Page 1

Parent Hand book


Parent Handbook Printed December 2018

Bold Park Community School respectfully acknowledges the Whadjuk Noongar people as the traditional owners and custodians of the land on which our school stands. We acknowledge their ancestors, who for many thousands of years gathered on this site to live, learn and grow. We are committed to honouring the Noongar people and their heritage by building our young people’s connection to this land by including indigenous knowledge and perspectives in our pedagogy.

Principal | Paul Whitehead | paul@boldpark.com

Business Manager | Sue Wyatt | business@boldpark.com Pedagogista | Nicole Hunter | nicole@boldpark.com

Middle School and College Team Leader | Tim Vidler | tim@boldpark.com Primary Team Leader | Felicity Kinsella | felicity@boldpark.com

Early Childhood Team Leader | Gabbi Lovelady | gabbi@boldpark.com Arts Team Leader | Rhys George | rhys@boldpark.com

2

08 9387 5050 | www.boldpark.com

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Contents From the Principal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

About Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Our Purpose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Our Vision. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Our Strategic Focus (2017 - 2020) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Teaching and Learning Framework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Connectedness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Relationships at the Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Complexity: The Wholeness of Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Teaching: As Research into Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Designing for Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Critical Reflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Collaboration & Communication - Weekly Pedagogical Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Collaborative Team Structures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Relationships with Families. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Curriculums and Frameworks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Real World Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Learning in local and natural environments: A sense of place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Learning through the Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Arts Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Project Learning: Integrating knowledge across the curriculum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fluency and Mastery: Content Knowledge Skills and Understanding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Community. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Parent Class Coordinators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Busy Bees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Staff Lunches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Contacts for Parents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Administration and Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

3


School Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Newsflash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Website. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 “Like� our Facebook Page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Direct Email. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Publications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Arrivals, Departures and Absences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Absences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Arriving Late and Departing Early. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Being Mindful of our Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Canteen and Lunches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Canteen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Sharing Lunches and being Nut-Aware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Library Books - Oliver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Medical, Health and Well-being . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Medication at School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Student Health and Data Update Form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Extra-curricula Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Before and After-school Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Music Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 After-school and School Holiday Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Ukulele Club. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Fees and Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 School Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Notice of Withdrawal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Car parks and Surrounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Arrivals and Departures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Magpies (Koorlbardi). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Needle Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

4

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Property: Yours and Ours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Uniform and Other Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Lost Property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Staff Lunch Dishes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Health and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Gifts for Teachers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Excursions and Camps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Student Free Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Mandated Curriculum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Early Years Learning Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Keeping Safe Curriculum: Child Protection Curriculum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Assessing and Monitoring Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Assessment Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Types of Assessments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Assessment and Learning through Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Reporting on Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 On Balance Judgments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Learning and Intervention Framework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Essential Components of Bold Park Community School Learning & Intervention Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Connecting Learning Action Plans (LAP) with Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Diagnostic Assessments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Mutual Respect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Social Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Guiding Behaviour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Incremental Stages of Intervention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Expected Behaviour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Social Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 When Problems Arise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Restorative Conferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Consequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Parent Collaboration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

5


Social Emotional Learning Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum (KS:CPC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Zones of Regulation (Pre-Primary to Year 6). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 The Four Zones of Regulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Inclusive Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Wilderness Playgroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Who Can Attend?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Days and Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Supervision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Early Childhood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Days and Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Supervision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Uniforms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 What to Bring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Capturing Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Capturing Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Primary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Days and Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Supervision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Uniforms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 What to Bring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 The Image of the Child as Competent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Capturing Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Days and Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Supervision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Uniforms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 What to Bring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Preparation - Reading Mastery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Capturing Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

6

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


College. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Days and Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Supervision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Uniforms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Offerings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 College Course Handbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Capturing Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

7


From the Principal Dear Families

We are delighted to welcome you to the Bold Park Community School family!

As you will discover, Bold Park Community School is an intimate, caring and innovative 21st Century school, catering for children through our Playgroup, Early Childhood, Primary and Adolescent Middle School and College Programs.

We pride ourselves in offering a unique educational choice between mainstream and established alternative schooling. We cater for families looking for a nurturing environment that supports latest research and best practice across ages and stages of child development. This Parent Handbook has been designed to help you know what to expect as your family embarks on a learning journey with us and also to help you understand why things may look slightly different than your previous school experiences. It is our goal that Bold Park Community School will become a model excellence for the 21st century. Our emphasis is on developingskills and understandings to create a community where children respect and value their families and the society in which they live, where children know and value themselves and are comfortable with the challenges that lie ahead.

of

As our Founding Principal Gillian McAuliffe says, “To seek to keep the light alive in children’s eyes.” Kind regards

Paul Whitehead Principal

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

9


About Us Our Purpose To cultivate a community of learners who positively influence their worlds.

Our Vision To be celebrated for our progressive and collaborative approach to child-centred education.

Our Strategic Focus (2017 - 2020) Children at the Centre We will grow our responsive, dynamic and nurturing environment to ensure that children are empowered as healthy, resilient, engaged, inclusive and self-regulated individuals in a culture of collaboration and mutual respect.

Leading Practices and Philosophy We will grow our staff and leadership capacity by documenting processes and procedures in order to achieve replicability. We will be recognised as leaders in Nature Pedagogy and ProjectBased Learning.

A Flourishing Community We will continue to treasure our heritage and work together to foster a loving, engaged, serving and learning community.

Accelerating Growth and Sustainability We will continue to grow our school enrolment capacity and build our financial sustainability. We will explore new horizons in our endeavour to expand opportunities for our children and our influence and voice in education. 10

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


About Us Bold Park Community School began in 1998, growing out of the shared aspiration of educators and families to reimagine schooling. They wanted to create a school where learning would be authentic, relevant and engaging. The founder of the school, Gillian MacAuliffe, described this intention as a desire to ‘keep the light alive in children’s eyes’. In this, she referred to the capacity of the human mind to seek meaning, explanation and wonder at the possibility of what could be. The unique pedagogical environment of Bold Park Community School continues to 'keep the light alive'. We encourage both students and educators to maintain their curiosity and wonder by connecting education to the rich complexity of daily life and the world around them. The philosophy, structures and programs of our school have been built from the ground up, based on research and and experience in how learning occurs. Central to this is developing each student's understanding that learning is continuous and integrated. Academic, social and emotional learning are deeply entwined. In order to be a successful learner and to develop quality relationships in life, students need to develop competencies across all three of these domains. We aim to develop in our students the dispositions essential for life-long learning, happiness, contentment, resilience and for them to flourish. The teaching and learning framework at Bold Park Community School has been developed as a holistic approach to learning with an emphasis on learning how to collaborate with each other, how to self regulate and build new understandings through meaningful and authentic relationships.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

11


Teaching and Learning Framework Connectedness

Connectedness

Beginning at birth, much of what we humans learn is acquired through our relationships and interactions with the people and places around us. We believe that school should be a place that forges student connection with the people and world around, rather than a place that isolates them from it. As such our educators seek out connections and interrelationships for learning to cross boundaries - between subject areas; feeling and thinking; playing and learning; indoors and outdoors; learning in the classroom and learning out in the community. This is described as an ecological view of learning, where we recognise the dynamic webs and systems of life, and the knowledge and understandings that connect us to each other and to the world.

Relationships at the Centre

Relationships at the Centre

Relationships between students, teachers and families are central to Bold Park Community School and are approached through the value of mutual respect. This attitude is crucial to developing an environment recognising each one of us brings something of worth to the learning process.

Interpersonal skills are essential to the learning process and as such, are intentionally developed in our learning programs. This includes behaviours such as empathy, collaboration and responsibility. The meaning people derive from being part of a community provides a strong motivation for learning and life. By supporting students in their ability to form positive relationships with each other and the world around them, we develop a culture where all can experience belonging and wellbeing.

We respect that our students will develop at different rates and may take different paths in their learning and development of complex social skills. However, we believe all students have the innate desire to connect with other people, and as adults, it is our responsibility to provide the necessary guidance and skills for them to successfully do so. Please see Mutual Respect (page 46) and Guiding Behaviour (page 47) for further information. 12

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Teaching and Learning Framework Complexity: The Wholeness of Learning Bold Park Community School learning environments are especially designed to help students understand themselves as a learner and see themselves as part of a community. Our educators spend time planning and organising classrooms that are asthetically; peaceful, interesting, stimulating and inviting, these spaces support the children be at an optimal point for learing. However, our classrooms are just one part of a child's learning environment at our school.

Real world and natural environments such as our Wildspaces, Galup (Lake Monger), our local community and beyond, offer further meaningful contexts for learning. By connecting curriculum content to places that matter to our students, we engage their curiosity and attention. This often leads to ongoing projects connecting learning to the ‘real world’. In addition, each environment requires differing levels of self-regulation, thought and action, adding further learning opportunities for each child. Our school is unique in the way we use the arts and nature as context for learning. Art and nature both involve complex relationships that engage the senses, emotions and intellect. As such these contexts offer the opportunity to embody the ‘wholeness’ of learning in a way that more honestly reflects real life. Educators use the arts and nature to bring subject area learning into a multidisciplinary environment, often through project-based work. Forefront to all learning at Bold Park Community School is engaging the interpersonal, intrapersonal and cognitive dispositions of learning. The complexity that these contexts provide gives an inclusive learning environment by offering multiple ways of engaging and entering into learning. Refer to Real World Learning (page 20). Our school week is deliberately structured to provide opportunities for all students to engage regularly with the arts and outdoor natural environments for extended periods of time. Art and nature specialist teachers work alongside classroom teachers in designing learning experiences and generating new perspectives and knowledge.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

13


Teaching: As Research into Learning Classrooms are complex places. Students bring diverse ranges in abilities, prior knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. There is no ‘one right way’ for teaching. Our educators must draw from multiple teaching strategies in order to develop a learning program that ‘works’ for each and every students in their classrooms. By using a cycle of planning, implementation and reflection, educators act as ‘researchers’. Their research is an inquiry into learning. In order to develop effective learning programs they must be able to identify where each student is in their learning progression and dispositions, what they need to learn next, and how they will know when students have achieved this learning. Through this research attitude, our educators become skilled observers and collectors of information and knowledge about their students. They also consider what would constitute authentic and meaningful learning for these students in order to lead them to the next phase of their learning.

Designing for Learning When our educators begin their planning they begin their research into how they can best bring the curriculum requirements, in a meaningful way, to their students. They must consider: •

What is the students’ current understanding of a topic?

What will successful learning of this topic look like?

• • • • •

What will be the best strategy to teach this?

What is the best strategy to develop fluency in this? How do we make that visible?

What questions, misconceptions, interests etc. do they have on this topic?

How can we engage them and make this learning relevant and meaningful?

Critical Reflection Our educators use a cycle of planning, teaching, assessing and reflecting on student learning. This is also described as critically reflective practice. For Bold Park Community School educators this critically reflective practice, along with collegial collaboration and continual professional learning is extrtemely important at Bold Park Community School. The school has purposefully developed strategies and organisational structures to enable our educators to work in this way.

. . . critical ref lection as a matter of ’stance and dance’. The stance toward teaching practice is one of inquiry, it being in constant formation and always open to further investigation. The dance is one of experimentation and risk, modifying practice while moving to f luctuating and sometimes contrary rhythms. Larrivee, 2000, p 295 14

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Teaching: As Research into Learning Collaboration & Communication - Weekly Pedagogical Meetings A unique and valuable feature of the Bold Park Community School pedagogical enironment is the time set aside for educators to collaborate with peers beyond the classroom. Each Wednesday at Bold Park Community School the students finish school at lunchtime and the teaching staff spend the afternoon meeting together. This structure allows for educators to engage with weekly reflection and planning sessions. These weekly meetings involve flexible groupings that include all staff; learning areas groups; or individual classroom teaching teams. Since all staff share this same pupil free planning time, collaboration occurs across the school including arts specialists and other teaching teams. Allowing time for this affirms the value Bold Park Community School holds for an educator’s collaboration, peer learning and reflective practice. Being able to work together as a whole staff has many benefits. Among these are: • • • • •

A consistent understanding of Bold Park Community School philosophy and teaching practices. Sharing of expertise, experience and ideas.

Continual and ongoing professional learning. Integration of the arts and nature programs.

Gaining an explicit and widely held view of what constitutes good teaching and learning is a first step toward any systematic efforts to scaling up quality. City et al., 2009, p. 173

Examination and moderation of student progress.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

15


Teaching: As Research into Learning Collaborative Team Structures

Media Intern

m

Tea Ed.

Music Specialist

Visual Arts Specialist

Pedagogista

eam L

sive

Language Specialist

Outdoor Provocation Specialist

Arts T

eam L Dance Specialist

eade r

Child

ager

Area T

Media Specialist

Man

Drama Specialist

Inclu 16

Class Teaching Intern/s

Class Teacher/s

iness

eade r

Principal

Bus

s

Each classroom has a minimum of two educators. The basic unit of the teaching team is made up of a lead teacher and a teaching intern (generally a third or fourth year education student or graduate teacher). These class teams work in collaboration with the specialist teachers. It is through their joint observation, reflection and planning that each class’ learning program is developed. These pedagogical teams are also supported by a relevant area Team Leader such as Early Childhood, Primary, Middle School, College and Arts; the Pedagogista and the Principal. The school has in place an Inclusive Education Team providing guidance and assistance in catering for learning differences. This collegial environment provides educators with multiple perspectives to enrich and continually develop their professional practice.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Relationships with Families Each child is unique, along with each parent and each educator and this is celebrated at Bold Park Community School. How a parent engages in their child's learning and builds relationships with educations, influences young children's development and learning. All educational contexts functions best when families and staff work together in the common goal of supporting children and young adults on their learning pathway. Our educators actively and intentionally work on developing open and trusting relationships with all families. We provide many and varied opportunities for you to engage with our educators and the school community as a whole. We encourage you to participate because these opportunities enable you to more fully understand the ‘wholeness’ of your child’s educational experience at Bold Park Community School. We welcome you into a community that continually asks itself; ‘what is the best we can do for children and young adults?’. Please see Community (page 22) for more information.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

17


Curriculums and Frameworks Bold Park Community School fully engages with the curriculum and learning frameworks specified by the Department of Education Services and the Schools Curriculum and Standards Authority (SCSA). These form the basis for our learning programs and student assessments. These are outlined in the table below. Area of Schooling

Western Australian Mandated Curriculums

Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten

Early Years Learning Framework

Pre-Primary to Year 2 Year 3 to Year 6 Year 7 to 9

Year 10 to 12

Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum Early Years Learning Framework Western Australian Curriculum

Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum Western Australian Curriculum

Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum Western Australian Curriculum

Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum Western Australian Curriculum

Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum Certificate II Permaculture

Certificate IV Design & Technology

Our educators use multiple pedagogical strategies to provide learning environments that can fulfill both the school’s vision and the mandated curriculum outcomes. There is no ‘one size fits all’ approach. The diversity that students bring to their learning requires an equally diverse set of teaching strategies. Hence our planning process is actually 'designing for learning'. The complexity of this planning, to include all the necessary frameworks, curricula, our pedagogy, philosophy and values, must not be underestimated. Please see Early Years Learning Framework (page 40), Western Australian Curriculum (page 40), Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum (page 41) for more information.

18

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Real World Learning Learning in local and natural environments: A sense of place

To live, is to live locally, and to know is to first of all know the places one is in.

Casey, in Gruenwald, p 9 , 2003

By connecting our students curriculum learning to the surrounding world, we engage the ‘head, heart and hands’. All of our students have time for direct experience in natural environments both on and off the school campus. Central to these experiences is fostering wonder and curiosity and incorporating indigenous knowledge and perspectives; the ‘heart’. To support these immersive opportunities, the school has developed two key staff positions;the kitchen garden specialist and the outdoor learning specialist. Both of these specialists work in collaboration with classroom teachers to integrate learning through nature and places into the classroom programs. We engage the 'head' and 'hands' by nurturing a connection to nature, using curriculum content, subject area knowledge and hands on activity. Our Year 10 students may continue with this learning through to a Certificate II in Permaculture.

Educators deliberately seek out opportunities to connect class-based learning to the community outside of the school. They do this with excursions, going out to places, inviting community members into the school, or engaging in project work that has a real and positive impact for our community.

Learning through the Arts

An education rich in creative arts maximises opportunities for learners to engage with innovative thinkers and leaders, and to experience the arts both as audience members and as artists. Such an education is vital to students’ success as individuals and as members of society, emphasising not only creativity and imagination, but also the values of cultural understanding and social harmony that the arts can engender. MCEETYA and Cultural Ministers Council, 2007, p. 5

Arts Skills The arts provide ways of thinking, perceiving, communicating and expressing that are highly valued at Bold Park Community School. The school has a dedicated arts team coordinated and lead by our Arts Team Leader. Students are provided with opportunities to engage with the unique knowledge, skills and symbols relevant to each discipline. Educators refer to the relevant achievement standards of Western Australian Curriculum as outlined in the following table to both plan and assess for learning.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

19


Real World Learning Strands of Western Australian Curriculum Performance Arts

Tactile Arts

Dance

Visual Arts

Media Arts

Design & Technology: Nature Arts

Drama Music

Design & Technology: Kitchen Garden

Arts Embedded

“The Arts enables an immensely rewarding way of human knowing and being - of imagination, aesthetic knowledge and translation and expression of ideas.” (Ewing, 2010, p 5) In recognising the potential of the arts to provide multiple ways of knowing and engaging with the world, we use the arts as a pedagogical strategy to engage student learning. From Pre-primary through to Middle School, Bold Park Community School arts specialists are embedded into each classroom on a weekly basis. This approach to teaching and learning allows for our arts specialists to bring their unique skill to other subject areas or class projects. We use the arts to generate new ideas and ways of thinking to enrich the experiences and learning that occurs in every classroom.

Project Learning: Integrating knowledge across the curriculum In the Bold Park Community School context, project based learning may include, but is not limited to creating an end product. At times projects may be striving to influence attitudes and behaviours such as gratitude, empathy or mindfulness. To us project based learning is a ‘mindset’ that gives value to learning as continuous, occurring in many and varied settings, through diverse experience and from contact and interaction with other people, other places, other knowledge. Our nature, arts and project-based experiences at Bold Park Community School, give students the capacity to apply and transfer their knowledge and understanding across subjectbased content and into their lives. The ability to do this will equip our students to be lifelong learners who can operate with confidence in a complex and dynamic world. This does not diminish the importance of developing subject specific content knowledge skills and understanding, but works in conjuction. 20

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Real World Learning Fluency and Mastery: Content Knowledge Skills and Understanding While integrated and multidisciplinary ways of learning are important pedagogical strategies applied at Bold Park Community School, they are not the only ones. Students at Bold Park Community School also spend time directly engaging with specific learning area curriculum knowledge. The school views this subject specific learning and our integrated learning as complimentary. The organisation of knowledge and understanding into curriculum areas or ‘parts’ helps us understand the ‘whole’, and the organisation of knowledge at a project or more ‘holistic’ level, helps to make sense of and give purpose to the ‘parts’.

Educators monitor students progress in relevant curriculum areas using multiple sources of assessments. These assessments help in planning for the learning and judging progress towards relevant achievement standards. Please see Mandated Curriculum (page 40), Assessing and Monitoring Learning (page 42) and Reporting on Learning (page 43) for more detail.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

21


Community Bold Park Community School has become what it is today through the energy and commitment of its staff and parent body. The very nature of a community school is where all families pitch in and take responsibility for the successful running of the school. Education is a team effort and we continue to seek your input and assistance across the school to promote and foster the community aspect of our unique school.

How can Parents get Involved?

At our school we truly embrace the 'village' in educating and supporting our children, and we value the role that volunteers play in our community. We love your involvement, it is beneficial to the school and also to your children by way of role modeling and creating school networks. Whether you have a small amount of time to give occasionally or a few hours on a regular basis, you can be involved in our school in the following ways: • • • • • • • •

Consider becoming a Class Coordinator for your child’s class at the beginning of the school year. You will get to know the wider school community as you help to coordinate the many and varied social and community events on offer through out the year.

If you prefer a governance role, and have experience and skills in finance, business, human resources, marketing etc, consider joining the BPCS Board. Each year at the annual general meeting new members are sought and applications are welcome. We have a Reconciliation Action Group and a Sustainability Action Group committed to developing our schools commitment to these actions, please contact nicole@boldpark.com if you would like to participate in either of these. Perhaps you have a specific skill set that you can share with the community on a voluntary basis e.g.: construction, architecture, design, maintenance, gardening, sewing, cooking etc.

From time to time classes look out for volunteers for specific class project: building a frog pond, felting, construction. Let you teaching team know what you can offer! In our younger years you might like to help out by signing up on the fruit roster or the reading support roster. Perhaps you can use your skills to coordinate the staff lunch roster or help manage the lost property.

Don’t forget our regular busy bees! These are a wonderful way to not only contribute the school but to meet with other families and strenghthen our community spirit.

Parent Class Coordinators At the start of the year staff may call for parents to volunteer to be class coordinators for their child’s class. Class coordinators assist the school with the following: • • •

Information flow

Social and community activities

Promoting of the Bold Park Community School philosophy

This role is an important link in communication across the school. Consider taking on the role for your class at the beginning of each school year, or alternatively supporting your class' coordinator.

A copy of the Bold Park Community School philosophy document can be downloaded through this link. http://www. boldpark.com/bpwp/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Bold Park Community School-Philosophy-Document.pdf 22

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Community Busy Bees Each year all families to commit to one busy bee. Busy bees are scheduled throughout the year and you attend the busy bee allocated to your child's class. They run from 9:00am - 11:00am. If you are unable to attend your allocated busy bee, you are able to attend one of the other busy bees during the year. As a small community school we rely on families to contribute to this important element of the school. We ask that if it is not possible to attend any of the busy bees, you contact your class teachers to discuss options of helping with some tasks at home such as covering library books, sewing cushions etc.

Staff Lunches Staff lunches are a highlight of the week for Bold Park Community School staff. They are looked forward to every week and contribute greatly to the commitment and motivation of the staff during the professional development (PD) session that follows, as well as the school week. It makes the staff feel proud and appreciated when families think enough of them to put heart into providing a meal and make this commitment. The Wednesday staff lunch is a successful fundraising initiative that began in 2003 with families providing staff with lunch during school terms. Each Wednesday of term, Bold Park staff meet for lunch their professional development afternoon, which finishes at 5pm. Staff pay $8.50 each per week, for a delicious meal provided by the families in the school. This is an opportunity for parents to show their appreciation to the staff for all those extras that our staff do outside their normal class times – parent nights, orientation days, professional development, busy bees, staff retreat, open days etc. Visiting teachers and professionals often envy the initiative and comment how the lunches show that staff and families of the school have a respectful and appreciative relationship.

It is acknowledged that some parents find this commitment burdensome however it is a democratic fundraiser as it requires all families to participate in supporting the school and does not unduly burden a few dedicated families. Coordinating and planning lunches provides families with the opportunity to talk to, and connect with, other community members who they may not otherwise meet.

Each term a roster is provided so families know when it is their turn to show their appreciation through a meal. Parents are welcome to join the staff for lunch on the Wednesday that they are rostered to provide food for the lunch.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

23


Communication Contacts for Parents From time to time parents have questions and concerns regarding their child and the management of the school. To ensure that all queries can be dealt with quickly by the appropriate staff, use the following plan so that you know who to contact. Individual queries regarding your child’s class/education should be directed to the following staff: 1. Classroom Teaching Team Your child's teaching team are the first point of call for the day-to-day needs of your child.

2. Team Leader for the appropriate learning area Each teaching team has an area Team Leader who is responsible for the leadership of their area of the school. If a student moves through Wave One Learning into Wave Two or Three (see Learning Intervention Framework, page 44), your area Team Leader will become a more direct support, both with advice and as a presence at meetings.

Gabbi Lovelady Early Childhood Team Leader gabbi@boldpark.com

Felicity Kinsella Primary Team Leader felicity@boldpark.com

If you require further help ask for the advice of either:

Tim Vidler Middle School & College Team Leader tim@boldpark.com

3. The Principal and/or Business Manager

Paul Whitehead Principal paul@boldpark.com 24

Sue Wyatt Business Manager business@boldpark.com Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Communication Other queries regarding your child's education at Bold Park Community School may be directed to the following staff: • • •

School Educational Philosophy Team Leader, Pedagogista or Principal Educational Administration Appropriate Team Leader or Principal Parental Support Appropriate Team Leader or Principal

WACE/VET Information and Assistance WACE/VET Coordinator and Middle School/College Team Leader

Inclusive Education Support Classroom Teacher, Inclusive Education Coordinator, Team Leader

Nicole Hunter Pedagogista nicole@boldpark.com

Rhys George Arts Team Leader rhys@boldpark.com

Jan Cox Inclusive Education Coordinator janice@boldpark.com

Liz Marazzato WACE/VET Coordinator elizabeth@boldpark.com

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

25


Communication If you have questions about your child’s learning or school experience, here are some suggested guidelines for investigating your concern.

1

Identify what is of concern, write these concerns down and then observe your child to inform your feelings.

5

If both parents and staff confirm a concern, then develop a plan with the school, to address the situation that will achieve the maximum benefit for your child.

6

3

4

Listen to what the staff have to say. They will be able to advise you on strategies to assist or reassure you when they consider that your child is developing appropriately.

Remember that your child is unique and what is happening with other children and what might work for other children may not be appropriate for your child so please discuss concerns and strategies with the staff first. 26

2

Read information we have given you to see if your concern has already been addressed.

Make an appointment to discuss your concerns with your child’s teaching staff giving them your list prior to the meeting so that they too can consider and investigate the problem. You may have identified something that they have missed and the staff will be grateful for your input.

7

Ask yourself the following questions:

Is my child engaged in learning about life? Does my child like to go to school and feel safe there? Does my child communicate an increasing understanding about their world? What is it that I do not understand about the school curriculum? Then discuss any concerns with the school staff. Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Administration and Communication Other administration queries regarding Bold Park Community School may be directed to the following staff: •

• •

Enrolment Registrar, Registrar Assistant, Business Manager or Principal

Financial Finance Officer, Registrar, Business Manager or Principal

Wilderness Playgroup Assistant Registrar, Registrar or Business Manager

Penny Billingham Registrar registrar@boldpark.com

Lisa Johnson Finance Officer and Assistant Registrar lisa@boldpark.com

Pamela Wise Executive Assistant pamela@boldpark.com Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

Marketing and Fundraising Marketing and Public Relations Coordinator, Business Manager or Principal Absences – Receptionist, Registrar or Executive Assistant (page 30)

Venue/Facility Hire and Occupation Health and Safety Executive Assistant or Business Manager

Michelle Colin-Thome Finance Officer finance@boldpark.com

Bettina Lloyd Receptionist and Absentees reception@boldpark.com

Juanita Reynolds Marketing and Public Relations Coordinator marketing@boldpark.com 27


School Communications Newsflash Newsflash, is Bold Park Community Schools ‘newsletter’ communication to parents. The Newsflash is sent via email to parents dependent on information that needs to be disseminated. The Newsflash is sent from the email newsflash@ boldpark.com. To assist your email software in knowing that receiving our newsletters is OK, we suggest you add this email to your contacts. If you don’t receive the Newsflash, we suggest checking your junk mail, clutter and spam. The Newsflash is also added to the resources section of EDUCA and can be searched using the word Newsflash. On enrolment at Bold Park Community School, the enrolling parent's emails are added to our communications list. If you change your email, please ensure you notify us of the amendment by downloading the update details form found in the Resources tab in EDUCA, completing it and emailing it through to reception (office@boldpark.com). Search for ‘Change of Details Form’ in the search bar.

Website

The Bold Park Community School website is a wealth of information for prospective and current parents. Programs, events, before and after school care activities as well as term dates can be found on our website.

School Calendar - What’s On

All events, classroom excursions, some incursions, term dates, public holidays as well as anything else that families would need to know is updated on the Bold Park Community School Calendar. This can be found on the website under the ‘What’s On’ tab or directly through this link https://www.boldpark.com/whats-on/. You can also directly access the calendar at the bottom of each Newsflash. If you have a Google Account and are signed in you can 'add' the What's On (Upcoming Events) calendar to your Google calendar feed. Just click on the '+' sign next to Google Calendar at the bottom of the What's On calendar. Families are encouraged to visit the calendar regularly to stay up-to-date with what is happening in the school.

Events

Our major events included in the calendar and will likely have a page of their own. These pages will include details specific to each event and often include ticket purchasing options and links.

Blog

Our blog on the website showcases some of the amazing learning that occurs at Bold Park Community School and is a good source of information for families. https://www.boldpark.com/our-blog/

EDUCA

EDUCA, which links from our website is an essential tool for current families. EDUCA is one of the main communication hubs of the school and all families need to access it regularly to keep up-to-date with the school’s happenings. EDUCA serves as the community-only section of the website and requires a login and password, which we will give to you at the beginning of the school year. 28

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


School Communications Policies Some school policies are available on the website; however, as a general rule the policies are accessible to parents by clicking on the ‘School’ tab then ‘Policies’ in the sub menu within EDUCA. As a default, the policies will be listed out in full. To find the policy you are after, click on the button ‘Policy List View’ and you will then see an alphabetical list of the policies to select from. https://boldpark.educa.co.nz/centre/policies

Resources

Resources is another tab under the ‘School’ tab that is useful to parents. Items are added throughout the year and include Newsflashes, update medical forms and change of details forms.

“Like” our Facebook Page

We encourage families who use Facebook to “like” our page (@boldparkcs). Facebook allows us to capture short events and stories from the wider Bold Park school community and to give you “eyes” on the bigger story. Many parents have expressed their desire to see “what’s next” in their child’s educational journey. Facebook can help parents connect with the exciting things that happen in our whole school community.

Direct Email

Your child’s teacher and administration staff will, throughout the year, email you with information on things like class excursions, fees, staff lunches and upcoming special events. It is important that we have your correct details. Parents should update their email addresses using the update details form found in the Resources tab in EDUCA. Search for ‘Change of Details Form’ in the search bar.

Publications

All Bold Park Community School publications are available through administration. These include The Humble Honkey Nut, The Book of Faces and the Bold Park Community School College Course Handbook.

Meetings

Sometimes a parent teacher meeting may need to occur. To ensure these meetings are effective, at our school they are carried out using the "BE HEARD' principles: • Best intentions assumed • Emphasis on learning • Home-school collaboration • Examples and evidence • Active listening • Respect for all • Dedication to follow-up

Prior communication is required from both families and teachers that include an indication of the subject to be discussed. We request that you are mindful that teachers are in team planning and preparation before and after school. Meetings may be scheduled from 8:00pm to 8:25pm and from 3:30pm to 3:55pm. You can share a quick relay of urgent information with a teaching team member from 8:30pm to 8:40pm. Further details may then be communicated by email or in a teacher/family communication book. Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

29


Arrivals, Departures and Absences Absences School absences are a part of educational life, with sicknesses and medical appointments being the main reasons. Under section 23 of the School Education Act 1999, it is a legal requirement that all students attend school from the ages of 5 to 17 on the designated contact days. You need to be aware that you are legally not allowed to permit your child to stay home from school without reasonable cause e.g. sickness. You are asked to email absences@boldpark.com or phone 9387 5050 if your child is: • •

Going to be absent for an appointment. Please notify the school ahead of time or the same morning. Unwell on the morning. Please notify the school prior to the school day commencing.

Arriving Late and Departing Early

A late note will need to be completed and the slip taken by the students to give to their teacher as they enter the class. This can be obtained at the front office. The student should be accompanied by a parent/guardian when signing in. Students departing early should be signed out by their parent or the school notified guardian/carer at the front office.

Being Mindful of our Environments

Parents and families are an integral part of our community and essential to supporting our school environment after hours (e.g. Wednesday afternoon and after-school). Here are some points you will find helpful in this endeavour. •

Please be aware that after-hours times are a vital part of our teaching staff’s planning, preparation and meeting times.

The Outdoor Provocation Specialist’s shed, Mud Hut, Fire Pit and Wildspace outdoor surrounds are not to be accessed after school hours.

• • • • • • •

30

You or your child's guardian is responsible for the supervision of your own children in the outdoor spaces after hours. The Early Childhood Wildspace is ONLY available for use by teaching teams and students during school hours.

The playground climbing equipment in the Primary School Playground is age appropriate for the students in primary school. Adult supervision is required at all times for all ages but we do not recommend the use of this equipment by any child under the age of five years. Our outdoor spaces are Outdoor Classrooms. The balcony of Middle School has ‘tanks’ that sustain plant and animal life with the permaculture garden adjacent to this. These learning areas are ONLY for the use of the teaching staff and students from Middle School and College.  Please supervise your children and ensure that they are not playing in this area.

In the interest of security, families are required to vacate the school grounds by 3:50pm, unless your child is involved in an after-school activity that does not finish until after 4pm.  All gates are locked at 4pm with the exception of the staff car park access gate. Please supervise and make sure your children clean up the areas they have used after school hours. For example, pack away the basketballs and sandpit toys before you leave. Some areas of the school, such as the tennis court/undercover area are booked by external providers for after-school activities. These areas are not available for meetings, gatherings or other activities while these services are occuring.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Canteen and Lunches Canteen School Lunch Online supplies an online ordering system for fresh, healthy lunches at Bold Park Community School. Lunch orders are available on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays. Lunches are available to Primary (Years 1-6) and Secondary classes due to the later delivery times. Children in Early Childhood have their lunch earlier in the day so are unable to order.

Who is supplying the food?

Chef’s Delight, a locally based company, who provides the food using the best quality ingredients. They are accredited to the World Health Organisation HACCP Standard. All their processes and products are independently audited. They are very amenable to menu changes and welcome suggestions if you would like to see something new.

The Cut Off Time

Orders MUST be placed by 8am on the day of delivery. The school is not able to process any orders on your behalf.

How do I place my order?

Visit http://www.schoollunchonline.com.au, register your family and then follow the prompts to choose your lunch selection and place your order. You will need to register before you can view the menu. It only takes a minute or two to register and is very simple.

School Lunch Online has conducted extensive testing to ensure the website and system are fully functional from day one. However, if you do encounter a problem, or need a little help with getting started, please contact them for help at hello@ schoollunchonline.com.au.

Sharing Lunches and being Nut-Aware The Student Health Policy found in EDUCA, sets out the no-shared lunch policy for students. In addition, the school works with individual families to address any life-threatening health conditions in order to minimise their risk. To this end, the school is not deemed a nut-free environment; however, there are times when we ask families to work with us in minimising individual children’s risk by eliminating certain foods from children’s lunches.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

31


Library Books - Oliver Our library is sorted and catalogued through a software package called Oliver, into collections which are located across our school. At the beginning of each year new students receive their logins to Oliver via their class teacher. Continuing students keep the same login. Once your child has their login they will be able to access our full collection online via these links: • •

Kindergarten to Class 2/3/4 Oliver Orbit http://library.boldpark.com/oliver/junior.do

Class 3/4 to College Oliver http://library.boldpark.com/oliver/libraryHome.do

What can Oliver do?

Once your child has their login, they can search the school library catalogue and: • • •

Reserve books they want to read; Check books out; and

Review books (after reading them).

There are even handy links to other resources such as the State Library of WA and The Australian Museum.

How exactly do I get the book I have checked out?

Our librarian spends time each week in the different areas of the school. These times are listed on the Oliver home pageand during these times, our librarian will have any books that have been checked out by your child listed for them to collect.

32

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Medical, Health and Well-being Medication at School If at any point students are required to take medication at school and during school hours, you must complete an 'Authority to Give Ongoing Medication' form. A copy of this can be downloaded through the resources section in EDUCA.

Student Health and Data Update Form Every year, families are required to provide a Student Health and Data Update Form for each child in the family. This is so that our records are accurate in the event of an emergency. This is provided in the information pack you receive at the end of each year. We encourage you to provide as much information as possible regarding your child’s medical needs. For instance, if your child suffers from asthma, please include on the form the severity and the medication required in the event of an attack etc. If your child has a particularly life-threatening medical condition, a more comprehensive form can be completed to detail the medical action plan to be used in an emergency.

Asthma action plans and other resources can be downloaded from the Asthma Australia website through this link.

https://www.asthmaaustralia.org.au/wa/about-asthma/resources

Anaphylaxis and Allergy Action Plans can be accessed and downloaded through the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy Limited (ASCIA) Website.

https://www.allergy.org.au/health-professionals/anaphylaxis-resources

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

33


Extra-curricula Programs Before and After-school Care Bold Park Community School partners with Mulberry Tree Kid’s Club to provide a before and after-school care program for our students.

Mulberry Tree Kid’s Club is a family owned and managed Western Australian company, who have been providing care for children of all ages since 1995. Their Kid’s Club Centres are licensed for children from 4 to 12 years of age, providing before school, after school and an exciting holiday program full of fun experiences, projects and outings into the local community. For more details or to enrol in this program visit our website at https://www.boldpark.com/our-programs/ or contact Mulberry Tree Kid's Club Manager Sarah Dedman on 9383 7145 or email her on wembley.kidsclub@mulberrytree.com.au.

Music Program We offer a range of music tuition through external tutors. This is offered on a sign-up basis directly with the tutor. Tuition occurs on the site of our school and is 30 minutes for individual tuition and 45 minutes for group tuition. Details on the tutors and the instrumental offerings is updated on our website. Any changes to the program are communicated to parents either through direct email from our music teacher/tutor or the Newsflash or EDUCA. Generally, Bold Park Community School has offered guitar, bass guitar, ukulele, violin, viola, drums, percussion and piano. For more details on the Music Program please visit our website and click on the programs tab or follow this link. https://www.boldpark.com/programs/ instrumental-music-tuition/

After-school and School Holiday Activities Each year, Bold Park Community School offers a host of after-school activities. Some activities are run internally, while others are accessed through external providers. A full list of these activities is updatedon the website at the beginning of the year and each term. To view activities being offered please visit our website, click on the 'programs' tab and then click on 'after-school activities' or follow this link. https://www.boldpark.com/programs/after-school-activities/

Ukulele Club In 2011 we chose the ukulele as our school-wide, instrument, and embarked on our Ukuele Program. We chose the ukulele because it is durable, compact, affordable and allows the player to sing and play both chords and melodies separately or simultaneously.

Students are encouraged to join the Ukulele Club to hone their skills. The Ukulele Club meets once a week, before school on Wednesdays, to rehearse for any upcoming events. For more information on the Bold Park Community School Ukulele Club visit our website on https://www.boldpark.com/programs/ukulele/.

34

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Fees and Contributions School Fees Bold Park Community School fees and levies are set out in a schedule that is provided to parents after the end of Term 4 each year. The fee schedule covers information such as tuition, infrastructure, resources, commitment fees and payment methods.

For new enrolments, an application fee accompanies all admission applications. This fee covers administration costs and is non-refundable. When you receive a written offer of a place at our school, you pay an endowment fee, which is also nonrefundable. This fee assists with the ongoing provision of capital infrastructure. The Bold Park Community School Advisory Board approves the annual fees. The infrastructure levy assists us to pay for the lease of our site and maintenance of the buildings and grounds. Parents are not required to supply books and stationery; however, a fee for portfolios and/or book resources used in the school program is included in the first instalment of fees. In addition, family discounts on tuition fees are available for siblings of students already enrolled at the school. In June of each year, a letter will be sent out to all families to plan for the following school year, this information helps us plan for the ensuing year. For those children intending to stay at Bold Park Community School, a commitment fee secures a place. This fee is offset against the school fee account in Term 1 of the following year. Should you choose not to return to the school, this fee is forfeited. There are a range of payment options for the fees and levies and for more information, please follow these links to download a copy. •

Fee Schedule http://www.boldpark.com/bpwp/wpcontent/uploads/2018/12/Fee-Schedule2019-FINAL.pdf

Direct Debit Form http://www.boldpark.com/bpwp/wp-content/ uploads/2018/09/Direct-Debit-Request-2019.pdf

Notice of Withdrawal

Written notice must be provided by the last day of the previous term prior for the student leaving in order to withdraw a student; that is, one full term plus school holidays written notice must be given. In 2019, the dates for when written notice is required are in the Fee Schedule 2019 (see link above). If an endowment fee has been paid and in default of this notice, one quarter of the annual fee will be payable. If enrolment was prior to 2017, a deposit system was in place (which no longer applies for students enrolled from 2017). For these families, failure to provide written notice as outlined under ‘Notice of Withdrawal’ in the fee schedule will result in the forfeiture of the deposit. Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

35


Car Parks and Surrounds Security We strongly encourage you not to leave computers, phones, keys, bags, wallets or purses in your car, even if you are just popping in and out. Our car park area is sometimes targeted by quick-fingered thieves!

Arrivals and Departures Staff are rostered as a physical presence in the car park areas at the front of school at the start and end of each school day. As well as offering security, they enjoy welcoming and farewelling students and families each day. A few quick reminders in relation to arrivals and departures in our car park: •

Follow all road signs when you drive into the Lake Monger Reserve car park.

Please do not park at the front gate for drop off or pick up because the children walking in front of your vehicle to cross the road will not be visible to the other drivers behind you.

• • • •

20km p/hour is the speed limit for our car park.

Be aware of cyclists who enter from multiple locations around Lake Monger.

Students arriving at school by bike or skateboard are reminded that a helmet needs to be worn. A bike and skateboard rack is located behind the staff car park. Please ensure the school's entry gate closes after your entry or exit.

Magpies (Koorlbardi) During spring, we will often receive reports from our community of swooping koorlbardi (magpies) in the car park and for those who arrive from Galup (Lake Monger) or Dodd Street. To read the suggestions for reducing risk and protecting yourself on the way to and from school follow this link: http://www.ehp.qld.gov.au/wildlife/livingwith/magpie_safe

Needle Disposal Please be aware that we have been notified of needles being found in the car park. If you or your child find any, please do not touch them. Please come and notify us and we will dispose of them.

36

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Looking After our Belongings Uniform and Other Items You are asked to ensure you clearly label all uniform and property that is brought to school with your child's name. This helps staff to return ‘lost’ property promptly. For specifics on uniform requirements for your child, see Early Childhood Uniform (page 56), Primary uniform (page 62), Middle School uniform (page 67) or College uniform (page 71).

Lost Property All unnamed property that cannot be returned to the owner is placed in the storage containers located at the North-West corner of the Multifuction Room building, just near the Listrumpet. Once or twice a term (when the amount of lost property is overwhelming), tables are set-up outside the administration building and the lost property is put out for collection. Following this, any uncollected property is given to charity or added to the school's second hand stocks.

Staff Lunch Dishes Platters, plates and containers that have been brought in by parents on their rostered staff lunch day are washed, dried and placed in the white cupboard directly outside the MAC kitchen. You are encouraged to collect your dishes as soon as possible. This helps prevent loss of property as well as clearing the space ready for the following week. To assist with the correct return of your dishes we ask that you label all items dropped off for the staff lunches.

Health and Safety If you notice something out of place, broken or in need of maintenance that could lead to an injury for someone on our school grounds, please let us know. Come into administration or email the Executive Assistant on pamela@boldpark.com as soon as possible.

Gifts for Teachers Your generosity and gratitude for our wonderful staff is both warming and appreciated! It is important to say that gifts are not expected. We know that many classes organise a ‘class gift’. If your class have organised a little surprise we only ask that you are careful about the size of the contribution being requested from families who may not feel they can say ‘no’. In 2017, the school introduced a “Staff Code of Conduct”. A portion of this agreement requires staff to be mindful of gifts received. The general guideline for schools (across WA) is that gifts of over $50 value should be declared and more sizable gifts may need to be respectfully declined. Class gifts and special celebrations (e.g. farewells) are a noted exception. A copy of the “Code of Conduct” appears on our school’s website if you wish to know more.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

37


Excursions and Camps Excursions are any learning activity organised by the school, that is conducted away from the school premises for educational purposes. We incorporate excursions into our educational programs through all years of the school to enhance student learning. You always receive communication notifying you of upcoming excursions and any associated costs and requirements. Before the excursion you can pay any costs at administration. For more information on payments of excursions please see the 'Other Charges' section within the Fee Schedule. This can be downloaded via the Fees and Contributions page of this handbook (page 35).

38

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Student Free Days We schedule student free days for important and extra professional development for staff. We may take up to four (4) student free days a year. Student free days are communicated through the School Calendar located on the 'What's On' page on the website.

Our school has been fortunate to be involved in opportunities to provide excellent and appropriate professional development programs for our staff. In order to minimise the costs of sending the whole staff interstate or overseas to attend workshops and conferences, we arrange speakers to travel to Perth. To maintain cost-effectiveness, the school extends these workshops and conferences to other educators and they help absorb some of the costs. At the same time, we are mindful of keeping true to our philosophy of being outward looking and enabling all interested educators to join with us on their learning journey and to share our stories. The education sector both envies and holds in high regard our internal professional development program on Wednesday afternoons, staff retreats, beginning and end of year reflections and pedagogical mentoring. We see this continual staff learning and support as the fundamental thread that will enable Bold Park Community School to grow, develop and maintain its core philosophy. Without it, our school will become just another school, with classrooms isolated from each other and teaching staff not having the time or expertise to work collaboratively and at the forefront of best practice for your children. The school acknowledges the wonderful support our families give to enable this program to continue and develop.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

39


Mandated Curriculum Early Years Learning Framework Belonging, Being and Becoming - The Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) describes the principles, practices and outcomes that support and enhance young children's learning from birth to five years of age and beyond. The diagram below demonstrates how the principles and practices of the EYLF form the foundation to learning through to Year 2, along with the Western Australian Kindergarten and PP - Year 2 content and achievement standards. https://k10outline.scsa.wa.edu.au/media/documents/outline_downloads/Western-Australian-Kindergarten-Curriculum-Guidelines-pdf.pdf

Western Australian Curriculum Learning Areas The Western Australian Curriculum has eight learning areas, some of which include more than one subject. The learning areas incorporate: •

English

Humanities and Social Science – incorporating History, Geography, Economics and Business, Civics and Citizenship and Work Studies (Year 9 & 10)

• • • • • •

40

Mathematics Science

The Arts – incorporating Drama, Dance, Media Arts, Music & Visual Arts Technologies

Health and Physical Education Languages (Italian)

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Mandated Curriculum As educators we are continually making professional decisions on the most effective pedagogical strategy to help all students achieve learning goals and fluency specific to subject areas. Our teachers use a variety of strategies from direct or explicit instruction, guided instruction, peer learning etc. to help students understand required content and learn skills.

General Capabilities and Cross- Curriculum Priorities

The Western Australian Curriculum pays explicit attention to how seven general capabilities and three cross-curriculum priorities contribute to, and can be developed, through each learning area. The seven general capabilities are literacy, numeracy, information and communication technology capability, critical and creative thinking, personal and social capability, ethical understanding and intercultural understanding. The three cross-curriculum priorities are: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders histories and cultures, Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia, and sustainability. We follow these areas.

Keeping Safe Curriculum: Child Protection Curriculum Child Protection Under the Department of Education Child Protection Policy, schools are required to provide a child protection curriculum. We choose to implement the Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum (KS:CPC) which is considered a best practice curriculum. We provide a whole school approach to this topic and the KS:CPC is applied from three year olds through to senior secondary. Under the Department of Education Child Protection Policy schools are required to provide a child protection curriculum.

About the Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum

The KS:CPC aligns with our Mutual Respect Policy and is based on two key themes: • •

We all have the right to be safe; and

We can help ourselves to be safe by talking to people we trust.

The main thrust of the curriculum is to teach children and young adults to recognise abuse, tell a trusted adult, understand what is appropriate and inappropriate touching and recognise ways of keeping themselves safe. As adults we are all responsible for keeping children safe, and this curriculum does not replace that responsibility. It is designed to complement this by arming children with the skills and strategies to recognise their feelings and take appropriate action or seek help.

If you have any questions or concerns about the KS:CPC or would like further information please make a time to chat with your child’s teacher. Alternatively you can contact your area Team Leader.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

41


Assessing and Monitoring Learning Assessment Strategies The following table provides examples of assessment strategies that enable teachers to understand where students are in their learning. Learning assessment and evaluation is a range of types and sources of evidence as demonstrated in the table below.

Types of Assessments Examples of assessment strategies

Examples of sources of evidence

Observation

Anecdotal notes, checklists, photographs, videos

Fieldwork or practical (authentic) evidence

Recording of fieldwork

Group activities

Video or audio recordings

Portfolio and work samples Tests or quizzes Written work

Graphic organisers

Visual representations

Performance or oral presentation Conferences

Self-assessments and evaluations and student journals Peer assessments

Rubrics, self reflections, peer assessment

Role-play, performances, speeches, play based learning, debates or discussions Collections of student work

Verbal questioning, multiple choice, short answer responses or openended questions

Short and extended written tasks. May include essays, reports, narratives or journal entries. Students may also conduct investigations in which they must develop questions, gather, analyse and evaluate information, reflect on conclusions Frameworks, concept maps, flowcharts and cause – effect patterns Algorithms, tables, graphs, posters, drawings, maps, brochures, photographs or other digital mediums (e.g. slideshows, blog) Role-play, speeches, simulations, debates or discussions Discussion or interview

The self-reflection of achievement and progression towards goals

Individuals or peers provide evaluative feedback on performance or activity

https://k10outline.scsa.wa.edu.au/home/teaching/curriculum-browser/technologies/technologies-overview/ways-of-assessing

Assessment and Learning through Projects When our educators plan projects that cross subject area boundaries, they refer to the relevant curriculum achievement standards and deliberately design experiences that teach these standards, as well as plan for assessments. These assessments can be used to help design the ongoing direction of the project or to evaluate the summation of learning. These are used in conjunction with other assessment information to provide a full picture of student learning. 42

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Reporting on Learning On Balance Judgments After gathering information from a range of sources on a student’s progress over time, educators then make an on-balance evaluation about the student’s achievement level in each subject area. They do this by making a professional decision on how the pattern of assessment evidence best matches the relevant achievement standards. Our educators from Pre Primary onwards refer to Government of Western Australian Schools Curriculum and Standards Authority (SCSA) assessment pointers and work samples. Our students' progress each relevant curriculum area is recorded using the Snap Shots reporting tool. Families receive this and studnts' portfolios at the end of Terms 2 and 4. If a teacher judges that a student's achievement is below the expected standard in a curriculum area, they will discuss this with families and a Learning Action Plan will be developed to achieve growth during the following semester. This level of achievement may also indicate a need for some diagnostic testing. See the Learning and Intervention Framework (page 44) for further information on our intervention strategies.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

43


wav e3

Learning and Intervention Framework

wave 2

If a student is still not progressing, they receive one-on-one intervention targeted to speci�ic skill needs. An Individual Education Plan is documented and followed. Consultation with external specialists may be recommended.

wave 1

Students not progressing in the regular BPCS small learning groups, are provided a variety of classroom-based intervention i.e. visual prompts or technology tools. A Learning Action Plan (LAP) for these interventions is documented and followed. Groups of students may recieve the same strategies in one single plan. Invididual progress is monitored, and diagonostic screening occurs.

All students receive a high-quality, philosophically guided, teaching and learning environment. The use of research-based methodologies and diverse teaching strategies are implemented. Includes focussed small group learning. Individual progress is monitored against year level milestones or achievement standards; diagnostic screening is conducted.

Essential Components of Bold Park Community School Learning & Intervention Framework •

Monitoring each student’s progress in the general curriculum through the use of embedded assessments, screenings and diagnostic tests.

Choosing and implementing research based interventions to address individual student learning if needed.

• • • • 44

Using this monitoring to make informed decisions about the intervention requirement to ensure each student’s learning success. Developing individual LAP to identify discrete learning goals.

Determining the efficiency of an intervention by monitoring the student’s progress towards the individual LAP goals at regular intervals. Consulting with families if school based-screening determines a lack of impact from Wave 2 or 3 interventions and providing recommendations to conduct more formal or external specialist evaluations.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Learning and Intervention Framework Connecting Learning Action Plans (LAP) with Families Here are some things that you can do to create an effective collaboration: • • •

Develop a partnership: A trusting partnership between families and school personnel relies on both parties recognising and valuing the expert knowledge of the other. Find time: Meet with educators to share information to help everyone understand more deeply what could be impacting on your child’s learning and emotional health, and strategies to assist. Get help early: If educators recommend you seek external advice you should act on this. Research clearly demonstrates the positive impact of early intervention on a child’s learning trajectory. There can be many factors that impact on a child’s learning. Expert consultation may be necessary to narrow down the strategies that will best support your child.

Diagnostic Assessments To establish benchmarks for student progress, some times a more refined assessment may be used. These are tools that examine and gather information on very specific aspects of learning. This detailed level of assessment of a student’s strengths and areas of weakness can provide helpful diagnostic information for specific and targeted intervention. Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

45


Mutual Respect Our aim is to promote the skills, strategies and understandings that equip students to positively manage their own behaviour and the social complexities they will encounter throughout their life. Through the principle of mutual respect we believe that every individual has the right: •

To feel safe

To be treated with dignity and respect

To learn

We also believe all individuals have a responsibility to act in ways that uphold these rights. Through positive guidance and modeling our aim is to support students to: •

Take responsibility for their words and actions

Respect the rights and feelings of others

Seek solutions and strategies that maintain or restore relationships

Participate and contribute to their own and each others learning

We aim to build a mindset recognising that each one of us has the capacity to choose how we behave in any situation, and a responsibility to uphold a mutually respectful school culture. We do that by being clear and consistent with students about what behaviour is expected and providing guidance to develop these behaviours.

Social Relationships

Developing healthy social relationships and sustaining these within a group setting requires many social and emotional skills and is a key learning area. We must always remember that social relationships are highly complex and our students are continually developing and refining these skills. Young children, in particular, are learning these skills and still developing the structures within their brains that enable them to regulate their emotional responses. It is inevitable that there will be situations where they say or do the wrong thing. At our school, when this occurs, we see it as an opportunity for learning!

Our educators use a range of strategies to guide behaviour and help students to develop self-regulation as a vital skill for social, emotional and academic wellbeing. Teaching these social and emotional skills is both implicit and explicit in our programs. As students mature they face new challenges in their social relationships and they continue to benefit from supportive guidance in navigating this space. See Social Emotional Learning Programs (page 50) for more information.

46

Our educators use their knowledge of individual students and the context of each circumstance when they respond to behaviour related issues. The inevitable conflict situations that arise offer the opportunity for all those involved to learn the skills and strategies required for building positive relationships, restoring relationships or establishing boundaries with others for a quality life. We believe that developing an environment of mutual respect is the best way to achieve this.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Guiding Behaviour Incremental Stages of Intervention At Bold Park Community School we hold high expectations of all student behaviour and directly address any behaviour that: • • •

Creates any unsafe situation for students Interrupts the learning of students

Causes damage to materials or property

Our learning environments are designed to promote cooperative behaviours and we intentionally teach the skills associated with being able to work and learn together. The aim of our behaviour management strategy is to promote healthy relationships and to provide a structure within which students develop effective self-regulatory skills.

Expected Behaviour At the beginning of each year, every class discusses and agrees on how they will work and learn together. Involving the students in developing these agreements builds an inclusive climate of shared purpose and a sense of ‘we’. The student’s involvement in crafting these agreements means they are better able to understand the reason for any decisions, processes, and expectations. These agreements then become self-regulating principles rather than external rules applied by an authority. They are displayed prominently in the classroom and referred to as necessary. Students are reminded of these through class discussions or individual conversations.

All classrooms have ‘quiet’ areas where students can remove themselves and have some time and space for calming before re-entering the group. Students are supported in regaining composure and restorative conferences are held to help resolve issues. Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

47


Guiding Behaviour Inappropriate behaviour sometimes arises when a student feels upset, angry or frustrated. Students are taught how to recognise their emotions and how to develop self-calming strategies so they develop the skills to regulate their behaviour. Students are supported in recognising the emotions of others and respecting their needs. For further information please refer to: • • •

Zones of Regulation (page 50) social emotional learning program Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum (page 50) Learning and Intervention Framework (page 44)

Social Environment A respectful classroom climate is the foundation for all other learning. Educators recognise and acknowledge acts of kindness, effort, and contribution to the group. Bringing awareness to the many things we have to be thankful for and promoting a sense of gratitude, helps build this positive environment.

It is natural that some students will need more support than others in identifying their feelings, coping with these and/or understanding the perspectives of others. Educators cultivate the social and emotional learning of all students to ensure that every student feels a sense of belonging and wellbeing and can contribute to the group in a positive way.

When Problems Arise We believe it is important for students to be able to express what behaviour they don’t like, if and when it causes them concern. Students are taught and supported to calmly and assertively identify and challenge any behaviour from another person that makes them uncomfortable or disrupts their learning. When necessary this communication is supported by staff.

Students are also encouraged to use the self-regulating strategies they have been taught, such as removing themselves from a situation or seeking staff support as appropriate, when facing confrontational situations. If a student’s physical, emotional or mental safety has been compromised by themselves or another student, the staff will engage all those involved in a restorative conference. This discussion will centre on how best to resolve the situation and how to best prevent it from occurring again. The situation may also warrant intentional consequences imposed by staff. Staff will record the event in a Behaviour Incident Report and discuss this with relevant families.

Restorative Conferences Any restorative conference held is based on a problem solving approach. This involves identifying the key issues, with all parties having the opportunity to express their point of view, and working towards a shared agreement on a resolution. In most cases, student behaviour can be guided by clear communication of expectations and applying suitable consequences and restorative practices. 48

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Guiding Behaviour Consequences Any consequence imposed by our staff is designed for the student to take responsibility for the effects of their behaviour choices and to diminish the behaviour. Educators will monitor and review how any consequences on guiding behaviour and may need to discuss incremental or alternative responses with families if a student doesn't moderate their behaviour.

Parent Collaboration The importance of the parent/school partnership is especially so when a student faces challenges. We expect you to partner with the school and help establish the best strategies for positive progress. We may ask parents for consent for our school psychologist to observe the student. Or we may ask parents to obtain external expert assessments with a psychologist, speech therapist, or occupational therapist. In some circumstances we may request that parents collect a student from school to remove them from a deteriorating situation. If parents do not work in partnership with the school, or the student does not respond to the strategies put in place, the school may need to review the child’s enrolment. This may include recommending alternative schooling arrangements; because for some students our school may not be the most suitable learning environment.

Behaviour Incident Report Teacher identi�ies repeated behaviour of concern, or that is interfering with learning.

Behviour Action Plan

Further Assessment

Teacher Communication and meeting with Team Leader and Parent.

School Counsellor IE Coordinator AISWA Psychologist External Specialists

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

May involve:

Enrolment Review

49


Social Emotional Learning Programs Keeping Safe: Child Protection Curriculum (KS:CPC) The KS:CPC is embedded across our school. This curriculum deals comprehensively with issues such as bullying, cyber safety, and recognising healthy and unhealthy relationships at age appropriate levels. Our educators receive explicit training in delivering this curriculum. They are able to draw on this body of work, to deal with issues that may arise in social relationships in the classroom.

Zones of Regulation (Pre-Primary to Year 6)

We can all become overwhelmed by the stressors of life, the hurdles we encounter and the associated flood of emotions. During these times, we may struggle to self-regulate, or manage our internal feelings and emotions to meet the demands placed upon us within a social context. We may meltdown, shutdown, or have a breakdown that incapacitates us for a moment of time.

The Zones of Regulation is a set of well researched educational tools, designed by author Leah Kuypers, to foster selfregulation and emotional management. These tools sit alongside our supportive class and school environments that foster successful social engagement. The Zones of Regulation curricular tools have been recommended, by our AISWA School Psychologist.

There is no “bad” zone. All of the zones occur at different times and circumstances and it is important to match one’s zone to the social context and environment. A person can be in more than one zone at a time and some emotions can also fall into several zones.

Social skills and self-regulation go hand in hand. In order to manage our internal state and our external behaviours, we need to adapt to various social demands and to have success in social situations. These social skills are transferable life-skills that are used in the workforce. They are personal qualities and attitudes that can help us make a positive contribution in society. A common vocabularly, a set of understandings and 'soft skills' occurs in our school's Primary Area because all classes use the Zones of Regulation. ‘Soft skills’ is a term for the cluster of traits that characterise relationships with other people. The benefit of having a common language is to have consistency in student to student and staff to student communications, so that goals and understandings are clear for all. Our staff takes a ‘team approach,’ where all team members have a shared responsibility, are considered stakeholders, and are invested in supporting an individual or a class. Each staff member has a unique and specialised set of skills which, when pooled together, can have a profound impact on the students who are learning ways to manage feelings and use pro-social behaviours. A solid home-school partnership creates further consistency and better supports a student's ‘soft skill’ development.

The Four Zones of Regulation

50

Blue Zone

Green Zone

Yellow Zone

Red Zone

Not ready to learn; feels sad, sick, tired, bored, moving slowly.

Calm state of alertness; optimal level to learn; feels happy, calm, feeling okay, focused.

Heightened state of alertness; elevated emotions; has some control; feels frustrated, worried, silly/wiggly, excited, loss of some control.

Heightened state of alertness and intense emotions; not an optimal level for learning; out of control; feels mad/angry, terri�ied, yelling/hitting, elated, out of control.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Inclusive Education Inclusivity is importnt to our school and we use tools and strategies to create change, as well as plan and use creative inclusive education resources. We facilitate a culture of inclusivity and support our unique philosophy. We maintain the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL) professional standards for Principals and Teachers, the National Plan for School Improvement and the Department of Education Services (Non-Government Schools Registration Standards and Requirements 2015) student learning, and where the Legislative Framework for students with disability (DDA, 1992; DSE, 2005) is upheld. Bold Park Community School focusses on Our Purpose; Our Vision and Our Values through: • • • •

Promoting a culture of inclusivity through strategic planning that supports and mentors teachers in inclusive practices and pedagogy Student voice

Optimising effective staff engagement

Data collection, analysis and informed decision making

Non government schools can receive special education per capita funding for eligible students with specific education and high support needs. This is imperative for us to provide appropriate support for your child. These are some ways that Bold Park Community School utilises the Inclusive Educational Needs Funding. •

Specialised support staff (Inclusive Education (IE) Coordinator, School Counsellor, Literacy Support).

Minimum of two person teaching team in each class grouping (smaller teacher/student ratio, providing extra teaching support and opportunities for 1:1 time and small group work).

• •

Tailored programs for individuals and small groups.

Specific classroom furniture, equipment and sensory aides (wobble stools and sensory cushions, head phones, audio tapes, handwriting aides etc).

Connecting the dots between staff and parents when there is a need that falls under the Inclusive Education banner.

Child Teacher/parent identi�ies a difference in physical, social, emotional, academic development. Parent (identi�ies) Communication with teacher. Teacher (identi�ies)

Communication with parent, following up from the meeting with Team Leader and/or IE Coordinator. Relevant Staff Member

IE Coordinator

Communication with parent and posible, relevant action suggestions.

Communication with AISWA Psychologist

School Counsellor/Youth Worker

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

Action

Intervention Diagnosis

Reports with possible funding

51


Wilderness P laygroup A magical outdoor environment excites the youngest members of our school family in the Wilderness Playgroup. This playgroup connects our young members and their families with nature bybeing based entirely in an outdoor environment.

The children engage in imaginative, creative and scientific play in a nature rich space. Whether it is climbing to the top of a hill, damming a flowing creek, making mud cities or engaging in creative encounters with natural materials – our young members forge a relationship with nature which stays with them forever. It is also an early introduction to science, with our educators creating a variety of stimulating provocations for children and parents to engage with. The nature and outdoor setting of the playgroup challenges parents to trust their children and helps them to see and value the lessons which nature offers.

Who Can Attend? The Wilderness Playgroup is suitable for children aged 18 to 36 months.

Days and Times Bold Park Community School runs two playgroup sessions per week for families. The Wilderness Playgroup operates each Friday and Saturday during the school term. Each session starts at 9:00am and concludes at 11:30am.

Supervision The playgroup is facillitated by a trained teacher, who is passionate about nature-based education and ensures that the children take appropriate risks in a safe and nurturing environment. It is also supported by the Early Childhood Team Leader and school leadership. Parents, guardians and caregivers play an integral role in the daily operations of our playgroup, attending with your young child and helping them to learn through exploration and play.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

53


Early Childhood At Bold Park Community School we value childhood and believe it is a time for curiosity, exploration and discovery. Instead of hurrying children through this stage, we want to give them the opportunity and time to develop their emotional intelligence and a love of learning in the present, rather than viewing education as purely preparation for the future. We deeply value the unique and important phase of life that is childhood.

Days and Times Pre-Kindergarten We have three Pre-Kindergarten sessions that run throughout the school terms. Below is a breakdown of the days and times.

Days

Commencement Time

Conclusion Time

Monday and Thursday

8:50am

3:10pm

Commencement Time 8:50am

Conclusion Time 3:10pm; 11:50am Wednesday

Commencement Time 8:40am

Conclusion Time 3:20pm; 12:00pm Wednesday

Tuesday and Friday Wednesday

8:50am 8:50am

3:10pm

11:50am

Kindergarten Days Monday Wednesday and Thursday Tuesday Wednesday and Friday

8:50am

3:10pm; 11:50am Wednesday

Pre-Primary Days Monday to Friday

Supervision

Staff supervise students from 10 minutes before the official class commencement time, to 10 minutes after class conclusion time each day. These times are from 8:30am to 3:30pm on all days except Wednesday which is 8:30am to 12:10pm. Supervision outside of these times is the responsibility of parents and the school cannot supervise students who arrive or depart outside of these times.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

55


Early Childhood Uniforms School uniform is compulsory for all full-time students, and optional for part-time students. However, we do recommend that children attending part-time have a school polo shirt, windcheater and a school hat for use on excursions so they are easily identified. Hats must be worn during outside play and appropriate footwear is required when engaging in Bluearth programs. School uniform items can be purchased from the office.

What to Bring Your child will require a labelled hat and roll-on sunscreen that can remain in class for the year, as there is a “No Hat, No Play” policy. Please have your child apply sunscreen at home before they come to school because it allows us to get straight into the day's program. Your child will also require a school bag, water bottle and a lunch box with a cooling brick of some sort. Their school bag should contain several sets of spare clothing. Your child's teacher will let you know what clothing is best for the wildspace days - usually bathers, rashie and hat for hot days or rain wear and warm clothes in the winter months. Please ensure that all your child’s items are clearly labelled with their name.

56

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Early Childhood Capturing Learning Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten Format

Content Focus

Frequency/Location

EDUCA - web-based

Individual and small group learning stories. The

Short individual stories per class per

Community School outcomes, Habits of Mind

year.)

curriculum and learning feedback

Whole Class Reflection

Student records for teaching staff use

Individual Portfolios Continuums

Project Documentation

Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) outcomes are recorded and if relevant, specific Bold Park

Learning Dispositions, and Childhood and Nature Design Principles.

week. (Ensure even spread across

EYLF outcomes and students over the

One EDUCA story relevant to whole group learning. Weekly This entry may include a brief reflection or

description of the weeks’ activities or a research

focus which should be identified and this may be followed over the course of weeks.

Teaching staff need to be mindful of tracking the

child across all five outcomes and supplementing other forms of recording for individual progress. Includes examples of students work, photos and

reflections by the teaching staff on the total school experience.

First Step analysis of the development of literacy skills communicated on a developmental continuum from 4 years of age.

Documentation and analysis of the learning journey of the students.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

Web-based reports are utilised to

ensure an even spread of individual

stories across the class, and across the EYLF outcomes.

Bi-annually - to be taken home at the end of Terms 2 and 4.

Bi-annually - included with individual portfolios as above: •

Speaking and Listening Term 2; Speaking and Listening and

Reading and Writing Term 4.

Where relevant. May be printed on panels for display in the school or other appropriate format.

57


Early Childhood Format

Content Focus

Frequency/Location

Parent and Teaching Team

Individual interviews to discuss particular

On entry and half yearly interviews.

Interviews

concerns or questions.

Additional interviews may be arranged where there is a particular need.

As requested by teaching staff and/or parents by arrangement.

Email

To communicate information regarding the care or As required.

Publications

From time to time work by the students may be

As appropriate.

To discuss class projects, inform parents about

Terms 1, 2 and 3.

Parent Information Nights and Events (Classroom and Whole School)

management of the school program as it relates to the specific child.

collated into a book or other medium which can be purchased by the families.

Bold Park Community School philosophy, allow a forum for parents to meet socially. May be held jointly with other classes, as appropriate.

Whole School Focus Night

To inform families about how the Bold Park

Transition Information

Pre-Kindergarten to Kindergarten.

Nights

58

Arts Showcase/Production Term 3.

Term 4 will be a forum for children to present work.

Term 3. Each teaching team presents

Community School Philosophy is articulated across documentation of their inquiry into the the school, and the School Focus for the year. Kindergarten to Pre-Primary. Pre-Primary to Year 1/2B.

Whole School Focus principle. Term 4.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Early Childhood Capturing Learning Pre-Primary (See Primary section on page 60)

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

59


Primary Primary classes follow a ‘flow of the day’ that includes: • • • • • • • • •

Class meetings to begin the day (it is important to be prompt as these are an integral element in the Bold Park Community School learning); Visual timetables to inform transitions;

Whole class concept/skill development sessions;

Explicit skills or crafting sessions in literacy and numeracy, usually with small groups rotating through both teacher led and independent tasks; Project-based and integrated learning sessions, focusing on communication, collaboration, creativity and critical thinking; Whole class and small group reflective meetings; Morning tea and lunch breaks;

Opportunities for a flow of in depth learning not interrupted by bells or sirens; and

Specialist teaching in integrated arts, outdoor learning, physical education (Bluearth), library and languages.

Days and Times Pre-Primary to Year 6 Days

Commencement Conclusion Time Time Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and 8:40am 3:20pm Friday Wednesday

Supervision

8:40am

12:00pm

School supervision of students is available 10 minutes before official class commencement time and 10 minutes after the conclusion time. This is from 8:30am through to 3:30pm on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday each week during school term times and on Wednesday from 8:30am through to 12:10pm. Supervision outside of these times is the responsibility of parents and the school cannot supervise students who arrive or depart outside of these times. Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

61


Primary Uniforms School uniform is compulsory for all full-time students. School uniform items can be purchased from the office, but we strongly recommend that you buy items during the advertised “uniform shop” days when possible. Hats must be worn during outside play and appropriate footwear is required when engaging in: • • •

Bluearth programs

The Wildspace for play or outdoor learning sessions (closed in footwear) Excursions

What to Bring Your child will require both a labelled hat and roll-on sunscreen that can remain in class for the year, as there is a “No Hat, No Play” policy. Please have your child apply sunscreen at home before they come to school. This allows us to get straight into our program for the day.

Your child will also require a school bag, water bottle and a lunch box with a cooling brick of some sort. As students in outdoor play may require a change, spare clothes are to be kept in their bag. Please ensure that all your child’s items are clearly labelled with their name.

The Image of the Child as Competent We recognise our students' everyday right to be seen as strong and competent and do not consider them to be incapable. The competent child is amazing if we can make them visible. The competent child, the competent teacher and the competent parent can share in making this visible. Encouraging and providing memory scaffolds for carrying, packing and unpacking their own school bags, locating homework folders and remembering their own hats, shoes and waterbottles are ways we encourage independence and demonstrate to our children that we consider them strong and competent.

62

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Primary Capturing Learning Pre-Primary through to Year 6 It is our hope that the following comprehensive approach gives your family access to all the information needed to understand your child's development within the shool experience.

Format

Content Focus

Frequency/Location

Introducing ourselves interviews

An informal meeting with teaching teams and families where current student strengths, interests and challenges are discussed. This experience is a relationship building opportunity.

In the first few weeks of Term 1

Email

Letters

EDUCA – Our web-based platform for making curriculum and learning visible

Class emailed newsletter Project documentation

For communicating urgent information regarding the care or management of the school program as it relates to the specific child.

As needed by families and teachers.

Staff write a letter to each child reflecting on the child’s learning and participation in school life. Writing allows staff to reflect holistically on each and every child and their experience. The letters are not a reporting format but hold a valuable place in building relationships between teacher and student.

At the end of Term 1 and Term 3.

As teachers have a duty of care role for students within the school day, they will read emails between 8:00pm to 8:30pm and 3:20pm to 4:00pm. Some planning time can be utilised to respond to and send emails.

Teaching staff reflections on whole class, small group and individual learning. Includes photos and/or video of the students at work. The focus will be identified, may follow a specific research focus, and will include some written or visual orientation for families about the experience.

At least one whole group communication update per fortnight. Some individual and small group learning experiences as noted.

The newsletter gives families further insight into class learning, Whole School Focus (WSF), home/ school homework partnerships, project-based learning and upcoming events.

At least one per month or as needed

Documentation and analysis of the Whole School Focus learning journey of the students. Includes, photos, student work samples, teacher and student reflections on the learning.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

One Specialist related post per month. Emails are generated for families each time a story is posted.

Posted for class and family reflection within the classroom. When appropriate – located on the website. May also be printed on panels for display in the school or in school publications. 63


Primary Format

Content Focus

Frequency/Location

Class veranda communication board

Briefly provides a run-down of the day’s flow at the start and a summary at the end. At times, reminders for forms or events will also be posted. In the middle and upper primary the students take on elements of this communication.

Start and end of each day

We use a variety of diagnostic assessments to provide details of student learning levels and benchmarks. Areas of strengths and/or weaknesses are discovered, and these diagnostics are utilised in developing specific and targeted interventions.

As needed when a more refined assessment may be required. See Waves of Learning pyramid (page 44).

Whole School Focus Night Internal testing

Individual portfolios

Parent and Teaching Team Interviews Snapshot Reports

The yearly School Focus evening informs families about how the Bold Park Community School Philosophy is articulated across the school.

Term 3. Each Teaching Team presents documentation of their inquiry into the WSF.

For families and for students. Include examples of student work, photos and reflections from both students and staff. Make visible the learning taking place in the class and of the total school experience. Will include some written or visual orientation about the learning known as ‘teacher voice’. As the students move through the primary years they begin to take greater ownership of selection and arrangement of portfolio content.

Bi-annually - to be taken home at the end of Terms 2 and 4

Curriculum plotting of student progress against student standards (achievement levels) for the knowledge, understanding and skills in the Australian Curriculum English, Mathematics and Science and the WA Curriculum for all other learning areas taught. Comments are included to contextualise the child’s achievement or progress. Grading decisions are informed by the Australian and WA Curriculum Work Samples and Judging Standards and the Australian Curriculum Learning Progressions.

Bi-annually – to be taken home at the end of Terms 2 and 4 with portfolios reporting on:

10-minute Q & A interviews to review Snapshot Report and Portfolio progress. Years 3-6 may be student led.

Habits of Mind (General Capabilities); English; Maths; Arts; Science; Humanities and Social Sciences; Geography; Technologies (Digital and Design); Italian Language and Culture; Civics and Citizenship (Yr 3+); Health and PE; Business and Economics (Yr 5+). 64

Term 3 (Student Free Day).

• • •

Habits of Mind English Maths

• • • • • • • • •

Arts Science Humanities and Social Sciences Geography Technologies (Digital and Design) Italian Language and Culture Civics and Citizenship (Yr 3+) Health and PE Business and Economics (Yr 5+)

Reporting also includes the following (at least once a year depending on the learning covered):

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Primary Format

Content Focus

Frequency/Location

Homework

Within the Primary School, there is a home/school partnership in practicing skills that are essential to sustaining student progress. Early literacy and math skills have a component, where repetition is key.

As students become ready and through to Year 6 as needed, books will be shared for home practice along with spelling/phonics work. Writing and math home practice or games will be shared on an as needs basis.

To discuss class projects, inform families about Bold Park Community School philosophy, allow a forum for parents to meet socially. May be held jointly with other classes, as appropriate.

Terms 1, 2 and 3.

Students at Bold Park participate in National Testing in Reading, Writing, Spelling and Maths. These tests are then reported, with the children’s achievement being compared with the rest of the children in Australia.

Annually in May, in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9

Publications Parent Information Nights Sassoon Handwriting Font

National testing (NAPLAN)

Transition Information Nights

From time to time, work by the students may be As appropriate collated into a book or other medium, which can be purchased by the families.

The preferred font used in the Bold Park Community School Primary School. The students and families will receive information on home/ school partnership in the development of handwriting.

Pre-Kindergarten to Kindergarten. Kindergarten to Pre-Primary. Pre-Primary to Year 1/2B.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

Term 4 will be a forum for students to present/exhibit work. Pre-Primary to Year 6

Term 4.

65


Middle School At Bold Park Community School, all ‘intelligences’ are valued and celebrated. The belief that children are able to express these intelligences in ‘100 languages’ is a core value that underpins the school’s educational philosophy and is strongly reflected in the practices and procedures of classroom life.

Days and Times Years 7 to 9 Days

Commencement Conclusion Time Time Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and 8:40am 3:20pm Friday Wednesday

Supervision

8:40am

1:00pm

The supervision of students is available from 8:30am through to 3:30pm on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday each week during school term times and on Wednesday from 8:30am through to 1:00pm. Supervision outside of these times is the responsibility of parents and the school cannot supervise students who arrive or depart outside of these times.

Uniforms School uniform is compulsory for all fulltime students. For Middle School students this consists of the navy blue polo shirt, hat, hoodie and windbreaker (winter use).

Hats must be worn during outside activities and appropriate footwear is required to be worn in the science lab, on excursions, and all outdoor activities including the Bluearth program. Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

67


Middle School What to Bring Your child will require a labelled hat and roll-on sunscreen that can remain in class for the year, as there is a “No Hat, No Play” policy. Please have your child apply sunscreen at home before they come to school, because it allows us to get straight into our program for the day. Your child will also require a school bag, water bottle, a lunch box with a cooling brick of some sort, and spare clothes to be kept in their bag and a change of clothes. Please ensure that all your child’s items are clearly labelled with their name.

Preparation - Reading Mastery Reading Mastery is a reading program designed to best prepare students to access the texts used in Middle School and College. According to national indications, about 30% of children are reading below grade 6 level when they enter high school. There are many reasons for this and so we choose to remedy this outcome before high school by addressing students’ needs with our reading program.

This program is delivered in a 40 minute explicit, fast-paced, concentrated small group session four out of five week days. Students meet before the regular school program and join their peers for the rest of their day as per normal. The effect on these student’s ability is often phenomenal. It is not unusual to see a student catch up two or three years’ worth of learning in one year. Whilst it is a commitment that parents make in order to bring their child early to school for year or so, the pay-off is that students self-esteem significantly rises and so too their engagement in learning. They are empowered to read and to learn alongside their peers.

Capturing Learning Year 7 through to Year 9 Format

Content Focus

Frequency/Location

EDUCA - web-based curriculum and learning feedback

Teaching staff reflections on whole class, small group and individual learning with the class. Includes photos and/or video of the students at work. The focus will be identified and may follow a specific research focus and will include some written or visual orientation about the experience, for families.

Usually daily updates.

Schoology

68

Schoology is a web-based, learning management system.

Schoology collates all current parent/student communications in relation to homework, events, assessments, resources, calendar, diary and extension/ support materials. It is used comprehensively across Middle School and forms part of the teaching and learning documentation in Middle School.

Updated daily.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Middle School Format

Content Focus

Frequency/Location

Individual Portfolios

Capturing assessment tasks/feedback and includes examples of students work, photos and reflections by the student on the total school experience.

Bi-annually - to be taken home as requested.

Documentation and analysis of the learning journey of the student.

As appropriate – located on the website. May also be printed on panels for display in the school.

Integrated Learning Documentation Snapshots

Designed to capture student learning “over time” (usually three years).

The Snapshot reports provide Australian Curriculum (AC) plotting of student development against curriculum outcomes for the knowledge, understanding and skills in the AC learning areas.

English

Comments are included to contextualise and report in more • depth the child’s achievement or progress. •

History

Habits of Mind - Learning Dispositions and Emotional Indicators are also assessed and reported. Email Publications Parent Information Nights Whole School Focus Night National Testing Internal Testing

Terms 2 and 4 reporting on:

To communicate urgent information regarding the care or management of the school program as it relates to the specific child

• • • • • •

Maths

Science

Geography Arts Focus

Italian Language and Culture Technology and Enterprise Business and Economics

As required.

From time to time, work by the students may be collated into a book or other medium , which can be purchased by the families.

As appropriate.

To inform families about how the Bold Park Community School Philosophy is articulated across the school and the School Focus for the year.

Term 3. Each teaching team presents documentation of their inquiry into the Whole School Focus principle.

PAT testing and other diagnostic tools in reading, writing, spelling, grammar and numeracy strands to inform teaching program, individual progress and achievement.

Annually in May - on the same days as the NAPLAN testing.

To discuss class projects, inform families about Bold Park Community School Philosophy, allow a forum for parents to meet socially. May be held jointly with other classes, as appropriate.

Standardised National Tests conducted on Reading, Writing and Maths for Years 7 and 9 students.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

Terms 1, 2 and 3. Term 4 will be a forum for students to present work.

Annually in May - conducted in the year the students turn 12 and 14 years of age before 30 June.

69


College Bold Park Community School offers College students diverse educational and vocational experiences in their senior years.

Days and Times Years 10 to 12 Days

Commencement Conclusion Time Time Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and 8:40am 3:20pm Friday Wednesday

Supervision

8:40am

1:00pm

The supervision of students is available from 8:30am through to 3:30pm on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday each week during school term times and on Wednesday from 8:30am through to 1:00pm. Supervision outside of these times is the responsibility of parents and the school cannot supervise students who arrive or depart outside of these times.

Uniforms School uniform is compulsory for all full-time students. For College students this consists of the navy blue polo shirt, hat, hoodie and windbreaker (winter use).

Hats must be worn during outside activities and appropriate footwear is required to be worn in the science lab, on excursions, all outdoor activities including sport and outdoor education.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

71


College Offerings In addition to the General WACE units in English, Media, Mathematics, Integrated Science and Physical Education Studies we are pleased to offer students a choice of vocational and ATAR courses.

Certificate IV Design (Two-year course)

This nationally recognised course is designed to give students a solid foundation in Design. Emulating design processes in industry, units are designed with links to real projects and allow students to personalise tasks to their own career interests wherever possible. Possible pathways include entry into degree or other higher education courses at most universities and TAFEs in; Game Design, Product Design, Graphic Design, Visual Communications, Interior Design, Media, Jewellery, Fashion & Textiles, Photography and Visual Art.

Certificate II Permaculture (One-year course)

This nationally recognised course is designed to give students a set of skills and competencies that are the foundation skills in a variety of land based industries such as Agriculture, Landcare and Horticulture. The course is competency based with practical hands-on skills that involve building, gardening, planning and organising linked to real projects linked to a student's interests. Possible pathways may include supporting food growing programs and community programs, and investigating permaculture as a practical solution for sustainable living in the future. In addition, students may choose to continue further study in Permaculture or other area of interest by accessing Certificate III, IV and Diploma options. This certificate can be complted in one year and is available for students from Year 10.

VETis courses (Vocational Courses in School – One-year course) A wide variety of courses across many industries are available to students while still at school. These are normally undertaken in Years 11 or 12 and are recommended to those students with a strong interest in a particular field and are not participating in a Certificate course at Bold Park Community School.

School-based Traineeship or School-based Apprenticeship (18 months +)

Students are typically released from school either one or two days to participate in work and related training for a particular industry/position. For this option the student will need to have an employer willing to participate in this arrangement. 72

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


College Workplace Learning (One term) Workplace Learning is an authority-developed endorsed program available for students in years 10 – 12. Traditionally, year 10 students will be involved in an in-house arrangement where they will work with a teacher from another year level within the school. Years 11 & 12 students are able to take up external placements within the industry they wish to trial or would like to eventually move into. Senior students can complete more than one placement, up to a maximum of four.

The Duke of Edinburgh's International Award

This award is recognised around the world as a premier youth development program. It provides opportunities for personal and social development for 14 – 25 years old. Students are encouraged to interact with the broader community through the areas of; developing a new skill, volunteering, physical activity and adventurous journey. We provide many opportunities for students to achieve the necessary hours to complete the award, which is recognised as one WACE unit for the Bronze award and two WACE units for the Silver.

SIDE (School of Isolated and Distance Education) The courses at SIDE complement the program at Bold Park Community School. This is a good option for students who wish to enter into a university where a particular course requires a prerequisite not available through the offerings at Bold Park Community School. Parents will need to check the associated costs and requirements of students. Please refer to the College Handbook for more details.

College Course Handbook The College Course Handbook with the full details of the courses on offer at Bold Park Community School is available in hardcopy at the office or online through our website. https://issuu.com/boldparkcs/docs/college_course_handbook_edition_3_d

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

73


College Capturing Learning Year 10 through to Year 12 Format

Content Focus

Frequency/Location

EDUCA - web-based curriculum and learning feedback

Teaching staff reflections on whole class, small group and individual learning, which includes photos and/or video of the students at work. The focus will be identified and may follow a specific research focus and will include some written or visual orientation about the experience, for families.

Usually daily updates.

Schoology

Reports

Schoology is a web-based, learning management system.

Updated daily.

School Reports provide an overview of student performance in WACE (Western Australian Certificate of Education) Units with mandated grading (A-E) and marks for Stage 1-3 Units.

Terms 2 and 4.

Schoology collates all current parent/student communications in relation to homework, events, assessments, resources, calendar, diary and extension/ support materials. It is used comprehensively across College and forms part of the documentation of teaching and learning in College.

Nationally Recognised Certificate Courses, Units of Competency, Endorsed Programs and Vocational Achievements are also detailed on the school report.

Comments are included to contextualise and report in more depth the child’s achievement or progress.

Integrated Learning Documentation Email

74

Habits of Mind - Learning Dispositions & Emotional Indicators are also reported.

Documentation and analysis of the learning journey of the student. To communicate urgent information regarding the care or management of the school program.

All course areas are marked/ graded and commented on. Comments are also provided for non-accredited school participation/activities (e.g. Physical Education, Electives, etc.)

As appropriate – located on the website. May also be printed on panels for display in the school.

As required.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


College Format

Content Focus

Frequency/Location

Publications

From time to time work by the student may be collated into a book, which can be purchased by the families, eg yearbook.

When appropriate.

To discuss class projects, inform parents about the Bold Park Community School Philosophy, allow a forum for parents to meet socially, as well as policies, planning of events, camps etc.

Terms 1 and 3 and as needed throughout the year.

National Testing

OLNA Testing from Year 10

Whole School Focus Night

To inform families about how the Bold Park Community School Philosophy is articulated across the school and the Whole School Focus for the year.

Annually in May - conducted in the year the students turn 12 and 14 years of age before 30 June.

Parent Information Nights Examinations

College Course Handbook.

For students enrolled in examinable subjects examinations will be supported prior to final WACE examinations in November.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

Annually in May (Semester 1 Examinations) and October (Mock Examinations) where required.

Term 3. Each teaching team presents documentation of their inquiry into the Whole School Focus principle.

75


Glossary Department of Education and Training

Pedagogy

Offers important services to education in Western Australia providing policy advice to the Minister for Education and Training and supporting universities, nongovernment schools, international education providers and in some cases individual students and teachers through scholarship programs.

The art or science of educating children.

Developmental Continua

The learning journey of a child’s progress.

EDUCA

Educa is a web-based portfolio of a child’s growth and development. It allows parents and teachers to share a child’s journey and gain valuable feedback.

NAPLAN

The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) is an annual assessment for students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9. NAPLAN is made up of tests in the four areas of: reading, writing, language conventions (spelling, grammar and punctuation) and numeracy.

OLNA

The Online Literacy and Numeracy Assessment (OLNA) is an online assessment. The OLNA is designed to enable students to demonstrate the minimum standard of literacy and numeracy, which is a requirement to achieve the Western Australian Certificate of Education (WACE). Testing takes place from Year 10.

PAT Testing

The ACER Progressive Achievement Tests (PAT) are widely used in schools across Australia to monitor progress in key skill areas. All tests are available in print or online and test content is regularly updated.

Pedagogista

The term used in the schools of Reggio Emilia to describe the educational (pedagogical) coordinator. 76

Reggio Emilia

A small town in Northern Italy whose system of education for young children engages social constructivist principles and is renowned for world’s best practice in early childhood education.

Rubrics

A recording framework used as an assessment tool. It lists short descriptive statements of criteria and standards along a continuum of excellence. The work can then be assessed against these.

Scaffolding

The process of providing strategic leads, prompts or external supports and then gradually removing these. During scaffolding, the task itself is not changed, but what the learner initially does is made easier with assistance. As the learner takes more responsibility for performance of the task, less assistance is provided until the learner is able to perform the task independently.

School Curriculum and Standards Authority

This was formerly the Curriculum Council. It provides the development and implementation of a Curriculum Framework for schooling which, taking account of the needs of students, sets out the knowledge, understandings, skills, values and attitudes that students are expected to acquire; provide for the development and accreditation of courses of study for post-compulsory schooling.

Social Constructivism

Social Constructivism proposes that the ‘cognitive construction’ of knowledge is socially mediated and the social interaction between child, parents, teachers and peers all influence the way a child’s mind works. It emphasises the importance of the relationship between thought and language.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook


Glossary Teaching Interns

Western Australian Curriculum

Our school's unique program where university students studying education or related degrees are able to work alongside qualified teachers at Bold Park Community School as they study. Additionally, teaching assistants working in the school are referred to as teaching interns.

Western Australian Curriculum is broadly consistent with the Australian Curriculum but has been contextualised to be more suitable for Western Australian students.

TRBWA

Teachers Registration Board of Western Australia. All Teachers must be registered members of TRBWA in order to teach in Western Australian schools.

Bold Park Community School | Parent Handbook

77


Bold Park Community School is proud to be recognised by the following organisations and programs


www.boldpark.com

(08) 9387 5050 | office@boldpark.com

Profile for Bold Park Community School

Parent Handbook - Second Edition  

Parent Handbook for Bold Park Community School

Parent Handbook - Second Edition  

Parent Handbook for Bold Park Community School

Advertisement