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TRIED AND TESTED

INSIDE

Adriano Zumbo Will Goldfarb Pod Chocolate Savory Chocolate Dishes

ARE YOU

A CHOCOHOLIC? APR 14 | volume 1, Issue 04

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P U B L I S H E R ’ S N OT E

Why Chocolate?

Because it’s good. Why else? Scientists will probably throw in some names like “dopamine” and “theobromine” that has a chemical reaction in the brain’s pleasure center that triggers a close-youreyes-in-pleasure type of response, and these scientists will have you believe that this is the reason why chocolate is somewhat a universal pleasure inducing food. What is YOUR story? Why do YOU like chocolate? All I know is that, I used to take a spoonful of milo straight from the cannister and indulge in a few seconds of chocolate bliss. I have never heard of Hershey’s, or even the cheapo local brands, my first memory of chocolate is Milo. Throughout our lives we learn that chocolate is positive, family, friends and the media make this clear. Valentines chocolates, Christmas chocolates, Easter bunny chocolate, it’s in weddings, birthdays, break-ups, make-ups, when you want to stay awake, before you go to sleep and even when you wake up. More often than not, it is the go-to food when you are depressed, of course that will not make everything go away, but it will allow the less important items that take up mental space to drop away. One advice, if you do choose chocolate, take your time with it as it enhances your positive experience because all of your attention is focused, and you are able to lengthen the amount of time that you experience pleasure. Case in point, nobody takes up a hobby (sports, knitting, yoga) that lasts for only a few seconds. In the end, we just crave chocolate because Linnaeus was dead-on when he named the plant Theobroma Cacao, or “Food of the Gods”. What is MY guilty choco-pleasure? I’ll take a frozen bar of Snickers with a glass of milk any time of the day while I enjoy this edition of the Foodie Magazine.

Publisher Richmond Blando Editor-at-Large Jed V. Doble Art Director Juke Bachtiar Editor Rafael Reyes Photographer Dennie Benedict Contributors Himawan Sutanto Rian Farisa Akhmad Baihaki (Aki) Hery Hermawan Adithya Pratama Administration Boedy Astuti Distribution Mukti Pelupessy

Happy Indulgence, RICHMOND BLANDO

PT. NUSA BINTANG LESTARI Jl. Gunawarman no. 16 • Kebayoran Baru South Jakarta • Indonesia Tel: +62 21 2905 3959 www.thefoodiemag.com

Photograph by ZELJKO DAN

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E D I TO R ’ S N OT E

I am Jed Doble, and I am a chocoholic. Don’t get me started. I love chocolate, any kind of chocolate. As a kid, growing up in Manila, I would buy Serg’s chocolate bars with my allowance. They were cheap and not really good by any chocolate standard, but I loved them! When my taste started to refine, my favorite became Toblerone. The creamy milk or white chocolate together with the nougat bits was just divine. Of course, there was a steady supply of the American brands at the supermarket, so every week I would ask, nay beg, Mom to buy me some. Hershey’s, Mars Bars, Snicker’s, 3 Musketeers, Butterfinger, BabyRuth, Milky Way, M&M’s. You name it, I loved it. Of course, as I grew older and a bit wiser, I knew I had to slow down on the chocolate. When I started to work and was earning my own paycheck, I would go to the grocery on my own and buy my stash. I would tuck myself away in my room and eat chocolate. Of course I had to hide since I would be scolded by Mom for eating too much! To this day, any time you open my fridge, there will be some chocolate in it. Now you all know. I think Australian patissier Adriano Zumbo, said it correctly, to paraphrase, he says that chocolate has a way of exciting us, it makes us naughty. And so, to everyone out there, who are secretly or publicly admitted chocoholics, this issue is for you. Leading off our issue is my article on Adriano Zumbo, whom I was very privileged to meet during a trip to Bali last month. Known for his amazing pastries and signature Zumbarons, we discover that Adriano is a chocoholic like myself. I am in good company, it seems. We also feature Bali chocolate producer, POD, who aim to create premium chocolate from the island’s cacao plantations. There is also an article on Chef Will Goldfarb of Mejakawi on his love for chocolate. Our Taking It To The Streets section is filled with sweet treats, Martabak Favourite and Roti Bakar Eddy. Plus we also have recipes for The Dharmawangsa Jakata’s famed Chocolate Martini and Pullman Jakarta Central Park’s chef Alexis Gudimard’s Royal Cake. I am definitely sure, this issue will give you a chocolate rush! I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I have enjoyed the chocolate tasting as we made it! Now back to my chocolate bar. JED V. DOBLE Editor at Large

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C O N T R I B U TO R S

THE GUEST LIST HIMAWAN SUTANTO

RIAN FARISA

AKHMAD BAIHAKI (AKI)

Himawan did portraiture for editorial, advertising and design clients for many years and also had a stint doing commercial photography. His love for food and travel brought him naturally to turn his lens on food and lifestyle which he thoroughly enjoys. He has recently been traveling to take photos for a global hotel chain. When not away shooting photos he tries to spend as much time with his newborn son.

Once a foodie, always a foodie. Rian started his popular food blog gastronomyaficionado.com in 2009. He has since become a culinary contributor for lifestyle and inflight magazines and newspapers. His job ranges from having intriguing conversations with celebrity chefs to memorizing the French names of Michelin-starred dishes he encounters. But at the end of the day he enjoys his scouring the city for good soul food with his beloved wife.  

Entusiastic and dedicated Aki has been a proffesional photographer for over 10 years now. Originally from Mojokerto, East Java, in his spare time, he loves to travel, watch and play his favorite sports and listen to music.

Photographer

Writer

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Photographer

Hery Hermawan

ADITHYA PRATAMA

Bali-based photographer, Hery Hermawan transformed his love for photography into a career in just three years and he keeps gaining momentum. With strong concepts and an innate ability to cover the gamut thematically, his expansive collection continues to grow--from weddings to landscape to day-to-day images. Hery meticulously covers the details. He has a vision from preproduction, ensuring his final product.

With two diplomas in pastry & bakery arts, Adithya finds himself engulfed with chocolate and butter all the time. Out of the kitchen, he’s an aspiring food and travel writer, food stylist and an avid scuba diver. When no one is looking, he will concede to a bar of Valrhona’s Araguani.

Photographer

Writer


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

The Foodie magazine volume 1, Issue 04

Things That Make You Go Yum 12 Are you a Chocoholic?

The Foodie’s List 14 Le Café Gourmand 16 HYDE 18 Easter Surprises

Cover Feature: Are You a Chocoholic? 20 24 28 30 34 36 40

Adriano Zumbo, Chocoholic Pod: From Bean to Bar Our Favorite Ice Cream Flavor For The Love of Chocolate Foodology: Choco Facts Starting Young Let Them Eat Cake

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

Went There Ate That 44 A Trip to Padova

Tried and Tipsied 46 THE Chocolate Martini 48 Wonderful Chocolate Cocktails

The Finer Things 52 Chocolate On High

Culture 54 Indonesia’s Love for Chocolate

Taking It To The Streets 58 Martabak Favourite 60 Roti Bakar Eddy

Iconic 62 Tan Ek Tjoan

Confessions of A Foodie 64 Billy Oscar & Luissa Luvania

A Foodie’s Life 66 Ronald Prasanto

Maya’s Musings 68 Maya’s Way Of Enjoying Chocolate

Tried and Tested 72 A Royal Treat

Stuff of Legends 78 Ermey Trisniarty – La Femme Chocolat

Pantry 101 84 Know Your Chocolate

What Chef Eats 86 Astrid Hadywibowo www.thefoodiemag.com | 11


T H I N G S T H AT M A K E Y O U G O Y U M

Things That Make You Go Yum is monthly column featuring our choices of the best

by JED DOBLE

food photos on Instagram. If you think you have a great photo worth sharing with us, tag it with #TTMYGY and @TheFoodieMag

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first prize @reynaldi_m reynaldi muliawan YES! I’m a chocoholic

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T H I N G S T H AT M A K E Y O U G O Y U M

Congratulations to the winners of our Chocoholic TTMYGY photo contest! Please email us your contact details to claim your prizes. info@thefoodiemag.com

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2n E PRIZ SECOND prize @anakjajan julia & Marius Amazing Chocolate Dessert by @janicewong2am

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3r E PRIZ THIRD prize @melbudiman MEL BUDIMAN Homemade hot chocolate with marshmallow www.thefoodiemag.com | 13


F O O DI E L I S T S

01 LE CAFÉ GOURMAND by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

Hailing from Surabaya, Le Café Gourmand’s appearance in Jakarta quite recently brings good tidings for the explorer of finer things in coffee and desserts. This new addition to the city’s culinary scene should make living in an era where dessert lovers can now get their way when it comes to dining out.

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F O O DI E L I S T S

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alan Gunawarman is definitely a great place to start for Le Café Gourmand. The all-day hustle and bustle through this street means progress and for that, the café starts early in the morning to serve everyone a quick cup of jo and Eggs Benedict before heading next to Sudirman or Senayan. Sometime later in the afternoon, people will come in after lunch and enjoy a couple of bites on Le Café Gourmand’s famed mille feuille and the chocolate tarts, among others like panna cotta, cheese cake, truffle cake, or even ice cream. Intriguing homemade ice cream flavors like crème brulee, peanut butter, salted caramel and white chocolate, the sorbets, or the oldie goodie rum raisin are among the best you can find here. One time, I personally had the latter flavor combined with coffee on their sought after best seller Affogato Espresso and

indeed it’s a must-try for anyone who visits the café for the first time. With that, it brings us automatically to the coffee subject and Le Café Gourmand is not short of options for this. From their majestic Kees van der Westen’s espresso machine to manual brews like Siphon or V60, they simply have what it takes to take coffee to the next level and the rest is, of course, up to the skill and knowledge of the man behind the machine alongside the magical beans. In terms with how it looks, we will all admit that this café has its own charm with neat décor, interesting painting on the walls and a warm, jazzy atmosphere that will make anyone prolong their stay and have their second pot of tea. But make no mistake because it gets full at times and you might want to reserve first. So, if you are looking for a place to mingle with your friends over dessert and coffee, now you know where to go now.

LE CAFÉ GOURMAND | Jalan Gunawarman 65, Jakarta | +62 21 2930 5522 Facebook: Le Café Gourmand | Instagram: @instagourmand

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02 HYDE by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

Kemang new eatery, Hyde, features talented young chefs behind the kitchen and a cool place to chillax, just a few steps away from traffic jams and the noise.

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or Jakartans, Kemang is simply priceless. It’s probably one among a few neighborhoods in the city where you can walk around to shop and dine like as if you were in Kuta or Seminyak, freed from the air-conditioned shopping malls, and hopelessly hoping for some fresh air in return. Not saying that Kemang is an ideal place for an easy walk like that thanks to the small sidewalks, the overly busy streets, and especially the humidity but Jakartans should be thankful nevertheless. While shops, pubs, and restaurants compete over the hegemony on the main streets, one particular new restaurant vows

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to rule over Kemang’s culinary scene from the quieter side of the neighborhood. Yes, like most Londoners who would take refuge at Hyde Park from the busyness of the capital, the safe haven philosophy is also adopted by this restaurant known by as Hyde, the mononym of the famous park itself. Inside the quiet Jalan Taman Kemang, Hyde appears more like a Greek-style restaurant with its whitewashed walls and large windows, although not surrounded by the blue Aegean Sea. Inside you will be welcomed first by an island bar encircled by different themes of dining areas with greenery ornaments on the walls and

convertible roofs, giving the extra spirit from the natural light. Moreover, finally you can enjoy your hang out time with ease on the alfresco dining section at the fore of the venue. From the kitchen, the creative minds behind Hyde are no other than young chefs, Ray Janson, Odie Djamil and Widarta Ryan. They work hand-in-hand to whip out sophistication on the menu with Ray’s French cooking techniques and Odie’s modernist desserts. In this chocolate issue, it would not be wise to rule out Odie’s fantastic dessert creations at Hyde. Take for example, his


F O O DI E L I S T S

interpretation of Chocolate Soil. The Bailey’s chocolate mousse is covered with “dirt”, as a result of transformation of chocolate using maltodextrin and then places this inside a small pot with a micro herb on top of it. Other creations prepared by Odie that you can find here are such as chocolate and PB&J lava cake, sugar-apple butter honey bread, earl grey tea cremeux, and other stuffs waiting to be discovered by you. From the hot kitchen, Hyde prepares Asian and Western choices including the decadent 24-hour lamb shank with ratatouille, steaks, ribs, and delicacies from the sea. Also, Hyde’s signature burger consisting of mozzarella cheese with brioche buns, crispy onion rings, homemade sauerkraut, sunny side up egg, with a side of fries and garden salad, a killer combination that you must not miss while you’re here. As the night grows long, Hyde becomes a great place to socialize over good drinks and good music, but you can still feel the romance in the air. It is simply a good place for anyone, anytime.

HYDE | Jalan Taman Kemang 1A no. 8, Jakarta | +62 21 5610 3888 Facebook: HYDEKemang

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Easter Surprises

At the Foodie Magazine, we love Easter or any holiday as a reason to go out and eat. Here are a few of our Easter highlights. The Dharmawangsa Jakarta presents the lavish Easter Super Brunch on Easter Sunday, April 20th 2014. A huge selection of scrumptious menu items, live music and fun activities for the kids, is sure to be an extravagant Easter treat. Experience a variety of mouthwatering delicacies such as Calvasius Italian Caviar (Caviar de Venise, Da Vinci, Calvasius Tradition, Oscietra Classic and Oscietra Royal) with traditional condiments, AOC Chantal Plasse French cheese selection, Seafood Vaganza Tower, Pan Fried Foie Gras, Roasted Organic Galician Cote De Boeuf and Around the World Corners (Italian, Japanese, Mexican, Spain, Indian, Asian and Indonesian). Compliment your Super Brunch with free flow flow Laurent Perrier Champagne, cocktails, mocktails, iced tea and juices. With room to spare, sample the Dessert Station with made to order Brandy Banana Flambe with Praline Crepes and Red Bean Banana Beignet in live stations, Assorted Chocolate and Fruit Mousse with Cotton Candy, Chocolate Soufflé, and our Chocolate Fountain and with an array of tempting condiments.

Easter Super Brunch The Dharmawangsa Jakarta Jalan Brawijaya, Jakarta +62 21 7258181 www.the-dharmawangsa.com

Kronuts and Eclairs Mandarin Oriental Jakarta Jalan M.H. Thamrin, Jakarta +62 21 2993 8888 www.mandarinoriental.com/jakarta The Mandarin Oriental Jakarta Cake Shop presents their new Hazelnut Kronuts and Éclairs, exclusively designed by our awardwinning pastry chef, Wita Girawati. Indulge in the mouth-watering Hazelnut Kronuts, a combination of delicate hazelnut cream with Nutella topping. Also, tempt your palate with hazelnut éclairs. The delicious pâte à choux is filled with hazelnut cream and topped with hazelnut coating and crushed hazelnuts.

Bunny Hop Hotel Indonesia Kempinski Jakarta Jalan M.H. Thamrin no. 1, Jakarta +62 21 23583800 www.kempinski.com/jakarta Children of all ages can hop over to Signatures Restaurant to celebrate Easter together with all the sweet treats! On the Good Friday, 18 April from 12.00 to 15.00 there will be Easter-themed coloring activities while parents can enjoy a long buffet lunch. On Saturday and Easter Sunday, the buffet brunch will feature egg hunting, rabbit racing and a giant egg coloring activities. Children under the age of 5 dine for free, while children ages 6 to 12 get 50% off.

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F O O DI E L I S T S At the Sunny Bunny Brunch, guests can gather and spend a convivial afternoon savouring an array of mouth-watering international and Asian dishes, including a selections of Indonesian signature dishes, a foie gras station, choices of Indian delicacies, a seafood and fresh oysters corner, a homemade pasta station, freshly steamed dim sum, Peking duck, roast rib eye, grilled baby lamb, and a huge selection of delightful sweet treats. Kids can also have their own fun as exciting games with cute bunny rabbits while being entertained by the Easter Bunny. Children are also invited to take part in the junior chef club and show their creative side in the Easter cake decorating competition.

Sunny Bunny Brunch Four Seasons Hotel Jakarta Jalan H.R. Rasuna Said, Jakarta +61 21 252 3456 www.fourseasons.com/jakarta

An Italian Easter Experience Intercontinental Bali Resort Jalan Uluwatu 45, Jimbaran, Bali +62 361 701 888 www.bali.intercontinental.com From Friday 18th April until Sunday 20th April, savour the tantalizing flavours of specially created Easter menus. For a finedining experience, enjoy a delectable Italian Easter Dinner at the elegant Bella Cucina Italian Restaurant of the InterContinental Bali, Jimbaran, where Chef Riccardo Ioana has creates a different set menu from each night.

The Cookie Shots The Ritz-Carlton Jakarta, Mega Kuningan Jalan Lingkar Mega Kuningan Kav. E.1.1 NO.1 Mega Kuningan, Jakarta +62 21 25518888 www.ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/Jakarta

Pastry Chef, Hendri Chang, presents a first in Indonesia, The Cookie Shot. Crafted to enliven your sweet tooth, this favorite cookie and milk combination is a new approach of innovation. The Cookie Shots are handmade sugary treats of hard cake, crumbled with chocolate-chips built within its delicious walls. Innovatively formed into the shape of a shot-glass, these little treats will satiate any chocolate craving. The Cookie Shot can be enjoyed as an individual dessert with warm milk poured into them or with their signature crème brûlée.

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Adriano Zumbo, Chocoholic by JED DOBLE photographs by AKI

Australia’s most celebrated pâtissier, Adriano Zumbo, started his life-long affection with chocolate by literally being left in the candy store! We sit down with him and talk chocolate.

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eality TV show MasterChef Australia instantly transformed pâtissier Adriano Zumbo into a household name. The show featured his croquembouche, macaron tower and V8 cake, and the public simply ‘ate them all up.’ Adriano’s desserts and pastries showed extraordinary skill and easily caught the attention of the public, with their use of very unique ingredients and quirky names. A confessed chocoholic, Adriano proclaims: “Chocolate is one of my favorite ingredients. It is such a versatile product. We all grew up with it.” Adriano further explains his love for chocolate. “Chocolate brings out the naughty in me. It’s that little voice in the back of your head, pushing you to be naughty. You know you don’t really need it and sometimes, you shouldn’t have it, but the little voice makes you decide to have it!” Adriano adds: “Chocolate excites the brain and the body. It goes with any flavor. I just truly love it!” Growing up, Adriano’s parents owned the local grocery store in Coonamble, New

South Wales. “I was literally the kid left in the candy store. I had my fill of lollies and chocolate, and it was all free! I would stuff my bag every time I went through the racks!” Adriano tell us that his favorites then were the Milo Bars and the Curly Wurly caramel bars. This is where naturally, Adriano developed his penchant for chocolate and the sweet things. But I guess, being exposed to the grocery store also instilled in him a keen business sense. After finishing high school Adriano traveled to Sydney to start his pastry apprenticeship in 1997. It’s his love affair with confectionery, combined with his Parisian training at institutions that include l’Ecole Lenôtre, Bellouet and stagés at Pierre Hermé and Damiani, which has resulted in a sensibility as delicious as it is irreverent. Adriano has opened six stores throughout New South Wales and Victoria. His flagship store at The Star Casino and Hotel complex in Sydney. Adriano Zumbo at The Star is an exciting concept store which comprises of a patisserie and

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C O V E R F E AT U R E an innovative dessert train. The decor showcases Adriano’s philosophy on food; it should be fun, textural, appealing to the eye and above all else taste incredible. A full range of cakes, Zumbarons and pastries are available. Also on sale are Adriano’s handcrafted chocolates. The whimsical dessert train allows you to simply take plates off the conveyor belt for a small treat. The open plan kitchen also lets you watch the talented chefs in action as they whip up some amazing creations.  Adriano has also released two books. His first, Zumbo in October 2011, which featured his desserts and in October 2012 Adriano released his second book Zumbarons, which celebrates his most popular creations, macarons, with 40 flavours to delight and inspire. The Zumbo South Yarra patisserie is their first venture into Victoria! Mirrored panels and pink neon dominate the modern interior, reflecting Adriano’s signature quirky and innovative style. The custom built pastry cabinet houses a collection of delectable cakes, colourful Zumbarons, tarts and pastries. They also carry the new line of

ADRIANO ZUMBO | www. adrianozumbo.com Twitter and Instagram @zumbopatisserie

hand crafted ice creams. And just last month, the newest addition to the Zumbo family was the opening of their located in the historical Queen Victoria Building in Sydney’s inner city. As usual, to end my chat with Adriano, I ask him what his chocolate guilty pleasures are. Without hesitation, he says that his all time favorite is chocolate fondant cake. He loves the texture of the cake and is always in awe as he cuts into it and the goowey chocolate center oozes out. A more sophisticated favorite are chocolate spheres, Adriano adds. He appreciates the effort put into making the spheres, with different layers of flavor, plus the added surprise of finding out what the sphere is concealing inside.

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POD: FROM BEAN TO BAR by JED DOBLE

Indonesian chocolate producers are few and far between. Quite an irony since Indonesia is the third largest producer of cacao. Bali based Pod supports local farmers to grow organic cocoa beans to produce a selection of high quality single origin chocolates.

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met Toby Garritt, owner and main man behind Pod, by coincidence at the lobby of the W Bali. He was wide eyed and smiling when he was introduced to me. He showed me his products and I was immediately impressed. Only then did I realize that ,unknown to me, I had already been enjoying the chocolates Pod was producing at some of Bali’s hotels. I told Toby that I had to visit his factory. And a few weeks later, I did come to visit. As we approached the Pod factory and café, I realize that organizing such an endeavor is no small feat. I ask Toby how he got into the chocolate business. “We were driving along and we saw some cocoa trees. I’d never tasted cocoa before and never even knew what a cocoa tree looked like. A friend cut a cocoa pod off the tree, cut it open and then said for us to try some. We were amazed by the flavor, we were never expecting anything to taste like that, part mangosteen, part soursop.” But the next thing that popped into their heads was, how does one make chocolate for this. Toby later discovered that there is no place really to go to learn how to make chocolate. You had to discover it yourself. So he spent a good part of 2010 and 2011 experimenting with cacao beans and trying to make chocolate. It was clear from very early on that the process at the farm level was critical to

make consistent and high quality chocolate. After a huge numbers of test on roasting times and recipes, finally Toby thought that he had it. But when they repeated the process, the outcome would be totally different. There reason for this was that farmers they were getting the beans from were doing different things to the beans. After the farmers have harvested the cocoa pods from the trees, some of the most crucial work begins to make fine, high-grade chocolate. The beans must be carefully fermented to bring out the very best flavors. It is unfortunate that the process of proper fermentation is under-appreciated. Most farmers in Bali don’t ferment their beans, there is no tradition of fermenting in Indonesia, plus it was additional work for them. Countries that have big production capacity need

to use fermented beans. To the artisanal chocolatier, proper cocoa fermentation is critically important. Chocolate made from unfermented cocoa beans does not have the body and richness as chocolate made from fermented cocoa beans. Thus finding fermented beans Bali was not easy. Toby had to help the 200 or so farmers they work with understand the value of fermentation. Toby says that there is a delicate balance working with farmers. If they worked with too many farmers, more than their capacity to produce chocolate, as in any supply chain, some farmers will not be able to sell their beans. “I wanted to be cautious. Farmers often hear a lot of empty promises. It was important for me to say as what we do, that is how we gained the trust of the farmers. It is really important for us.”

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Another area Pod works with the farmer is in pest control. Across Indonesia, the biggest pest to the cacao pods is the pod boarer. It is a mosquito like insect that drills a hole into the cocoa pod and lays thousands of eggs. These hatch inside the pod and destroy it from inside out. At least 50% of harvests are destroyed. Using pesticides doesn’t help, because aside from being expensive and unhealthy, pesticides kill all the insects, including the good insects, like ant and aphids which help pollinate the trees. Toby tells me that they work with a young agronomist , and she came up with the idea of using pheromones of the female pod boarer to attract the male pod boare. Essentially, they try to kill the male pod boarers so that they cannot breed. This is a method of pest control called improved pest management, which doesn’t focus on just killing insects but focuses on the breeding cycle of the insects. This connection with the land and respect and support for its farmers that forms the heart of Pod’s chocolate making philosophy. Toby tells me that in selling and marketing Pod, they have two main areas in which they work. One is to provide chocolate and chocolate products to hotels and restaurants, for pastry use, desserts, cooking and amenity products, such as in room gifts. The other is their retail concept, which is now in the works. “We don’t want to put the brand in supermarkets or boutiques. So we decided to build our own chocolate lounge concept. Wherein the focus is around the chocolate,. It will be a showcase for our products, a showcase of how chocolate can be used in our cakes pastries and desserts. It is an edgy, sexy and comfortable place to relax and enjoy chocolate.” As Toby speaks, his passion for the business, their partners and the chocolate is palpable. If you are in Bali, be conscious of the chocolate desserts you consume, I am quite sure, they may be made from Pod chocolates. Who knows soon, Pod may reach Jakarta and other cities in Indonesia or abroad. Passion drives success, and that is what we wish for Pod.

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C O V E R F E AT U R E

POD CHOCOLATE | Jalan Tukad Ayung, Carangsari, Petang, Bali | +62 361 837 0888, +62 361 239 440 www.podchocolate.com | Facebook: podchocolate

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Our Favorite Ice Cream Flavor by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

We at The Foodie Magazine are avowed chocoholics, so we scoured the streets of Jakarta to find the best chocolate ice cream there is. Now, let’s see which one becomes your favorite!

RON’S LABORATORY Created by the molecular gastronomist, Ronald Prasanto, the ice cream shop boasts of experimental ice cream flavors and scientific tweaks. Get ready to queue if you happen to visit during the weekends! RON’S LABORATORY | Grand Indonesia – West Mall 5th fl, Jakarta – Indonesia +62 21 9878 2192 | www.ronslaboratory.com | Twitter: @ronslaboratory

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THE BREAKFAST

ULTIMATE DARK VADER

RED VELVET

Inspired by his childhood breakfast favorite, Ronald created this gelato that consists of milk and cream but added with a generous dollop of Nutella to give that richer taste. Additionally the ice cream is also showered with cornflakes, thus resembling our favorite cereal breakfast.

Not wanting his customers to just experience the stereotypical taste found in other chocolate ice creams, Ronald uses 70% local dark chocolate mixed with Valrhona for this flavor. By that, he wanted to give a hint of elegance but something that everyone could also afford.

As one of the most famous flavors at Ron’s Laboratory, Ronald has given this formulation special attention since the beginning. He specifically uses medium roast chocolate powder he acquired from a chocolate supplier for the basic ingredient and presents the ice cream with a syringe fully loaded with cream cheese, as inspired from hawker’s ketchup bottles.

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LIN ARTISAN ICE CREAM

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LIN will always be known as the first liquid nitrogen ice cream parlor in Indonesia and has a relaxing ambiance to spend your weekend having an ice cream treat. Their latest ice cream creations that involve chocolate as we featured here are definitely not to be missed. LIN Artisan Ice Cream | Jalan Taman Kemang 1 no. 6, Jakarta – Indonesia +62 21 7179 4393 | www.linicecream.com Twitter: @linicecream

4 MILO DINOSAUR

NUTELLA

While it is more known as a much-loved beverage for both children and adults, LIN also adapts it in the form of ice cream and features it as one of their latest creations. As for the rest, LIN relies upon the richness of the milk and cream to make it wholesomely delicious.

The luscious hazelnut chocolate flavor from Nutella is successfully adapted by LIN and it became a wonderful addition for the rich array of LIN’s finest ice creams. Not only that, this flavor is also combined with crushed Marie Regal biscuit to give the crunchy texture.

6 ESKIMOMO

7 CHOCO MINT COOKIES

CHOCO ORANGE

The delicate taste coming out from this particular flavor comes from an inspirational combination of dark chocolate with a hint of fresh mint alongside cookie crumbs. Therefore, the flavor of the ice cream feels elegant while also refreshing and colorful.

The invigorating orange tang from this milky chocolate ice cream comes from a great combination of citrus and candied orange peel. With a combo like that, surely you can imagine that chocolate ice cream alone will never put you in a state of boredom anymore.

The duo of best friends, Gupta and Primo, started their home ice cream business for delivery just last year but they’ve quickly amassed popularity and already distribute their products to as far as Bandung. Currently, Eskimomo is only serving online order and ready for delivery around Jakarta. ESKIMOMO | Jakarta: +62 81 2858 77334, Bandung: +62 85 9742 10637 www.helloeskimomo.com Email: helloeskimomo@gmail.com

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C O V E R F E AT U R E

For The Love of Chocolate by JED DOBLE photographs by HERY PORTRAIT & AARON CIMARON

Each of Chef Will Goldfarb’s desserts at Mejakawi is a work of art, always an interesting play with flavor and texture, using the most modern of cooking techniques. He sits down with us to chat about his favorite ingredient, chocolate.


C O V E R F E AT U R E

“I

love it all!” exclaims Chef Will Goldfarb. Growing up as a kid in New York, Chef Will was exposed to all the brands of chocolate. Kit Kat, Snickers and Mars were his favorites. During the holidays, he would get a taste of the luxury brands such as Godiva and Leonidas. He loved them all! I asked Will to share with us some of his chocolate memories. The very first thing which came to mind was his mother’s chocolate chip cookie recipe. A version of Nestlé’s Toll House Chocolate Chip cookies, he says the recipe is indestructible. You can never go wrong with it, to this day, we still make this recipe at home. Another favorite is the Molten Chocolate cake. The Michel Bras original, a soft chocolate cake with a liquid center still conjures up fun memories for Will, even if he had his first one 25 years ago. Having worked with various culinary legends such as Ferran and Albert Adria, Tetsuya Wakuda , Gerard Mulot and Fabio Picchi, Chef Will Goldfarb has created his fair share of chocolate masterpieces. In Paris, in 1997, he created his first plated dessert, which was coincidentally a chocolate mousse with pistachios. At El Bulli, Will made a number of memorable desserts, but his favorite was a chocolate sorbet with a lavender sabayone and an egg yolk sponge cake soaked in orange syrup with chocolate sticks. This he considers his best dessert during the time he was working there. When Chef Will moved to Bali five years ago, he still continued to pursue his love for chocolate. “I love working with chocolate. Especially here in Bali because so many of my friends are producing good quality chocolate.” Will calls chocolate a life product. There are countless things you can do with chocolate, he says. Important thing is that with all flavor, is to be critical of the quality. Chef Will works with three chocolatiers in Bali. First is Valrhona because of their high quality and high quantity. He says it is very easy to use in professional recipes for pastry and bakery. Next is Big Tree Farms , which focuses on raw chocolate. Raw chocolate is very challenging to work with, since it is difficult to get the same depth of flavor from the raw product compared to a roasted product. Last is Primo Chocolate. This is a small producer, here, when they MEJEKAWI | Jalan Kayu Aya, Kuta Utara, Badung, Bali | +62 361 736969 www.kudeta.net

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C O V E R F E AT U R E

say single plantation, it is not a huge estate, you go house to house, single village by single village. As Will explains the different chocolate suppliers he works with, you know that he is very much involved and concerned not just with the chocolate that he uses in his dishes, but with where they also come from. I asked Chef Will what he sees himself doing in the future which he hasn’t done before. He turns to chocolate. “Picking the beans is important, and following the process of the chocolate making” He says

that in everything he does, he wants to understand the fundamental technique correctly so that the application is even better than the original product. He further explains: “Take for example this chocolate gelato that we make with fresh chocolate. Since the supplier’s the grinder isn’t too fine, the texture of the chocolate is not perfectly smooth. But when we make the gelato, we emulsify it and aerate it. We use the Bravo machine, the finished product’s elasticity is amazing so when you eat it, the mouth feel is more than the original. “How

do you take something and make it even more that what it is? That is the job of a good chef.” Words of cooking wisdom, from Chef Will. To end our conversation, I ask Will for his chocolate guilty pleasures. “I don’t consume a lot of chocolate myself, but my ultimate favorite is Peanut M&M’s! I also love all the junk – Sno-Caps and Raisinettes bring back memories. And also the chocolate shake at Burger King!” To this we both let out a laugh. That is Chef Will Goldfarb for you, a real foodie.

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FO C OO VD E RO LO F E AT G YU R E

We know dark, milk, white and an enless list of bars, but there are so much more facts and information we do not know about our favorite sinful indulgence. Find out here!

FOODOLOGY:

CHOCO FACTS compiled by ADITHYA PRATAMA

1778

The year cocoa plants brought over to Indonesia in Jakarta & Sumatera.

1828

Coenraad Johaness van Houten discovered Dutch Processed Cocoa.

9kg Average chocolate consumption by a Swiss.

40%

4.5kg Average chocolate consumption by an American.

20%

40 The average number of cocoa beans inside a pod of cocoa.

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The minimum percentage of cocoa solids in a dark chocolate, any lower it is addressed as milk chocolate.

The minimum percentage of cocoa butter needed in a white chocolate to be considered as chocolate.


COV FO E RO D F EOAT LOUGR YE

100

1

100 Cocoa Beans – a price of a slave in 19th century Nicaragua where cocoa beans were used as a currency.

407,409,600 80,000,000 bars of Snickers bars were sold between 2011-2012 in the US alone.

Kisses - produced by Hershey’s every day.

The largest cocoa producer

Ivory Coast

Ghana

Indonesia

430,000 metric tonnes – the amount of cocoa produced by Indonesia in 2012, making it the third largest cocoa producer after Ivory Coast and Ghana.

5792 Kilograms Weight of the world’s largest Chocolate bar made in Italy in 2000.

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C O V E R F E AT U R E

Starting Young by JED DOBLE photographs by HIMAWAN SUTANTO

Looking at his plating, one would think that he was a chef with many years of experience. But to our surprise, he was just 19. Adrian Aryo Bismo is definitely starting it young.

I

was immediately impressed by photos of his dishes when I saw them on Instagram. They looked painstakingly created, colorful, whimsical and elegant. I immediately followed him. As weeks past, I would find myself drawn and started liking his photos whenever he would post. I said to myself, I had to get in touch with this chef. I sought him out, sent him a message and then to my astonishment, found out that he was just 19! Meet Adrian Aryo Bismo. Adrian has just finished a Diploma of Culinary Arts from AtSunrice Global Chef Academy in Singapore and is now back to his native Jakarta and is raring to show the city what he can do. Again, I quickly forget that he is 19. Adrian tells me that he has always been exposed to food. “I believe that cooking runs in my veins. Everyone in my family cooks. My Mom and Dad like to cook Western food, both my grandpas are really good cooks too. Plus my Dad’s family used to own a restaurant back when they were all living in Berlin.” Adrian further says that having grown up with such a foodie environment, it was just natural for him to turn to food. “I started to cook when I was very little. At age 11, I knew I wanted to be a chef.” He says that it is really his family who inspire him to push forward and be creative in his cooking. I ask him who his chef idols are, quickly he says: Grant Achatz, Jamie Oliver and Alain Ducasse. Big names,

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but also reveal what kind of food Adrian likes to prepare. Since he already wanted to be a chef at age 11, Adrian really did start young. He tells me that he was already reading cook books by his favorite chefs starting at this age. He apprenticed at ninety-nine restaurant when he was 17 just before leaving for culinary school in Singapore. While studying, his various internships at Mandarin Oriental Singapore, Burlamacco Restorante and The Connoisseur Concerto helped him hone his skill and creativity. Last year, Adrian helped the Singapore Bocuse D’or team as a kitchen helper. Getting back to his plates, which where what initially attracted me to reach out to Adrian, he explains: “For me, a plate is like a canvas to a painter. Personally, being a chef is like being an artist.” I tell him that I love the color and originality his brings to his plating. I ask what drives him to make these plates. “My inspiration comes from everywhere. It could come from my childhood or as simple as my surroundings.” Adrian tells me that sometimes, he would just open the fridge and see what is in there, and he would challenge his imagination to create something from what they have. For this issue, we challenged Adrian to do just that. Since this is our chocolate issue, I knew that our content would be inundated with chocolate bars, cakes

and desserts, so to give some variety, I challenged Adrian to prepare for us savory dishes using chocolate. And I can safely say that Adrian rose to the challenge. Adrian designed a four course menu, with all the dishes containing chocolate. The first course was a Hazelnut Cocoa Pate with Toasted Paper Bread. The pate made from chicken liver, hazelnut and cocoa was delicious and made for a good start of the meal. For the second course, Adrian made a Cocoa Eggplant Puree with Sliced Zucchini and Chocolate Alio Mayo. Surprisingly, the chocolate and eggplant meld well together. The main was a Herb-crusted Fillet Mignon with Chocolate Beef Jus Spherification. Combining the chocolate with the beef jus gives it a deeper, richer flavor which goes well with the steak. And the last dish was Pan-seared Bacon with Cold Dark Chocolate with a Chili Dip. As this dish had the most chocolate, it felt like a dessert, the chocolate and bacon was an obvious combination but to have the added zing of the pepper was an interesting twist. In all, the meal was gracefully executed, perfectly plated and was delightfully tasty. With these dishes, one would just wonder what is in store for Adrian. He plans to start his own private catering business while he is in Jakarta. But this won’t stop him from taking a role in any of fine kitchens here or abroad. For Adrian, the world is at his doorstep, let’s see where it leads. ADRIAN ARYO BISMO | Instagram: @ab _ chef


C O V E R F E AT U R E

HOLYCOW! STEAK HOUSE BY CHEF AFIT | Twitter: @lucywiryono, @steakholycow

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C O V E R F E AT U R E

let them eat cake photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT teapots, teacups and saucers, candles and tea accesories provided by TWG Tea

An afternoon of fun, laughter and story-telling is always the best excuse to eat chocolate cake. Tess Pantoja, home baker and entrepreneur, hosts the ladies for afternoon tea and serves them her best chocolate cakes and desserts.

Chocolate and Tea with Tess Pantoja Chocolate Cake iced with Fudge Chocolate Coffee Fudge Red Velvet Cake Turon with White Chocolate Sauce Fried Banana Spring Rolls Chocolate Cupcakes with Marshmallow Swirl and Choco Fudge Vanilla Cupcakes with Swiss Meringue Icing Avocado Cake with Avocado Chocolate Sauce TWG Macarons Lemon Bush, Matcha, Earl Grey Chocolate TWG Teas Iced Pink Flamingo Hot Earl Grey Buddha


C O V E R F E AT U R E

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TWG TEA SALON & BOUTIQUE | Plaza Senayan, Level 1, Jalan Asia Afrika, Jakarta | +62 21 572 5276 www.twgtea.com


C O V E R F E AT U R E

TESS PANTOJA | +62 818 889 088 | Email: tesspantoja@gmail.com | Facebook: Cake Date with Tess

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W E N T T H E R E AT E T H AT

A TRIP TO PADOVA by RAFAEL REYES

P

adova is a city steeped in creativity and culture. At every turn, you will find works by the great masters such as Michaelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Giotto and Mantegna in it’s frescoes, basilicas, piazzas and palazzos. The University of Padova, which was established in 1222 and is one of Europe’s oldest, has seen great minds such as Galileo and Copernicus grace its halls. Padova is also the setting of Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew, and its 13th-century Basilica di Sant’Antonio is the resting place of venerated Saint Anthony of Padua. Among Padova’s picturesque neighborhoods is Villa del Conte, home of world-class artisanal chocolates. With such a historic and creative town as backdrop, it is no wonder that even the chocolate has an interesting story to tell.

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Padova may be the oldest city in northern Italy, as it is claimed to have been founded in the 12thcentury BC by the Trojans. Located in the Italy’s culturally opulent Veneto region, it is a treasure trove of medieval and renaissance art and architecture. We found another kind of treasure in Padova, Villa Del Conte Chocolates.

The story of Villa del Conte chocolates spans three generations. It all started with Nazzareno Cattapan’s pioneering spirit and passion for creating only the finest cioccolato, giving birth to what is now Villa del Conte chocolates. Like an heirloom, each recipe of these edible art forms is passed on from father to son. Nazzareno bequeathed the cioccolato legacy to his son Orfeo Celestino, who likewise passed it on to his son. Today, at the helm is the third-generation cioccolato connoisseur, Enrico Cattapan. With 75 years of experience, passionately making traditional fine chocolate in their factory in Padova, they make sure that every piece of Villa del Conte chocolate is of premium quality and contains only the finest ingredients. Villa del Conte chocolate is made

from the highest quality, handpicked cacao beans and shaped by a unique process, passionately perfected throughout the years. With each bite, you will savor a masterpiece of authentic, Italian tradition. A myriad of chocolate flavors and variety awaits you. My attention was caught by their Praline balls, which are milk or dark chocolate shells enclosing silky, creamy flavors of hazelnut, macadamia, caramel, cacao or coffee. Biting into one will reveal the delicious flavored center. Their Praline sticks on the other hand, had fruit and mint cream filling, with an outer layer of milk or dark chocolate. Truly exquisite. A foodie and an avowed chocoholic, a visit to storied Padova cannot be complete without a stop at Villa del Conte Chocolates, a truly amazing experience.


W E N T T H E R E AT E T H AT

www.villadelcontecioccolato.com | Facebook: Villa Del Conte

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

THE Chocolate Martini by JED DOBLE photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

The Dharmawangsa Jakarta is nestled in a very private neighborhood in South Jakarta, known as the grand dame of hotels in the city, it is famous for its excellent service and charming Indonesian heritage design, and it’s delicious Chocolate Martini.

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

A

trip to The Dharmawangsa is always a pleasant experience. I always feel welcome and well taken cared of when I am at this institution of the Jakarta hotel industry. The minute that you enter, the atmosphere immediately changes, it is like entering a big family home, you immediately sense that they want to ensure that your stay is memorable. Their stately Majapahit Lounge, named after the vast Javanese empire dating back to 1293, has been the venue of many happy encounter with friends. It’s rich décor and warm, cozy ambiance is perfect for times spent with friends. And to my delight, these moments with friends have always been fueled with no other than The Dharmawangsa’s legendary Chocolate Martini. I’ve been told that the Chocolate Martini was first served around 16 years ago when the hotel first opened. I guess to choice to serve such a classic cocktail in such a splendid place is fitting. Even the service ritual is impressive. The bartender brings a tray with all the ingredients by your side and prepares the drink in front of you. The cold and smooth cocktail is indeed very hard to resist. If you are in the mood for a chat with friends and would like to experience a true Jakarta icon, head over to The Dharmawangsa for their velvety smooth Chocolate Martini.

THE DHARMAWANGSA CHOCOLATE MARTINI Serves 1

INGREDIENTS: 60 ml 52.5 ml

Premium Vodka Creme de Cacao White

STEPS:

• Rim the Martini glass with chocolate ganache about 1.5 cm from the glass’ rim • Pour all the ingredients into the shaker, shake with lots of ice • Pour into dip rimmed cold chocolate martini glass • Drop in one chocolate kiss

THE DHARMAWANGSA JAKARTA | Jalan Brawijaya, Jakarta | +62 21 7258181 www.the-dharmawangsa.com

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

Wonderful Chocolate Cocktails by JED DOBLE photographs by AKI

Amazing sunsets and fancy cocktails definitely go hand in hand at the WOOBAR of the W Retreat & Spa Bali. They share some of their chocolate cocktails recipes with us to enjoy during the sunset cocktail hour, or any hour you choose.

W

OOBAR, W Retreat & Spa Bali’s three –storey al fresco beachside venue has been a magnet for sunset and beat seekers since the swanky resort opened. Many guest eat, drink, flirt and play to the vibe of international DJs who man the decks, most especially during the sunset hours. F&B manager Yudi Hendrasyah holds court at WOOBAR, making sure everyone has a cold drink in hand, the food is scrumptious and comforting and the beats moving at a steady pace. A Jakarta transplant, Yudi has been with the W Bali since its pre-opening and has moved his way through the resort in different capacities until finding his niche at WOOBAR. All the cocktails at WOOBAR are personally created by Yudi, incorporating top-shelf spirits, the best and freshest produce and incorporating his inspired ingenuity. For our Chocolate Issue, Yudi has created four bespoke cocktails and shares with us their recipes. Easily prepared at home, these cocktails highlight the different chocolate notes of the ingredients and partner well with the spirits. When in Bali, head over to WOOBAR for one of Yudi’s edgy cocktails or try some of his recipes at home and wow your friends with your own cocktail prowess.

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

WOOBAR, W Retreat & Spa Bali, Seminyak | Jl. Petitenget 路 Seminyak, Bali | +62 361 3000 106 www.wretreatbali.com | Facebook: W Retreat & Spa, Bali | Twitter: @WBali | Instagram: @WBaliSeminyak

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

NEW SEEN Serves 1

INGREDIENTS: 22.5 ml 15 ml 7.5 ml 5 ml 5 ml 1 pcs 30 gr 5-8 tbs

Beluga Vodka Strawberry Pure Strawberry liquor Lemon juice Gomme Fresh strawberry W-made Vodka Caviar White Cacao Air

W-made Vodka Caviar 60 ml Vodka Beluga 5 gr Alginate 10 gr Calcium lactate 2 cup Chilled water Cacao Air 90 ml White cacao liquor 5 gr Lecithin or sucro Texturas (this air can used for more than 20 cocktail)

MY-DESSERT ON Serves 1

INGREDIENTS: 30 ml 30 ml 30 ml 30 gr 1 pcs

Patron XO Cafe Baileys Dark Cacao Assorted tropical fruits soaked in Cointreau Chocolate chip cookies

STEPS:

Shaken with ice.

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T R I E D A N D TI P SI E D

W CUBA LIBRE Serves 1

INGREDIENTS: 30 ml 60 ml 1 pc 10 gr

Ron Zacapa 23 W-made Cherry Cola Ice crystal ball Dry ice

STEPS:

Stirred with ice. W-made Cherry Cola Rind of 1 Lemon, Lime and Orange 1 pc. Vanilla pod, split 2 tsp Citric acid 2 tbs Dried lavender 120 ml Orange juice 60 ml Maraschino 30 ml Lemon Juice 200 ml Raspberry puree 150 ml Cherry juice 2 L Coca-cola 1 cup Sugar Finish with additional Coca-Cola and Tonic Water to taste

W – TROUBLE SHOOTER Serves 1

INGREDIENTS: On Left 45 ml 1pcs

Patron Anejo infused with chocolate nibs Lime wedge

Middle 45 ml

Patron Silver

On Right 22.5 ml Patron Silver infused with Chipotle chili 7,5 ml Patron Citron 7,5 ml Lime juice 1 pcs Bali red Chili Dash Gomme

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FI N E R T H I N G S

Chocolate On High by JED DOBLE photographs by MARINA BAY SANDS

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If you want to sample delectable chocolate with and awesome view, head over to The Chocolate Bar located at The Club at Marina Bay Sands on the Sands Skypark on level 57.


FI N E R T H I N G S

W

eekly, more than 250 kilograms of chocolate are used each to create the desserts and pastries for the chocolate buffet at The Chocolate Bar at Marina Bay Sands. The creative genius behind this is executive pastry chef, Ryan Witcher. He also oversees SweetSpot, the hotel’s espresso bar, bakery and dessert concept. The Chocolate Bar represents another creative outlet for Chef Ryan to experiment with the textures and tastes of chocolate in all its forms. Here he is able to surprise and delight the taste buds of chocolate lovers with new and innovative flavor combinations. Chef Ryan Witcher started his culinary career on the savory side of the kitchen. He learned flavor profiles, especially herbs and spices along with cooking techniques, and this helped when he transitioned into pastry. Growing up in Michigan, Ryan was constantly surrounded by amazing produce, this led him to want to use products when they are at their peak in the growing season. “A lot of produce and herbs peak around the same time in the season. Basil and thyme are my favorite herbs, so it was easy to pair these with desserts,” Ryan explains. To showcase these unique herb and chocolate pairings, Chef Ryan regularly creates unique chocolate flavors and infusions. “We have the Milk ChocolateThyme Praline available in SweetSpot. We also have a White Chocolate-Panna Cotta with Strawberry-Basil Gelee available there. Spring is around the corner so the desserts are lightening and showing off the freshness of the produce. Rhubarb will be making an appearance soon,” I push further and ask what are the most unique combinations Ryan has tasted and how they turned out. “I’ve tried Milk Chocolate-Curry Macarons, which were good and balanced, but some flavors just are not meant to be. Another combination was the White Chocolate-Arctic Char Cheesecake Foam. It was part of a tasting

and the flavours were quite interesting. I also liked the Chocolate-Sumac Marshmallow—where the acidity of the sumac brought out unique characteristics of the chocolate. Quite adventurous if you ask me, but these are chocolate inventions, so maybe, I may be up for a tasting. At the Chocolate Bar, Chef Ryan tells us that he uses over 20 varieties of chocolate, which are treated with a tempering machine where the solid form is first heated to become liquid in the machine before it is cooled back down. The process of melting and cooling improves the consistency, sheen and texture of the chocolate, ensuring that only the best chocolates are used at the chocolate buffet. Since chocolate is my personal guilty pleasure, I ask Ryan what his chocolate

MARINA BAY SANDS | J10 Bayfront Avenue, Singapore | +65 6688 8868 www.marinabayands.com | Facebook: Marina Bay Sands | Twitter: @marinabaysands

guilty pleasure are. “My personal favorites are tea and herb infusions with chocolates. The tea and different herbs help bring out the complexities in chocolates and provide a wonderful experience for the palate.” These favorites are obvious from the flavors available at SweetSpot and Chocolate Bar. So I chide Ryan and ask him to reveal, his deep dark chocolate secrets. “I love ice cream and one of my guilty pleasures would have to be Ben and Jerry’s Chocolate Fudge Brownie, which is an extreme dose of chocolate. Another guilty pleasure is Oreo cookies or the Girl Scout Cookies called Thin Mint. They are both fantastic little treats.” So if you find yourself in Singapore with a chocolate craving, swing over to Marina Bay Sands and partake of chocolate with a view at their Chocolate Bar.

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C U LT U R E

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Indonesia’s Love for Chocolate by ADITHYA PRATAMA

Indonesia is the third largest producer of cacao beans, but it’s chocolate consumption doesn’t amount to much. We take a brief look at the history and affinity Indonesia has with chocolate.


C U LT U R E

R

umor has it that Coenraad Johannes van Houten visited Java prior to his world-changing discovery that changed the world’s way of consuming chocolate in the early 19th century. Unfortunately, there are no historical records of such a visit. However, the history of Cocoa in Indonesia has dated almost a century before Van Houten’s discovery. The cacao beans from Acapulco, Mexico arrived at the port of Manila in the 1660s, this event marks the first cacao that reached Southeast Asia. These were soon successfully cultivated and were established towards the end of 18th century. A botanist named Georg Eberhard Rumphius later suggested that cacao trees should also be introduced to Indonesia in order to complete his work, Herbarium Amboinense. In 1778, the Dutch decided to bring cocoa plants from the Philippines all the way to Jakarta and Sumatera where they established propagation facilities. The Dutch East Indies Company awarded trophies awarded to the first person to plant more than 50 cacao trees in Indonesia, in a plan that intended to promote large scale production of cacao. Soon enough, crops extended all the way to Minabassa in the northeast of Celebes (Sulawesi) where the local inhabitants followed the Dutch and were eagerly cultivating. The harvest reached a peak of 50 tones of annual export in 1830, making it the biggest producer in the region. The invasion of Helopeltis and Cocoa Pod Borer (Conopomorpha cramerella) – a moth that infests cocoa fruit with its larvae, attacked the plantations in Minabassa in the 1850s and forced the cultivation to be abandoned. The major production of cocoa was then shifted to Sangir Island in the northwest of Sulawesi and Java. Far away from the Indonesian archipelago, Coenraad Johaness van Houten; came up with an innovation that revolutionized the chocolate industry in 1828. Van Houten treated the cocoa powder with alkaline salts to remove the bitter taste and turned it water-soluble. This resulted in a dark colored chocolate with subtle bitterness and strong cocoa taste that we now all know as “Dutched” Cocoa Powder. PROCESSING CHOCOLATE The chocolate that everyone enjoys now is a product of a craft that has gone through a long and elaborative process from its initial bean form. To achieve the melt-in-yourmouth characteristics and the complexity of the flavor, cocoa beans have gone through processes that can be generalized into five phases: Fermentation, Drying, Roasting, Conching and Tempering. As an agricultural product – just like coffee, different sources of cocoa will give

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C U LT U R E off different characteristics and flavors to its bean. For example, the tannic (sour) notes of cocoa come from South American beans. Whereas Indonesian beans will give a wellrounded bitterness that is significant in most of chocolate products. Hence, many of the experienced chocolate makers sacrifice years of research in order to find the perfect flavor balance for their end product. In the beginning, the cocoa beans are separated from the flesh and skin of the cocoa fruit and fermented for about five days to develop their flavor. Once fermented, beans are then sun-dried to stop maturing and remove any excess moisture content that causes molds during storage and shipping. Natural sun dried beans usually give better results as compare to artificial drying where the aroma may be contaminated and beans may become too brittle due to over drying. The final roasting is usually done at a temperature between 120–160 degrees Celsius for up to 35 minutes. During roasting, the husk will separate from the nibs and as the water vapor evaporates the bean will pop and crack to indicate that the nibs are ready to be processed into cocoa liquor. The nibs are then grinded into cocoa liquor which also known as cocoa mass – the heart of chocolate. Once grinded, the mass is either used as it is or further pressed to extract the cocoa butter that is used to emulsify all the ingredients, control the viscosity and provide the pleasurable mouth feel of the chocolate. A chocolate consist of five main ingredients; cocoa mass, cocoa butter, sugar, flavoring and an emulsifier. All these ingredients are blended in a conching machine and heated to produce a homogenized liquid. It is then tempered to stabilize the fat and sugar crystals inside before molded into bars or pellets for consumptions. INDONESIANS & CHOCOLATE For most Indonesians, chocolate is considered a luxury. Although the country produces a lot of cacao beans, 70-80% are exported to Europe and the United States. These chocolates are then marketed back to Indonesia with prices that are extremely expensive due to the imported goods tax duties which are levied upon them. When asked about their chocolate memories, older Indonesians will remember the brand Ayam Jago immediately. Cokelat Ayam Jago was a milk chocolate bar that was produced by the company Ceres in the 1980s. Priced then at Rp. 500, the product favored well as an affordable luxury by many Indonesians. However, Cokelat Ayam Jago is only made of compound chocolate that uses vegetable fat to replace the cocoa butter that is presented in a chocolate hence

allowing the production costs to go down. The stable feature of compound chocolate is also favorable for big producers like Ceres as to prolong the shelf life of its product. As milk chocolate, the product also contains high dosage of sugar. All these combinations give distinct perceptions towards Indonesian that chocolate has to be sweet. In the 1990s, the big hotel chains have started importing chocolate of a high quality for their amenities and in-house shops. Many of Indonesians started to recognize a well-produced chocolate that contains higher percentage of cocoa and –of course, lesser sugar. It is not until the 2000s, this luxurious idea of chocolate started to crack. The early 2001 marked the start of affordable luxury trends in chocolate. Few brands had come up with store concept that promises better quality chocolate with a much affordable pricing. Through combining both local materials and imported ingredients, these pioneers begun to establish a chocolate eating culture in Indonesia to a greater scale. Throughout the years, Indonesians have developed a more sophisticated palate towards food. Demand of finer ingredients and artisanal products have increased up to 70% over the last 10 years. This growing trend also affected the pastry and bakery industry –that revolves heavily around chocolate, as many European chocolate brands have penetrated the scene. Given the options provided, many chefs were benefited as to created more innovative and complex products for the customers. As agricultural products, fair-trading in cocoa has become a rising issue since the beginning of 2010. This raised local companies to do the same in promoting Indonesian cocoa. Few small enterprises are now producing their own chocolate using pure Indonesian cocoa coming in from the northern part of Aceh and also Tabanan at the Island of Gods. From plantation tours to displaying a bean-to-bar process to creating molecular

chocolate treats, these brands help Indonesians in appreciating chocolate as an artisanal craftwork than a mere sweets. The inclining interest of the market has driven chocolate into what it is now in Indonesia. As more brands and products are being introduced and tested for the market, Indonesians have better appreciation towards chocolate with more bitter and tannic flavor for both enjoyment and health factor. Though it will never be a staple like it is with the Swiss and French, chocolate will eventually reach the level of appreciation as a product of thoughtful researches and intensive labor that gives off a delightful texture and heavenly flavor that become a good definition of happiness.

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TA K I N G I T TO T H E S T R E E T S

MARTABAK FAVOURITE by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

Martabak Favourite has ruled East Jakarta for almost three decades as everybody’s favorite sweet martabak. The Foodie Magazine sought them out to find out really how good they are.

I

have to admit that it’s pretty unusual for the eastern part of Jakarta to get the spotlight for interesting places to eat. Even in a food guide I acquired recently, the pages for East Jakarta are no match when compared to other more familiar parts of the city. To tell you the truth, this side of Jakarta has so many hidden gems waiting to be discovered and if time allows, The Foodie Magazine will unearth these in upcoming issues. Back to the real story, the all-day vibrant Jalan Balai Pustaka is a den for foodies to explore – from hawkers, restaurants, cafés and even a bustling supermarket for affordable groceries. It’s hard to talk about the famous Indonesian pancake when it comes to Jalan Balai Pustaka as Martabak Favourite rises above everybody else with its food truck appearance and a legacy that has lasted for

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around 30 years. This family business is now being run by the second generation. Yudi’s father created an excellent recipe for the martabak dough and has since been well-loved by people from around this area. The strange thing about martabak is that often we see random stalls poured so many chocolate sprinkles or cheese on top of their martabak but that doesn’t mean that you’re going to get what you expect. Decadent yes, but delicious? Not always! The key lies in the dough recipe and Martabak Favourite does a fantastic job with that. Martabak Favourite keeps its martabak size relatively compact but somehow, more affordable. After the dough is cooked properly, it is sent off to the serving station right on the food truck, then the rest of the crew, including Yudi or his wife, will shower the pancake generously with

rich Wysman butter and toppings such as chocolate sprinkles, crushed peanuts or cheddar cheese. While the topping selections may seem classic if compared to those who already leveled up the ante in order to renew public interest over this iconic evening snack, Martabak Favourite still retains a huge number of followers and they even recommend everyone to book their martabak first before coming in straight or risk themselves waiting in the queue. The owners of Martabak Favourite see diversification as a way to expand their business. Just nearby the already famous food truck, they have a bubur ayam and nasi goreng stall and a savory martabak stall just across the street. If you have made it all this way to East Jakarta, you definitely can’t just leave without tasting their delicious creations.


TA K I N G I T TO T H E S T R E E T S

OPENING HOURS: Everyday, 6 pm – 12 am (other branches: from 4 pm – 12 am) SPEND: IDR 45,000 – IDR 60,000 / martabak

MARTABAK FAVOURITE | Jalan Balai Pustaka Timur (in front of Lada Motor), Jakarta | +62 816 1922 336

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TA K I N G I T TO T H E S T R E E T S

O ROTI BAKAR EDDY by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

Roti bakar stalls have become known places to “hang out” for many decades. And Roti Bakar Eddy has become one of the ultimate places to hang out, celebrate life and enjoy the rest of the evening with good treats and great company.

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ftentimes one would go to hawkers only for light snacks or just to enjoy the conversation over coffee, especially for late nights and weekends. This is practically the reason why Indonesians need the side street coffee shops like Roti Bakar Eddy. Even though nowadays, we witness the growing popularity of convenience stores as a new hang out place, all-nighter roti bakar hawkers are still very much in demand. People usually come here either for a bowl of instant noodle with grated cheese and corned beef, or grilled banana with chocolate sprinkles, or the simple toast with jam. Some complement these with iced milk coffee, warm citrus drinks, or energy drinks like Milo or more traditionally a beer glass filled with fresh milk, ginger, honey, and eggs. Even they do have soft-boiled eggs as well like Singaporean kopitiams. It’s all simple and affordable for everyone. Roti Bakar Eddy is located just nearby Al-Azhar mosque around Blok M. During the evening, this neighborhood is simply crowded and the success of Roti Bakar Eddy has been influencing different hawkers to join them there. This is the turf where everyone enjoys their dinner. The story of how Roti Bakar Eddy

became so influential was an arduous one. As one who was enchanted with the promises and opportunities from living in Jakarta, Pak Eddy arrived here in the late 60s. After a string of odd jobs to keep him and his family afloat, he decided to enter the hawker business. Challenges kept on coming until he finally proved his mettle by becoming the most famous in Jakarta and owns several other branches around the city run by his children. Operating at this huge a scale, Roti Bakar Eddy bakes their own bread fresh everyday since hundreds upon hundreds of loaves are sold every night. At one point, you might find that your drinks or order of nasi uduk arrive sooner than the toast because so many people come and take away dozens of it for office overtime! Mind you though because hanging around in traditional roti bakar seller like Pak Eddy may feel a bit noisy and smoky but nothing can beat the liveliness and spectacle of the sight. People came in to order their stuff, street musicians traverse from one hawker to another, cars passing by, and those who are already seated converse, laugh, and enjoy their meals. Once in a while, nothing can beat the excitement of hanging out the classic Jakarta way.


TA K I N G I T TO T H E S T R E E T S

OPENING HOURS: Everyday, 4 pm – before dawn SPEND: IDR 15,000 – IDR 30,000 / person

ROTI BAKAR EDDY | Jalan Raden Patah (behind Al Azhar University), Jakarta

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I CO N I C

TAN EK TJOAN by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

One important legacy the colonial powers left Indonesia would probably the bread baking industry. Tan Ek Tjoan is one of the oldest bakeries in Jakarta and has a very colorful story of how it all started and how they keep their legendary stature alive.

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I CO N I C

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f you happen to visit some major cities in Java, you will find that each of them usually has iconic bakeries that may predate as far as the 1800s. The same goes also for Jakarta with some of its legendary bakeries but the famous one is surely Tan Ek Tjoan in Cikini. Back in 1921, Mr Tan Ek Tjoan started his bakery in Buitenzorg or which is now known as the city of Bogor, but some three decades later, he decided to move his business to Jakarta to cater to the bigger market by choosing the strategic neighborhood of Cikini. To make it even more lucrative for the business, Tan Ek Tjoan bakery initiated the plan to spearhead the sales through bicycle cart peddlers. Nowadays we can even still see so many of them peddling the bread the traditional way. The one and only store in Cikini is ready to serve all day only for takeaway and people do come from time to time to buy their roti gambang, roti bimbam, chocolate smeared bread, sugar-apple bread, horseshoe bread, and other classic breads that Tan Ek Tjoan bakery is known for. The unique roti gambang and roti bimbam are creations of Mr. Tan Ek Tjoan’s successor, Mr Tan Kim Thay. These come from the philosophical thinking of Yin and Yang. Roti gambang is a sweet, brownish bread with sesame seeds that appears hard from the outside, but when you bite into it, the bread is actually easy to chew and has a really pleasant flavor. While it describes the dark Yin side, Mr Tan Kim Thay also derived the inspiration from gambang, a xylophone-

like instrument that possesses a beautiful sound but is made from the thick 18 layers of wood, as known in the gambang kromong – the traditional orchestra of Betawi and Chinese influence. As for the Yang side, the bakery creates roti bimbam, a soft bread with mild texture that has a sweet, buttery flavor much loved by everyone. Peeping through behind the screen of Tan Ek Tjoan bakery, we saw the bakers happily working on each of their stations - from mixing and heaving the heavy dough, kneading and putting the ingredients inside, and baking the bread on huge ovens. Thousands of breads are produced daily and distributed to around 80 bicycle cart peddlers spread all over Jakarta and its satellite cities like Bekasi and Tangerang. Additionally, Tan Ek Tjoan designed special workspace only to produce customized pastry and bread for the flagship store itself. The three-storey building has actually a lot of potential should Tan Ek Tjoan wishes to develop into a coffee shop and even a rooftop café. During our visit, we took a small detour to the rooftop of this colonial era building and found out how nice it would be if one day Tan Ek Tjoan decides to make the flagship store bigger. Even so, the plan to open a new concept bakery is already being implemented and will soon open at Jalan Panglima Polim. As for now, it will always be a great pleasure for their regular buyers to enjoy their favorite bread from Tan Ek Tjoan accompanying us during breakfast, tea time, and even on our way back home from the office.

TAN EK TJOAN | Jalan Cikini Raya no. 61, Menteng, Jakarta | +62 21 314 2570

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CO N F E S S IO N S O F A F O O DI E

BILLY OSCAR & LUISSA LUVANIA by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

Partners in crime, Billy Oscar and his wife Luissa Luvania, share how food fuels their passion and colors their life together.

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y encounter with Billy Oscar was somewhat of a different experience because most foodies that I have met before come from related professions like chefs or restaurateurs, or even food bloggers. However, Billy works in finance and has no related job whatsoever to F&B aside from his virtual social media persona on Twitter and Instagram, sharing his gastronomic adventures. Initially, Billy shared his explorations on food through Twitter, using @soalperut or literally translated as “about tummy” as his nickname. Later he also became known through his Instagram account. “Why do I use @soalperut as my nickname? Well, we have other ‘soal’ or ‘abouts’ in music, love, and others. As for me, this is all solely about food!” explained Billy. While we waited for his beloved wife to arrive and join us, we continued to indulge ourselves with conversations about the social media life he has gone through so far. Billy remarked his keenness to implement

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the ‘blue ocean strategy’, as inspired by what Steve Jobs did in the past, to further improve his personal brand. “I have put some thought to it, how to do it and it will be something related to the personal branding of restaurants and café, but not solely about food”, said Billy still keeping the rest of his thoughts yet to be unveiled in time. Soon, we welcomed Billy’s wife, Luissa Luvania. Caca, as people would call her, has the bubbly personality in contrast with the calmness of Billy. However, when it comes to food, both of them share the same spirit that of explorers of the New World and often they hop from one place to another trying to sample different flavors and discovering new things. When asked about their favorites, Caca answered right away, “Billy likes coffee a lot but I prefer my iced chocolate. For desserts, I’d choose mille feuille from Social House and panna cotta from La Luce” as Billy then continues, “In that case, I vote for Gaia’s tiramisu!” For Caca, having those luscious desserts is one thing, but

her infatuation lately with the delicious puffs from Beard Papa’s is what she likes the most and she even admitted that her boss has caught her eating the puffs almost every day at the office! Well, both of them may have their own preferences when it comes to food, but at the end of the day, they enjoy their bowl of ramen at their current favorite joint Ikkudo Ichi, since apparently noodles have always been their favorite staple dish that glued them together. Through his social media accounts, Billy successfully tempts everybody energetically with intriguing food shots and with some style put into them. While he appears like a slim guy, he practically ravishes everything in his path, leaving nothing but his wonderful trails as seen through his timeline. At the end the day, for Billy, nothing could ever beat his family time with Caca and their little boy Kenzo during the weekends as they move around the city having a good time together over something delicious, as always.

Twitter: @soalperut | Instagram: @billyoscar


CO N F E S S IO N S O F A F O O DI E

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A F O O DI E ’ S L I F E

RONALD PRASANTO by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

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usiness appears good and busy as we approached Ron’s Laboratory during a fine afternoon. As always the clouds of smoke coming out of the mixing bowls have always been the sign of their use of liquid nitrogen that can only witnessed from a handful of ice cream shops in Jakarta which utilize this molecular gastronomy technique. At Ron’s Laboratory, it does feel like we’re in real laboratory with the attendants wearing white coats working from behind the counter, mixing the ice cream formula from the vessels with liquid nitrogen, and finally putting the finishing touch on the colorful mango pudding dim sum ice cream flavor or the unique M&M gelato with cookies and cream cheese injection. Meanwhile in one corner, the owner sits down and relaxed while conversing casually with his friend. Now, let us meet Ronald Prasanto, a quirky guy with a good sense of humor who takes his business seriously down to the most minute details. “In this line of business, we have to be precise with the formula to ensure full satisfaction of the customer and also be conscious of the safety”, said Ronald. For instance, the ice cream made by using liquid nitrogen may result in a light frostbite on the tongue and Ronald has come up with a formula to anticipate that. The story of how he became one of

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As a molecular gastronomist, Ronald Prasanto’s work has been acknowledged by many, including legendary Ferran Adria himself. But what about his life away from the kitchen. We discover something sinfully delicious from the man behind Ron’s Laboratory.

the pioneers of molecular gastronomy started when he became a judge for a barista championship alongside Toni Wahid, a prominent coffee blogger also known as Cikopi. “We were thinking that coffee should be more exciting than just brewing it with spices or performing latte art, and at that point, I promised him to make something unique over the course of one month”, he said. This very conversation was what made Ronald decide to learn about molecular gastronomy and how he could apply it to coffee specifically at that time. The research was a thorough one as not only did he experimented a lot by himself, he also corresponded with Ferran Adria’s team regarding the tips and tricks about molecular gastronomy. The result was fantastic as not only was he able to invent his own espresso ravioli and proved to Toni Wahid that he could create something new for coffee. “Aside from that, Ferran Adria asked my permission to feature the espresso ravioli for El Bulli for the whole month!” said Ronald gratefully. The espresso ravioli is made from a reaction between liquid espresso mixed with sodium alginate and then put inside a bowl of calcium chloride. After mixing those two, the espresso’s form turns into an egg yolk-like jelly, ready to be served alongside a shot of milk.

As time went by, Ronald decided to incorporate the molecular gastronomy technique he had been learning so far with ice cream making. That’s pretty much what we can see with Ron’s Laboratory now. He creates so many interesting flavors through his experiments from his laboratory back home almost every day. “Well, it’s more like a small garage rather than a laboratory!” he cheerfully confessed. Some people may think that molecular gastronomy is as complicated as rocket science and the players who have the knowledge are considered as those who achieved a new level of sophistication. While that may be true, Ronald ultimately admits that what he likes best is the simple and hearty street food at the end of the day. Alongside Adi Taroepratjeka, a TV show presenter who is also a coffee expert, he wanders around Jakarta to sample street food while working together for a café concept project for a big oil company quite recently. “Adi has the comparison data but one time we sampled several nasi uduk hawkers around Kebon Kacang to know which one has better fritters, which one has better nasi uduk, and other details!”, confessed Ronald while heartily laughing. The best part was actually when we heard him declare that healthy food is actually what he really likes. Seeing us perplexed, he continued, “By that


A F O O DI E ’ S L I F E I was meant about eating the innards of the cow and goat and you have to admit that it simply makes you happy and ‘healthy’!” I swear that everybody could hear our laughter throughout the ice cream shop upon hearing that! “I really enjoy savoring Soto Betawi, sop kaki sapi, and particularly when I was having this goat’s head curry back in Tegal! Additionally from the tabooed vegetable, once I had one of the best grilled jengkol with coconut milk back in Cirebon”, confessed Ronald enthusiastically. So, after all those work for precise calculations and having the access of world’s most gourmet ingredients to work with, everyone is basically the avid fan of traditional food. Truly, nothing could beat how hearty street food is, and that’s the case also for Ronald Prasanto

RONALD PRASANTO | Twitter: @ronprasanto

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M AYA ’ S M U S I N G

MAYA’S WAY OF ENJOYING CHOCOLATE by MAYA ALDY photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

With so many chocolate dessert options nowadays, Chef Maya Aldy decided to do something unorthodox, yet still interesting and mouthwatering. Follow along below as she takes a page from chocolate’s history to cook up a very modern story.

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M AYA ’ S M U S I N G

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hocolate! Naturally we are in love with it. You can’t possibly deny its charm or resist the temptation when someone serves you a lovingly prepared chocolate treat no matter what it is, right? While chocolate has been a traditional drink for thousands of years and a highly sought after food for also a lengthy number of years, to this day we still consider it as an exotic commodity. Historically speaking, chocolate was first developed as a beverage in Central America where forms of the ancient drink can still be found. Through colonization, Mexican chocolate was introduced to Europe and its use began to evolve into traditional forms we now know. Today, Mexican cuisine is still head over heels for chocolate, along with the amazing avocadoes and chilies they introduced to the rest of the world. For me, it was love at first bite when I tried their famous mole poblano sauce. I even love to adding it to soups with chunks of meat and beans, or as a sauce on grilled chicken. The fantastic taste of mole comes from the slow cook process that brings together the complex mix of chilies, herbs, sometimes nuts and, of course, chocolate! For desserts, I like my chocolate dark and often salted. I remember how much I loved the Belgian brand Leonidas’ chocolate bon-bons when I was abroad. To appease my cravings here, I often make my own dark truffles or sometimes a rich decadent hot chocolate. From what we can see in Jakarta, chocolate is definitely in a renaissance era with the appearance of artisanal chocolatiers, bakeries and even some of the premium coffee shops providing gourmet chocolate accompaniments. We all have to admit, when it comes to chocolate most of us still think of it as a sweet snack or dessert. Let’s take inspiration from chocolate’s history though, from mole poblano, and allow me to share with you guys how chocolate can be applied to a savory dish. To make it simple, fun and a really delicious standout I have decided to go for a Chocolate Rub Burger! Using chocolate as the star ingredient

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for the rub may seem like an unusual choice, but the rub itself goes really well with beef, chicken or vegetables with the notable exception being fish as I would not recommend it. Sometimes I even play around by adding a touch of coffee alongside the chocolate and the spices. This rub works especially well for steaks and roasts. It makes the steak feel luxurious and rich. Notes of the chocolate and coffee will subtly jump out in-between the juiciness of the meat. Alternatively, may want to play with the bon-bon theme and use the rub for your next batch of meatballs? I enjoy a sour cream or yogurt dipping sauce to bring everything together harmoniously - starting from the chocolate flavor, the earthiness of the rub, the full flavor of the meat and the light tanginess of the sauce. Whew! So much we can do with chocolate, right? I hope you will find the recipe useful and enjoy cooking with it!

Health benefits from chocolate: 

Much love,

Despite of the health benefits, we have to also understand that chocolate usually has a lot of fat and sugar. It is recommended for us chocolate lovers to also exercise and maintain a healthy way of life.

• Dark chocolate contains huge quantities of the antioxidant called flavonoids and has more than any other fruits. • Chocolate releases calming endorphins that reduce anxiety and helps you through stress or PMS. • Improved blood flow has been seen in people who regularly consume 70% dark chocolate and thus helps prevent heart disease. • The compounds in chocolate also act as a UV filter and help you to have good skin. • Not only can it help lower cholesterol, chocolate may also reduce pain as also found in drinking water.


M AYA ’ S M U S I N G

Chocolate Rub Burger Serves 1 portion

INGREDIENTS:

Chocolate Rub 3 1/2 tbsp Unsweetened chocolate powder 1 tbsp White pepper 1 tbsp Coriander 4 1/2 tbsp Cinnamon powder 2 tsp Nutmeg powder 4 tbsp Salt 1 tbsp Brown sugar Burger 180 gr Fresh hamburger patty 1 pc Sesame bun to add Lettuce, onion, and tomato Chili-lime Yogurt Sauce 2 tbsp Plain yogurt 1/2 tsp Lime zest 1 tsp Lime juice 1/4 tsp Japanese chili powder Prepare also some olive oil and vegetable oil.

STEPS

Method: • Mix all the chocolate rub ingredients. • Separately, mix and season the yogurt sauce to taste. • Rub the meat generously with the chocolate rub. • Heat the pan or grill until smoking hot. • Coat the meat with olive oil. • Cook the meat to your liking. • Ensemble the burger and enjoy! Best consumed with the ice cold draught beer.

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A ROYAL TREAT by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT


TRIED AND TESTED

Hailing from France, the young Alexis Gudimard, who just recently joined the ranks of Pullman Jakarta Central Park as its pastry chef, quickly charms everyone with his good looks and wonderful creations. Not just that, the young chefs also told us of how it all started with his career and introduces his latest creation, The Royal Cake.

PULLMAN JAKARTA CENTRAL PARK | Podomoro City, Jalan Let. Jend. S. Parman Kav. 28, Jakarta | +62 21 2920 0088 www.pullmanjakartacentralpark.com | Facebook: PULLMANJAKARTACP | Twitter: @Pullman _ Jakarta _ CP

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TRIED AND TESTED

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hef Alexis Gudimard’s apprenticeship years began around in several boulangerie and chocolaterie in Montpellier and Nice in France, following his pastry education at two schools, until he wrapped it up by working under the most famous French chocolatier, Pascal Lac. “After I finished my studies, I headed to Courmayeur right at the edge of Italy, nearby Chamonix, to start working professionally as a pastry chef for one of the resorts there,” Alexis told us. As fate would have it, he met his girlfriend there, and they worked together for a year, until moving to England together for work. England became the big break for Alexis

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as he got admitted as chef de partie for the only restaurant outside of France to retain three-star Michelin for almost three decades. “I was proud to part of the team that assured another year for The Waterside Inn to preserve such prestige”, said Alexis. The Waterside Inn itself is managed by the Roux family famed for their flagship restaurant in London, Le Gavroche. “I had a fruitful two years of learning so much at The Waterside Inn. The ala carte desserts were delicate to handle but I enjoy my years of making special pralines and soufflés for the guests there”, he continued. When asked about his favorite dessert, the chef simply replied, “While sometimes what I eat may depends on my mood of

whether I want milk chocolate or dark chocolate, I personally like my chocolate strong and I will put a lot of sour accompaniments from fruits and caramel around it”. In this edition, The Royal Cake he presents us is a mixture of four delicate elements that pair perfectly with each other. The flavor depth of Valrhona dark chocolate and milk chocolate are combined with cream and biscuits to make the textures even richer which concealed perfectly with the luscious dark glaze. You can personally savor his secret touch for this cake every day at Pullman Jakarta Central Park or perhaps you’d prefer to recreate it yourself and bring your skill to the next level. Either way, enjoy the treat!


TRIED AND TESTED

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TRIED AND TESTED

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TRIED AND TESTED

THE ROYAL CAKE

STEPS (in order):

Praline Feuilletine 500 gr Couverture milk chocolate 800 gr Praline 600 gr Royaltine

Dacquoise • Whip the egg whites with half of the sugar using 3rd speed until it achieves a light meringue consistency. • Add remaining sugar little by little and keep whipping it until it reaches full meringue consistency. • Add sifted flour and icing sugar that has already been mixed with the ground almond slowly. • Spread the mix upon two trays using baking paper and ready to cook. • Bake for around 10 minutes or so at 180oC. Set aside and let it cool down naturally or chilled until needed.

Bavaroise Dark Chocolate 325 gr Cream 35%, liquid 3100 gr Cream 35%, whipped 325 gr Egg yolk 350 gr Sugar 1700 gr Couverture dark chocolate 61%

Praline feuilletine • Melt the chocolate and add the praline. • Add the royaltine and mix it altogether. • Spread the mix all over the dacquiose evenly. Don’t forget to border the cake first using rectangular bracket to make it tidy.

Black Glaze 870 gr Sugar 480 gr Water 1070 gr Cream 35% 535 gr Glucose 230 gr Cocoa powder 235 gr Trimoline (inverted sugar syrup) 300 gr Gelatin

Bavaroise Dark Chocolate • Mix the egg yolk and the sugar well. • Bring the liquid cream to boil and pour half of it to the mix. • Pour the rest while boiling the mix up to 81oC. Mix it constantly during the process. • Put out from the stove and continue mixing for around 1 minute.

Serves: 60x40 cm size

INGREDIENTS: Dacquoise 700 gr 320 gr 600 gr 150 gr 150 gr

Egg whites Sugar Ground almond Flour Icing sugar

• Bring in the dark chocolate, put it in the microwave for 45 seconds, and pour the cream mix over the chocolate. • Mix slowly until it becomes homogeneous. • At around 35oC, incorporate the mix with the whipped cream. • Once ready for use, pour over the dacquoise and praline feuilletine to create a new layer. • Tidy the surface by using an iron ruler. Set aside and refrigerate. Black Glaze • Cook the sugar with water at 120oC. • At the same time, boil the cream and glucose. • Add the cocoa and the trimoline in the hot cream. Mix it. • Add the cooked sugar with water while not boiling by mixing it altogether. • At 60oC, add the gelatin and the remaining glaze (if you made one before this). • Mix well using hand blender until thick and without incorporating the air. • Use only when at 35oC and always check the temperature before use. • Pour it over the chilled cake evenly by using strainer. • Tidy up the black glaze on the cake. • Decorate the cake as you please and ready to serve.

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ST TR U I EFDF O AN F DL ETGEESNTDE SD

ERMEY TRISNIARTY – La Femme Chocolat by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

Luck may not be the right word for Ermey Trisniarty, co-owner of Dapur Cokelat. As the main person behind most of the creations of the famous chocolate store, it is a testament to her great ideas and hard work. Let’s hear her recipe for success.

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STUFF OF LEGENDS

“I always tell people that starting a business is easy, but to maintain it, now that’s the real challenge!” – said Ermey Trisniarty, the co-owner of Dapur Cokelat.

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STUFF OF LEGENDS

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ack in 2001, there was once this modest chocolate shop that just started to pave its way as the pioneer of praline-for-everyone in Jakarta. That time, pralines were not wellknown to Jakartans except for those who frequented certain five-star hotels and one or two boutique chocolaterie. Within thirteen years, Dapur Cokelat has managed to set its foot firmly in Jakarta, Makassar, and Surabaya with around a dozen outlets. Many may not recognize that the success was made from a combination of talent and determination of the owners. Ermey Trisniarty – who happens to be the mastermind behind all those good looking cakes and chocolates at Dapur Coklat, met us recently and reveals how it all started.

THE DETERMINED ONE Born from a family of food lovers and home bakers, Ermey quickly rose to prominence as the talented one when she was entrusted to assist the family’s home business at a very tender age. “I remember helping my mom selling iced cake when I was a kid”, she reminisced. Even only at home scale, her mom’s business had been well-known by notable people, especially those who came from Makassar – the city where her family was originally from. As a teen, Ermey decided to discover more of her talents with pastry as she headed for Bandung to study at NHI, the country’s most prominent tourism school. “It was intense back in NHI as I had all the trainings theoretically and by practice, day in and day out”, she confessed and later admits that it was ultimately one of the highlights

that brought her to closer to success. Back then, the theses of NHI students were examined by professional foreign chefs from five-star establishments in Jakarta and her work caught the attention of a master chocolatier, Dieter Speer, and she was immediately inducted to work at Mercantile Executive Club. “Several years there were such an enjoyable time as I learned a lot by just working with the chefs, but soon I realized that what I was aiming for was to continue my study after all”, said Ermey. Even though she was bestowed with the privilege to fuel her passion since very early while many people usually found their calling at a later stage in their lives, struggle remains the keyword that made her an achiever. She decided to resign from Mercantile and continued her studies at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture by specializing in agribusiness,

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STUFF OF LEGENDS much to the amazements of many. “My friends questioned my decision about this choice, but somehow I can relate agribusiness to what I had gone through and found it beneficial nonetheless”, she said defending her choice and continued, “Resigning from Mercantile left me with a lot of free time before heading to college in the evening. That’s where I decided to find myself a full-time job”. For her nine-to-five work, she joined the ranks of the editorial team of Sedap, a distinguished local magazine featuring cooking tips and recipes. “At Sedap, not only did I write, I also helped the clients to devise recipes and did also a lot of food styling,” said Ermey recalling her time there and describing how her previous job benefitted her a lot in this line of work. At the end of the day, she rushed back to Bogor for her studies almost every single day.

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THE ADVENT OF DAPUR COKELAT During her days in Bogor, she met her future husband and co-owner of Dapur Cokelat, Okky Dewanto, by a recommendation from her landlady who suggested that she should meet the brains behind Bogor’s famed apple pie shop. Impressed by Ermey’s skills in pastry and her passion, Okky suggested that she open up her own chocolate shop and he was more than ready to become her partner for it. “Okky is a seasoned man in the F&B business with an amazing portfolio. His shrewdness convinced me to start Dapur Cokelat and in 2001, we built our first ever outlet at Jalan Ahmad Dahlan,”she said recollecting how it all started. It wasn’t easy at first as Ermey had to brace herself to maintain the business with her remaining savings and even that time, they were still unable to finish decorating the store. “We were lucky that I had always been a collector of mugs and we finished our decorations using that. That’s how we did it modestly with Toko Cokelat, before it was finally known with Dapur Cokelat,” as she reminisced their early struggles.

Their business was finally having the big break thanks their continuous hard work and boosted also by a weekend article from Kompas. “All of a sudden after the article was published, people were simply flocking to our store and more and more people came each and every day!” exclaimed Ermey clearly remembering how exciting it all was some 13 years ago. “I always tell people that starting a business is easy, but to maintain it, now that’s the real challenge!” At this stage, the most challenging thing to do for Dapur Cokelat is to always stand up and be ready for competition. For that, Dapur Cokelat has to always come up with fresh creations and in terms of leadership, her way of treating the employees as a part of her family is also a way to be successful. As you can see, through all these hardships Dapur Cokelat has become a huge success and it all started from Ermey’s home kitchen where she assisted her mom daily to bake cakes and traditional delicacies. Who would have guessed? I guess only those who believe and are willing to work hard to make their dreams happen would.


STUFF OF LEGENDS

DAPUR COKELAT | 13 outlets in Jakarta, Surabaya, and Makassar www.dapurcokelat.com | Twitter: @dapurcokelat

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PA N T R Y 1 0 1

KNOW YOUR CHOCOLATE by RIAN FARISA

Chocolate is not all about common store bought bars that we usually eat. Chocolate is also applied for cooking and baking. We present you with the various types of chocolate and their characteristics which appear in our daily consumption of this most luscious and well-loved ingredient.

T

he US FDA and the European Union both have specific definitions of the types of chocolate, with their corresponding compositions. But these can be very confusing for the uninitiated. Let’s define some terms first: BASIC TERMS CACAO This is the cacao bean, right out of the cacao pod, it is fermented and dried, then it is either sold raw or roasted without the shell. Whole cacao is the whole bean,

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cacao nibs are crunched up pieces of bean, and ground cacao is powdered. This is the barest and healthiest form of chocolate, cacao can sometimes be quite bitter but already has the same chocolate aroma. CHOCOLATE LIQUOR This is the basis of all types of chocolate, formed by grinding cacao beans into a smooth, liquid paste. Nothing is added, and it does not contain alcohol, despite the name. It naturally contains about 53% cocoa butter (fat). COCOA BUTTER Also called theobroma oil, this is a paleyellow, edible vegetable fat extracted from the cocoa bean. It is used to make chocolate. Cocoa butter has the same

flavor and aroma as cacao. Cocoa butter is obtained from whole cocoa beans, which are fermented, roasted, and then separated from their hulls or shells. About 54–58% of the residue is cocoa butter. Chocolate liquor is pressed to separate the cocoa butter from the cocoa solids. COCOA POWDER Made by pressing the chocolate liquor, the cocoa butter will then be partially separated and left to harden. The solids, or usually called ‘press cake’, is then ground and becomes dry cocoa powder. Light brown in color and possessing a strong chocolate flavor, the cocoa powder becomes the base for cakes, cookies, brownies, and confections when added with sugar.


PA N T R Y 1 0 1

UNSWEETENED CHOCOLATE

DARK CHOCOLATE

MILK CHOCOLATE

WHITE CHOCOLATE

Also known as Chocolate, Baking Chocolate, Pure Chocolate and Bitter Chocolate. This is Chocolate Liquor that has been allowed to cool and harden. It is used for baking and to make other types of chocolate. Many bakers prefer this type of chocolate for baking because they have more control over the flavor and sweetness.

Dark chocolate is made up of at least 35% cocoa solids, other brands may even have a high of 70% to 99% of cocoa content, with fat and sugar making up the remainder of the content. For certain dark chocolates, milk is also added to soften the texture but only up to around 12% of the content. The different ratios of cocoa butter and other elements will further classify dark chocolate into several types such as sweet, semisweet, bittersweet, and ‘couverture’. Semisweet chocolate contains 40% - 62% of cocoa solids and is frequently used for cakes, cookies, and brownies, but if more sugar is added then it is classified into sweet chocolate. Meanwhile, the bittersweet chocolate has less sugar and more liquor than its semisweet counterpart. Good bittersweet chocolate is what that classified as having 60% - 85% of cocoa solids depending on the brand.

Milk chocolate usually contains at least 10% of chocolate liquor, this type of chocolate also contains cocoa butter and sugar in varying amount in addition to at least 3.39% of fat and 12% of milk in a form of dry milk solids, cream, or condensed milk. Originally it is much sweeter than dark chocolate, lighter in color, and has less chocolate-y taste although the latest trend shows us that chocolate producers are now putting more than the minimum amount of chocolate liquor, making it possess stronger chocolate taste and less sweetness. Milk chocolate is mostly consumed directly or made into cookies because of its difficulty to be tempered properly and its proneness to overheating.

White chocolate is not technically one of the types of chocolate because it does not contain any chocolate liquor. White chocolate does not contain any non-fat ingredients from the cacao bean, making it possess an off-white color. It must contain at least 20% cocoa butter and 14% milk solids, 3.5% milk fat, and not more than 55% of sweeteners alongside lecithin, vanilla, or other flavorings. Its mild and pleasant flavor makes it a star ingredient for making panna cotta, mousse, or can be eaten directly.

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W H AT C H E F E AT S

O

ne can say that it’s a mixture of far-sighted vision, right momentum, and the courage to dive in, but those are the reasons why Astrid Hadywibowo is known for her business initiatives. As the owner of LIN, the first liquid nitrogen ice cream shop in Jakarta, she has all the right to be content, but instead she chooses to keep herself busy plotting for a grander business scheme. Before meeting Astrid at her ice cream shop in Kemang, we spotted her earlier overseeing a new restaurant project located just beside LIN. Curious, we asked her about it. “After the liquid nitrogen ice cream, it’s time to unveil the noodle burgers!” It may not be new concept abroad and some restaurant might have already put it in their menu here, but for Jakarta, it will be the first time hearing a restaurant specializing fully with this and the trend of having it as a meal might be starting very soon for the citizens. Looking back, it’s been a long journey for Astrid as she drew inspiration for her business concept since her college days abroad and she started it first as a home business. She enjoyed selling baked goods but it had always been her dream to have her own business and through her husband’s support, they started it with Papabubble candy shop in Grand Indonesia. “I am always fascinated with anything artisan and hand-made candies quickly caught my attention”, said Astrid. She took the effort in learning how to make the candies and that’s also how she did it with the liquid nitrogen ice cream business as well. Despite her ice cream business, Astrid originally didn’t like milk at all. “When I was a kid, I always closed my nose whenever I drank milk. Luckily, my mom made me es mambo instead so that I can still get the benefit from milk and from there, I grew up liking it”, she said. Es mambo has always been a popular dessert in Indonesia, especially for elementary school kids. It’s basically a frozen dessert made from sweetened milk or fruit juice. After mixing all the ingredients, the liquid is then poured inside a slim plastic pouch and put into the freezer. Like enjoying popsicles, all you have to do next is to sip the entire flavor coming out from the ice. “Although es mambo is considered more suitable for kids, it doesn’t make me stop enjoying it from time to time!”, said Astrid admitting it out loud. Truly, who would have imagined that disliking milk made her ended up having a successful ice cream shop?

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ASTRID HADYWIBOWO by RIAN FARISA photographs by DENNIE BENEDICT

Who would have guessed that disliking something in the beginning made you end up liking it and even made it into business? Such is the case of Astrid Hadywibowo, the owner of a well-known ice cream shop, with milk!


TRIED AND TESTED

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THE FOODIE MAGAZINE APRIL 2014