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Contents Meet the team...................................................................................................................5 History...............................................................................................................................6 Unions, Labour and Development: A tale of two developers....................................7 Silent Disco, Sustainable Style........................................................................................8 Modular Construction- Good or Bad?..........................................................................9 Iris Apfel...........................................................................................................................10 Where Else but Queensland..........................................................................................11 2012 Summer Exhibition..............................................................................................16 Grow-Time......................................................................................................................18 What has happened to the Architect...........................................................................19 Games Night...................................................................................................................20

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................................ Andrew Kiggundu President

................................ Brad Stacey Vice President

................................ Tamyka Patterson Secretary

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................................ Hannah Kidd Treasurer

................................ Daniel Kotzias Events Director

................................ Lauren Maher Academic Affairs Director (Sustainable Development and Environmental Science) ................................

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................................ Lily Brand Academic Affairs Director (Architecture)

................................ Emmanuel Gomez Post-Graduate Liaison

................................ ................................ Benjamin Hickey Rupert Harper Corporate Relations Competitions Officer Director

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................................ Elise Taylor Publications and Promotions Director ................................

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The Institute of Sustainable Development originally housed the Mirvac School of sustainable development which started in 2005. Bond University’s Mirvac School of Sustainable Development is the first designated planning and design institute in Australia to develop a new approach to architectural, planning, real estate and development education that fully integrates these variant elements. The Soheil Abedian School of Architecture will be completed will be completed in April 2013. The Mirvac School of Sustainable Development is one of the first buildings in Australia to achieve a 6 Green Star – Education PILOT rating which means the building is pretty much self-sufficient with wind turbines, regenerative lifts, water tanks, grey-water recycling system which lessens reliance on the local water supply, solar panels, active light & cooling sensors in each room and the extensive use of recycled materials in the construction. The building has won numerous awards from the United Nations, Government of Queensland and Australian Institute of Architects just to name a few however the magic really lies in between the interdisciplinary nature of the degrees offered and building working in unison. History The humble roots of the student representation began in 2005 with the Sustainable Development Students Associations (SDSA) as there was a need to represent, support and strengthen the student life within the faculty. As the world has changed, Bond as too which has resulted in the introduction of new degrees into the faculty such as Environmental Science, Environmental Management, Carbon Management, Architecture, Urban Planning, Project Management and Property Valuation just to name a few. The faculty has continued to grow and evolve so should the faculty representation. In 2012, SDSA became the Sustainable Students Association (SSA) which reflected the existing and future of the direction of the Institute of Sustainable Development encompassing and incorporating all the degrees of the faculty and not just property development and construction management. The SSA The Sustainable Students Association (SSA) is the main liaison body between students at the Institute of Sustainable Development and Architecture, Bond University’s academic staff and the general property industry. The association provides Bond University’s student body with a unique level of industry and academic access through a variety of networking functions, presentations and workshops to cater equally to undergraduate and postgraduate, local and international students. The stuff that we have in the cooker at the moment, is the Industry Networking Night in partnership with Blackboard which is now sixth semester which gives students ability to meet and network in a relaxed environment while knocking back some of the best food on the Gold Coast and in the long-term a unique social

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...................................................................................................................... Andrew Kiggundu President

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Unions, Labour and Development: A tale of two developers

Talks have failed to resolve the Grocon dispute after the CEO Daniel Grollo rejected a Fair Work Australia recommendation to put a hold on industrial and legal action for 14 days. Many of us can sympathise with his position as he finds it totally unacceptable to have talks with unions while it was illegally blockading sites and intimidating workes. Early today on the news, Grocon workers had to be escorted in the work site by police as CFMEU refused to move. It seems like something out of a movie. Things are not getting better, recently a meeting of building union leaders voted unanimously to support the CFMEU action. Like wildfire, industrial action has now spread to Grocon building site in Brisbane which shut down work for the day and attempted a similar action in Sydney which failed After many hours of talks, court orders and police force no significant headway was made. The estimated cost per day since the action has occurred is looking at $370,000 which Grocon put to the Supreme Court in an Injunction in Victoria. What signs does this show for the future, should developers have to employ non-union workers just to get work done.

Lend Lease CEO Steve McCan; on the back of the latest financial reporting received a 60% increase in salary shared his views on the current development climate. In an ABC interview, he stated that he is a strong believer of successes of enterprise bargaining and they seek to develop and nourish long standing relationships which produce good outcomes for parties. Recent economic data has shown high insolvency rates in the construction industry in NSW, housing market dropped 12.3% this month and 40% fall in apartment sales. Steve McCan view on the current market is that it is disappointing but not surprising as there have been a couple of blimps recently but the fall doesn’t come as much of a shock. Ultimately the way the market is presenting itself, Lend Lease’s strategy is simple to bring to the market, the right packages to take advantages of growth corridors. Maybe we can all learn something from Lend Lease. What are your views on the current issue?

Picket line workers at Grocon in Melbourne’s CBD. Picture: Pinder Trevor

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..................................................................................................... Brad Stacey Vice President

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Silent Disco, Sustainable Style Shuffling of feet, people breathing heavily, 100 students dancing in time with each other yet no music? This is the sound of the sustainable students association’s (SSA) first social event, the silent disco. In conjunction with the SSA, Redbull and One Society teamed up in order to make the event as successful as it was; with Redbull in charge of the DJ’s and silent headphone system, and One Society organising drink specials and buses to the after party in Sin City. The night began with the arrival of Bond Students at their favourite off campus pub, CBD. Upon arrival students who were keen to boogie made their way to the Silent Disco Section and those where thirsty made the best of the drink specials provided by One Society. These included the popular ‘Silent but Deadly’ shot and the infamous cocktail ‘Silence is Golden’. Upon arrival in the silent disco section, students were given their headphones and were instructed how to operate them; as Red Bull had been kind enough to have present two of their DJ’s play students had the option to change signal and tune into their selection of music,

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alternating between dubstep along the likes of Skrillex and house bangers such as Aviccii. This selection of the two quite different genres made for an interesting view with some of the students head banging to dubstep whilst the rest of the party goers got their shuffle and groove in time with the house music. After a few hours of silently getting down and throwing back ‘silent but deadly’ shots, students were ready for more and were ushered to the front of CBD and onto the famous Cyril’s ‘BendyBus’ to Sin City. All the usual banter was thrown on the bus with classics such as ‘I wish all the ladies’ and the infamous ‘My name is Jack’ chants which always quickens the sobering and hot bus ride into Surfers. A rowdy night in Sin City was a given and the sustainable students first social event was a popular success.


............................................................................................................................ Tamyka Patterson Secretary

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Modular Construction—Good or Bad? After the first six weeks of doing the tedious Capstone subject, a member of my group came across what I believe to be a very cool and modern construction method—Modular. Many or few of you may have through your time at Bond or somewhere else heard about Modular Construction, others of you may not have heard of it at all. This article will give you a brief background about the method and the benefits and disadvantages. Modular Construction is a relatively new method of construction within the industry, which involves factory made components of buildings. Modern Modular Construction involves larger components, such as sections of houses as seen in image below, are pre-fabricated in a warehouse and transported to the site.

So what are the benefits of Modular Construction? Well there are quite a few different benefits to using modular construction and they are: • Lower cost and capital expenditure, which when constructing a building is a MAJOR factor; • Construction time is reduced by up to 50%; • As a result of being constructed in a supervised and controlled

environment, material waste is reduced; • The logistics of the site are made simpler; and • From a sustainability and the public’s point of view it involves less disruption to the surrounding environment; • As we all should know many contractors and Project Managers dread theft and vandalism of materials, however modular construction prevents this from occurring! So now that I have covered some of the advantages of modular construction, it’s time to determine what or if there are any disadvantages with the method. There were very few disadvantages that could be found with this construction method; in fact the only aspect which is a disadvantage is the lack of understanding about the process within the industry. So if awareness or more information was provided about modular construction there would be nothing wrong the process! Besides individual opinions of the method of course, because for me despite this method being so advantageous, I still believe being out on site is important. So I have given you a basic run down of what modular construction is and the advantages and disadvantage, now it’s your turn to make the decisions yourself, is the way of the future for construction?

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........................................................................................................................... Hannah Kidd Treasurer

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IRIS APFEL.

I was doing research for my latest architectural assignment the first time I stumbled upon Iris Apfel. I was flicking through Rabbit Black (an online blog), looking for design inspiration and there she was. Oh she was glorious- wearing oversized owl glasses, endless bangles and every colour known to man. She was fabulously wrinkled and full of wisdom... Her philosophy on life? Dressing up is good for the soul. Now, as fellow Bondies, I know you can relate. I see the mischief you all get up when painting the town in your coloured spandex and themed costumes. Well at 91 years old, Iris still dons bright, feathery attire on a daily basis. And damn she looks good. The second time I discovered Iris, I was fiddling through the library resources, typing God knows what into Summon...and unexpectedly her name popped up again! It was in a book entitled Rare Bird of Fashion: the Irreverent Iris Apfel by Eric Boman that she made her second appearance. This book featured hundreds of items from Iris’ astonishingly eclectic wardrobe- shaped by half a century of travel, wit, humour and creative experimentation. Her ensembles were so extraordinary that New Yorks’ Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibited her closet in 2005. She was fabulously quirky and exciting and everything I want to be when I’m an old bird. And the best part is yet to come... Her wardrobe features items from flea markets and bazaars from around the world- A global op-shop hunter and a lady after my own heart. “Post-World War Two Europe was a wonderful classroom for me. Style made up for the lack of many material things -it ain’t what you do, it’s the way that you do it.”

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So if you want to pop some tags, but only have twenty dollars in your pocket, take a leaf out of Iris’ book and get creative! Walk the streets in your grandma’s coat, beads, bright feathers or anything of similar charm. And in the wise words of Venturi don’t forget, “Less is a bore...”


.............................................................................................................. Lauren Maher Academic Affairs Director (Sustainable Development and Environmental Science)

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Where Else but Queensland...... ASSESSING AUSTRALIAN ENVIRONMENTS FIELD TRIP UNDERTAKEN IN OCTOBER 2012 BY 20 STUDENTS, 2 TEACHERS AND 1 BUS DRIVER WHO COULD TALK YOUR EAR OFF. Monday 8 October 2012 At 7.15 am we set off through the sixth most populous city in Australia known as the Gold Coast. The Gold Coast’s metropolitan area is the home of Bond University where we boarded our Peter’s Coaches bus, along with our driver Rick. As we travelled through residential development, then commercial, then industrial we found ourselves along the Pacific Motorway heading towards our first stop of Gympie. Along the way we travelled through Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast. Unfortunately the drive wasn’t exactly scenic comprising mostly of vehicles resulting in traffic jams, with the exception of the view of the Brisbane River from the Sir Leo Hielscher Bridge, and again with the view of the Glass House Mountains National Park and pine plantation along the Bruce Highway. After several hours of driving we pulled up at Matilda Service Station at Gympie to enjoy some lunch. Not long and we were back on the bus. Heading out of Gympie towards our next stop at the macadamia farm near Bundaberg there was little to see except for sugar cane field after sugar cane field. On arrival at the macadamia farm we were met by two men from Bundaberg Sugar to give us a tour of the property. The processing of the nuts was explained first which included a tour of the factory. Did you know that they have an imagining machine which scans each and every macadamia nut then sorts it based on its colour! Next we were off to the farm. We were given a very thorough explanation of how the nuts are produced and cultivated, what the nuts comprise of, their nutritional qualities, and other uses including macadamia oil.

We pinched a few loose nuts hiding within the grass and cracked them open on the bus. They were delicious! Back on the bus again we were heading into down town Bundaberg for a chat with two members of the Bundaberg Fruit & Vegetable Growers Association to discuss what the region has to offer to the rest of the world, as well as government incentives including grants and subsidies for sustainable management. After a stop at the bottle-o for a bottle of red we are back on the bus heading towards Childers where we were to spend the night. Childers is a fairly small town comprising of approximately 1,350 people. The township is set on a ridge overlooking fields of rich volcanic soil and is renowned for its heritage character and is a classified National Trust town. Home for the night was the Palace Backpackers Hostel which I was a little spooked out about considered back in June 2000 an arsonist set fire to the hostel claiming the lives of 15 tourists! After having a shower we made our way to the restaurant for dinner where steak was on the menu! Luckily for myself and the two other vegetarians a vegetable curry was served! After a few glasses of wine it was off to bed for another big day tomorrow. Tuesday 9 October 2012 After a bite of toast for breakfast I went for a wonder down the main street of Childers for a morning coffee before it was back on the bus. Today we were heading north towards Emu Park but not without at stop at Gladstone first! The drive was much the same of that yesterday – passing through small towns including Gin Gin, Miriam Vale and Bororen with the highway bordered by grazing paddocks and crop fields. There was also a rare glimpse of the Great Dividing Range.

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It was stated that some fish were found with cloudy eyes, redness/skin discolouration or lesions. An investigation by Queensland Health found no link between diseases in fish from Gladstone Harbour and its surrounds, and human health issues. It was also mentioned that overtopping events at Awoonga Dam resulted in a significant number of stocked barramundi moving into the Boyne River estuary and Gladstone Harbour. These fish suffered physical stress during the floods which resulted in physical stress. Once the discussion had come to an end it was into the bus for a tour of the Port and its operations. It was interesting to learn that Gladstone Port has many natural advantages including a deepwater harbour, protected waters sheltered by harbour islands, stable weather patterns, abundant energy sources including coal, natural gas and water, as well as a short sailing time of 10 to 12 days to the Asia Pacific region. The Port’s facilities cater for the import of raw material and the export of finished product associated with major industries in the reWe were provided with an insight into the operations gion. Multi-user facilities cater for the export of the region’s coal, mineral and agricultural resources. of the port, along with a detailed explanation of the Western Basin Dredging and Disposal project. It was We even got to witness a vessel being loaded with interesting to hear about the suspected contamination coal for export! It was then off to Emu Park which we would call of the Gladstone Harbour, in particular reports from home for the next two nights. Emu Park is a small commercial fishers about a condition affecting fish town on the Capricorn Coast located 21 kilometres being caught in the Harbour south of Yeppoon. This small, peaceful town is a popular tourist spot and boasts views of Keppel Bay. We finally reached Gladstone, home to Queensland’s largest multi-commodity port. The town is currently overrun with workers from all over the world working for Gladstone’s primary industries which are mining-related. We made our way to Queensland Alumina Limited where we were given a tour of the refinery and lookout. I thought that our guide, Krystal, provided us with a lot of useful information in regards to environmental management although she is the Community Relations Officer. I found it interesting to learn about the measures taken to mitigate air quality, odour and water quality. Once the tour concluded it was off to Goondoon Street for some lunch. Unfortunately most of the group decided to eat at the local pub which seemed to run a little slower than what we were used to! Next stop was the Gladstone Ports Corporation (GPC). The GPC is a significant employer in the Central Queensland region with more than 670 people working across three port precincts, Gladstone, Port Alma and Bundaberg.

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Our resort was modern and even had a swimming pool! We all enjoyed a few drinks at the bar before tucking into a bbq dinner. After a few more beers it was time to call it a night in preparation for a day out on the water tomorrow! Wednesday 10 October 2012 Off to the local bakery we went for a coffee and a bite to eat before we headed up to Rosalyn Bay to depart on the Freedom Fast Cat over to Great Keppel Island. It was slightly overcast while we were waiting to board the boat, however once we were on the water the sun started to shine! It was love at first sight. The island was absolutely breathtaking. As soon as we arrived on the island we transferred onto a glass bottom boat for a guided tour around the island. We had the opportunity to see many different types of reefs, coral, marine life and even watched our guide feed the fish. Back to the beach we went. We all enjoyed a relaxing dip in the water before a bbq lunch was served. After lunch it was all aboard again so the boat could take us out to a reef for some snorkelling. Fortunately as I decided not to snorkel I was dropped off on the beach in the rubber ducky. Sheer paradise – I had the entire beach to myself, white sand and crystal blue water! Once snorkelling was over with we had to make one last stop back at the main beach to collect the remaining passengers. We were allowed half an hour off the boat before departure. I went for a wonder up along to beach to check out the abandoned resort. It was sad to see such an opportunity wasted – a resort has real potential on such a beautiful island like this! Time to head back to reality! I enjoyed a cold can of XXXX Gold on the journey home which was a little rougher than the journey to the island as the wind had picked up. After returning to the resort we fancied a dip in the pool before tucking into another bbq dinner – I think we were all getting over bbqs by this stage! After a few wines I decided to call it an early night while many of the others set off down to the beach to enjoy the fire.

An hour or so later and we arrived at Mount Morgan. It was a warm day with the smell of bush fires and sound of fire engines filling the main street. Mount Morgan is a quaint, historic town with a population of around 3,000, nestled in the foot of the Dee Ranges. The old mine still dominates the landscape overlooking the town and the Dee River giving an eerie appearance from a time long ago. We had a short toilet break before jumping onto another bus for a tour of the Mount Morgan Mine with our guides John and Camille. The mine site reveals yesterday’s mining methodology from grand old buildings, famous land marks to 100 year old equipment. The mine area today displays the many environmental challenges underway to manage the acid mine drainage and revegetation attempts over the site and the adjacent Dee River. I found this tour particularly interesting as I hope that one day I will be working within the mine rehabilitation field. Once the tour concluded we travelled down south minor highway which mainly comprised of dirt and gravel to the Callide Power Station where we were greeted by the Station’s Environmental Scientist, Ben. Ben boarded our bus and gave us a detailed tour of the station, however it was quite rainy and cold which seemed to of dampened the whole experience. Callide Power Station uses coal-fired power generation to supply baseload electricity to Australia’s national grid. Callide Power Station is comprised of Callide A, B and the Callide Power Plant (Callide C). Callide Power Station is also home to the site of the Callide Oxyfuel Project which utilises carbon capture and storage technology - unfortunately Ben could not tell us much about the project. We were then on our way to Cania Gorge to spend the night. Cania Gorge is some 35km west of Monto and boasts 3,000 hectares of spectacular landscapes, prominent sandstone cliffs, caves, eucalypt forest and dry rain forest. This secluded area is home to a variety of Australia’s native flora and fauna including kangaroos, rock wallabies, bettongs and numerous species of birdlife.

Thursday 11 October 2012 After two nights along the Capricorn Coast at Emu Park it was time to hit the road again. We set off back towards Mount Morgan. The route took us through the town of I got straight to work on dinner – fresh prawns from Rockhampton – a reasonably developed city which lies Rosalyn Bay, vegetable frittata, spinach and feta on the Fitzroy River. quiche and curry. What a feast! I enjoyed a bottle of red from a local winery in the Southern Burnett Region known as Clovelly Estate. After a few hours of conversation in our cabin it was time for bed.

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Friday 12 October 2012 I didn’t sleep too well last night so I decided to get up at 4.30 am this morning and go for a walk around the Gorge hopeful to spot some native wildlife. Unfortunately they were all still asleep except for a few cockatoos. We cooked breakfast and cleaned up our cabins before it was time to hit the road again. Next stop – Cecil Plains. It was a fairly decent drive from Cania Gorge to Cecil Plains and the scenery was much the same of that that we had experienced over the past week. After several hours of driving we reached the Cecil Plains Cotton Gin. Graham, a local cotton farmer gave us a very insightful talk about the local agriculture and farming industry, as well as the coal seam gas project. It was devastating to hear the effects that the project could potentially have on the local area and the community. I really felt for Graham and the rest of the locals. Once Graham’s talk was over we entered the Cotton Gin to experience first-hand how cotton is processed. The machinery was extremely loud so we all had to wear ear plugs. It was fascinating watching the cotton gin at work. I couldn’t believe how efficient the machines are - they can produce up to 54 cotton bales per hour! After a stop at Dalby to refuel with a bit of alcohol for the night we were off to the Jondaryan Woolshed. Dating from 1859 this magnificent building stands as a monument to Jondaryan station and the pioneers of the Darling Downs. In its heyday Jondaryan covered 300,000 acres and the woolshed itself was the jewel in the crown of what was one of the most prestigious sheep stations on the downs. After dinner and a few drinks around the fire it was time to call it a night in the historic Shearer’s Quarters – rooms built of corrugated iron, built in the late 1800’s. Luckily I had a warm sleeping bag because it was freezing!

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Saturday 13 October 2012 I finally got a bit of a sleep-in this morning in the Shearers Quarters. After having a tour of the museum exhibits including the old woolshed and listening to Tor reminisce about his days working at the woolsheds it was time to head off to the Bunya Mountains. The Bunya Mountains are a distinctive set of peaks forming an isolated section of the Great Dividing Range in southern Queensland. The mountain range forms the northern edge of the Darling Downs near Bell and Dalby. The range is the remains of a shield volcano which was built from numerous basalt lava flows about 23-24 million years ago. The mountains were quite chilly due to a cold snap hanging around. We set off on a bush walk through the Bunya Mountains National Park to have a closer look at the flora such as the ferns and staghorns, as well as the unique Bunya Pine. We also got the opportunity to hand-feed a small patch of colourful birds including king parrots and rosellas. The majority of us enjoyed lunch at the local cafe where I got to try some bunya nut chutney on my meatless bunya burger! It was quite sweet but tasty. Back on the bus we went for our final leg home! Much to my delight we got to drive through Toowoomba – my birthplace. It was great seeing all of the sights and recalling memories of when I was a child. Rick provided us with a very insightful guide detailing the effects and devastation of the recent ‘in land tsunami’. Finally we hit the Pacific Motorway and it was smooth sailing all the way back to Bond University. What a week we had had!


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........................................................................................................................... Elise Taylor Publications and Promotions Director

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After many long hours collaborating InDesign files, models, building structures to support the A1 panels, putting up lanterns, taking photos of each student, collecting construction prototypes and videos, the exhibition and annual magazine successfully came together in time for the arrival of hundreds of guests. The launch of the Soheil Abedian School of Architecture Summer Exhibition on 5th December showcased both first and second year work. The studio was opened up and transformed into an exhibition, which was completely created, constructed and curated by the first year Architecture students. Friends and family would often hear us talk of the ‘studio’ but never actually see any of our work until the launch of the exhibition. It brought friends and family even some from interstate together for one night to celebrate our past year of many hours of hard work.

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Along with the exhibition the first year students also produced an annual magazine called ‘Moment’ which also displayed work from both cohorts. Everything from the name of the magazine to the design of the front cover was created by these students. The list of potential titles from all students for the magazine was posted on our private Facebook group where all first year students were able to vote. Once the title was settled on ‘Moment’ the biggest challenge the magazine committee faced was creating a front page where all 23 students agreed . Lots of different ideas for the front cover were posted on the Facebook group. From there the team then had to collaborate all 44 articles and had to have the magazine ready for publication few weeks before the exhibition. Overall the Summer Exhibition and annual magazine was enjoyed by all. A fitting end to the 2012 year!


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............................................................................................................................ Lily Brand Academic Affairs Director (Architecture)

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Grow-Time

Graffiti – the art form that is still walking the fine line of social appreciation. Some love it, others despise it. Regardless, it is not a new trend, and it is starting to grow – literally! Gone are the days when graffiti was restricted to hooligans or hoodie-wearing teens who felt compelled to ‘tag’ every tangible object in their sights – graffiti is now classified as art by some, and many people are passionately approaching in this way too. Most commonly known as ‘moss graffiti,’ ‘eco-graffiti’ or ‘green graffiti,’ there are two prominent processes that can be undertaken to form this natural art. The most raw of creation occurs through the blasting of high pressure water hoses onto moss-coated public walls. With this hose, they create highly detailed ‘drawings’. Comparatively, artists choose to ‘grow’ their graffiti from scratch. Painting the public wall in a glorious adhesive concocted from ingredients such as sugar, beer and yoghurt.With processes such as these, it is easy to understand why this form of artistic expression is much kinder on the earth.

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British artist Anna Garforth appears to be the pioneer of this ever-growing wolfpack, and she is showing no sign of slowing down. With clients such as the Deutsche Bank, London College of Communication and Holland Graphic Design Museum, her artwork is bringing graffiti into a whole new world – but she hasn’t lost her faith in the impact of smaller works. According to Garforth, she has no fear of “sneaking behind locked gates” and focusing on the “small wilderness.” But do not think for a second that this movement has not come out of nowhere. Many consider it to be an elaboration of the ‘green wall’, founded by French botanist Patrick Blanc, as well as the concept of the green roof – favoured by many architects around the world. With the only change really occurring in materials, it is fascinating the impact that it can have. A “revitalising” contribution to general society, green graffiti, at its heart, seeks to challenge and alter the urban landscape that envelops many, and with that, create sustainable artworks.


........................................................................................................................ Emmanuel Gomez Post-Graduate Liaison

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What has happened to the architect? Why is architecture being taught the way it is? Who really cares about a building that tells a story about its design? Who cares about a design that is not feasible or pragmatic enough? Why are designs being produced where the proposal does not meet zoning conditions of land and/or property? These were some of the many questions that emerged when I tried to study architecture. While I arrived from a background in analysis of urban planning and a little bit of urban planning, it was rather challenging to come up with a design that tells a story by itself or even coming up with ‘good’ or ‘effective’ design. In urban planning, you do not get much of a choice or option – everything has to work. In architecture, it seems like while designs should work, it is not that big of a deal if it does not work. The decision(s) is and/or are based mostly on the budget and the schedule of the project. While the architect strives to make their structure/building look good in their eyes, the client has the final say if they like the design or not. However, as architects essentially mostly only care about exterior design, it is the most noticed portion to numerous people that pass around the vicinity of the architect’s structure. However, architecture has become a more of a principle of “dressing up” buildings rather than “making buildings work”. In the last few decades, the profession of an architect has lost value and possibly even recognition. Architects who have been practicing architecture for the last few decades, construction managers, developers and builders would probably be able to notice this shift in numerous students that come out of school without an idea of how to have the insides of a building structure function even though the outside of a building is aesthetically appealing. Perhaps in this manner of teaching, it is the only way students can broaden their horizons with architecture. When they are in the real world, they will have to consider numerous constraints such as cost, time, schedule, resources, and materials and so on and so forth. Nonetheless, since architects are known for their dressing up ofbuildings, some refer to architects as “hairdressers” of the construction industry.

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http://www.facebook.com/BondSSA

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SSA Gazette