in place for the gambling revenues that are set to flow into government coffers — but that doesn’t necessarily mean there aren’t still decisions to be made about how to spend the funds. The commissioners for the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kan., met Thursday, Feb. 2, to review casino revenue distribution, and Joe Reardon, mayor and CEO of the Unified Government, warned the commissioners that they still have to determine the best use of the funds. Commissioners reviewed revenue distribution required by state statute and the agreement formed in 2007 for revenue sharing between the county and Wyandotte cities. The casino will give 27 percent of its gambling revenues to the state. Of that, 22 percent remains with the state, and 2 percent goes to the Problems with Gambling and Addictions grant fund. Under state statute, 1.5 percent of funds goes to the host county, and 1.5 percent of funds goes to the host city. The 2007 interlocal agreement states that the 1.5 percent that goes to the host city will be divided among the three cities in the county: .75 percent goes to Kansas City, Kan., .47 percent goes to Bonner Springs, and .28 percent goes to Edwardsville. “Part of the idea with the interlocal agreement was before a single application came in to any city … the cities got together and tried to raise the bar on quality and stop the cities from being played one against the other by applicants,” Reardon said. “… The idea here was to put the cities in a position of power to get the best applications possible by setting criteria high and ensuring that regardless

SEE CROWDS, PAGE 7

SEE OFFICIALS, PAGE 7

MIKE YODER/STAFF

Gamblers take to the slots on the opening day of the Hollywood Casino at Kansas Speedway Friday. Seats for the 1,300 playing positions in the casino filled up quickly after doors opened to the public at 11:45 a.m.

Revved-up crowd helps open new Hollywood Casino Friday BY CAROLINE BOYER CBOYER@THEWORLDCO.INFO

Grass fires burn tree farm Four grass fires in Leavenworth County on Thursday and five on Wednesday have been caused by a winter that's been perhaps unprecedentedly dry.

PAGE 5

INSIDE COMMUNITY CALENDAR . . . . 4 CLASSIFIEDS . . . . . . SECTION B DEATHS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OUR TOWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 SPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-15 VOICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 WEATHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

With the call of “Gentlemen, start your engines,” the ceremonial first craps shoot was thrown Friday, and the doors of the Hollywood Casino at Kansas Speedway opened to the public. Within 30 minutes, there were few empty seats at the 52 table games and 2,000 electronic machines. Julie Rich of Ottawa was among the first through the door, deciding to head to the bar for some video poker. For Rich, her husband and two friends they brought along, checking out the casino on its opening day was worth taking the day off work. Rich and her husband worked in the gaming industry when they lived in Black Hawk, Colo., and she said they wanted to see what Hollywood Casino had to offer. “We’re mainly here to have fun,” she said. “How exciting is this, to have something this close to home that looks like Vegas?” A ribbon-cutting ceremony preceded the opening of the doors. Amidst bright lights, showgirls and special guests — NASCAR drivers Clint Bowyer and Kasey Kahne — the ceremony included state and local dignitaries and officials from casino operators Penn National Gaming and the International Speedway Corp. Lesa France Kennedy, International Speedway Corporation CEO, spoke first, saying the combination of a sports facility and casino would make for a

MIKE YODER/STAFF

Francis and Lela Fisher, Hutchinson, were successful playing the slots shortly after the opening of the Hollywood Casino, a Las Vegas-style casino at the Kansas Speedway, Friday, Feb. 3. Francis had a win total of $95 and Lela spun up more than $368.

SERVING BONNER SPRINGS, EDWARDSVILLE AND THE KAW VALLEY SINCE 1896


PAGE 2

T H E C H I E F TA I N | F E B R U A RY 9 , 2 0 1 2

SUZANNE SCHLICHT

For local farmers, there’s more going on than meets the eye during the cold months between fall and springtime. Page 10.

POINT OF VIEW/PAGE 6

5questions

IN BRIEF

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

Friends of library open weekly bookstore

DENNIS ANDERSON MANAGING EDITOR

danderson@theworldco.info

The Bonner Springs City Library’s Friends of the Library group now offers its “Found Treasures” bookstore weekly. The bookstore will be open 5-7 p.m. Thursdays in the library’s storm shelter. Carol Geary, president of the friends group, said they decided to try selling the gently-read books that are donated to the library weekly rather than letting them build up for semi-annual book sales as in the past.

SUSAN CANTRELL

VICE PRESIDENT, SALES

& MARKETING

scantrell@theworldco.info The Chieftain, the official newspaper for Bonner Springs and Edwardsville, is published Thursday by The World Company, Bonner Springs office, P.O. Box 256, Bonner Springs, KS 66012. Second class postage paid at Bonner Springs, KS 66012. Subscription rates: For mail subscribers in Wyandotte, Johnson, Leavenworth and Douglas counties, $37 (plus tax) for one year, $55 (plus tax) elsewhere in Kansas and $60 (includes tax) out of state. To subscribe, call 800-578-8748. USPS 884-480. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 256, Bonner Springs, KS 66012. MEMBER OF THE KANSAS PRESS ASSOCIATION COPYRIGHT 2012

READER SERVICES For subscriptions, requests for copies of the Chieftain or delivery problems, call Chris Bell, circulation director, 800-578-8748 To submit a news tip, call: 913-232-6511 email: editor@bonnersprings.com

Advertising To place a classified advertisement, including garage sale ads, call us (toll free): 866-8238220. For inquiries about display advertising, call 800-578-8748

News Caroline Boyer, reporter, 913-232-6511 Stephen Montemayor, sports editor, 913-962-3000

BONNER AREA WEATHER READINGS 1-31 2-1 2-2 2-3 2-4 2-5 2-6

High 66 63 63 52 43 47 53

Low 36 28 26 41 33 28 22

Snow 0 0 0 0 T T 0

2

FOOD: WINTER FARMING

R E A D T H E L AT E S T N E W S E V E RY D AY AT B O N N E R S P R I N G S . C O M

The Chieftain

|

Precip. .00 .00 .00 1.05 .35 .05 .00

Year-to-date rainfall: 1.56” Year-to-date snow: .3”

Information compiled by Gil Hoag, National Weather Service observer

Submissions policy By submitting opinions, articles, photographs, poems or other creative works, you grant The Bonner Springs Chieftain a nonexclusive license to publish, copy and distribute that submitted content, while acknowledging that you are the author of the work. You grant the Bonner Springs Chieftain permission to publish and republish this submitted material without restriction, in all formats and media now known or hereafter developed, including but not limited to all electronic rights. Solely by way of example, such rights include the right to convert and store the submitted content on CD-ROM, DVD and other current and hereafter developed formats, the right to place the submitted content in whole or in part on the Internet and other computer networks, and the right to electronically store and retrieve the submitted content in electronic databases.

FILE PHOTO BY MELISSA TREOLO/STAFF

A customer browses greeting cards at Walgreens in Bonner Springs in this file photo. Valentine's Day, coming on Tuesday, is a big day for the greeting card industry.

CARDS OF LOVE As Valentine's Day approaches on Tuesday, scores of people are sure to head to the greeting card racks. Below, the U.S. Greeting Card Association provides some facts and figures about Valentine's cards. Q: How many greeting cards will be exchanged on Valentine's Day this year? A: The Greeting Card Association estimates that approximately 150 million greeting cards will be purchased for Valentine's Day this year in the United States. This figure is based on member company sales and does not include children's packaged valentines for classroom exchanges. Q: Where does Valentine's Day rank among other holidays in the United States, in terms of greeting cards? A: Valentine's Day is the second largest holiday for giving greeting cards, behind Christmas. Q: How will Valentine's card sales in 2012 likely compare to 2011 figures? A: The Greeting Card Association expects the number of greeting cards purchased for Valentine's Day to hold relatively steady from last year's estimate of approximately 160 million

Valentines purchased. Historically, more valentines tend to be exchanged when the holiday occurs on a weekday — as it will again this year with Feb. 14 falling on a Tuesday. Q: What varieties of Valentine's Day cards can customers find nowadays? A: Valentine's Day cards are available in a wide range of price points, from 99 cents for a simply printed, unembellished greeting card to $10 or more for one with special enhancements such as embossing, die-cutting, foil-printing, hand-detailing, licensed characters, 3D lenticular motion or light and sound effects. Although designs and verses range from traditional to contemporary to humorous, hearts and flowers continue to be the most popular motifs, and red and pink remain the top colors for Valentine's Day cards. Q: When did the custom of giving cards on Valentine's Day develop? A: Valentine greetings have been exchanged since the Middle Ages in Europe. In 1850, Esther Howland, an American printer and artist, was among the first to publish and sell Valentine's Day cards in the United States.

follow us online HEARD IN BONNER Chieftain reporter Caroline Boyer blogs about what she hears in Bonner Springs. Read Caroline’s blog at bonnersprings.com.

GLITZ AND GLAMOUR

Find video of Hollywood Casino’s opening day

SPEAK OUT Registered users of bonnersprings.com can comment on any story that appears in The Chieftain or its website. Get in your two cents’ worth today!

Check for news updates 24/7 at bonnersprings.com and at twitter.com/bonnersprings

Booster club’s annual pancake feed set for Friday The Bonner Springs High School Booster Club will have its fourth annual Chris Cakes pancake supper and silent auction starting at 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10 at the high school cafeteria. Pancakes will be served from 5 to 7:30 p.m. The cost for all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausage and a drink is $5 for adults and $3.25 for children. The silent auction will run in the District P.E. Center from 5 to 8 p.m., with tables beginning to close at 7:15 p.m. The auction will included more than $3,000 in donated items, such as a Schlitterbahn Water Park family four-pack of tickets, two Kansas Speedway Tickets for the Spring Cup race, and a Jaeger’s Paintball and Laser Tag package. A Cash For Gold representative also will take unwanted jewelry and donate 20 percent of its sales to the booster club. To donate an item for the auction or for more information, contact Laurie Steuart at 816-863-0071.

Mental Health First Aid training offered Wyandot Center and PACES, Wyandotte County’s mental health providers, will offer Mental Health First Aid training that can equip participants to assist an individual experiencing a mental health crisis. The 12-hour program, which is open to the community, will take place from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23, and Friday, Feb. 24, with time for lunch and breaks. Registration fee for the training is $40 per person and includes a manual. Sessions are interactive and will be held at Wyandot Center, 1301 N. 47th St., Kansas City, Kan. Register by calling Beth Yoder Stein at 913-328-4633 or emailing yoderstein_b@wmhci.org.

Band trip, fundraiser top Kiwanis club discussion Bill Turley, Bonner Springs High School band director, was the featured speaker at the regular meeting of the Edwardsville Kiwanis Club held last week at Sister’s Restaurant. Turley discussed the band’s recent trip to the Alamo Bowl. In addition, $5 tickets for the annual pancake breakfast are available from any club member. The breakfast will be 7-10 a.m. March 3 at the Bonner Springs High School cafeteria.


THE CHIEFTAIN | FEBRUARY 9, 2012

COMMUNITY | 3

COURTWARMING CANDIDATES

SPECIAL TO THE CHIEFTAIN

The Bonner Springs High School 2012 Courtwarming royalty include, front row from left to right: Dyan Mackey, Hannah Mauk, Eliza Scott, Meagan Stice, Emily Wilson; and back row from left to right: Austin Clouse, Joseph Dooley, Daemon Franklin, Mark Hobson, Stevie Williams. The king & queen will be crowned Friday, Feb. 10, during half time of the boys varsity basketball game.

Edwardsville takes action on dangerous buildings STAFF REPORTS The city of Edwardsville is taking action to condemn an unsafe building for the first time in several years. At its Jan. 23 meeting, the Edwardsville City Council adopted a resolution setting a hearing at 7 p.m. March 12 for the dangerous and unfit structure at 204. S. 4th St. After the meeting, Mike Webb, city administrator, said this is the first of many dangerous structures the city was taking a closer look at. “This house has been vacant for quite some time and obviously has fallen into a high level of disrepair and has been an ongoing eyesore,” Webb said. The home has a hole in the roof, broken windows, missing siding, and floors that have collapsed into the basement, Webb said. “For all intents and purposes, it is certainly not inhabitable by people,” he said. A bank owns the building, though it is not clear which bank. Webb said an ownership and encumberence report shows the title belongs to an entity called Ever Bank in Florida, but Bank of America also has stated to city that it owns property. Bank of America has told the city it would demolish the building, but to ensure the process moves forward, the city initiated the condemnation process,

When that close encounter is just a little too close...

Webb said. The hearing in March is just for property owners, in which the city can order it to be repaired or removed, and if the owner fails to meet the city’s requirements, the city can raze the building and file a lien on property. Webb said residents and council members have expressed concerns in the past, but no one officially filed a complaint. The city initiated the condemnation process in this case, but it also can be intiated with five filed complaints. Webb said the process can be expensive for the city, but the city has decided to take a closer look at buildings that may be unsafe. “I anticipate there will be others that we will pursue in the future,” Webb said. The motion to set the hearing was approved 3-0. Council members Mark Bishop and John Eickhoff did not attend the meeting.

ONLINE

QUESTION OF THE WEEK Go to bonnersprings.com to answer our weekly reader poll. This week’s question: Do you do anything special with your sweetheart for Valentine’s Day?

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4 | COMMUNITY

THE CHIEFTAIN | FEBRUARY 9, 2012

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COMMUNITY

CALENDAR To submit a calendar item, send, in writing, to: The Chieftain, 128 Oak St., P.O. Box 256, Bonner Springs, KS 66012, or send by online submission form at bonnersprings.com or e-mail to editor@bonnersprings.com. Deadline for calendar items is 5 p.m. Monday for the following Thursday publication. There is no charge for publication of calendar items.

2/9 | THURSDAY

2/14 | TUESDAY

• Walkie Talkies, 8 a.m., Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010 • Open gymnasium, noon, Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010 • Edwardsville Kiwanis Club meeting, 6:45 a.m., Sisters Restaurant & Bar, 11657 Kaw Drive, Edwardsville • Morning Steppers, 7:30 a.m., Edwardsville Community Center, 696 S. Third St., 913-4413707 • BSE Chamber Networking Group, 7:15 a.m., Bonner Springs Family YMCA, 410 B N. Bluegrass, 913-422-9348

• Open gymnasium, 10 a.m., Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010 • Morning Steppers, 7:30 a.m., Edwardsville Community Center, 696 S. Third St., 913-4413707 • Senior Sing-A-Long, 1:45 p.m., Council on Aging, 109A Delaware St., Leavenworth, 913-6840777 • Walkie Talkies, 8 a.m., Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010 • Kaw Valley Chorus rehearsals, 7 p.m., Basehor United Methodist Church, 18660 158th St., 913724-2077

2/10 | FRIDAY

2/15 | WEDNESDAY

• Job Club, 8:30 a.m., Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church, Shawnee, 5501 Monticello Road, 913-422-5700 • Walkie Talkies, 8 a.m., Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010 • Open gymnasium, 10 a.m., Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010 • BSHS Booster Club pancakes & auction, 5 p.m., Bonner Springs High School, 100 McDanield St., 913-422-5121

• Walkie Talkies, 8 a.m., Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010 • Open gymnasium, 10 a.m., Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010 • WOW! (The Word on Wednesdays) Program, 6:30 p.m., Basehor United Methodist Church, 18660 158th St., 913-724-2077

2/13 | MONDAY

• Edwardsville Kiwanis Club meeting, 6:45 a.m., Sisters Restaurant & Bar, 11657 Kaw Drive, Edwardsville. • BSE Chamber Networking Group, 7:15 a.m., Bonner Springs Family YMCA, 410 B N. Bluegrass, 913-422-9348 • Morning Steppers, 7:30 a.m., Edwardsville Community Center, 696 S. Third St., 913-4413707

• Walkie Talkies, 8 a.m., Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010 • Open gymnasium, noon, Bonner Springs Community Center, 200 E. Third St., 913-4227010

2/16 | THURSDAY

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FEBRUARY 9, 2012

COMMUNITY | 5

Firefighters battle grass fires in Leavenworth County BY MATT ERICKSON MERICKSON@THEWORLDCO.INFO

A grass fire burned through several acres of a Basehor Christmas tree farm Thursday afternoon, one of at least four blazes treated by Leavenworth County fire departments Thursday, Feb. 2. Firefighters from four fire depart“We’re going to ments, riding in eight different vehi- be in this boat until it starts cles, drove around Basehor's Wilderson greening up in Tree Farm and two April.” adjoining properChuck Magaha ties, putting out Leavenworth County flames that left Emergency about 10 acres of Management director land blackened and climbed up Christmas trees on the north end of the farm. Leavenworth County Emergency Management director Chuck Magaha, at the scene of the Basehor blaze, guessed that about 100 trees fell victim to the flames. Magaha said the recent spate of grass fires — there were four in Leavenworth County on Thursday and five on Wednesday — had been caused by a winter that's been perhaps unprecedentedly dry. “This stuff's like gasoline,” Magaha said, pointing to the thick layer of dry, dead grass and brush that covered the ground of the tree farm. The Basehor fire started at about 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Magaha said, and crews had the blaze under control by about 2:30. The fire started on a property adjoining the tree farm on the east. Dennis Nichols said a brush fire had started in his backyard Thursday after he had dumped some charcoal there two days before, and

he was unable to stop it from spreading. Nichols, a longtime neighbor of the tree farm and its owner, Chuck Wilderson, said he felt bad that the fire had burned his friend's trees. “Man oh man, what a mess,” Nichols said. Attempts by the Sentinel to reach Wilderson on Thursday were unsuccessful. Wilderson, a longtime community leader and volunteer in Basehor, told the Sentinel about a year ago that he planned to wind down operations at the tree farm within the next five years. The farm began selling Christmas trees in 1982. Crews from the Tonganoxie city, Fairmount Township, Stranger Township and Leavenworth County Fire District No. 1 fire departments responded to the Basehor blaze. Grass fires also broke out Thursday near Leavenworth County Road 1 and Hemphill Road south of Tonganoxie, off Kreider Road near Linwood and in Alexandria Township near 222nd Street. Most of the county's recent fires have begun when residents with proper permits began burning brush and other materials, Magaha said, but the dry and windy conditions caused them to get out of hand. If the problem continues, he said, the county may need to institute a burn ban. Even after this past weekend's rainfall, Magaha said Monday that conditions would likely remain bone-dry for the remainder of winter. If possible, he said, residents should put off any burning until the spring. “We're going to be in this boat until it starts greening up in April,” Magaha said. If they do burn anything, he said, residents should make sure winds are blowing at less than 10 miles per hour and that they have adequate water and people present to control the flame.

| D E AT H S | LEOLA PETERSON 1931-2012

Leola Peterson, 80, of Tonganoxie, KS, passed away on Feb. 2, 2012, at the Tonganoxie Nursing home. Cremation has taken place with the assistance of Penwell-Gabel Johnson Chapel, Junction City, KS. Graveside services will be held at 11 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012, at Highland Cemetery, Junction City, KS. Leola was born March 17, 1931, Junction City, KS to Leo and Lucille (Parker) Kidd. She was a homemaker for many years, but also worked as a cashier for Gibson’s in Junction City and Rich-

mond-Gordman in Topeka. She was also a member of the Edwardsville Christian Church in Edwardsville, KS. She was married to Cleon Peterson; he preceded her in death. She was also preceded in death by two sisters; Dorothy McDonald and Lenice Jean Morris and one brother, Leo Kidd. She is survived by her son, Charles Peterson of Leavenworth, KS, and a daughter, Patty Menhusen of Tonganoxie, KS, many grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Please sign this guestbook at obituaries.ljworld.com.

| PUZZLE ANSWERS |

• Today’s puzzles can be found in the classified advertising section


VOICES

FEBRUARY 9, 2012

|6

QUOTEWORTHY Rudeness is the weak man’s imitation of strength.

Eric Hoffer

SUBMIT LETTERS TO EDITOR@BONNERSPRINGS.COM

COMMENT

POINT OF VIEW

Scouting still important Recently, I was asked if I thought the But that isn’t the end of the road for Boy Scouts of America remains a vital and the candidate, as now they also have to viable organization for young men in the complete a major service project. This 21st century. Without pausing a second isn’t just some simple chore as some of I answered emphatically that it certainly the projects are huge undertakings. The was and that we needed it as much as Eagle project requires the young man to ever. The Boy Scouts remain the premier plan the work, receive proper permischaracter-building organization for sion, recruit volunteers, work out financyoung men in the country. We need an ing and then spent a lot of hours workorganization that emphasizes learning ing and directing the project. skills, exploring the world around them, Believe me, these projects involve the understanding governentire family. Nearly a ment and giving back CLAUSIE SMITH decade ago we spent to the community many hot days helping through service. with the scraping and Obviously I’m a big painting of the interior supporter of the proof the caboose at Cengram and my love of tennial Park and workScouting comes natuing on landscaping rally. My father was a projects. longtime Scoutmaster Over the years, and leader in Troop 126 young men have comin Garnett. I was an pleted some projects Eagle Scout and my brother-in-law was which were valuable to the city, schools an Eagle Scout. In addition I have a son- and churches. Recently, the football lockin-law who was an Eagle Scout. To keep er room was painted and back in the the family heritage going both of my 1980s steps were built to a giant slide that Bonner Springs grandsons were Eagle was located in Lions Park. I really believe Scouts in Troop 149. Yes, I remain a vol- that conducting a service project teaches unteer with the local program. It certain- the young man many skills that are ly is easy to see why I believe in Scouting. important for successful living. Don’t get me wrong; there are many Thanks to Camp Naish, the Boy Scout other character-building organizations program has been vital to our communithat do a great job, too, and I don’t want ty. Many thousands of folks who live to take anything away from them. My throughout the region have visited Bonwife was Who’s Who in 4-H and my ner Springs because of Camp Naish. daughters were involved in Girl Scouts During the next few weeks you’ll have and Camp Fire Girls. They all are fine a chance to help the Scouting program. organizations that provide great training The first will come on Saturday when for youth. Yet, due to my experience, the Troop 149 holds its annual pancake Boy Scouts have stood the test of time breakfast at the United Methodist and have evolved into an organization Church from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Bonthat serves modern needs. ner Springs United Methodist Church. When I was working toward being an Tickets are $5 each. It is a great commuEagle, I mastered many skills although it nity event. In addition the annual Boy has been 50 years since I’ve used some of Scout Friends drive will be conducted. If them. The requirements were much sim- you want to help, contact Bruce Colepler in those days. You had to earn 21 man, myself or other volunteers. merit badges with a few required ones Scouting is over a century old, but such as Hiking, Camping, Swimming thanks to dedicated volunteers it is still a and Cooking. While many of these are program that provides learning experistill required, others such as Personal ence and adventure to young men. Yes, Finance and Citizenship in the commu- I’m proud to be involved in the Scouting nity, nation and world are mandatory. program.

Three local residents are our community voices for this three-month period. The three will comment on events local and national. And, at times, our local commentators may offer additional views online at bonnersprings.com

Q:

What was your favorite moment (commercials included) during the Super Bowl on Sunday?

“My favorite commercial moment was the dog that went on a diet. It was for Volkswagen, I think.” Jeri Cochran

Bonner Springs Head Start director

“Mario Manningham's catch and the safety caused by Justin Tuck were the most entertaining moments, and my favorite.” Basehor-Linwood High School senior

MAYOR Clausie W. Smith 13820 Grove Bonner Springs, KS 66012 913-441-1379

WARD 1 George Cooper 126 Maple Bonner Springs, KS 66012 913-749-8738 Jack Knight 402 E. Second St Bonner Springs, KS 66012 913-441-3671

WARD 2 Tom Stephens 13835 Woodmont Ave. Bonner Springs, KS 66012 913-441-8583 Racheal Haas

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WARD 3 Rodger Shannon 908 S. 134th Street Bonner Springs, KS 66012 913 441-1487 Bob Reeves 756 Lakewood Bonner Springs, KS 66012 913 441-6190

WARD 4 Jeff Harrington 914 S. 131st Street Bonner Springs, KS 66012 913-441-3281 Eric Freeman 335 S. 134th St. Bonner Springs, KS 66012 913-441-2155


FEBRUARY 9, 2012

COMMUNITY | 7

Crowds give casino stamp of approval

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FROM PAGE 1

“You know that the Unified Government has realized a hugely bold vision in bringing this all together,” Carlino said. “I believe this is the premiere gaming facility, not just in Kansas, but in this market — including across the river where those other guys are. This sets a new high bar.” Dennis Wilson, executive director of the Kansas Lottery, said the casino was the “crown jewel” of the western “I believe this is Wyandotte County the premiere entertainment district and would fur- gaming facility, ther boost tourism. not just in “It’s not just a Kansas, but in local destination, this market — not just a regional including across destination, but a the river where national destination,” Wilson said. those other “There is no need to guys are. This travel any farther sets a new high west than this.” bar.” Bob Sheldon, general manager, Peter Carlino announced a chari- Penn National Gaming Chiarman and CEO ty gambling event at the casino Monday had raised $25,000, and the casino was going to match that total to give that amount to both Sunflower House and the Kansas City, Kan., School Foundation of Excellence. Bowyer and Kahne then threw the ceremonial first dice, and the doors opened to the public. Janet Bimer took the opportunity to get a good look at the lights, games and layout. “If you’ve ever been to Vegas, it looks like Vegas,” she said, nodding her head in approval. Mary Summers of Tonganoxie said she begged her daughter-in-law, Cecilia Summers of Basehor, to bring her to the casino’s opening day. “If we can win, it’ll be really fun,” Mary Summers said.

MIKE YODER/STAFF

A Hollywood Casino Show Girl gets set to welcome visitors to the opening of the new Las Vegas-style casino at the Kansas Speedway, Friday, Feb. 3, 2012.

“We thought we might win,” Cecilia Summers added. “We thought they’d have some loose slots.” Both agreed the casino was impressive and said it was worth it to brave the opening day crowds. Alan Thompson, table games manager, stood back and took in the scene as he kept his eye on the games. “I was here at 6 this morning and there was almost no one here,” he said. “And I thought, ‘This is the last time we’ll ever see this place empty.’” Thompson spent the last year going through almost 1,500 applications for dealer positions, conducting interviews and running a dealer school for more than 100 inexperienced dealers — 93 of whom were hired on at the casino. He said he was happy to get back to the business of running the games. “All the build-up leading up to it is important, but this is what we’re good at,” he said, motioning to the craps, blackjack and roulette tables. “It was a good learning experience opening a new facility, but once the cards start throwing and the dice start rolling, that’s when I’m at home.”

Officials ponder how to spend revenues FROM PAGE 1

what city landed the casino, all cities had a potential to benefit from a portion of the revenue that came into the community.” With gaming revenues estimated at $200 million in the first year, $54 million would go to the state. Unified Government staff members said they have been told that the casino will send its revenues to the state, who will distribute it back to the county and city governments each month. The local governments should receive those payments 10 to 15 days after the end of each month. The commission also reviewed decisions it will have to make in the coming year. Part of the Unified Government’s development agreement with the casino required that the casino provide $1,135,000 in annual charitable contributions, which won’t be distributed until 2013. The commission will have to decide how those funds are distributed. “We’ve had phone calls, we’ve had concerns, that the casino is opening — how can I get some charitable contribu-

tion?” Dennis Hays, county administrator, said. The commission will have to decide how to distribute the $500,000 of those charitable funds to social service organizations and another $500,000 to local school districts — Kansas City, Kan., Piper, Turner and Bonner SpringsEdwardsville. The county parks and recreation department is to receive $100,000 of charitable funds: $25,000 goes to the Kansas City, Kan., Convention and Visitor’s Bureau; and $10,000 goes to the Wyandotte County chambers of commerce — Bonner Springs-Edwardsville Area Chamber of Commerce would get $1,500. The Unified Government is projecting it will receive $3.7 million in 2012, and commissioners discussed how they already had planned to use that to cover budget shortfalls in other areas. Reardon said they will need to decide if funds will be used to “fill holes” or to create programs that don’t currently exist. “It’s a good challenge to have; not many cities have this challenge, quite frankly,” Reardon said.

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HOMES FOR SALE

$154,900 2829 N. 114th St.

1030 Bury St.

029(,15($'< x9HU\QLFHEHGURRPUDQFKIORRUSODQ x3OHQW\RIVWRUDJHDQG+XJHEDFN\DUG x)XOOILQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW x6ROGDVLV'RQuWPLVVRXW

Tonganoxie Schools

525 Pleasant St.

$119,950 1212 Delaware Dr.

x63$&,286+20(21&251(5/27 x*UHDWSULFHEUKRXVHZIHQFHGLQ\DUG x/DUJHNLWFKHQZEXLOWLQSDQWU\ x+DUGZRRGIORRULQJWKURXJKRXWKRPH x'HWDFKHGFDUJDUDJHZKHDW $&

119 Gould St.

$89,950

Tonganoxie Schools

741 Chestnut St.

$82,000

x$EVROXWHO\IDEXORXVEUEDWKUDQFK x1HZHUIXUQDFHDQGODPLQDWHIORRUV x*5($7RSHQIORRUSODQZLWKODUJHNLWFKHQ x(QFORVHGSRUFKHVRQIURQWDQGEDFNRIKRPH x+DUGZRRGIORRUVLQWKHOLYLQJDQGGLQQLQJURRPV

Tonganoxie Schools

1207 Atchison St.

$79,950

Atchison Schools

121 Karen Ln.

211 E. Riley St.

$169,950

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3121 S. 65th St.

$149,950

$249,000

x%5$1'1(:EHGURRPUDQFKKRPH x6SDFLRXVNLWFKHQZLWKDQLVODQG x+DUGZRRGIORRUVWKUXRXWORZHUOHYHORIKRPH x&RYHUHGSDWLRDQGIURQWSRUFK

Basehor Schools

$134,500

x*UHDWEHGURRPWRZQKRXVHZWRQVRIVSDFH x/UJNLWFKHQZSDQWU\PDLQOHYHOPDVWHUVXLWH x9DXOWHGFHLOLQJVLQOLYLQJURRP x)DPLO\URRPZLWKILUHSODFHDQGDUHFURRP xUGEHGURRPDQGIXOOEDWKLQIXOOILQLVKHGZDON RXWEDVHPHQW Tonganoxie Schools

1003 West St.

$129,950

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KCK Schools

823 Willow Pointe Cir.

$139,950

x$ZHVRPHQHZIORRUSODQZVSDFLRXVEU x)DEXORXVPDVWHUVXLWHZPDVWHUEDWK ZDONLQ x)LQLVKHGEDVHPHQWZEU ODUJHIDPLO\URRP x)HDWXUHVWLOHIORRUVDQGXSJUDGHGFDUSHW x$0$=,1*35,&()251(:

Tonganoxie Schools

407 Westview Dr.

14123 Belrive Cir.

$599,500

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$137,900

x2XWVWDQGLQJEHGURRPUDQFKYLOOD x+DUGZRRGIORRUVLQODUJHHDWLQNLWFKHQ x*UHDWPDVWHUVXLWHZLWKSULYDWHEDWKDQGGHFN x/DXQGU\RQPDLQOHYHO IXOOILQLVKHGEDVHPHQW x+8*(IDPLO\URRP UGEHGURRP x5RXJKO\\HDUVOHIWRQWD[DEDWHPHW Bonner Springs Schools

7601 E. 132nd Terr.

$124,000

x$OOQHZIORRULQJZLQGRZV OLJKWIL[WXUHV x7UDQVIHUDEOHZDUUDQW\RQQHZURRI x1HZIURQWVWHSV GHFN QHZHUIXUQDFH x)RUPDOOLYLQJURRP GLQLQJ x )LQLVKHG EDVHPHQW ZLWK D JUHDW EULFN ZHW EDU Grandview Schools

$134,500 13505 184th St.

x%HDXWLIXOXSGDWHGEHGURRPUDQFK x&XVWRPLQODLGKDUGZRRGIORRUV x+XJHNLWFKHQ [IDPLO\UPDGGLWLRQZ YDXOWHGFHLOLQJVILUHSODFHDQGVN\OLJKWVx3URS HUW\ KDV D SULYDF\ IHQFH DQG JUHDW GHFN IRU HQWHUWDLQLQJ McLouth Schools

18730 207th St.

$159,950

xEHGURRPXSVWDLUVLQWKLVUDLVHGUDQFK x/DUJHNLWFKHQYDXOWHGFHLOLQJVLQOLYLQJURRP xQRQFRQIRUPLQJEUVLQZDONRXWEDVHPHQW x/DUJHGHFNRYHUORRNVDJUHDWVWRFNHGSRQG x3ULYLOHJHVWR6DUFR[LH/DNHDQGJUHDWYLHZV RIIURPEDFN\DUG Basehor Schools

$219,950 16701 Parallel Rd.

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Basehor Schools

20618 Mitchell Rd.

$599,950

$139,500

xEHGURRPWUXHUDQFKZLWKFRXQWU\YLHZ x/DUJHHDWLQNLWFKHQZLWKGHFN x+XJHOLYLQJURRPZLWKEHDXWLIXOVWRQHILUHSODFH x'HWDFKHGJDUDJHZZRUNEHQFK x3HUIHFWORFDWLRQQHDU/HJHQGuV6KRSSLQJDUHD x/RWVRISRWHQWLDO Basehor Schools

19220 252nd St.

$209,000

x%HDXWLIXODFUHVZLWKURDGIURQWDJHRQVLGHV xEUMXVWRXWVLGHRI7RQJDQR[LHRQSDYHGURDGV x6SDFLRXVNLWFKHQZLWKORWVRIFDELQHWV x/DUJHYDXOWHGOLYLQJURRP JUHDWPDVWHUVXLWH x/DQGIHDWXUHVSRQGVDQGD[PHWDOEDUQ

x&RXQWU\KHDYHQRQEHDXWLIXOWUHHGUROOLQJDFUHV x$ZHVRPHIURQWSRUFK ODUJHGHFNRIIWKHNLWFKHQ x/DUJHEHGURRPVZLWKZDONLQFORVHWV x)LQLVKHGEDVHPHQWZIXOOEDWK 0XUSK\EHG x[VODELVUHDG\IRUWKHVKRSRI\RXUGUHDPV

Tonganoxie Schools

Tonganoxie Schools

Tonganoxie Schools

$14,900 139 Warner Ave.

1518 S 15th St.

7+,6,6$*5($7'($/ x*UHDWDIIRUGDEOHEHGURRPKRPH x1LFHIRUPDOGLQQLQJURRP xEHGURRPVRQWKHPDLQOHYHO XSVWDLUV x*UHDWKRPHWRIL[XSRUIOLS

Atchison Schools

x*UHDWXSGDWHGEHGURRPUDQFK x0DLQWHQDQFHIUHHYLQ\OVLGLQJQHZWLPEHUOLQHURRI x*UDQLWHFRXQWHUVLQNLWFKHQDQGEDWK x)URQWEDFNFRYHUHGSRUFKHV DEYJUQGSRRO x [ GHWDFKHG JDUDJH ZLWK ERQXV ORIW URRP DERYH Turner Schools

$189,950

x%UDQGQHZEUUDQFKSODQZFDUJDUDJH x4XDOLILHVIRU%DVHKRUuVWD[UHEDWH x*UHDWRSHQIORRUSODQZYDXOWHGFHLOLQJV x+DUGZRRGIORRUVLQNLWFKHQDQGGLQLQJ x7LOHIORRUVLQEDWKV DJUHDWPDVWHUVXLWH Basehor Schools

$179,500 1920 Jackson Dr.

$139,950 15810 Christie Dr.

x*UHDWEUUDQFKKRPHEURQPDLQOHYHO x+RWWXE DERYHJURXQGSRROIRUPDOGLQLQJ x*DUDJHFRQYHUWHGWRIDPLO\URRP x%DVHPHQWLQFOXGHVDUHFURRPZEDU x2IILFHZILUHSODFHDQGQRQFRQIRUPLQJEHG URRPV Lansing Schools

16907 Juniper Dr.

c: (913) 481-6847 o: (913) 369-3000 danlynch@lynchresidential.com

HOMES WITH ACREAGE FOR SALE

613 High Prairie Pl. $179,000 2434 Sycamore St. $229,950 x*UHDWEHGURRPEDWKIORRUSODQ x%($87,)8/21(2:1(5+20( xEHGURRPYHU\ZHOONHSWKRPHZJUHDW x.LWFKHQRSHQVWROLYLQJURRP YLHZV x.LWFKHQLVODQGDQGIRUPDOGLQLQJURRP x6WDLQOHVVVWHHODSSOLDQFHVVWRQHILUHSODFH x%HDXWLIXOPDLQOHYHOPDVWHUVXLWH x0DVWHU MDFX]]L WXE UG FDU ODZQ PRZHU x%DVHPHQWSOXPEHGIRUUGEDWK JDUDJH Tonganoxie Schools Tonganoxie Schools

1116 Tamarisk Dr.

x$ZHVRPHVWRU\ZLWKRSHQIORRUSODQ x%HDXWLIXOEDFN\DUG VSDFLRXVXSVWDLUV x/DUJHQGDQGUGEHGURRPV x6XSHU0DVWHUZVHSDUDWHEDWK ODUJHZDONLQ 3LFWXUHV DUH ZKDW KRPH ZLOO ORRN OLNH ZKHQ ILQ LVKHG Leavenworth Schools

Leavenworth Schools

x1HZO\UHPRGHOHGEHGURRPKRPH x)LQLVKHGXSSHUOHYHOGHFNIHQFHGEDFN\DUG x&HUDPLFWLOHLQNLWFKHQ ODXQGU\ x$OODSSOLDQFHVLQFOXGHGDPXVWVHH x6TXDUHIRRWDJHLVHVWLPDWHG

$159,950

x9HU\QLFHEHGURRPVSOLWHQWU\KRPH x0$,17(1$1&()5((EULFNDQGPHWDOVLGLQJ x1(:ODPLQDWHDQGWLOHIORRULQJWKUXRXW x)LQLVKHGEDVHPHQWZLWKEHGURRP x/$5*(GHFNZLWKDIHQFHGLQ\DUG

Tonganoxie Schools

x5HFHQWO\UHQRYDWHGEHGURRPKRPH x1HZDSSOLDQFHVWLOHIORRUVFDELQHWV FRXQWHU x+DUGZRRGIOUVLQOLYLQJUPQHZFDUSHWLQEUuV x*UHDWSDWLRWRHQMR\%%4uV x$OOORFDWHGRQDFXOGHVDF

$219,950

x%HDXWLIXOEHGURRP&DOLIRUQLDVSOLWHQWU\ x+DUGZRRGIORRUVLQNLWFKHQGLQLQJURRP x*UDQLWHFRXQWHUVNLWFKHQLVODQG x+8*(PDVWHUVXLWHDQGDILQLVKHGEDVHPHQW 3LFWXUHVDUHZKDWKRPHZLOOORRNOLNHZKHQILQ LVKHG Piper Schools

DAN LYNCH

%FIPò3E  x([FHSWLRQDOEUKRPHRQOUJFRUQHUORW x+DUGZRRGIORRUVLQNLWFKHQGLQLQJURRP x9DXOWHGOLYLQJUPKXJHILQLVKHGEDVHPHQW x0DJQLILFHQWPDVWHUVXLWHZZDONLQFORVHW x )DEXORXV FRYHUHG GHFN DQG SULYDF\ IHQFHG \DUG Tonganoxie Schools

16426 Leavenworth Rd. $149,950 x/RRNLQJIRUWKDWKLGGHQMHP"7KLVLVIRU\RX xEHGURRPEDWKUDQFKKRPHRQDFUHV x$ORWRISRWHQWLDOZLWKDOLWWOHHOERZJUHDVH x3URSHUW\LVMXVWRXWVLGH%DVHKRURQSDYHGURDGV x,QFOXGHVDQLFH[PHWDOEDUQ Basehor Schools

22010 219th St.

$149,950

xEUEDWKPDQXKRPHRQSULYDWHDFUHV x3ULYDWHPDVWHUVXLWHZZDONLQFORVHW x)RUPDOGLQLQJURRPODUJHJUHDWURRP x9DXOWHGFHLOLQJV ZRRGEXUQLQJVWRYH x%UHDNIDVWURRP DGHWDFKHGJDUDJHZRUN VKRS Tonganoxie Schools

22934 George Rd.

$349,950

x6HFOXVLRQRQDFUHVZVWRFNHGSRQGV x+XJHKRPHLQFOXGHVEHGURRPV x)DPLO\UPZISJUHDWUPZZRRGEXUQLQJVWYH x/DUJHPDVWHUVXLWHKLJKHIILFLHQW+9$& x3URSHUW\LQFOXGHVEDUQV ZOHDQWRZWDFN URRP  VKRS Tonganoxie Schools

20511 Golden Rd.

$299,950

25025 Stillwell Rd.

$274,950

x%HDXWLIXOEHGURRPKRPHZWRQVRIH[WUDV x2YHUDFUHVZLWKDOOSDYHGURDGV x+XJHNLWFKHQZSDQWU\DQGJUDQLWHFRXQWHUV x'RXEOHVLGHGVWDLUVOHDGLQJXSVWDLUV x)RUPDOGLQLQJURRP+8*(PDVWHUVXLWH x)LQLVKHGEDVHPHQW Basehor Schools

x%HDXWLIXOQHZHUEUKRPHRQDOPRVWDFUHV x*RUJHRXVPDVWHUVXLWHZLWKWUD\HGFHLOLQJV x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW VWRFNHGSRQG x&XVWRPEXLOWFDELQHWV VROLGVXUIDFHFRXQWHUV x/HVVWKDQDPLOHRIISDYHPHQW

Lawrence Schools

19261 254th St.

16834 258th St.

$305,000

18529 Tonganoxie Rd.

$174,950 17651 190th St.

x6WXQQLQJVWRU\RQDFUHV x+DUGZRRGIORRUVRQPDLQOHYHO x+XJHNLWFKHQZFHQWHULVODQG SDQWU\ x )RUPDO GLQLQJ URRPVSDFLRXV OLYLQJ URRP x %HDXWLIXO PDVWHU VXLWH ZZDONLQ FORVHW  OX[XULRXVEDWK Tonganoxie Schools

MOTIVATED SELLERS!! x2XWVWDQGLQJDOOEULFNEUKRPHRQDFUHV x1HZO\UHPRGHOHGNLWFKHQQHZIXUQDFH x1HZWKHUPDOZLQGRZVWKURXJKRXWKRPH x&RYHUHGIURQWSRUFKDQGDJUHDWFRYHUHGGHFN

17400 174th St.

$219,950

Basehor Schools

18151 Donahoo Rd.

$164,950

7+,6,6$08676((+20( x*5($75DQFK+RPHRQDFUHV xEHGURRPVEDWKZLWKPDLQOHYHOODXQGU\ x+8*([EDUQDQGIWFDUJDUDJH x6SDFLRXVNLWFKHQDQGOLYLQJURRP

Tonganoxie Schools

x%($87,)8/EHGURRPKRPHRQ$&5(6 x/DUJHOLYLQJVSDFHVZLWKWRQVRIVWRUDJH x)HQFHGZLWKvKRUVHJXDUGwHOHFWULFIHQFLQJ x0DVWHUVXLWZLWKMHWWHGWXEDQGZDONLQFORVHW x+DVD[ORDILQJVKHGDQGVWRFNHGSRQG

$156,800

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Tonganoxie Schools

22922 148th St.

$319,950 27711 207th St.

x8QLTXHDQGPDJQLILFHQWEHGEDWKKRPH xDFUHVZVSHFWDFXODUKLOOWRSYLHZV x6HSDUDWHOLYLQJTXDUWHUVZSULYDWHHQWUDQFHV x0DLQWIUHHH[WHULRUZILQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW x3HUIHFWIRUHQWHUWDLQLQJODUJHVSDFLRXVURRPV Basehor Schools

$154,950

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$219,950

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Pleasant Ridge Schools

LOTS and LAND RESIDENTIAL

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Piper Landing. – Lots starting at $50,950. 223rd St. – Pristine views, gorgeous valley, Perfect location in Piper’s newest community! BCVOEBOUXJMEMJGF  "VCVSO)JMMTo#FBVUJGVMXBMLPVUMPUTPOQBWF- -PU OE4Uo-BSHFCVJMEJOHMPUJO ment! Lots starting at $49,950. 8BMOVU3JEHFTVCEJWJTJPO  Prairie Gardens. – 2 cul-de-sac lots to choose from each just $36,500. Stone Creek. – Come and see what Stone $SFFLIBTUPPòFS"òPSEBCMFMPUTTUBSUJOH at $30,000. The Estates of Cedar Lake. – Great lots availBCMFXJUIQSJNFMBLFGSPOUBOEMBLFWJFXT starting at $49,950. 8PPETPO.VODJFo4VQFS-PDBUJPO"òPSEBCMFMPUTTUBSUJOHBUKVTU 

Lot 1, 2 or 3 George Rd. – Great 3 acre NMMPUT(SFBUMPDBUJPOKVTUPòQBWFNFOU $49,950 each. PRICE REDUCTION!! Tract 1 or 2 Evans Rd. – 2-40 acre tracts of perfect ground. $164,000 & $240,000 Chieftain Rd. – Wonderful 20 acres m/l with level open space. $199,950. Lot 3 State Ave. – Great price on this 5 acre CVJMEJOHMPU 

Woods of Wellington – 5 fantastic LeavenXPSUICVJMEJOHMPUTGSPN 

-PUPSUI4Uo4BSDPYJF-BLFCVJMEJOHMPUTBUBOJODSFEJCMFPGQSJDF  & $24,500

McGee Meadows – 37 multi-family lots. First DPVMECF[POFEBTGPVSQMFYFT5IFSFTUPG

Lot 11, 160th St. – Wonderful 2.57 acre m/l estate lot in Saddle Creek Estates $79,950.

Lot 1 Parallel Rd. – Building site on hard surface roads. $59,950. Lot 5, 169th St. – Great corner lot location! -PUJT[POFEGPSEVQMFYMPU  /,)XZo"DSFTPGCFBVUJGVMHSPVOE  including a pond! $159,950. 17th St. – Property consists of 3 lots that make up 6.6 acres in Crown Estates $109,950. (PMEFO3Eo1SPQFSUZIBTCFFOQMBUUFEPVU into 15 residential lots w/city water & sewer. $199,950. Lot 2 or 3 5th St. - Great walkout lot at a fantastic price! $19,950 Lot 3 187th St. - Beautiful 5 acre m/l tract of MBOE-PDBUFEKVTUPòQBWFESPBET  $MVCIPVTF%S"MNPTUBDSFTPGMBOE XJUICFBVUJGVMWJFXTPGBTNBMMMBLF  Lot 5 or 6 147th St. - Great access to all major highways! 2 and 2.3 acres $79,500 each.

COMMERCIAL 153rd St . – Great commercial corner location in the city of Basehor! $49,950. /8FTU4Uo"DSFTNMWBDBOUMBOESJHIUPò)XZ $449,000. State Ave. – Best location in Tonganoxie! 3.6 Acres m/l. . $400,000. HUGE PRICE REDUCTION!! Honey Creek Farms. – Fantastic commercial lots ranging from $30,000 to $200,000. #BZTJEF%S(SFBUBDSFQJFDFPGMBOE[POFEGPSDPNNFSDJBMVTF that fronts on State Ave. $1,045,440 .D(FF.FBEPXTNVMUJGBNJMZMPUT'JSTUDPVMECF[POFEBT GPVSQMFYFT5IFSFTUPGUIFMPUTBSF[POFEBTEVQMFYFT Stone Creek - 3 prime development locations - perfect for highUSBóDCVTJOFTTTUBSUJOHBU  -PU UI4U0OFPGUIFCFTUMPDBUJPOTMFGUJO#BTFIPS acres m/l $189,950.

24130 Golden Rd.

$110,000

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19162 Cantrell Rd.

$129,000

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FEBRUARY 9, 2012

WWW.LYNCHRESIDENTIAL.COM OPEN HOUSES

| REMEMBER WHEN | 10 YEARS AGO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FEB. 7, 2001

OPEN SUNDAY 2:00 - 4:00

2516 Stone Creek Ave. Tonganoxie, KS $214,950 OPEN SUNDAY 2:00 - 4:00

16907 Juniper Dr. Basehor, KS $189,950 OPEN SUNDAY 2:00 - 4:00

2434 Sycamore St. Tonganoxie, KS $229,950

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Amy Sorensen, Charla Taylor, Brett Marmon, Patrick Mintner, Aaron Boal, Patrick Brady, Chris Lulu, Anthony Springfield, Stacy Brewer, Stacie Hylton, John David Ferenz and Aaron Sharp represented Southwest School in state math competition. The Bonner Springs optimist Club funded the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just Say No to Drugsâ&#x20AC;? program at local schools. The Kansas Thoroughbred Association endorsed the Sunflower Racing, Inc., for pari-mutual racing facilities in Kansas City, Kan. The Basehor-Linwood Board of Education voted to hire a consulting firm to

study secondary school facilities. Dr. Charles Edmond was superintendent.

50 YEARS AGO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FEB. 8, 1962 The Bonner Springs City Council set plans to vote on a $100,000 bond issue to build a new city hall. The Bonner Springs Laundromat announced it was moving to a new site in the Masonic Lodge building. Olan Barclay owned the business. Nine burglaries were solved when Elbert Woolf, police chief, arrested two Bonner Springs juveniles. He said the crimes were committed by 15- and 16year-old boys. The 15 year old was taken to the juvenile detention center and he escaped and was again apprehended in Bonner Springs. The Basehor Kiwanis Club held its annual banquet for Boy Scout Troop 168. Donald Grisham was the scoutmaster.

100 YEARS AGO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FEB. 8, 1912 The Good Roads Association held an organizational meeting. Dues were set at $1 per year. John Stark was elected treasurer. Farmers living along the road west of the Santa Fe depot requested a rock road from Bonner Springs to Elm Grove. Albert Mize purchased the Penrod Grocery Store and Meat Market. Bonner Springs High School defeated the eighth grade boys, 75-4.

Chieftain/Sentinel

HOMES NOT PICTURED 211W 3rd St. ..................................................2 6217 Ann Ave. ..............................................2 2906 S 24th St. ..............................................3 7832 Longwood Ave. ............................3 6143 Longwood Ave. ............................3 125 Kindred Ave. ........................................2 309W Lake St. ..............................................2 239 Sheidley Ave. ......................................2 412 Main St. ....................................................4 25 Santa Fe St. ...............................................2 201 E Lucy St. .................................................1 2055 Brook Ridge Ct. ..............................2 2524 N 54th St. ............................................3 103 S Green St. .............................................2 2080 Joles Dr. ................................................2 521 Pleasant St. ...........................................2 1601 Fall Creek Dr. .....................................2 13421W 102nd St. ...................................4 1621 Fall Creek Dr. .....................................2 502 E 5th St. ....................................................3 501 S 17th St. .................................................3 502 E Cynthia St. .........................................3 191Willis Dr. ...................................................3 1182 Delaware Dr. ....................................5 521 Birch St. ....................................................3 2280ValleyView Dr. .................................4 945 Hickory Dr. ............................................3 4321 Ironwood Dr. ...................................3 911 Church St. ..............................................4 17651 190th St. ...........................................2 213 S Bluegrass Dr. ...................................3 2210 Rock Creek Dr. ................................3 18529Tonganoxie Rd. ..........................3

A major winter storm left an inchthick layer of ice that caused major power outages and damage to trees in Basehor and Bonner Springs. At one point more than 400,000 people in 20 Kansas counties were without power. Berkel & Company of Bonner Springs was helping with the clean-up of the World Trade Center Twin Towers in New York City. The Basehor VFW essay contest winners were Amanda Vervaecke, Cory Bunting, Chris Prgomed and Lauren Helverson. Aaron Weathers scored 14 points for Bonner Springs in a 90-59 loss at Ottawa.

25 YEARS AGO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FEB. 5, 1987

NEW HOME SUBDIVISIONS

COMMUNITY | 9

7514 Orient Ave. .........................................3 9424 Goddard St. ......................................3 623 Green St. .................................................4 23501 152nd St. ..........................................4 18336 Butternut St. ..................................4 839 E Chestnut Dr. ....................................4 2719 E Sycamore St. ................................4 4324 Grand Ave. .........................................3 14300W 55th St. ........................................3 15907 Cedar St. ...........................................4 20021 Douglas Rd. ...................................3 2516 E Stone Creek Ave. ......................3 923 S 17th St. .................................................4 237 S Melrose Ln. .......................................4 19750 Stranger Rd. ..................................3 3VCZ8BZ........................................3 3VCZ8BZ........................................3 13245 Leavenworth Rd. ......................4 18151 Hollingsworth Rd. ....................5 25025 Stillwell Rd. .....................................5 17218 Feather Ln. .....................................3 20476 147th St. ...........................................3 17851 Hollingsworth Rd. ....................4 16834 258th St. ...........................................3 18151 Donahoo Rd. ...............................5 11112 Sloan Ave. .......................................5 15015 Lake Side Dr. .................................4 "MCSJHIU%S.....................................4 6100Wolcott Dr. .........................................5 12361 Merion Dr. .......................................3 20703 Brandt Rd. .......................................5 3020 158th St. ..............................................3

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FOOD

FEBRUARY 9, 2012

| 10

ON DECK: CHEAP EATS On next week’s Food page, watch for tips and recipes with seasonal ingredients to stretch your food dollar. Find the story now at bonnersprings.com and basehorinfo.com.

F O O D N E W S , I D E A S A N D R E C I P E S F O R Y O U A N D Y O U R FA M I LY

Think farmers relax all winter? Think again BY SARAH HENNING SHENNING@THEWORLDCO.INFO

The weather lately might not prove it, but it is full-blown winter out there. And whether the mercury hovers near 50 (like this week’s afternoons) or 5 (like points last winter), it’s still winter. And no one knows this fact better than local farmers. They work hard day in and day out from weeks before the last frost up until Thanksgiving, planting, harvesting and caring for food that nourishes many in Douglas County. But that doesn’t mean farmers spend the winter on a sandy beach or even in their pajamas. “We usually try to go to Hawaii and stuff if possible,” jokes cattleman Mark Wulfkuhle. “No, I mean, right now, we have 1,000 mouths to feed.” On the farm, there’s work to be done, season be darned.

A MILD WINTER Truth be told, though, this winter’s mild side has certainly made things a bit easier on local farmers. At his Rocking H Ranch just south of Stull, Wulfkuhle and his family aren’t complaining in the least that things have been, for the most part, unseasonably warm. “It takes more feed to keep their body temperature warm, so we’ve been able to use less feed,” says Wulfkuhle, who grew up raising cattle. “In the winter we have to keep good open water for them, and it’s a struggle to keep the ice chopped and keep our waters going, and this year we haven’t had too much of a struggle. From the livestock end, this has been a real blessing for us, compared to the last couple of years.” Vegetable farmers are also enjoying the weather, which is allowing for maintenance that is usually hard to do during the winter, and nearly impossible to do during the full-time growing seasons of spring, summer and fall. “Although we always do maintenance and repair on the buildings, we’ve been able to actually prime and paint doors and things like that that we would never be able to do now,” says Stephanie Thomas of Spring Creek Farm near Baldwin City. “That part of it is a little differ-

MIKE YODER/LAWRENCE JOURNAL-WORLD

MAD Farm’s Dan Phelps harvests some heads of lettuce in a hoop house garden. Phelps said he’d planned on growing and selling greens in the winter, but that this mild winter has made it that much easier.

ent. But I think for the most part we have a certain routine we go through out there anyway, regardless of the weather.” Jill Elmers of Moon on the Meadow says she, too, is enjoying fixing outbuildings, but niggling thoughts about the warmth do tend to worry her in ways that wouldn’t bother a livestock operation. The cold does have its purpose for those who grow from seed to harvest. “It’s definitely making for a better frame of mind,” says Elmers, who took advantage of a recent 60-degree day to till up a field for an upcoming planting. “It has been a very strange winter, so we’ll see what that does to affect our spring. If you have a really warm winter, you tend to have more pest problems in the spring because we don’t have the real deep cold to kill off a lot of bugs, which can be detrimental. And we definitely need some more moisture.”

PREPARATION AND REST If this winter weren’t so strange, it wouldn’t matter a whole lot; the same checklist needs to be done each year down on the farm, regardless of the tem-

“We have a certain routine we go through out there anyway, regardless of the weather.” Stephanie Thomas Spring Creek Farm

perature. Farmers must order seeds for the season, plan planting schedules, crop rotations, prepare contracts for restaurants and grocery stores, work on promotion and stay up to date with certifications and professional organizations. For Stu Shafer of Sandheron Farm, it’s a checklist with a clear beginning and end — Shafer is also a professor at Johnson County Community College. “For me, because school takes up so much time, it’s during the winter break that I do a lot of work around the farm. We’ve been working on the high tunnels this winter (and) there’s work to do inside, too, looking at the records and summarizing and figuring out what we did well, and planning crop rotations and all that sort of thing. It’s, interestingly, a lot of computer work,” says Shafer, whose sales come mostly through the Rolling Prairie Farmers Alliance. “I keep my planting and

any kind of tillage or pest control and labor and production records on spreadsheets on the computer. I just keep running tallies as I go. ... I go back now, and because it’s in a spreadsheet, I can just do quick summary statistics and keep track of how much space it took, so I can calculate productivity per space unit so I can be more productive per space unit.” Bob Lominska, who, like Shafer farms for Rolling Prairie, retired a few years ago from school teaching and now farms full time. Therefore, his winter is similar, but a bit different than his cohort’s. For example, he actually was very near a beach just weeks ago — visiting family in South Florida. “Visiting family, reading books, watching movies,” he says of his winter plans. “I also try to do some promotion for Central Soyfoods (where he’s a partner), go to meetings. And I always have the goal, but don’t get a great deal done, of doing volunteer work.” Some local farmers are even using the winter as a miniature selling season. Dan Phelps and Cole Cottin of MAD Farm are lining a table with vegetables every other Thursday at Cottin’s Farmer’s Market. Phelps said the couple had planned all year to grow and sell veggies in the winter thanks to a hoop house setup, but this winter’s mild temps have made it much easier than expected. He thinks a change in perspective during winters of any stripe can keep the local goodies coming even as farmers are putting in their seed orders for spring. A project for next winter, perhaps? “You can grow year-round under plastic, even in the colder years. Last year was a pretty harsh winter and things don’t do much from mid-December to mid-January. They just kind of sit there, they don’t grow much. But come Feb. 1, the things that are established in the ground are just bumping once the days get a little bit longer,” Phelps says. “And storage crops have a huge amount of potential. I think that’s an under-utilized market right now, growing more than you could possibly sell during the growing season for crops like potatoes and onions, sweet potatoes, garlic, winter squash — things that will store six months into the winter. I think increasing production of those crops would really, really help.”


SPORTS

THE CHIEFTAIN | FEBRUARY 9, 2012

| 11

KAW VALLEY WRESTLING Bonner Springs and Basehor-Linwood wrestlers compete in the Kaw Valley League wrestling tournament Saturday. Visit bonnersprings.com & basehorinfo.com for brackets and results.

G O T O B O N N E R S P R I N G S . C O M F O R S P O R T S U P D AT E S

On the dotted line: Signing Day send-off for student athletes

BSHS’ Oakes gets career win No. 200

BY STEPHEN MONTEMAYOR BY STEPHEN MONTEMAYOR

SMONTEMAYOR@THEWORLDCO.INFO

The smile wouldn’t leave Stevie Williams’ face last Wednesday morning. Maybe the Bonner Springs senior thought there was still a camera pointed at him. They were, to be fair, everywhere in the school’s weight room. Parents, friends, coaches, media. All had their cameras and cellphones trained on the four Braves football players who signed letters of intent to continue their careers after graduation. And there they sat, beaming, despite it being 8 a.m. and — for Williams, J.J. Jackson and Daemon Franklin — just hours after the boys basketball team competed at Piper the night before. “It’s a huge relief now not to have to worry about deciding where to go,” Williams said. Williams, a wide receiver for the Braves, signed to play at Butler Community College, just weeks after visiting and just one year removed from choosing to pursue college football over basketball. In 2011, Williams led the 6-4 Braves with 50 receptions for 930 yards and 13 touchdowns. JaVante Young had further incentive to celebrate: He signed on his 18th birthday. Young, a linebacker with the Braves, signed to play for Fort Scott Community College. “I’m a little light headed right now,” he said. Young plans to play special teams and linebacker at Fort Scott, and while the team’s coach told him he might not start right away, Young will have every chance to contribute. Young said he prided himself on being one the Braves’ hardest hitters, finishing second on the team with 45 tackles. Two years and then Division I, that’s the plan for defensive back Daemon Franklin, who signed to play at Highland Community College. Franklin visited the campus two weeks ago before making his

SMONTEMAYOR@THEWORLDCO.INFO

quarter as Ryan Murphy set the tone for the game by scoring seven points early. He was the early leader for the Bobcats in the game. The team led 22-7 at the end of the first quarter. In the second quarter, Younger scored 11 points and the Bobcats outscored Bishop Ward 24-8. Tanner Garver drilled a three pointer as time expired and the score was 50-15 at halftime. In the third quarter, Bishop Ward its best quarter of the game. The Cyclones outscored the Bobcats 21-18. C.J. Vallejo scored nine points in the quarter. He led the team with 16 points in the basketball game and was the only player to finish

Bonner Springs girls basketball coach Clay Oakes could be forgiven for being taken by surprise after it was announced that Tuesday’s victory against Lansing was career win No. 200. The possibility came up a few weeks ago, but Oakes said he hadn’t had a lot of time to think about it. What with three straight nailbiters — two in which the Braves had to overcome halftime deficits — going into Tuesday’s 51-28 victory. Oakes stood in his office, catching his breath after telling his team (now 15-0) to celebrate, and reflected for a moment while the band played and the boys warmed up for their game. Clay Oakes “It hadn’t even BSHS girls coach occurred to me,” he said. “Now that you mention it, it feels pretty good.” The Braves never trailed against Lansing (2-13). In fact their lead swelled from seven in the first quarter to 10 at halftime and 27 heading into the final quarter. Bonner Springs’ leading scorer, Anna Deegan, led the team with 14 points, including two late baskets to extend the rout. Deegan also shot 6of-11 from the free-throw line. Erica Wilson added eight points, including two from the paint to help lead a run that would produce the Braves’ largest lead yet. Haley Hoffine and Erin Marx each scored seven points. The Braves held Lansing to just two made field goals in the first quarter. Bonner Springs jumped out to an early 7-0 lead that could have been wider had a few shots below the basket gone in and a pass didn’t go out of bounds. “We missed a couple bunnies and chip shots tonight,” Oakes said. Although the Braves experienced a handful of fits and starts on offense, the message from the bench remained consistent. “Let’s just run it,” Oakes said. “That’s our style of ball. We’re at our best going up and down the court.” In that aspect, Hernandez lapped the competition. She was in the face of Lions shooters all night, swiping the ball away and jetting up court. When she couldn’t buy a bucket, she’d find Erica Wilson in the paint for an assist. “That was Yessenia’s best job of

SEE YOUNGER’S, PAGE 14

SEE BRAVES, PAGE 15

STEPHEN MONTEMAYOR/STAFF

Bonner Springs football players Daemon Franklin, J.J. Jackson, Stevie Williams and JaVante Young pose with family after signing letters of intent on Feb. 1’s Signing Day.

BUSH TO PLAY AT WJC Bonner Springs senior Spencer Bush signed to play soccer at William Jewell College on Signing Day. Read about Bush’s thoughts on his career’s next chapter on Page 12.

final choice. A new coaching staff took over late last year, opening up new opportunities for the team’s incoming freshmen. “For a second there it was a little overwhelming,” Franklin said. “But when I sat there at the table, I became clear headed.” Signing Day marked the culmination of a narrowing down of two programs for Franklin, who ultimately chose High-

land over Dodge City Community College. “Go somewhere where you know they want you there,” Franklin remembers his mother advising him. All four athletes will compete in the Kansas Jayhawk Community College Conference, meaning they’ll soon know each other as opponents rather than teammates. “We finally get to see what everybody is made of,” Young said. “I think it’s going to be fun to play against them,” Williams added. “It’ll be great to see them.” Franklin already thinks he has an advantage in that he said he already knows his soon-to-be former teammates’ tendencies. And he already knows who he most looks forward to playing. SEE BSHS FOOTBALL, PAGE 12

Bobcat boys, girls hoops on a hot streak NICK BRATKOVIC CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Coach Mike McBride can sense that this year’s team is starting to get into postseason shape. The team is getting better each game as it prepares for substate play later this month with players finding their ways into roles on the team. Evidence came in the form of an 80-39 victory against Bishop Ward (2-12) on Tuesday. It wasn’t really the margin of victory that impressed McBride, but rather how the team played. “Yeah, I mean a lot of teams take that game for granted and come out and relax,” he said. “We came out strong early on. The thing is, we were trying to work

on what we needed to work on and get better. We had a lot of energy.” Chase Younger led the Bobcats with 24 points and was a spark plug on offense throughout the game. The sophomore guard continues to open things up for the team’s interior post players, making it difficult for opponents to defend the Bobcats with a zone. He has been effective at slashing to the basket for points and also at making baskets from threepoint range. In addition, Ryan Murphy finished the game with 16 points and Ben Johnson scored 12 points. Colin Murphy finished with eight points. Basehor-Linwood was in control of this game from the tip off. The Bobcats led 11-2 early in the first


12 | SIGNING DAY

FEBRUARY 9, 2012

Bush to play soccer at Jewell

BSHS football sends off four

BY STEPHEN MONTEMAYOR

FROM PAGE 11

SMONTEMAYOR@THEWORLDCO.INFO

“I want to guard Stevie,” he said, smiling. J.J. Jackson, the Braves’ leading rusher in 2011, made his college selection the night before signing day, ending what he called a stressful last couple of weeks. Like Franklin, Jackson will also be stepping into a program in transition and expects to compete for a starting position right away. “I hope to play right off the bat,” he said. Jackson ran for 1,549 yards last season (7 yards per carry) and 24 touchdowns. He also caught 21 passes for 203 yards and two touchdowns, including a 77yard catch and run. Looking back, one of the memories Jackson said he’s going to think of often will be having been able to play alongside his brother, sophomore quarterback and defensive back Jourdaine Jackson. “Not a lot of people get that opportunity,” he said. Jourdaine still has a few years until he’ll have to decide which sport to pursue and, still, which college at which to pursue it. “Hopefully in two years we can have another one,” their mother, Dawn Jackson, said. It was a big day in the weight room, coach Lucas Aslin said. He chose the setting for the players’ signing day because it was where so many hours of conditioning and preparation took place. And for one more summer, it will be where the four seniors work out one last time, trying to get their speed and

STEPHEN MONTEMAYOR/STAFF

Bonner Springs football coach Lucas Aslin takes a photo of the four Braves football players who signed with colleges last week.

strength just right before departing for college. It will also be a chance, Jackson said, to show the team’s incoming freshman where the sport can take them. “You’ve got to understand,” Aslin said beforehand, “once you sign, the work begins.” WANT TO REPORT A SIGNING? If your student athlete has signed or plans to sign with a college program soon, please contact sports editor Stephen Montemayor via email at smontemayor@theworlco.info or by phone at 913-962-3000. We will continue to provide updates on our websites, Twitter and Facebook feeds and in each week’s paper.

It didn’t yet hit Spencer Bush that it was official. Not even after he decided to commit to play soccer at William Jewell College in Liberty, Mo. And not even when he signed and faxed the letter of intent on National Signing Day Wednesday, Feb. 1. Instead, it happened during the most formal of formalities when Bush, a Bonner Springs senior, sat at a table as his parents and Spencer Bush soccer coach stood BSHS senior behind him, smiling for a photograph. “It was humbling,” he would say. “This is going to be my next home.” Ultimately, it was William Jewell’s coaching staff, campus layout and academics that made the difference for Bush, who will play tennis this spring and continue playing soccer for Wichita’s Evolution Futbol Club until he leaves for Liberty. He also said he liked the team’s style of play, similar to what he said he’s played at Bonner Springs and club soccer throughout his high school career. It was a career that saw Bush become a two-time first-team All-State selection, a two-time first-team All-Region selection and pick up first (2010) and second-team (2011) awards in the Kaw Valley League. Bush has played the sport since he was

3 years old and joined his first club team at nine. His older brother, Ryan Bush, also played soccer at Bonner Springs before attending Kansas University. Before he could sign his letter of intent for William Jewell — where he will take pre-law courses — Bush said he was busy filling out eligibility paperwork in the long days leading up to signing day. Bush’s senior season ended with a 1-0 loss to the eventual state champions, Kansas City Christian Academy. “It was a hard season,” he said. “Our last game, honestly, I thought we had it until the clock ran out.” Looking back, Bush points to the previous year’s game against Kansas City Christian, then the state’s No. 1-ranked team, as the highlight of his career. In Oct. 2010, the Braves won the regional tournament with a 3-1 victory, coming back from being down 1-0. On the verge of the school’s first state title in 25 years, the Braves fell short and eventually lost 3-2 against St. James Academy in the tournament’s third place game, a finish Bush has yet to put to rest. “I wish I had that one back,” he said. Success on the pitch can still be had for Bush as his high school days wind down. He said the club tournament’s quality of competition is comparable to that of the state tournament. Should his team go deep, Bush may play well into June, a mere months until he reports to William Jewell to start a new chapter. It’s been a long journey so far, he said, looking forward to his new home. “I’m becoming a Cardinal,” Spencer said, “and that’s cool.”

See all our office’s listings in full color, many with virtual tours and find tons of other helpful real estate info online. 913-724-2300 Basehor

913-369-2300 Tonganoxie

www.ReeceAndNichols.com

17355 Donahoo Road, Basehor

Beautiful two story home sets on five acres, 4360 Sq. ft. of living space, plenty room for children. This house has four brms, three full baths, one half bath. New granite counter tops, new light fixtures, plenty of cabinets. Large great rm. with fp. MLS# 1736836

913 Somers St., Tonganoxie

15111 Parallel Rd, Basehor MLS # 1741685

3 bedroom 2 bath ranch home with full basement and hardwood Reduced!!! This is a spectacular home with plenty of square footage, floors throughout. Fresh paint inside and out. Newer roof, gutters and 2.4 wooded acres, Detached garage that is heated and cooled just windows. New bathroom and updated kitchen. Owner/Agent 913 minutes from the Legends and down town Kansas City. $639,000 Somers St., Tonganoxie. MLS #1736846 $126,995

Heather Vukas 785-331-9370

Jerry Hardwick 913-244-2397

Mary Knapp 816-835-4976

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jerryhardwick@reeceandnichols.com

OPEN HOUSE SAT. 2/11/12 1:00 TO 4:00 PM

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NEW PRICE $269,900 Between Tonganoxie/Basehor. Gorgeous 1 1/2 story sitting on 3 acres & asphalt road with 30 X 50 metal workshop. Features include granite kitchen countertops, all stainless steel appliances, formal dining with hardwood floor, 6 panel wood doors on 1st level, large 26 X 24 attached double car garage with 8’ doors, double hung windows. MLS # 1749880.

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johnbarnes@reeceandnichols.com

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John Barnes 913-775-0577

johnbarnes@reeceandnichols.com


FEBRUARY 9, 2012

SPORTS | 13

KVL leader Lansing controls rematch of December classic against Bonner Springs boys BY STEPHEN MONTEMAYOR SMONTEMAYOR@THEWORLDCO.INFO

Early in the second half there were flirtations, but the magic just wasn’t there this time. Not when Bonner Springs boys basketball and Lansing met once more. It took two overtimes and a pair of three-point daggers for Lansing to put away Bonner Springs in their first meeting. But on Tuesday, the Lions (14-1, 9-0) never relinquished the lead, winning 4434 and further tightening their grip on the Kaw Valley League. “It was hard for us to get a good shot,” coach Andy Price said. Price said the length and physicality of Lansing’s defense disrupted Andy Price his team’s thought BSHS boys coach process. Each shot, he said, was attempted with the expectation of being blocked or fouled. That expectation — coupled with a handful of actual blocks — kept the Braves from finishing their shot attempts. B.J. Watson led the Braves with 12 points, including the team’s only successful three-point shot. Watson was 2of-4 from the free-throw line in the final eight minutes. Brett Steuart scored 7 points, but was kept off the board in the fourth quarter. J.J. Jackson scored the Braves’ only field goal in the fourth quarter, finishing with six points. Bonner Springs held the Lions’ leading scorer, Izaiah Grice, to just two points off a lone first-quarter bucket. Lucas Mein and Khalil Bailey were another story. Mein — who finished with a game-high 17 points — was a force in the first half, scoring 10 points. Bailey took over for Lansing in the second half, himself scoring 10 points. Young added nine points. Each team looked rough in the early stages, taking turns giving up the ball and missing below-the-basket attempts. The first quarter was a sprint in which just one foul was called and few whistles sounded otherwise. It was in the opening frame, the latter half of which saw Bonner Springs go scoreless, that the Braves

developed a deficit they’d find themselves chasing all night. Down 12-6, the Braves opened the second quarter with four consecutive missed shots from beyond the arc, two of which turned into points in transition for Lansing. The Lions built and maintained a 10-point lead heading into halftime. It was then that a repeat of the two teams’ early-season classic became a possibility. Shots started to fall for the Braves, Lansing put Bonner Springs at the freeline, and, before long, it was a three-point game. A 15-point third quarter — fueled by five points from both Jordaine Jackson and Watson — made the home crowd dare to believe and the Bonner Springs student section rib the visiting crowd for being so quiet all of a sudden. It wouldn’t last. Three points became four, which soon swelled to seven. The Lions, by no means playing a flawless game, were still able to keep Bonner Springs at a stiff arm’s length. The defeat puts Bonner Springs (11-4, 6-3) behind Lansing and Basehor-Linwood (whom the Braves play on the road in the season’s final game on Feb. 24) with losses to each and now two against first-place Lansing. The Braves will need a lot of breaks to go their way to win a league title, but Price said the season’s focus is unchanged: state. With Topeka Hayden and BasehorLinwood in Bonner Springs’ substate bracket, Price said his team’s goal is to do what it can to secure a top seed in the tournament. “We don’t have time to feel sorry for ourselves,” Price said. Bonner Springs hosts Mill Valley (8-7, 6-3) at 7:30 p.m. Friday. The two teams last met in December, a three-point victory for the Braves.

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14 | SPORTS

FEBRUARY 9, 2012

Clutch BLHS girls net fourth win in five games BY NICK BRATKOVIC CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Kara Stephens stepped to the foul line having not scored a point in the game, the Bobcats up 52-51 against Bishop Ward with less than a minute left. Now Stephens, who had missed most of last season with a wrist injury was shooting a pair of foul shots. She tried not to think about much other than shooting the ball. The philosophy worked as the first shot went up and clanged around the rim before falling through. The next shot tapped the rim and fell in. “I was just trying to do whatever I could to help the team and not put too much pressure on myself,” she said. “I kind of tried not to think about it too much.” The baskets were the deciding points in a game where neither team was able to gain control until the final whistle. Bishop Ward turned the ball over on its next possession. Basehor-Linwood faced a press and turned the ball over when it caught the ball on the in-bounds line. With possession of the ball, Bishop Ward attempted a three-pointer and then was forced to foul. The Bobcats went to the line and missed the front end of a one-and-one. With another chance to tie the game and needing a 3-pointer, Bishop Ward’s Hanna Barnhart made a field goal with 4.6 seconds left. The Bobcats turned the ball over on

the in-bounds play, but the Cyclones missed a last-second shot that would have won the game as time expired, giving Basehor-Linwood (7-7, 5-4) a 54-53 win and its fourth victory in five games. “Yeah, it was a physical game, with our two post players on the bench late in the game we found a way to get it done,” he said. “I haven’t had that much fun coaching a game in a long time.” Basehor-Linwood post players Bailey Hooker and Victoria Smith each fouled out with less than two minutes to play in the game. Hooker had led the team with 17 points. Smith finished with four points. “We just outlasted them tonight,” Simpson said. “I wasn’t real comfortable until all time was off the clock.” Basehor-Linwood led 25-23 at halftime. Hooker led the team with 10 first half points. In the third quarter, BasehorLinwood made four three-point shots, leading 42-39 entering the fourth quarter. Basehor-Linwood led 52-46 with three minutes left after Maggie Hattock's fourth three-pointe basket. Bishop Ward got back into the game with a 5-0 run as the Bobcats again failed to score until Stephens stepped to the foul line. “I just couldn’t be more proud of this team and the way we continue to battle,” Simpson said. The Bobcats host Piper (8-7, 5-4) at 6 p.m. on Friday.

As our boys strive for their 8th consecutive Big 12 championship, KUsports.com will be there with you for every squeak, drive and free throw. We are the Jayhawk Nation’s only news website 100% dedicated to KU sports, fortified with all the energy a rabid fan needs to get through a long season filled with cheering, crying, leaping from sofas, hugging, worrying and high-fiving.

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ONLINE: Read about the BLHS boys and girls Feb. 3 victories against Turner on basehorinfo.com.

Younger’s 24 powers BLHS blowout victory on Tuesday FROM PAGE 11

in double figures for the Cyclones. Younger led the Bobcats with seven points in the quarter. Basehor-Linwood led 68-36 entering the fourth quarter of play and the running clock rule was instituted. Ryan Murphy led the Bobcats with five points and the team outscored the

Cyclones 12-3. Vallejo hit the lone trey for the Cyclones, finishing the game with 13 points. Basehor-Linwood hosts Piper (3-13, 0-9) at 7:30 p.m. on Friday. The game will also feature the school's Courtwarming ceremony. Among the students nominated are senior basketball players Ryan Murphy, Colin Murphy and Brad Waterman.

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FEBRUARY 9, 2012

SPORTS | 15

KVL shakeup possible BY ELVYN JONES EJONES@THEWORLDCO.INFO

Four Kaw Valley League high schools could learn Thursday whether they will be invited to join the Frontier League. Baldwin High School activities director Gary Stevanus said Basehor-Linwood, Bonner Springs, K.C. Piper and Tonganoxie have applied to join the Frontier League of Baldwin, De Soto, Eudora, Lindsburg, Ottawa, Paola and Spring Hill. Stevanus said the Frontier League’s high school principals would make the final decision about which schools, if any, would be invited to join the league. The principals are to meet Thursday and the four membership applications are on the agenda, but the principals may or may not vote on the membership applications Thursday. The league’s activities directors dis-

cussed the issue last month but did not make a recommendation on the applications of any of the schools, Stevanus said. The activity directors did recommend that any school invited to join be a good fit athletically and academically, he said. Although the schools applying for membership are not that distant for current Frontier League schools, Louisburg and Paola activity directors had some concerns about the added drive time required to get to some of the schools in more metropolitan settings, Stevanus said. The four schools applying for membership have 4A classifications, as do the current seven Frontier League schools and they all have a smaller enrollment than De Soto, which is currently the largest school in the league. Visit bonnersprings.com and basehorinfo.com for the latest on the possible conference shakeup.

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Bonner Springs swimmers bound for state The Bonner Springs boys swim team qualified several Braves for state competition last week in the team’s final home meet of the season. Blaine Edmondson qualified in the 50-yard freestyle medley. Edmondson joined Nate Mitchell, Ethan Hook and Ryan Cook to qualify to compete in the 200-yard freestyle relay as well. The 200-yard freestyle team qualified after it took second place (1:40.71) against teams from six other schools at the Wednesday, Feb. 1 meet. The same team finished fourth in the 200-yard medley relay (2:00.15).

Edmondson punched his ticket to state after he captured fourth place in the 50-yard freestyle medley (23.98). From there, Edmondson set another personal record in the 100-yard butterfly, finishing third (1:03.08). In the 500-yard freestyle, Thomas Hook finished ninth with a personal record of his own. Ethan Hook finished third in the 200-yard freestyle (2:18.63). Jacob Kraus set a new personal record in the 200-yard individual medley, finishing 10th (2:57.99). Ryan Cook placed sixth in the 100-yard breaststroke (55.26).

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attacking and running and getting the ball down court,” Oakes said. Hernandez scored five of the Braves’ final nine points. The Braves didn’t leave unscathed. Emily Wilson went down early in the second quarter after becoming tangled up and falling on defense. Oakes said she aggravated her left knee, which she sprained prior to the girls’ Jan. 13 game against Turner. Emily Wilson has worn a black knee brace since the injury. “She said she heard a slight pop,” Oakes said. “But she didn’t think it was a ligament.”

And while Emily Wilson sat out against Turner, Oakes said he hopes to have her back in time for Friday’s game against Mill Valley. The Jaguars, 12-3 and second in the Kaw Valley League, have won 12 straight since Bonner Springs won the two teams’ first meeting, 38-37, in the season’s third game. A Mill Valley victory would create a two-team gridlock atop the KVL standings. Also on Tuesday, the Jaguars routed Tonganoxie (10-5). The final score? 51-28. “We knew we were on a collision course with them,” Oakes said. At 6 p.m. Friday, prepare for impact in Bonner Springs.

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FEBRUARY 9, 2012

| 16

| NEIGHBORS |

SEND YOUR BEST SHOTS AT BONNERSPRINGS.COM & BASEHORINFO.COM

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Blake Waters Occupation: Basehor/Piper market president, First State Bank & Trust; president, Basehor Chamber of Commerce Place of birth: St. Francis Family: My wife, Kathryn, of 32 years; my son, Nate Waters, a captain in the U.S. Marine Corps, and my daughter-in-law Erin; and my daughter, Sarah Beardslee, a licensed professional counselor, and my son-in-law Michael. Q: When did you move to the Basehor area, and what brought you here? A: I moved here in 2006, for career advancement. Q: What's the biggest risk you've ever taken? A: Helping to open a new charter bank in Elkhart.

PHOTOS BY MATT ERICKSON/STAFF SEE THESE PHOTOS AND MORE ONLINE AT BASEHORINFO.COM

Above left: Jana Deters of Basehor bends down and helps her son Colton, 9 months old, clap his hands during a Basehor Parents as Teachers Fun and Fitness class Friday morning at Basehor Elementary School. Jana and Colton were part of the “non-walkers” session. Above right: Molly Crews pats her 16-month-old daughter Avery on the back after the workout class. "She was exhausted by the end of it," Crews said, and was ready for a nap. Parents did dance-themed exercises that included their infant or toddler children. Below left: Jen Penegar, who leads fitness classes at Sarah's Studio of Dance in Basehor through her business Extreme Fitness Fusion, uses a stuffed Elmo doll to demonstrate to parents how to incorporate their toddlers into their dance workout. Below right: As part of an abdominal exercise, parents and their toddlers make hand motions as a song plays. In the foreground are Kristine Fowle and her 15-month-old son, Isaac.

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The Chieftain Feb. 9, 2012