Page 1

MY COVID STORY

COMING HOME

LOCAL BAND

KINSFOLK ROAD FREE

Special Digital Issue

SPRING/SUMMER 2020 ISSUE 09

COMPARISON:

THE THIEF OF JOY


Prefer La Trobe latrobe.edu.au/prefer

INSIDE FRONT COVER

CRICOS Provider 00115M DC37626 09/20

Prefer a clear pathway to success


Abdul Ali


64

48 PROJECT DIY

24


56 eat This

8

68

CONTENTS 05 Hello

50 Fictional Piece

08 Profile - Local Creatives

52 Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

12 Coming Home - My COVID Story

54 Local Eats

17 Read This

56 Eat This

18 Watch This

60 How to Journal

20 Listen To This

62 Overcoming an Eating Disorder

22 Apps & Gaming

64 Sport - Lindsay Barbary

24 Local Band - Kinsfolk Road

76 Sport - Jade Kempton

30 Profile - Ainsley Evans

72 Help from headspace online

34 Comparison: The Thief of Joy

74 Local Artwork

49 Fashion

76 Mildura Senior College Art Students

44 LGBTQIA+ Coming Out

78 BOLD Contributors

48 Project DIY

82 Inspiring Youth - Finley Hopley-Willcock


MY COVID STORY

COMING HOME

LOCAL BAND

KINSFOLK ROAD $4 S

Our awesome cover artwork is by Melisa Sivlim. You can find more of Melisa’s work online at:

Including G

T

SPRING/SUMMER 2020

COVER

COMPARISON:

@aspire.arts

THE THEIF

DO YOU HAVE SOME SWEET ARTWORK OR PHOTOGRAPHY? WE’D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU! If you are aged between 12 & 25 and are interested in seeing your work in our magazine please contact: boldmildura@gmail.com Submissions are subject to BOLD Magazine’s approval.

Background illustration: Olivia McCarten

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HELLO

HELLO

SPRING/SUMMER 20 // Welcome to BOLD issue 9! What a year it has been with a worldwide pandemic, COVID-19. There is no doubt there has been a multitude of ups and downs, with this year being a tough one for many having so many changes to our work, school and social life. As we all endeavoured to adapt to balancing school, work and our social lives online (even more so than normal!), we thought it would be a fitting time to launch BOLD online too. headspace Mildura and Mildura Living Magazine are very pleased to have been able to continue to support our youth in bringing you this issue, in this new and exciting format. With the same amazing content from our talented contributors, both returning and new, you can now access this issue from any mobile device. Even your friends and family interstate or overseas can also easily access the magazine - how exciting is that! We would like to congratulate our young contributors on an incredible issue - their resilience and passion is admirable. We’d also like to acknowledge and thank our supporters who have made this issue possible. So, please sit back, relax, and enjoy the work of our youth, who share with you not only their amazing art work and photography, current fashions, reviews and DIY projects, but also their own personal journeys through some of life’s challenges. We wish you an enjoyable read and hope that you too are as inspired by our local young talent as we are. x

BOLD magazine would like to thank all of our advertisers for their support, along with the Commonwealth Bank Mildura and Findex Mildura Community Fund for their sponsorship of this issue. It’s through this support that BOLD magazine can continue to promote the Sunraysia region to our young people. If you would like to make a donation or advertise in the next issue of BOLD please get in touch. BOLD magazine is a collaboration between Mildura Living magazine and headspace Mildura. BOLD MAGAZINE 5


EDITORIAL

headspace Mildura helping young people in our community

headspace Mildura is a place for our local young people between the age of 12-25 years who need support with mental and physical health (including sexual health) concerns, use of alcohol and other substances, risk of homelessness or vocation and education. You can access headspace Mildura and its support services by dropping in to make an appointment, or by phone call, email or fax.

BOLD magazine is produced twice a year by Mildura Living magazine. PUBLISHER // Mildura Living Pty Ltd ISSN // 2206-3307 PUBLISHING EDITOR // Toni Stoeckel EDITOR // Teresa Cavallo SUB-EDITORS // Marita Barnes, Sandy Guthrie

headspace Mildura

2/125 Pine Avenue, Mildura, Victoria 3500 Hours: Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm & Tuesday - 9am - 7pm Contact: P: (03) 5021 2400 E: my.headspace@headspacemildura.com.au www.headspace.org.au @headspacemildura

@headspaceMildura

CREATIVE // The Workshop Creative GRAPHIC DESIGNERS // Bec Grayling, Kellie Morgan, Krystal Torney CONTRIBUTORS // Paige Avery, Riley Baldock, Maddy Barbary, Matilda Bresnehan, Elise Cirillo, Eleanor Danenberg, Ruby Dawson, James De Maria, Claudia Dimasi, Chloe Donehue, Susan Dunn, Brady Glen, Sara Hancock, Morgan Hopcroft, Finley Hopley-Willcock, Hannah Jackson, Leon Kemp, Amber McCarthy, Arin Milward-Holmes, Emily Schofield, Pathama Wankhuan, Michaela Whitehead PHOTOGRAPHY // Paige Avery, Sara Hancock, Hannah Jackson, Amber McCarthy, Maddy Barbary, Pathama Wankhuan, Michaela Whitehead,

Featuring the best of our region Proudly supporting BOLD magazine

ARTISTS // Indiana Belvedere, Connor Bosch, Ruby Dawson, Jacynth Domingo, Mia Duong, Ainsley Evans, Elizabeth Gareffa, Anna Hawkes, Ethan Heywood, Briana Hibberd, Denzel Irons, Paige Johnson-Holland, Georgia Judd, Abby Mahoney, Sophie McAliece, Olivia McCarten, Isabella McIntyre, Portia McKee, Milla Morgan, Mabel Morrison, Alicia Muir, Elly Pileggi, Leslie Rolph, Mahkaila Sansom, Rachael Sharman ONLINE // Issuu ADVERTISING & ENQUIRIES // BOLD magazine: boldmildura@gmail.com Toni Stoeckel: toni@milduraliving.com.au All material appearing in BOLD magazine is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without written permission by the publisher. BOLD magazine takes every care to ensure the accuracy of information in this publication. Opinions represented in BOLD magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher. The publisher accepts no liability for errors in editorial or advertising copy. Some graphics and images used have been sourced from Vecteezy.com, Freepik.com & Unsplash.

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram. Visit www.milduraliving.com.au or email us at info@milduraliving.com.au

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The people who make up headspace Mildura


Mia Duong Mildura Senior College


PROFILE

WORDS MORGAN HOPCROFT

Artist Olivia McCarten is currently studying a Bachelor of Fine Arts and enjoys creating pieces using a variety of mediums. Can you tell me about what you do? My art entails a variety of mediums and subject matter. While I generally stick to painting with acrylic, oil and gouache, I often find myself exploring other practices such as print making, clay sculpting and embroidery. Then when it comes to subject matter I am always constantly changing what I paint to continue developing my technical and creative skill and show the extensive range of what I am capable of creating. How did you start? Throughout my life I've always been drawn to creative activities. They've always provided enjoyment and a sense of self for me but I didn't begin heavily practicing as an artist until my later years in high school when I found myself becoming more influenced by art and the arts community. What do you like most about your art? For me, what I like most about my art is the way it makes me feel. Being able to create art with my hands forms a distraction from the outside world and allows me to focus all of my energy into the pieces I make. It's just super fulfilling to be able to create beautiful things that provide happiness to myself and others. What are your goals for the future? My main goal for now is to get back to Melbourne and complete the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree that I'm currently studying online. I'm 6 weeks off of finishing first year so I'm a third of the way there! Short term wise though I'd like to continue selling art online and at local markets when things are back to normal. Overall I just aim to continue studying as an artist and producing as much work as I can while developing my technical and creative skills to my best ability. @livmccarten_art @livmccartenart www.livmccartenart.bigcartel.com

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STORY

Riley Baldock is a young local film maker who started out making short videos with his neighbour for YouTube. He hopes to one day make a full-length film with his friends. Can you tell me about what you do? I make comedic short films with my friends, some of which we've posted to Mildura's yearly short film competition and others straight to YouTube. Our process usually involves: having an idea, planning and writing the scenes, gathering a cast and starting filming. We then edit it obsessively into a ridiculous masterpiece for everyone to enjoy. How did you start? In 2011, my neighbour Tyler Aitken was making mini shorts with his camera, and showing them to our classmates at school. One day he asked me if I wanted to be in one, and I said yes. It was fun, so we started making shorts regularly together. Then in 2015, he called me and said, "hey, we're gonna remake one of our old shorts, you in?" and I couldn't say no. We made this short film called The Action Movie. We were so proud and had such a great time making it that we knew this was what we wanted to do with our lives. What do you like most about your films? There's a lot I love about it; it feels great to wrangle our friends together, have them say these hilarious lines in silly costumes. We bond over how much fun it all is, though I think the best feeling is when we have people enjoy our film enough to ask us when we'll make the next installment. It tells us we did a fantastic job, and that this project really means something. What are your goals for the future? We have a lot more projects in mind, but our biggest goal is to work our way up to making a proper, feature length film. That's a dream I can really see us achieving in the near future. www.youtube.com/c/RileyBaldock

BOLD MAGAZINE 9


PROFILE

Ali is a local musician who loves to play the drums. His music is inspired by the genres of jazz, funk and soul and he is always looking to further his skills. Can you tell me about what you do? I am primarily a drummer, but I also enjoy playing and experimenting with guitar, bass, and piano. I love to involve myself with events such as the Eisteddfod as well as concerts and gigs like the Nowingi New Year's concert. This year has been very beneficial for my guitar playing, since lockdown gave me more time to spend with my Dad, Iwan. He’s taught me many things musically and has helped my guitar playing immensely. I have also been lucky to play guitar for the Art Centre's Backstage Pass live performances which was an amazing experience. How did you start? I was always a kid that could never sit still for a minute without having to tap my feet or hands. It was only fitting that I chose drums as my first instrument. My playing and music interest was heavily influenced by my dad's taste in music. Jazz, funk, soul and blues music was what I would usually hear my dad playing, which I eventually learned to love and incorporate into my playing today. What do you like most about your music? I think that my favourite part about my music is definitely the learning stage. The idea that there is always going to be something new for me to learn and always something for me to work on. Understanding new musical concepts and techniques can sometimes seem tricky and tedious, but I enjoy the challenge and being able to reap the benefits of the work that I put in. What are your goals for the future? My goal for the future is to finish my VCE Music Studies and move away to continue my studies at university. I hope this provides me with a pathway into working within the music industry.� ali_soebardi2047 Ali Soebardi

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Mildura Base Public Hospital MBPH is a 180-bed (level 1) tertiary

Proudly Supporting Rural Youth through:

teaching offering services to both public and private patients.

- Sporting clubs sponsorship - School of the Air - Our commitment to Business Week - Community involvement

Elders Insurance Mildura 97-99 Lime Avenue Mildura VIC 3500 P - 03 5025 8777

Ontario Avenue Mildura, VIC, Australia 3500 Phone: 5022 3333

www.mbph.org.au

BOLD MAGAZINE 11


COVID STORY

COMING HOME - MY COVID STORY -

WORDS & PHOTOGRAPHY AMBER McCARTHY January 2020 I left Australia for an 11 month student exchange in Italy. Little did I know I’d be coming home 2 months later due to a global pandemic. The start of my exchange was amazing! I made so many friends and everyone was so accepting and helpful at school. My whole experience changed on March 4, when the Italian government announced that there would be no school starting March 5. It was such a sudden change that I wasn’t expecting, yet I still didn’t understand how serious the situation was. We started doing online video classes, but never a full day because no-one expected not to be attending school for more than 2 weeks. The days went by really slowly and we couldn’t leave the house as a precaution. One day felt like two and one week felt like a month. On March 9 it was announced that all schools would be closed and Italy was placed into lockdown. Leaving the house was prohibited unless it was for work or to go to the supermarket, and only one person from each family was allowed to go. It was so hard for me to understand what was happening. All the news was in Italian and my host family only spoke in Italian which meant I couldn’t understand the full extent of what was happening. The reality of what was actually happening really hit me when the virus was announced as a global pandemic on March 11. The days started to get harder and harder, especially being away from my family. On March 15 I decided that I wanted to come home. Here is part of a message I sent to my Mum telling her I was coming home; ‘I can’t sleep. I can’t stop thinking about the coronavirus and it’s starting to really scare me’. I am so glad I made the decision to come home when I did otherwise I could’ve been stuck there. As the days passed, more uncertainties arose about whether I would even find any flights or if I did, would they be cancelled? Would I be granted permission to leave Italy? The days prior to leaving

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Italy and while travelling back to Australia were the most stressful, challenging and scariest of my life. My flights were booked for March 21. I had to fly to Rome, then from Rome to Munich (Germany) as there were no flights directly from Italy to Dubai. The next few days were hard because we didn’t know when Germany was going to shut its borders and stop flights coming in. I started organising the permits and documents I needed to leave Italy. My flight was departing at 6:30am on Saturday morning and to get to the airport on time we had to leave the house at 3am. By this point I just wanted to go home but I couldn’t sleep due to the amount of stress and worry and being woken up multiple times due to issues with my permit. I was unsure if I would even be able to leave the country. I finally got the permit at around 1:30am, an hour and a half before having to leave for the airport. It was such a relief. I was so tired, but had no time for sleep. The drive to the airport was an hour and 45 minutes on the main highway in Sardinia. I saw an ambulance and one car that was leaving the airport. That road would usually be busy. There was hardly anyone at the airport. Everything felt like a ghost town. After check-in we went through security and showed our permits and other documents so that we could leave. Everyone was wearing masks and gloves, including myself and the other people I was travelling with. As we boarded the plane, we realised how few people there were on board. Everyone had a row to themselves and were seated apart. We landed in Rome, got off the plane and then walked straight to our next gate, trying our best not to come into contact with anyone, finding seats away from other people and waited. It was finally time to board again and there were hardly any passengers on the flight. About half way through the flight we were given a piece of paper with information about COVID-19 on it and also a form to fill out for contact


COVID STORY

tracing. We landed in Munich and before collecting our bags we had to prove that we had flights out of Munich and were not there for a holiday. Surprisingly the staff checking us in were not wearing masks. Once we had checked in we went straight through security, after getting through security we had our passports checked again and then went straight to the gate. Seeing as we were in Germany I had to try a pretzel and it tasted better than I expected. We sat there and waited for a while and then boarded the flight. Again there weren’t many people on the flight (I counted 23) especially for a big plane! The flight went well except when I realised I was going to see my family but not be able to hug them and started crying midway through the flight. When we landed in Dubai we walked straight to our next gate. There were lots of people on our flight to Adelaide as everyone was trying to get back to Australia as the government had advised. When we walked through to board the plane we had our passports checked twice along with our bags. We found our seats and the flight was packed. I was lucky to be in the first row and only have one other person in the row with me. When we landed in Australia we got off the plane and then had to fill out an Isolation Declaration stating that we would self-isolate for 14 days. We were then allowed to enter the country, but had to get temperature checked to make sure we didn’t have a fever. After collecting our bags, I drove to Renmark with my friend and her Dad. I stayed overnight and arrived in Mildura around lunchtime on Monday March 23, just before the SA border was closed to VIC. I realised how lucky I was to come back when I did. It was so hard when I arrived home as I couldn’t go near my family or give them a hug. Staying away from the people you love the most in the world is so tough, but I realized that if I got close to them I might put them at risk and that’s the last thing I wanted to do.

BOLD MAGAZINE 13


COVID STORY

ISOLATION DIARY DAY 1

DAY 5

It’s only the first day and I’m already lonely. It was so hard when I arrived home as I couldn’t go near my family or give them a hug. I’ve got Netflix to keep me company but sometimes it’s nice to have an actual person there to talk to.

I’ve made it to Day 5 of self-isolation without any symptoms of COVID-19. I feel so lonely and I need a hug. Singing is making isolation a bit easier for me because I find it’s a good way to let out all my emotions.

DAY 2

DAY 6

Woke up early & still jetlagged. It’s easy to run out of things to do when you’re stuck in a room alone and can’t go anywhere to get anything. I started sorting out the pieces to a puzzle.

Isolation half-way mark. It’s so easy to get lost in the internet when you have nothing else to do. Today my Italian friend sent me a picture that she found of us and it made me cry. I’m really missing her and just human contact in general.

DAY 3

DAY 7

I’m bored and losing my mind. I woke up early again. I have all the time in the world for selfreflection and to think about how amazing and beautiful nature actually is.

7 more days to go until I can be in the same room as my family. We have been FaceTiming at dinner so it feels like we are eating together. I’m still living out of my suitcase, so my clothes are all in a big pile.

DAY 4

DAY 8

I finally slept past 6:30am! I’m drinking way more water than usual which is a positive thing. My order of Nano blocks arrived today, which should help with my boredom.

6 more days. There have been lots of butterflies and bees in the garden lately, especially near the flowers and it’s so beautiful to watch them all.

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COVID STORY

DAY 9

DAY 13

I’ve almost hit double digits which is very exciting. I was bored until a few of my friends & I did a FaceTime call which lasted almost three hours!

I’m not ok right now! Hopefully I’ve only got today and tomorrow left and can get out Monday. I just can’t wait until I can give my family the biggest hugs ever and I really need it after what I’ve been through this past month.

DAY 10

DAY 14

Double digits! Self- isolation is starting to affect my sanity. Today actually really sucked because I found out that my friend had tested positive for the virus. I am now going to get tested as a precaution even though I haven’t had symptoms.

Hopefully it’s my last day in self-isolation. Fingers crossed the results come tomorrow! I’m really starting to worry that I do have corona even though I haven’t had symptoms but I think I’m just overthinking about it way too much.

DAY 11

DAY 15

I had a COVID test today. I had to stick the swab to the back of my throat and then stick the same swab up my nose to what felt like my brain and twist it around for ages.

I GOT MY RESULTS AND TESTED NEGATIVE! I am so happy to be reunited with my family. As soon as we got the results back I ran out of room and hugged Mum and Riley. It is such a relief to be out of isolation.

DAY 12

POST ISO

Today it rained, then there was a really pretty rainbow out my window which brightened my day and made me a bit happier. The hardest part about self-isolation right now is just watching the world from a distance with nothing to do.

I’ve now been out of isolation for a while and it’s great but it’s also really hard because I’m not used to being around people all. I feel very lost at the moment and I also still feel so lonely even though I’m surrounded by my family.Ð

BOLD MAGAZINE 15


Portia McKee Artist


READ THIS

ONLY MOSTLY DEVASTATED

WORDS LEON KEMP

Ever considered a modern-day queer Grease retelling? Set amid the backdrop of a family dealing with grief, a teenage boy struggling with identity, and a small group of friends learning how to stand up for both themselves and each other? Then please, let me introduce you to the gem that is Only Mostly Devastated by Sophie Gonzales. After being left with only the memories of his summer fling and moving halfway across the country to care for a sick relative, Ollie thinks his life is about as rocky as it’s likely to get. Only it’s not over. Because it quickly becomes apparent that his summer fling isn’t just memories anymore; he’s at Ollie’s new school, and he is nothing at all like Ollie remembers. Funny, heartwarming, and at many times tear-inducing, Only Mostly Devastated is everything you could ask for and more.

I’LL BE THE ONE

WORDS LEON KEMP

Skye Shin is sick of being told that fat girls can’t dance, fat girls don’t belong in the world of K-Pop, and fat girls certainly aren’t meant for TV. She’s heard it all, and she’s about to do absolutely anything it takes to prove them wrong. Even if that means blowing the world away in the first US based K-Pop competition. She’s prepared for how hard it’ll be – but she’s not prepared for the aftermath of going viral just for being herself, nor of navigating the messy boundaries of her relationship with fellow You’re my Shining Star contestant and pretty rich boy, Henry Cho. An excellent exploration of societal standards, cultural expectations, and learning to both live in and love your own body despite the ever crushing pressure of others, I’ll Be The One’s messages are timelessly relevant, upliftingly endearing, and just an all around excellent time.

THE FIRE NEVER GOES OUT

WORDS LEON KEMP

A memoir in pictures; Noelle Stevenson documents her rise from a young girl to an accomplished cartoonist, known as the artist behind the hilarious and witty comic ‘Nimona’ and then for her crowning success as the showrunner behind ‘She-Ra and the Princesses of Power’. ‘The Fire Never Goes Out’ is a deep dive into some of the most personal moments of her life, and an exploration into what it’s like to grow from one person into another. Noelle touches on her relationship with faith, God, sexuality, gender, friendship, family, and love. Reading through collections of comic essays that she’d written yearly for her blog, as well as fresh takes of her life as a young woman make the book fly by. Both funny and tragic, Stevenson’s memoir manages to be somewhat deeply relatable and faintly whimsical, and a brilliant read for a contemplative mood.

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WATCH THIS

KLAUS

WORDS ARIN MILWARD-HOLMES

“Set in the 19th Century of Norway, the story follows Jesper Johansson (Jason Schwartzman), the self-entitled and lazy son of the Royal Postmaster General (Uncredited). His father stations him to Smeerensburg as Postman for a full year after Jesper proves himself as the Worst Postman in the training course. There he meets a boatman named Mogens (Norm MacDonald), falls in love with a woman named Alva (Rashida Jones), and befriends a reclusive toymaker named Klaus (J.K Simmons). He helps deliver gifts to the folks of Smeerensburg after the children of the town were inspired to begin sending letters to Klaus for toys, which in turn melts an age-old feud and forms a holiday tradition. Set with a broad range of voice casts which includes Will Sasso, Joan Cusack, and Sergio Pablos, the film itself consists of gorgeous animation style, beautiful color palettes, and a comprehensible story to follow. The visuals are also very grim and morose, consistent with setting the right mood for the right scenario. The sharp dialogue and engaging interactions add as the cherry on top. If you’re compelled enough to watch this movie, its available on Netflix. What I find most fascinating about this film is it doesn’t follow the same formula like you’ve likely seen in other films such as “Elf” and “Arthur Christmas”. Rather, it focuses on a more accurate approach on the origins of Santa Claus, originally known as Klaus. Again, if you’re looking for a feel-good, Christmas film that the whole family can enjoy, Klaus is the movie for you.

Isle of Dogs

WORDS RUBY DAWSON

Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs takes place in the fictional dystopian city of Megasaki, Japan, where an outbreak of dog flu has resulted in the banishment of all dogs to Trash Island by order of Mayor Kobayashi (Kunichi Nomura). The film follows 12-year-old boy Atari (Koyu Rankin) who flees to Trash Island in search of his beloved dog Spots (Live Schreiber). He enlists the help of a pack of banished dogs living on the island by the names of Boss (Bill Murray), Duke (Jeff Goldblum), Rex (Edward Norton), King (Bob Balaban) and Chief (Bryan Cranston) who despite the rest of the pack’s enthusiasm, is reluctant to associate with the boy. Perhaps the most outstanding element of Isle of Dogs is the film’s stop motion mastery, the extensive detail and precision throughout the film’s animation style which is visually striking. Isle of Dogs is like magic on screen, the world created within the film is mesmerising and trash island has some of the most beautiful trash you will ever see. You can also expect typical Wes Anderson dry humour and wit, the dystopian political themes make for the butt of many jokes as well as a general abundance of doggy shenanigans. The fantastical setting and visuals coupled with Anderson’s wicked wit make for a film that is engaging for all, even the cat lovers.

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Mabel Morrison St Joseph’s College


LISTEN TO THIS

School of Rock Soundtrack

WORDS RILEY BALDOCK

Ladies and gentlemen, get ready to ‘stick it to the man’ with the most face-melting, gut-busting rock soundtrack of all time! We all know that Richard Linklater’s 2003 film School of Rock is an absolute goldmine for one-liners and classic rock hits, but nothing pulls the whole movie together quite like the original pieces.

School of Rock (Teacher’s Pet) is a song that perfectly encapsulates the movie’s themes and ideas; how the spirit of rock is an escape from the dreary slog of school life. The lyrics “don’t take much to memorise your lies, I feel like I’ve been hypnotised”, particularly stand out as a commentary on how so many students feel like their school is trying to strip them of their individuality, and that rebelling against it with rock music is their way of reclaiming their identity. The licensed music is also utilised to the best of its ability with songs that fit the mood of their respective scene, and the movie as a whole. It never feels like they just threw a song in because it’s a rock hit - it always has a purpose. This is also true with the band’s cover of It’s a Long Way to the Top, which is an awesome sendoff for the movie, reflecting how much effort the students have put in, and how far they have yet to go in their hardcore careers. An excellent soundtrack that complements the movie wonderfully, 9/10.

The Slow Rush - Tame Impala

WORDS RILEY BALDOCK

Kevin Parker’s work as Tame Impala throughout his career has been nothing short of enthralling, and that level of quality is expectedly abundant in his newest album, The Slow Rush. Despite having a generally more seasoned atmosphere than his previous album Currents, 2020’s The Slow Rush never dwells on any singular mood for too long, and will have you feeling reflective one moment, and dancing the house down the next. Each song has its own personality, with smashing funky beats from ‘Borderline’ and ‘Breathe Deeper’, but also exploring some strongly personal themes, such as Parker’s difficult relationship with his late father, in ‘Posthumous Forgiveness’. One major outlier is ‘On Track’; a song that evokes a deep sense of sentimental optimism with its adventurous instrumental and triumphant lyrics. This emotional range makes it clear as day that this was an incredibly intimate project for Parker. It’s such an investing album that when ‘One More Hour’, the grand finale, starts to fade out, it feels like you and Parker have together reached the end of a personal journey. You’re starting a new chapter in your life, and you’re ready to embrace it. Any album that can make you dance and feel such emotions simultaneously is an album that deserves respect, and The Slow Rush achieves this in scores. Like many great albums, this one gets better with each listen. Currently 9.5/10.

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ART PROGRAM

headspace Day This year headspace Mildura celebrated headspace day - a day for raising awareness of youth mental health - with a mosaic created by the Christie Centre’s ArtRageUs program. The mosaic is a stunning reminder of the small steps we can take every day for positive mental health and wellbeing and brings our 7 tips for a healthy headspace to life – get into life, learn skills for tough times, create connections, eat well, stay active, get enough sleep, cut back on alcohol & other drugs.

Proudly Supporting Youth in our Region.

Supporting Youth through: • Actively and financially supporting locally based youth focused organisations and programs • School based apprenticeships • Full time apprenticeships • Work experience placement

YOUR CHOICE, OUR PURPOSE The Christie Centre is here to help YOU plan your NDIS Supports. Supporting YOU to succeed in life is important to us.

Seeing greatness, not dependence P: (03) 5023 2761 E: intake@christiecentre.com.au www.christiecentre.com.au

Devilee’s are Australia’s Leading Regional Dealer for Daikin, Actron Air & Bonaire. Excellence in Heating, Cooling & Commercial Refrigeration Solutions. Award Winning. Family Owned & Operated. Since 1961. VIC - 15 Eighth St Mildura Phone 03 5021 1210 SA - Old Sturt Hwy Berri Phone 08 8582 1844 www.devilees.com.au

Registered Provider #4050000563

BOLD MAGAZINE 21


STORY

WEBTOON

FOREST

Home to epic sagas, short stories, manga, and daily comic strips, Webtoon has something for everyone. The creator-owned comics span over 23 genres and can be accessed on and offline, anywhere and anytime. Users are able to access stories from phones, iPads and computers; even without an account. If there’s a story of interest, it can be easily added into the My Series list for when the next story update arrives. Users are also able to create their own comics through the website, enter contests and join the largest webcomic community. Webtoon is free to download off the Apple App Store, Google Play or through any browser. Webtoon is a fantastic site with stories you are bound to obsess over.

When our phones are such a constant distraction, it can be hard to settle down and do all the things we need to in our day. Forest helps you grow trees instead of a to-do list! Acting as a combination of a timer, habit tracker, and anti-procrastination tool, the app allows you to set a plant to grow within a designated time period, locking you out of your phone until it’s done. Better yet, all the time you spend planting trees translates to trees being planted in real life too! Cultivate a garden of carefully selected bushes, trees, cacti, and other greenery in both the real world and the app and feel productive while doing it! - Leon Kemp

- Elise Cirillo

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GAMING STORY

A SHORT HIKE

FALL GUYS

If there’s something the success of Animal Crossing has taught us, it’s that sometimes we just need to unwind with a pointless walk around a gorgeous island full of delightfully sentient and cheerful animals, eager to demand errands from us and chat about the weather.

Have you ever wanted to see fifty jellybeans attempt an obstacle course while suspended above a pit of fluorescent slime? If your answer is yes, I have good news – if it is no, then I’m about to introduce you to something that is as fun as it sounds outrageous.

A Short Hike is a quiet experience more than a game; you are on vacation. There is no phone signal. To get a phone signal, you will need to reach the top of the climbing trail. On your way there, you will collect coins, shells, treasure, and, most importantly, an adorable assortment of animal friends. A truly cathartic few hours of investment that leaves you feeling refreshed and very nostalgic for that Animal Crossing island you haven’t checked in weeks.

In Fall Guys, you and a collection of other eager individuals will compete to wiggle, jump, push, shove and climb your way over a set of competitions. In one, you must dodge the flying fruit trying to make mush out of you, and in another you must keep your feet beneath you on an ever-rolling cylinder. Difficult, hilarious, bright and infuriating, Fall Guys is a must play for anybody with time to spare and a wish to return to the backstabbing days of Mario Kart. - Leon Kemp

- Leon Kemp

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LOCAL BAND

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LOCAL BAND

kinsfolk road WORDS BRADY GLEN Who is Kinsfolk Road? A brother & sister duo from Mildura who grew up with strong musical influences & perform locally wherever possible. What got you into music? Kate - We grew up with a lot of live music around us; our dad was in a lot of local bands, so we were always at their gigs from a young age. Which musicians would you say are your biggest influences? Kate - We have such a large variety of genres that we enjoy and play that there are so many to choose from. But to name a few, probably Fleetwood Mac, Missy Higgins and mostly anything from genres of pop and pop punk. What’s it like working with your sibling? Sean - I think it makes it easier to figure out what direction we want to take with our music or what music we should play as we really do know each other already.

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STORY BAND LOCAL

we are siblings so we are ‘Kinsfolk’ to each other What have you been getting up to during the pandemic?

What do you find rewarding?

Sean - We both have still fortunately been able to stay at work, but also have been recording some of our own music with Hosea Creative. We will hopefully have a single out very soon.

Sean - Being able to make a person feel better or brighten their day through our music. We’re glad when people hear us play and stop to listen and we can see that their mood changes even just for a second.

What do you find challenging about being in a band?

What lies in the future for Kinsfolk Road?

Kate - I think really the only challenging part would be finding the time to practice and go over our songs and ideas together, with both of us working full time and studying, then fitting gigs in (pre-COVID) as well. Our music tends to take a backseat, but we still work hard to fit that time in for us because music is a big part of who we are and it’s our passion.

Kate - We hope to continue playing live gigs for everyone (once restrictions have eased) and release our own original music in the near future. Where does the name Kinsfolk Road come from? Kate - Kinsfolk Road means that our band is made up of family, we are siblings so we are ‘Kinsfolk’ to each other and our musical passion is the road we want to continue to pursue.

@kinsfolkroad @folkroadmusic

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STORY

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Ruby Dawson Olivia McCarten Mildura Senior College Artist


Ethan Heywood Mildura Senior College

Connor Bosch Mildura Senior College BOLD MAGAZINE 29


PROFILE

WORDS MICHAELA WHITEHEAD

Ainsley Evans

Ainsley is a thirteen year old student who aspires to be a professional makeup artist. How did you start? I always used to play with my mum’s makeup and dress up my little brother so I could do his makeup. I got really into makeup when I was given an eyeshadow palette and lipstick for Christmas in 2016 from my grandparents - I didn’t stop after that. I sat in my room for hours just doing makeup, taking it off and then doing something new. My interest in makeup continued to grow and last year which is when I created my makeup account, after my mum gave me an early Christmas present which was a bright peacock inspired eyeshadow palette. I have always been interested in all kinds of art - I used to paint new faces on my Barbie dolls and give them new clothes out of socks and duct tape! I have always found art a great way to express myself. What do you like most about what you do? I love creating fun and colourful looks and I love to see the reaction of my family when I walk out of my room with some crazy colours all over my face. I like posting my looks on Instagram and looking at my progress. I love to interact with the people that follow me including my family who live far away. I use makeup as a way to express how I feel; I am a control freak when it comes to myself and the things around me and I like that I can control everything about my makeup. 30 BOLD MAGAZINE

I can pick the foundation, concealer, eyeshadow colours etc. I like that no matter how I am feeling I can just sit down and put it on my face/body when I can’t put it into words. I love it all, I love the way I feel after putting on some crazy colours and knowing it looks good. My makeup helps me deal with things that no one talks about and I have really bad anxiety so when everything gets too much I know I can sit in my room and do my makeup to help me relax. What are your goals for the future? I want to be a professional makeup artist, and I plan on taking a course on beauty at my school. I also want to go to uni and become a criminal psychologist as well. I love all sorts of horror movies. I would love to do movie makeup and makeup celebrities. I want to inspire other people to do what they love as well. As for my goals for the near future I want to improve my makeup, and my special effects makeup as well. I am trying to get to 300 followers on my Instagram so I guess that’s a goal, right? I really want to work on a huge movie set with heaps of celebrities one day. And I am hoping that the opportunity to be in this will help me even a little bit to get closer to my dream. My dream has always been to be in a movie. I used to want to act but turns out I have horrible stage fright, so something more behind the scenes seems a little more appropriate for me. I have also always wanted to write a book, which I know is very different to anything else.


PROFILE

Makeup Artist What would you say to anyone looking to start doing what you do? I would tell them that they don’t need a bunch of expensive fancy stuff to make something great - it takes time, practice and a lot of patience. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and keep trying. And don’t get offended by constructive criticism because it will help you improve. Draw down your idea on paper so you have a structured plan of what you want to do, or just add as you go. If it looks bad oh well. We all have bad days and sometimes it’s best to step back and take a break. I think it’s also really important to not always wear makeup, let your skin breathe and take a day or two without makeup. Don’t wear makeup for the wrong reasons; make sure you feel comfortable in your own skin before adding to it. I would tell someone that is just starting out that people will say things that aren’t what you want to hear or that can be really mean. But I think as long as you feel good that’s all that matters.

@makeup_by_ainsley.jade

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Denzel Irons Mildura Specialist School 32 BOLD MAGAZINE


Jacynth Domingo Artist


LIFE

comparison: the thief of joy

WORDS ELEANOR DANENBERG I turned 25 this year, a quarter of a century. While it sounds like such a mature and grown-up age, I feel like a teenager in adult clothing, about to be found out and exposed for the fraud I really am at any moment. There’s still so much I must learn about being an adult and a productive member of society. On the flip side, being 25 also means I have learned a lot of life lessons, and I officially have wisdom to share with those younger than me. In this stage of life, it’s far too easy to compare ourselves to others. It feels like so many people are ‘ahead’ of you; they’re more advanced or established in their career, they earn more money or have more savings than you, they’ve travelled to more countries than you, they have more designer items in their wardrobe than you, they have a house, a pet, a child. You might find yourself feeling jealous of a friend’s achievement rather than feeling happy for them. You can feel competitive with the lives of complete strangers, and it’s not a good feeling. That’s the thing about comparison, we’re so busy fixating on the people we think have more than us, or are ‘doing life’ better than us. Too many tears are spilled and hours are wasted over this.

PHOTOS & POSTS ARE FICTITIOUS

I should add here that while social media has many benefits, it can be really bad for people’s mental health, and it’s no wonder why. Every time we open Facebook or Instagram we see flat stomachs and ab muscles; flawlessly clear skin; straight white teeth; glamorous holidays; mind-boggling bottoms that we can never achieve no matter how many squats and lunges we do; and outfits, jewellery, cars, and houses we could only wish to afford ourselves. We see seemingly perfect people live seemingly perfect lives. But we have to remember that social media is curated; people pick and choose what they share, so lots of them only show the good stuff. The good angles, the good lighting, the good days; the pimples, cellulite, and under-eye bags

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LIFE

You might go on a completely different path to the one you always imagined; maybe you’ll do something totally different to your friends or the people you went to school with.

edited out, or removed courtesy of expensive medical treatments. Someone can put up a beautiful photo with their partner, their arms around each other at sunset, with huge and authentic-looking smiles. We see this and think their relationship is perfect; but behind the picture, their relationship might be crumbling. People perform for social media. We really don’t know someone from a few photos, stories, or statuses. We don’t know if they’re fulfilled or happy. If there’s a certain account you follow that brings you nothing but negative feelings, I can’t urge you strongly enough to unfollow it, or block it; just do whatever you need to do. In real life and on social media, you can tend to get so caught up following and focusing on what other people are doing, that you forget to celebrate your own accomplishments, and all the amazing, special things about YOU. You should focus on what you want. It’s easy to forget that it’s completely normal, if not advisable, for people to have different goals. We’re not all meant to have the same path, and life would be so boring if we did! If I have learned anything over my 25 years that I’d like to share with people younger than me, it

would be this: comparing yourselves to others is a waste of time. Grow and age with an open mind. You might change your plan, your opinions, your job, your friends, and that’s okay. You might go on a completely different path to the one you always imagined; maybe you’ll do something totally different to your friends or the people you went to school with. If you’re staying true to yourself and if you’re happy, that’s all that matters. When I turned 25 this year I honestly felt really happy about it. I feel with each year, I know myself more, and I like myself more. Ageing, getting older and the wisdom and perspective that come with it, is such a privilege. I’m lucky to be alive, we all are. I love my family and my friends, and I’m excited about where my life is heading. As a wise woman once said to me, “being an adult means you make the rules”, and that’s really stayed with me. It’s your life, so you decide where you’re going and how you’ll get there. Life doesn’t happen to you, you should be in control. So, that’s my wisdom after my first 25 years. But I’m not naïve enough to think I know it all just yet. I know I have more learning, changing, and growing to do. I don’t know about you, but I find that so exciting.Ð


Alicia Muir Artist - Photographer

Elizabeth Gareffa Artist - Photographer BOLD MAGAZINE 37


Isabella McIntyre Artist


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WORDS PATHAMA WANKHUAN

Loafers are another effortless slip-on option to jazz up your outfit by leaps and bounds. As comfortable as sneakers but, like mules to slides, loafers add extra class and can be worn to more formal events too.

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shoes

Summer approaches… so does a new season of shoes! No outfit is quite complete without the right pair of shoes to finish it off and this season sure doesn’t disappoint in style and comfort.

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6 The versatility of slides are what makes it the perfect shoe for any casual outing, especially in the Mildura summertime! Slides – typically flat-soled and open-toed – are available in many varieties and styles. Mules (closed-toe slides with heels of varying heights) are also effortlessly trendy, making it the perfect shoe to jazz up your outfit for a more put-together look.

2020 fashio

FASHION

Try pairing slides/ mules with comfy straight-leg jeans with rolled cuffs to show off your ankles and a cute blouse for an easy outfit idea.

7 Sneakers – easily a must in any wardrobe – are suitable for casual to semi casual events. They’re cool, comfy and always trendy! Not to mention perfect for a day out in town if you’re constantly on your feet.

1 FIFI & ANNIE 2 IGGY & ZEE 3 SURF CREW 4 ANTISOCIAL COLLECTIVE 5 DOUG HAYNES 6 FIFI & ANNIE 7 & 8 GEORGE & OLIVE 9 FIFI & ANNIE


2020 fashion

FASHION

going out

WORDS PATHAMA WANKHUAN Keeping it cool, comfy and chic has never been easier! Lockdown wasn’t fashionable… but it sure was comfy and your outfits can be too. It’s simple!

Denim is every wardrobe’s staple for good reason; finding that perfect pair of jeans makes it all that much easier to style your outfits, and this season is all about wide-legs (mum jeans, straight, flared, you name it). Dress it up or down however you want!

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Statement bell or bishop sleeves and milkmaid necklines are everywhere! Available in plain and prints, effortlessly couple one of these cute blouse styles with your favourite bottoms, an oversized tote and sneakers, and you’re set for a girl’s day out.

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Or how about a flowy tiered dress? Also available in plain and print, this is a fabulous addition to your summer wardrobe that allows you to keep cool and stay chic simultaneously.

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accessories 1

WORDS SARA HANCOCK

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Accessories are an important part of any outfit; they allow the wearer to express themselves in a variety of different ways. Whether your style is minimalistic, alternative or casual, statement pieces will elevate your look.

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Small businesses and local artists have pieces of clothing and jewellery that will be special and handmade with passion. Don’t just follow along with what is trendy at the moment, do your own thing. Stand out with your own style.

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2020 fashio

FASHION

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A statement piece could range from anything such as bags or shoes to jewellery, but this doesn’t have to mean the latest pair of branded shoes or expensive mass produced jewellery. Look for unique pieces to add to your collection.

1 I GOT GORGEOUS 2 FIERCE TRIBE 3 AUNTIE TAZZ 4 TIG & MOSQUITO 5 EMILY ROSE MACRAME 6 LE CHER PETITE 7 TIG & MOSQUITO 8 AUNTIE TAZZ 9 ORCHARD ROSE 10 EMILY ROSE MACRAME 11 FIERCE TRIBE


2020 fashion

FASHION

casual wear WORDS MICHAELA WHITEHEAD

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Lockdown’s over and you want to dress up but all of your dresses and skirts are uncomfortable to wear. Here are a couple tips to dress up your casual outfits.

But you can just wear casual too! Just pair any cute outfit with some accessories and you are done!

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If you want to wear a t-shirt and jeans pair them with some heels or wedges and a cute jacket.

Wearing dull track-pants? Pair it with a cute shirt and some bright accessories.

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lounge wear WORDS CLAUDIA DIMASI

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Comfort meets fashion when it comes to current trends of lounge wear, from home to the gym. Find influencial fashion runway trends by Offwhite, P.E Nation and Ivy Park.

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FASHION

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Pop into any local store such as Intersport Mildura, Iggy & Zee or Fifi & Annie to find comfortable, trendy pieces to add to your wardrobe.

Celebrities, models and internet influencers like the Kardashians, Charlie Damelio and Gigi Hadid have made lounge wear fashionable by pairing outfits with designer shoes, bags and accessories.

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STORY

ALPHABET SOUP LGBTQIA+ MILDURA

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STORY

Coming out to friends & family + Struggling to come out WORDS: AJ Coming out to friends and family from my experience, is a difficult decision to make, but once you’ve made the decision, how do you do it? Here are a few things to think about while coming out to friends and family, and some things that can help the people around you understand and give their support. Make sure you are safe Don’t come out if it could put yours or other people’s life in danger, slowly introduce the idea to your parents or guardian. If someone asks you whether you’re a part of the LGBTQIA+ community and you don’t feel comfortable, it’s ok to say no. You’re not stuck with the one label for the rest of your life. Its ok to try different labels or pronouns with people you trust. For those around you If you don’t understand someone’s label or pronoun, ask politely. Introduce your friends and family to the idea through any form of appropriate media. Encourage your friends or family to listen to songs, watch programs or read books by LGBTQIA+ people. Take time out of your day to explain to them why you feel the way you do. Things that can happen In the worst case if they flat out deny your identity, this is not because you are bad, broken or disgusting, there is only so much you can tell some people before they try to shut you down, and that’s ok. Not everyone will except you and you don’t need their approval to keep living your life your way. If doing something makes you happy i.e. changing your hair, buying new clothes, or altering your pronouns don’t let family or friends bring you down. Understand that they might not be doing it consciously. Them not accepting you the first few times could be because they don’t know what’s going on in your head & that they may just need some more time. Resources Switch Board 1800 184 527 – this is an emergency contact number Minus 18 - great for LGBTQIA+ resources and events A Microaggression can be verbal, nonverbal, behavioural, or environmental actions that convey a hostile, derogatory, or negative connotation about a particular person or identity. Sexual or Gender Microaggression is defined as a subtle negative attitude that infers that someone’s sexual or gender identity is less valuable or “normal’. Microaggressions are a death by 100 cuts, often building and building for people until they snap at a “little comment” or “joke” and seem to overreact at nothing when really they are reacting to the stress of constant “little comments” or “jokes” made at their expense. (Reference: www.psychologytoday.com/au/blog/microaggressions-in-everyday-life) Assuming pronouns It is hard to tell someone halfway through a conversation they are getting my pronouns wrong, you know what is easy? Introduce yourself with your pronouns, it gives a chance for other person to do the same! Example: “Hi I’m Bob and I use he/ him pronouns”; be like Bob he’s a bloody legend. Assuming peeps are straight Don’t ask me about my girlfriend or my wife or when I’m going to make a family - that life is fine but it’s awkward when I say it’s not my scene. That’s so gay and no homo When I say, “that’s gay” I mean “that’s awesome”, when you say, “no homo” I hear “don’t come near me”. It’s not funny it just makes you look like you hate LGBTQIA+ people. BOLD MAGAZINE 45


STORY

Man up, or boys don’t cry or don’t throw like a girl 1) Everyone has emotions not just females. 2) What’s wrong with being female? Do you really want to make one of the biggest population groups of the world angry? and 3) Crying is good for you. Stereotyping “you’re not like other gay people” What’s wrong with other gay people? And yeah every LGBTQIA+ is different and unique, kind of like every other group of people on earth. “It’s fine behind closed doors, I don’t care what people do in their own bedrooms just don’t flaunt it”; Umm no, I’m not going to hide a part of myself for your comfort. I’m not “flaunting” my gender or sexuality, I’m living my life. Why isn’t there a straight pride? You didn’t have to riot to be accepted or have your identity debated by politicians asking if “it’s ok to be Queer”, every day is straight pride day. Don’t ask that! I can’t count how many times I’ve been asked about my genitals or surgeries by complete strangers! Don’t ask me that!! Jeez you can google some stuff but I don’t want to be asked “how do you have sex?” while I’m buying orange juice! Demanding education I don’t mind answering a couple questions here and there, but I can only talk about my life, not every other gay or trans person’s life. I’m not your teacher, google it. “People like you” or “your people” Do you know how bad this sounds? Mate they are people, you have LGBTQIA+ people in your life and in your family, they are “our” people. Policing people’s gender presentation I like makeup and skirts, this does not make me a female (not that there is anything wrong with females). I just happen to like makeup and skirts. Don’t tell people how to dress or act, it’s really creepy, why do you care what I wear? Watch your language If someone tells you that something you say is offensive then chances are, they are right. Like dude I have a little more experience on what’s offensive to LGBTQIA+ people being Queer myself, why would I lie? Just apologise and learn from it, no biggie. Some jokes are only funny coming from us I love gay jokes; I think they are hilarious. But when I make them I am making a joke based on my experience as a gay person, when straight people make gay jokes it seems like they are just making fun of LGBTQIA+ folks. Demanding “proof” of someone’s sexuality or gender Sorry I left my diploma of being hella queer and awesome at home, but why would you need proof? If someone says they had eggs for breakfast do you demand proof of that too? It sounds like you have trust issues dude. Ignoring people when they misgender or deadname people I’m not talking about outing someone, but if you see someone using the wrong name or pronouns for someone when they should know better pull them up! It’s exhausting for Queer people to do it all day every day, lend a hand and be a pal.

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STORY

Anything goes Identity & Exploration – A Personal Experience When I first realised I had an attraction to both boys and girls I was a little scared because I have been raised in a family were mostly everyone (except my Aunty) was straight, and where I grew up it was rare to be a part of the LGBTQIA+ community. I was scared to be judged and stared at, and not accepted. It took me about 6 months to tell my family. I’m so glad that they accepted me even though it took some time for them to accept the change and to start calling me by my chosen name. A lot of people deny the fact that they are attracted to a certain gender or a different gender to what they were assigned at birth. A lot of people deny their gender/ sexuality for different reasons such as: homophobic parents/ family members’ judgement from others and the fear of not being accepted, to name a few. I have been really lucky that my school has been very supportive and the teacher’s call me by my chosen name which makes me feel accepted and relieved. A lot of people don’t fully understand what it means to be part of the LGBTQIA + community and I am happy to tell our stories and hopefully make people more understanding and accepting. Kai

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PROJECT DIY

PROJECT DIY

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FAIRY GARDEN Supplies: Plant pot(s) Herbs and/or flowers Water Small container Matchsticks

Hot glue gun Potting mix Pebbles Popsticks

Step 1 Fill the plant pot with the potting mix. Add another pot on the side for some height! Step 2 Gently pull/dig the plant up and loosen the dirt around its roots. Step 3 Dig a small hole in the potting mix and place the plant in it. Step 4 Cover the roots with potting mix and pat down firmly to hold the plant in place. Step 5 Repeat steps 2 to 4 for all the plants you want in your fairy garden. Step 6 Decorate! Suggestions: pebble paths; pond (container filled with water); stick fence, ladder, bench, tent.

Supplies: Small hinges x4 Plastic sheet Old dresser MDF board Wood saw Chain Small nails

Step 1 Find an old dresser. Take the drawers out and cut off any unnecessary pieces of wood. Step 2 Make the doors. Measure the bottom width of the dresser and the length of the door. I used thin pieces of wood as door frames. Connect the pieces of wood using nails and wood glue. Step 3 To make floors, measure the inside of where the drawers sit and use MDF board as the base. For the second floor cut a square out for the ramp. Spray paint the front of the drawers, door frames and the outside of the dresser. Once dry, prepare fake grass. Step 4 Cut fake grass to size then use wood glue to stick onto the MDF board. When you’ve stuck the grass down nail the baseboards into place. It’s time to finish the doors. Cut the plastic sheet to fit the inside of the door frame & staple in. Attach doors to dresser with small hinges at the base of the door frame & chains on both sides to open and close the doors with hooks. You can have the doors partially open for ventilation or fully open to get out your rabbit.

Step 7 Water regularly. - Pathama Wankhuan

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Metal hooks x4 Staple gun Wood paint 12mm pine or recycled timber Sand paper Flathead wood screws 1 sheet 1m x 1m Fake grass

- Paige Avery


PROJECT DIY

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TEDDY BACKPACK Supplies: Stuffed toy 1 zipper Fabric Chain Scissors Sewing materials (needles, pins, thread) Ruler and pencil/pen Step 1 Determine the size of the zipper required by measuring the back of the toy. Step 2 Cut a slit in the back of a stuffed toy to the length you have chosen & remove stuffing. Step 3 Roughly measure some fabric to create a pouch to go inside of the toy. Step 4 Sew the zipper to the fabric, then sew down the sides to create the pouch. Step 5 Put the pouch inside the toy and hand sew the edge of the zipper to the toy.

JEANS APRON Supplies: An old pair of jeans (any style) Scissors Hot glue Pins Seam ripper Measuring tape Step 1 Take an old pair of jeans and cut the legs off to desired length. Make sure it’s a size that can cover you as this will be the bottom half of the apron and then unpick the inside leg seam. Step 2 Unpick the crotch so you can overlap it. Step 3 Hot glue the pieces together.

Step 6 Measure the chain to the length you would like the backpack. Sew the chain securely to the bear to make the bag straps.

Step 4 Grab a pant leg and unpick one panel and attach to the missing area. Trim to desired length.

- Sara Hancock

Step 6 Attach the straps made out of fabric to the apron. If you wish to, cut some fabric & attach for some colour.

Step 5 Unpick the other leg from the front panel and hot glue to the skirt.

- Michaela Whitehead

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FICTIONAL STORY PIECE

Arcadia

WORDS JAMES DE MARIA ARTWORK ANNA HAWKES Across the waving Minoan sea As gelid as hibernal night Against the ancient quay Beneath the stars of pallid white A primal pool of sapphire From a time before man Swaying to the soul’s lyre In vestal nature’s grand clan By the words of the breeze Whispers of Gaia’s earthly breath Courting the passionate tide of the seas Extending to Arcadia’s lanes There botanical fields possess The immense Hellenic plains In Arcadia all is a divine image With it’s complex of streams And the sun that smiles gleams With the sky in celestial peerage Here there was land before the till There were beasts before the chase There was fields before the mill And there was wood before a fireplace This was the gods’ abode Here they made and prepared the ground Here they slept, feasted and strode Here they were throned and crowned. 50 BOLD MAGAZINE


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HEALTH STORY

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

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HEALTH

WORDS CHLOE DONEHUE Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (or PCOS for short), is a common hormonal condition that affects one in ten women. As common as it is, many women are uninformed about it. So, what is PCOS?

that, your doctor would typically ask you questions about your period and weight changes, and your medical history to rule out other problems. Most women typically just get the blood test and ultrasound, like I did.

PCOS is a complex hormonal condition that can affect many females between the ages of 14 and 44. While the exact causes of it are unknown, we do know that chemical imbalances contribute to it; women with PCOS usually have higher levels of androgen and insulin. Higher levels of androgens can prevent women from releasing an egg during ovulation, and contributes to other symptoms of PCOS, such as acne or facial hair. Higher levels of insulin can lead to women with PCOS gaining weight and being put at risk of type 2 diabetes. PCOS can be genetic – if you have a female family member with PCOS, then there’s a higher chance you could develop it too.

To help manage PCOS, many women are put on medication. To help regulate menstrual cycles, birth control pills can be used (implanonor vaginal ring could be used instead). This helps decrease androgen production, and regulate oestrogen. Regulating these hormones helps to reduce the risk of endometrial cancer and correct abnormal bleeding, and other symptoms such as excess hair growth and acne. There’s also a few types of medications that can help with ovulation if planning pregnancy, such as; Clomiphene (an oral anti-oestrogen medication taken during the first part of your menstrual cycle), Letrozole (a breast cancer treatment that can work to stimulate the ovaries), Gonadotropins (a hormone medication that’s given by injection), and Metformin. Metformin is actually the medication that I’m taking for my PCOS. It’s a medication for type 2 diabetes; it helps to lower insulin levels and improves insulin resistance. It can also help with weight loss, and slow the progression of type 2 diabetes if you have prediabetes.

One of the most noticeable symptom of PCOS is having a delayed or irregular period cycle, however there are many other symptoms of PCOS, including: weight gain, acne, thinning or hair loss, excessive hair growth (usually on the face, chest, and back), pelvic pain, and ovarian cysts. As someone who has PCOS, I have experienced many of these symptoms, including weight gain, pelvic pain, and irregular periods. I’ve always been a bit overweight, but as I got older, I noticed that I was gaining more and struggled to lose weight. And my irregular periods were also a concern to me; I had my first period at 15, and since then I had a time gap of six months between each period. I even went an entire year without a period. At that point, I decided to go see a doctor.

I personally haven’t heard of any support networks or services, but through some research I was able to find many online groups and websites; one support network that I found was ‘My PCOS Team’. This website allows women of all ages and locations to connect, and share their stories. From what I have read, it has helped many women suffering PCOS – as it makes them feel that they are not alone during this journey.Ð

To get a PCOS diagnosis, there are three tests you can do: pelvic exam, blood test, and an ultrasound. Before

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LOCAL EATS

LOCAL EATS OUR PICKS FOR LOCAL DINING WORDS SUSAN DUNN

HOGS BREATH

MILDURA WORKING MAN’S CLUB

Hogs Breath has one of my favourite meals, and it is worth spending your money here for great food and excellent customer service! I always get the caesar wrap filled with crumbed chicken, lettuce, bacon, caesar sauce and served with famous curly fries on the side and some salad. I recommend you go and try their food.

My second favourite place to visit and have a great meal is at the Mildura workers. This is a hard one to pick a favourite from but if I had to choose, it would be between the Aussie Parmigiana and the Caesar wrap.

134 Deakin Ave Mildura www.hogsbreath.com.au @hogsbreath @hogsbreathcafe

I have chosen the Aussie Parmigiana, Why you ask? Because it hits all the taste buds for me - it’s loaded with BBQ sauce, bacon, eggs and topped with melted cheese. It also comes with chips and salad on the side. The environment when you come here is great and the people are too. The cost of the meals are affordable and you get your bucks worth here. Therefore, it’s in the top three on my list of go-to when we are wanting to go out for tea or lunch. 100-110 Deakin Ave Mildura www.milduraworkers.com.au @milduraworkingmansclub @theworkersmildura

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LOCAL EATS

DOCKSIDE CAFE This is my favourite place to go for breakfast. I usually order the waffles with ice cream. Why not have ice cream for breakfast every now and then. It’s an easy decision, it melts in your mouth when you eat it and everything on the plate just works well together. I also order the iced chocolate with breakfast, it’s delicious to have on a summer day. The waffles come with berries, a scoop of ice cream and some sauces. Did I mention that you can sit and watch the river? Just relax, unwind and take in nature while you eat or have a drink. You‘ll forget what’s going on in the world for a minute and enjoy life.Ð Dockside Drive, Mildura www.milduradocksidemarina.com @MilduraDocksideCafe @milduradocksidecafe

BOLD MAGAZINE 55


EAT THIS

eat this WORDS & PHOTOGRAPHY HANNAH JACKSON Creamy chocolate and refreshing peppermint a match made in heaven. Hannah shares one of her favourite ‘NO BAKE’ dishes. This slice has a combination of peppermint crisp & aero bars throughout – what more could a peppermint lover want? A super easy, sweet slice that only takes a few minutes to make.

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SIMPLE FOOD

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EAT THIS

PEPPERMINT SLICE (APPROX 48 PIECES)

INGREDIENTS

UTENSILS

500G PLAIN BISCUITS 360G PEPPERMINT CHOCOLATE (I USED DARK) 200G BUTTER 550G CONDENSED MILK 500G WHITE CHOCOLATE 1 TBSP COCONUT OIL 3 MINT FLAVOURED CHOCOLATE BARS (2 PEPPERMINT CRISP AND 1 AERO MINT) GREEN FOOD COLOURING PEPPERMINT EXTRACT

KNIFE SKEWER WOODEN SPOON CHOPPING BOARD LARGE BOWL ROLLING PIN SLICE TRAY OR CONTAINER

METHOD 1. Line a tray or container with baking paper and grease it. 2. Crush the plain biscuits until they are mostly crumbs with a few larger chunks left in. You can do this with a food processor or by hand with a rolling pin. Place the biscuits in a large mixing bowl. 3. Crush and/or grate the chocolate bars into tiny pieces. Add half of the pieces to the crushed biscuits. 4. Pour 300g condensed milk into the bowl with the crushed biscuits and chocolate bars and stir. 5. Melt the peppermint chocolate, butter and 250g condensed milk together in the microwave for 30 seconds at a time, mixing in between each burst. 6. Pour the melted chocolate mixture over the biscuit mixture. Add a few drops of peppermint extract and mix well to combine. 7. Pour this mixture into your tray or container and smooth the surface with the back of a spoon. 8. Melt the white chocolate and coconut oil together in the microwave in 30 second bursts, stirring well in between. 9. Add a few drops of peppermint extract and mix the chocolate well to ensure there are no lumps. 10. Pour the white chocolate slowly into the tray or container, ensuring that the whole surface is covered. Slowly move it from side to side so that the chocolate is smooth. 11. Pour a drop of green food colouring onto the white chocolate and use a skewer to swirl the colour around. Repeat until you are satisfied with the design. 12. Sprinkle the other half of the crushed/grated chocolate bars over the top of the white chocolate. 13. Put it in the fridge for about 30 minutes or until the white chocolate is tacky. 14. Run a knife under hot water (to help melt the chocolate without breaking it) and then cut the slice into small squares.

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SIMPLESTORY FOOD

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JOURNALING

how to journal

WORDS MATILDA BRESNEHAN ARTWORK RACHAEL SHARMAN

Writing prompts and ideas • How your day was • What you did that day • Name three things that you are grateful for • Draw a picture of something • Track your mood, sleep and water habits • Make a weekly planner • Name three things you love • Just scribble on a page to get out your

anger or anything that is bothering you.

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What is a journal? A journal is a small book that you can use to track your feelings, growth, goals, mood, collections, or really whatever you like. Your journal is for you and you can make it special. You could use your journal as a scrapbook for photos and adventures, or you can write ideas, draw pictures and design things. A journal can also be used for expressing your feelings and thoughts without anyone even knowing!

How is journaling useful? Journaling is useful in many ways as it encourages people to express themselves, and to be productive and creative. It can also help you to understand more about what things you want to accomplish in life and keep you motivated. Journaling is also good for your mental health and wellbeing because it can help you unwind and get thoughts and feelings out of your head. You might also find it easier to express your thoughts, feelings or questions you might have down on paper instead of telling someone face to face; but remember if it is a serious problem or something you need some help with, you should definitely talk to a trusted adult about your worries.

How do you start a journal? Starting a journal is very easy. All you need is a small notebook or if you don’t have one, paper will do for now. Next you are going to need some colour! Use pens, textas, watercolours, graphic makers, etc. If you want your journal to look extra amazing, you could add some washi tape or stickers if you like. Finally, you need something to write or draw about. For inspiration you could go outside and look at nature, draw your room or read some of the prompts (left).


JOURNALING

Digital journaling Digital journaling is another option if you don’t really like to use pen and paper. It is very efficient because you can use it on your phone or i-pad wherever you are. There are a lot of Digital journaling apps that you can use. Here are some that you might like to check out! • Reflectly • Journey • Breeze • Morning • Day one • Five minute journal All these apps are a great way to journal on the go. Some of them offer Meditation classes for free so you can de-stress and unwind after writing about your day. Many also let you note how you were feeling that day and how you would describe your day in three words. I believe that journaling is something that more people should try because it is great for your mental health, and that is important! Ð


BODY

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BODY

Overcoming an eating disorder WORDS EMILY SCHOFIELD ARTWORK ELLY PILEGGI Ever since I was 10 years old, I was told that I needed to lose weight or I was too big. I would get told this a lot from my skating coach in particular. She would tell me that I needed to look a certain way or that I was too fat to fit into a costume. I was 10 years old, all I wanted to do was skate and have fun with my friends. That moment was the first part of my toxic cycle, that was when my relationship with food changed. Throughout high school I never liked the way I looked, I hated my body and I was so ashamed of the person I was. My friends saw me as the quiet kid in their group that had the perfect life. My dark thoughts were screaming at me every day. They always said, “you're worthless”, “you're pathetic”, “you’re so disgusting to look at”. I hated myself and the way I looked. Things got really bad when I was in year 12. My dad was diagnosed with terminal cancer and that’s where I developed an eating disorder. I was so clueless about other types of eating disorders because I only ever heard of anorexia and bulimia, and I thought to myself “well, I’m not super skinny so I don’t have an eating disorder, I’m fine, everything’s fine”. No one knew about it, it was my own deep dark secret. My friends started to notice that I was losing weight and they would say to me “you look good, Em” so I didn’t stop. A year later and my dad passed away and that’s when I started completely binge eating. I was so angry at the world, I was angry with myself, I was so sad and disgusted in myself. I didn’t care anymore, I didn’t care about existing, I stopped caring about myself. I binged my way into a deep, dark depression.

and I stopped one day, and I said to myself “things need to change and I need to change them”. So, I got into contact with headspace and I spoke about my binge eating and me starving myself. They have helped me throughout my dark depression and helped me see brighter days. I don’t think so much about what I eat, and I exercise at a normal pace and I now have more good days than bad. I have moments where I have thoughts of binge eating and starvation, but I have an amazing support group by my side that are willing to help me get through anything. I feel now I have the courage to share my story and hopefully inspire others who have been in a similar boat than me. I hated my body, I spent so nearly 10 years of my life living in self-loathing, hating what I saw in the mirror. I am finally in a place in my life where I am learning to love myself more and more every day and I’m waking up to more happy days. Ð

HELPFUL Resources Feed Your Instinct www.feedyourinstinct.com.au The Butterfly Foundation www.thebutterflyfoundation.org.au Butterfly’s National ED Helpline 1800 334 673 Eating Disorder Victoria www.eatingdisorders.org.au Mental Health First Aid Guidelines for Eating Disorders www.mhfa.com.au

It wasn’t until last year when I moved away from home

BOLD MAGAZINE 63


SPORT

LINDSAY BARBARY BASEBALL WORDS MADDY BARBARY Tell us about your history of baseball I started playing baseball when I was 4 for our local team, Hawks, and started in T-ball. My family was involved for quite a while, both my parents were coaches for that team and my sister played as well. I just got hooked and I moved up the age groups slowly for most of my childhood. Eventually, I went over to South Australia to play for the Renmark Dodgers so I could play baseball in summer, and a few years later I decided I wanted to play in Adelaide for West Torrens Eagles and then East Torrens Red Sox where we have very strong family connections and have been doing that for a few years. About the same time as playing in South Australia I also started playing senior games at home most weeks too. What competitions and championships have you been involved in? As we grew up, we went through Little League, so ages roughly 10, 11 and 12, then Junior League and Senior League. In our first year of Little League we made the nationals and travelled to the Gold Coast and in our last year of Senior League we also made nationals which was in Lismore.

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What were some of the challenges you face while being involved in baseball? Probably competing with other players that are older than me as well as those my own age from other clubs because we have some talented local baseballers and the guys from Adelaide are just as talented. Also, when trying to make regional and charter teams, trying to stand out in the crowd of great baseballers. Another challenge I’ve had to face would be the constant drives to Adelaide every weekend, I made the decision to say goodbye to a weekend social life and play ball with the boys, being constantly tired from the travel and helping mum and dad drive to Adelaide and back in a day or maybe two. But I wouldn’t change any of that. How has 2020 impacted your goals for the future? Well at the start of 2020 our Adelaide season was cancelled and cut short in the preliminary finals, so we didn’t get to go through to the last round of finals. Also, my plans were to go to college in America to play college baseball in hopes to be picked up by a professional team over there but unfortunately it looks like travel overseas won’t be happening any time soon. Also, local baseball was cancelled because of COVID


SPORT

“ I made the decision to say goodbye to a weekend social life and play ball with the boys”

BOLD MAGAZINE 65


SPORT

“As a kid we were told to remember our roots and where we came from and never take that for granted.”

and now because the SA border is completely shut I can’t go over there to play, so it’s been a long time since I’ve even played a real game of baseball. What alternate pathways have you been exploring now? I would like to attend university at Flinders in South Australia and look at a possible transfer once international borders open back up again to maybe a junior college or a regular college and see if I can make a team over there that way. What are your biggest highlights from playing baseball, locally, state, national or international? Probably being able to represent Victoria in the Victorian Kookaburras team where we travelled over to the US for a college experience. So, it was a tournament where a bunch of players from around Victoria tried out for a team and they travel to compete in the Cal Ripken tournament, we also visited colleges to find pathways to the major league. If you would be doing anything in baseball, anywhere, what would it be? I’d be in Adelaide training with the East Torrens.

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So, you wouldn’t want to be playing major league baseball? No, I just want to be playing good old local ball because I’ve missed it so much. As a kid we were also told to remember our roots and where we came from and never take that for granted. Other than baseball what is a main interest of yours? Online learning at the moment, trying to do year 12 online. But seriously I like to shoot some hoops every now and then. I am enjoying a bit of gaming and I’ve also discovered a liking for crafting I guess, building stuff for the house. But nothing keeps me as interested as baseball. Ð


Ruby Dawson Artist


SPORT

JADE KEMPTON DANCER WORDS MADDY BARBARY Tell us about yourself and your dance journey I was always an active kid, rolling around, tumbling, doing somersaults and scraping my knees. I was the kind of kid that would perform in the lounge room every time RAGE came on the tv, and there were barely any moments that I wasn’t dancing around and being silly. I came late to the dance scene, starting with jazz and tap with Libby Kennedy around 9, then a few years later I decided to start ballet and contemporary with Janine Kerr and Taylor-Paige Willkie and Sally Hendrics; I was very behind in all this as all the other kids my age had been training the classical technique from a very young age. I threw myself into it and I was doing classes most nights of the week for up to 5 hours. All my teachers had dedicated a lot of hard work, effort, and time into helping me perfect my technique and craft. I also travelled to Melbourne, Adelaide and Sydney for workshops and classes to help me along the way. I had a very successful year at the Eisteddfod last year when I was asked to be part of the Gala concert and received the TASCO petroleum scholarship and then had to be in Melbourne the next day at 8:30 am for an audition at Jason Coleman’s Ministry of Dance . Before that, I

68 68 BOLD BOLD MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

had also applied and auditioned for Brent Street Performing Arts school in Sydney. As I was accepted into both, I had to decide between the two. What challenges did you face? Last year I had to work with an injury to my shoulder where I had to push myself past pain and see the bigger picture, which was performing. Everybody knows I’m not the person to back out of what I came to do and it was a small sacrifice for doing something I love. I don’t really know what goes through my head sometimes, because pain isn’t really pain when you dance - I’m so used to blisters and my feet bleeding and being sore from days of hard work. Something else I’ve had to face is body image, you expect dancers to be tiny and thin, whereas I’m not - I’m stocky and strong - and sometimes you feel as though that’s not how you’re supposed to look but then I’m reminded by people that it’s what makes me unique and stand out. There was also a point where I thought, what’s the point, I can’t do this, but eventually, I just said, stuff it, I can’t see myself doing anything else, this is what I have to do, it’s what I’m good at and I should do it and prove to myself I can.


SPORT STORY

“I’m so used to blisters and my feet bleeding and being sore from days of hard work.”

BOLD MAGAZINE 69


SPORT

“nothing is ever easy, if you want to be the best at something you can’t just put in 100% you have to put in 175%!”

2020 wasn’t what we had planned so how did you adapt? I decided to go to Jason Coleman’s and study a diploma of elite performance and teaching and management. I had moved into an apartment and was starting to settle into classes, meeting very similar people who I clicked with instantly and I was loving all of the classes. I came home after a few short weeks, and I’ve been doing some stuff online but it’s just not the same. What is your most memorable dance experience? I went to the Victorian dance festival and I was lucky enough to be asked to dance with some of the classes from the professional level where there were dancers already in fulltime training, and I also participated in an audition for Travis Wall, a dance legend. I had such a great experience and was lucky enough to make it to the final round of cuts, and while I didn’t make it through, that achievement changed the way I saw my future in dancing. What is your biggest dance dream? My biggest dance dream would be to dance professionally, perform in all kinds of shows and travel the world with my dancing. At my school, Jason Coleman’s ministry of dance, I am constantly surrounded by working and successful people within the industry - for the weeks that I was at ministry we were working in the same space as performers who were auditioning for Moulin Rouge and CATS the musical, and we

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also had the couple from dancing with the stars working in our studio as well! It is so inspiring and motivating because you can see all these amazing things happening in the other room and I can’t wait until I get to make dancing professionally my career. Anything else you’d like the readers to know? Nothing is ever easy and if you want to be the best at something you can’t just put in 100% you have to put in 175%! I would also like to say I am very thankful and fortunate to have such an amazing support base from my family, teachers and friends. I would also like the thank the Mildura eisteddfod society and Mildura ballet and dance guild for providing me with the opportunities to perform and giving me something to look up to and work towards. Mildura has so much talent when it come to the arts industry, and I hope to see more opportunities being brought to Mildura to help motivate and inspire upcoming performers to persue the arts as a career. Ð


Paige Johnson-Holland Artist


STORY HEALTH

YOUR OWN (PERSONAL) SPACE

G HE L P F R

O M

TIN T E G

This is your space on the headspace website for you to collect and manage resources to build your own personalised mental health toolkit. You have complete control of the spaces that you create and the resources you choose to save there.

GROUP CHAT

-

- SO

HEADSPACE ONLINE

Visit: headspace.org.au/ eheadspace/spaces/personal/ setup

L

ORT

PP

CIA

DIS

Group chats allow you to connect with other people like you. They are led by headspace clinicians hosted 3 times per month on topics where you, or those supporting you such as friends and family, can ask questions and receive information from a mental health professional.

TA N

CING FRI

Y ENDL

SU

Visit: headspace.org.au/eheadspace/groupchat There are many ways to access information and support about your mental health and wellbeing; it’s important to choose the way that best suits you. In addition to visiting a headspace Centre, headspace online has a range of resources and supports available for both young people and friends and family – it’s all free and confidential and can be anonymous.

WORK & STUDY

SUPPORT CHATS Navigating relationships: Every Monday 6 pm -10 pm qheadspace: Every Tuesday 6 pm -10 pm General coping: Every Wednesday 6pm - 10 pm Yarnspace: Fortnightly Thursdays 6 pm - 10 pm Supporting Others: Fortnightly Thursdays 6 pm - 10 pm

YOUNG PEOPLE

GP HELP If you are a young person aged between 12-25 and need

Free & confidential support delivered online or over the phone for 12-25 year olds. The headspace work & study specialists can assist you with creating a resume, career planning, job searching, interview preparation and exploring education options. They also offer a career mentoring service.

information relating to general mental health, physical health, work & study, and alcohol and other drugs, this section is designed for you. You can also try our interactive activities there.

Visit: headspace.org.au/work-and-studysupport

FRIENDS & FAMILY

EHEADSPACE Online and telephone support. Open 9am – 1am (Melbourne time) 7 days a week for a 1-on-1 chat for both young people and their families & friends. It is a confidential, free and safe space to talk about what’s going on. Visit: headspace.org.au/eheadspace/connectwith-aclinician

Visit: headspace.org.au/young-people/life-issues

Raising sensitive issues and working to resolve problems that arise along the way can be challenging. It can also be hard as a parent to know the difference between normal behaviour, such as moodiness, irritability and withdrawal, and an emerging mental health problem. This section is designed to help you. Visit: headspace.org.au/friends-and-family/life-issues

INTERACTIVE ACTIVITIES

A shared area of the headspace website for you to engage with each other about high level topics such as general coping, qheadspace, yarnspace, navigating relationships, supporting others & climate change

Online bite-sized modules of interactive content that encourage young people, family and friends to actively reflect on their own needs, engage in skill building and set meaningful goals to improve their mental health. There are many different topics available. To try the modules on the opposite page, click on any and be linked directly to the site.

Visit : headspace.org.au/eheadspace/spaces/community

Visit: headspace.org.au/interactive-activities

COMMUNITY SPACES

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HEALTH STORY

INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY MODULES

FUTHER INFORMATION AND SUPPORT

(CLICK EACH FOR THE LINK)

KIDS HELPLINE HAVING TROUBLE WITH MOTIVATION? https://headspace.org.au/decks/motivation/

www.kidshelpline.com.au | 1800 551 800 Free, private and confidential 24/7 phone and online counselling service for young people aged 5 to 25.

BEYOND BLUE SLEEP IS INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT TO SUPPORT YOUR MENTAL HEALTH https://headspace.org.au/young-people/ sleeping-well-for-a-healthy-headspace/

UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONS IS AN IMPORTANT PART OF MENTAL HEALTH https://headspace.org.au/young-people/tips-tomaintain-your-mental-and-emotional-health/

www.beyondblue.org.au | 1300 22 46 36 Information on supporting someone with depression or anxiety. Online chat & phone support.

Q LIFE www.qlife.org.au | 1800 18 45 27 Information about supporting LGBTQIA+ young people. Online chat & phone support.

SANE AUSTRALIA www.sane.org.au | 1800 18 72 63 Information on supporting someone experiencing a mental health crisis. Online chat & phone support.

MENSLINE AUSTRALIA STAYING ACTIVE CAN BOOST YOUR MENTAL HEALTH

www.mensline.org.au | 1300 87 99 78 Information and support for men on emotional health, family and relationship concerns.

BLACK DOG INSTITUTE GP HELP / ARTWORK www.blackdogInstitute.org.au

www.headspace.org.au/young-people/ moving-your-way-to-a-healthy-headspace

For Information on supporting someone with depression or bipolar disorder.

MINDFULNESS CAN HELP US COPE WITH THE TOUGH TIMES https://headspace.org.au/decks/mindfulness/

WE ALL ENCOUNTER PROBLEMS THAT CAN SOMETIMES FEEL OVERWHELMING https://headspace.org.au/young-people/how-toget-over-a-relationship-breakup/

BUTTERFLY FOUNDATION www.butterfly.org.au | 1300 33 46 73 For people impacted by eating disorders and body image issues, and for the families, friends and communities who support them.

REACH OUT au.reachout.com Online mental health organisation for young people and their parents supporting them to get through difficult times.

USEFUL USEFUL APPS APPS (CLICK (CLICKEACH EACHFOR FORTHE THELINK) LINK) Calm

Remente

Headspace Inc.

PAUSE

Breakup Shakeup

What’s Up?

Daylio

Self-help for Anxiety

Smiling Mind

Stop, Breathe & Think

Calm Harm

Management (SAM)

Happify

Daybreak

Chats for Life

7 Cups

Treat Ap

Pacifica

Moodpath

Buddhify

BOLD MAGAZINE 73


LOCAL STORY ARTWORK

CHECK OUT OUR LOCAL TALENT! 1

2

3

4

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LOCAL ARTWORK

5

7

9

6

8

OUR LOCAL ARTISTS 1. LESLIE ROLPH

6 INDIANA BELVEDERE

2. BETHANY SCHOLAR

7. SOPHIE MCALIECE

3. MILLA MORGAN

8. ABBY MAHONEY

4. BRIANA HIBBERD

9. AINSLEY EVANS

5. GEORGIA JUDD BOLD MAGAZINE 75


LOCAL STORY ARTWORK

MILDURA SENIOR COLLEGE ARTS STUDENTS 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

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LOCAL ARTWORK

MILDURA SENIOR COLLEGE ARTS STUDENTS 13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

1. madeline overell 2. hena folauhola 3. deagan paul 4. emma mihaljevic 5. alannah talbot 6. isabel wheatly 7. james prictor 8. kiera begg 9. siann brookes 10. KEEDA MAYES 11. RUBY DAWSON 12. ABBEY CARMICHAEL 13. ASHLII WHITE 14. JOSIAH TRESIZE 15. CHLOE MACGILLIVRAY 16. GEORGIA HUNTER 17. GEORGIA STEWART 18. MILLA MORGAN 19. BREANNA CAMINITI 20. LAURA OOSTING 21. milla deckert

2020 has been a year unlike any we have seen before. For our arts students, while completing folios and final artworks during remote learning posed numerous challenges, they adapted and created some incredible, thought provoking pieces. Unfortunately, COVID has meant that our end of year exhibition has been cancelled, but we have created a virtual exhibition of artworks including paintings, drawing and photography to be viewed online. The arts faculty at Mildura Senior College are incredibly proud of our students for successfully completing such a difficult year, and we wish them all the best in their future creative endeavours.

Rhian McLeod

Arts Faulty Leader BOLD MAGAZINE 77


CONTRIBUTORS

BOLD’S NEW CONTRIBUTORS

OUR MAGAZINE COULD NOT BE POSSIBLE WITHOUT THE HELP OF OUR INSPIRING YOUNG CONTRIBUTORS ARIN MILWARD-HOLMES, 16

CHLOE DONEHUE, 18

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? I enjoyed writing my review for Klaus. It’s a wonderful movie and I hope to people will want to check it out after reading about it.

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? Since it’s my first time writing for BOLD Magazine, I actually enjoyed everything about it. Mostly I enjoyed writing and sharing information that can be educational for some people.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? My friends I hang out with at school. What’s your dream job? To become a professional illustrator or storyboard artist.

What do you enjoy about living in Mildura? Mildura is very diverse and full of many different and unique people. As a community we’re all very supportive of each other. What’s your dream job? My dream job is to be a Midwife.

MICHAELA WHITEHEAD, 14

PATHAMA WANKHUAN, 19

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? Getting to share my ideas on the DIY for the magazine.

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? I really liked the freedom to write articles on content that I find interesting.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? I love growing up in Mildura because it’s in the country and it’s not very busy compared to the city. What’s your dream job? To be a General Practitioner.

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What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? I moved to Mildura from Thailand when I was 8, so I really like the friendly community and all the different community events. What’s your dream job? That’s a hard one... I would love to be a fashion or graphic designer, or an events planner. Maybe a bit of everything?


CONTRIBUTORS

RUBY DAWSON, 18

MADDY BARBARY, 20

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? I like that I get to showcase something of mine alongside other people my age. It’s a nice chance to challenge myself creatively as well as put something out into the community.

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? Being able to get out into the community and learn more about people and what Mildura has to offer.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? I enjoy our wide open spaces and tightly knit communities.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? The unique opportunities we can experience, such as being part of a magazine and also being part of town life but going 5 minutes down the round to some country café.

What’s your dream job? I’d love to be an artist or just do anything where I can make things.

What’s your dream job? Either a music teacher or a photographer, I love both so it will be impossible to choose one.

PAIGE AVERY, 12

JAMES DE MARIA, 17

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? The part I most enjoyed was starting a project I had not tried before and having something creative to work on.

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? I enjoyed the opportunity to try something new. It’s great to have an avenue to be creative.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? I love going motorbike riding at Dirtworxs with my best friend. I also really love that Mildura isn’t a big city and that it’s the perfect size to get around easily. What’s your dream job? I really have no idea at this stage, only being 12. Maybe something that includes debating (I tend to think outside the square) or I did have a plan with my 2 friends in prep to have a pet hotel.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? I really appreciate the open space, clear blue skies and the warm weather. What’s your dream job? I haven’t decided just yet, but, I enjoy reading lots of early literature including philosophy, and I really enjoy creative writing.

RILEY BALDOCK, 20

MATILDA BRESNEHAN, 12

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? It’s given me the chance to write about something I enjoy, and to share it with other members of the community.

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? Being able to share my creativity with people my age and hopefully inspire them to try new things because you won’t know unless you try.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? I have a great social circle, and meeting with my friends has been easy because there are so many great places to catch up. The cinema has always been a fun experience for me. What’s your dream job? I want to write and direct movies, make music, and create all kinds of other consumable media. Essentially, I want to entertain people.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? I enjoy long walks along the river with my family and going to the skatepark with my brothers. I also love how friendly our local community is and the ice cream! What’s your dream job? My dream job is to be a graphic designer because I have a big passion for art and creativity.

BOLD MAGAZINE 79


CONTRIBUTORS

BOLD’S NEW CONTRIBUTORS CONTINUED... AMBER McCARTHY, 15

SARA HANCOCK, 19

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? I have enjoyed being able to express myself and how I felt through writing. It has been a very enjoyable and challenging experience!

What have you enjoyed most about working on BOLD? Being able to have a crack at writing instead of just sticking to what I’m used to, which is more the visual side of things.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? Mildura is an incredible place to grow up in and being near the river is very fun and great during the summer. What’s your dream job? My dream job is somewhere in medicine, I’m still not 100% sure but I am excited to see what the future holds.

What do you enjoy about growing up in Mildura? I enjoy the variety of natural environments that are in this area, nothing is the same which is cool. I also like the close community this area has. What’s your dream job? My goal is to be able to make a living from being an artist.

DO YOU HAVE ARTWORK OR PHOTOGRAPHY YOU’D LIKE TO SUBMIT FOR THE NEXT ISSUE OF BOLD MAGAZINE? If you are aged between 12 & 25 and want to see your work in BOLD magazine Please contact: boldmildura@gmail.com (Submissions are subject to bold magazine’s approval)

80 BOLD MAGAZINE


CONTRIBUTORS

RETURNING CONTRIBUTORS

THESE CONTRIBUTORS HAVE RETURNED TO PRODUCE ANOTHER AMAZING ISSUE OF BOLD MAGAZINE

ELEANOR DANENBERG

MORGAN HOPCROFT

ELISE CIRILLO

LEON KEMP

EMILY SCHOFIELD

BRADY GLENN

SUSAN DUNN

CLAUDIA DIMASI

HANNAH JACKSON

FINLEY HOPLEY-WILCOCK

IF YOU’RE AGED BETWEEN 12-25, LIVE IN THE MILDURA REGION AND WANT TO CONTRIBUTE TO BOLD, SIMPLY EMAIL YOUR DETAILS TO: BOLDMILDURA@GMAIL.COM AND WE’LL BE IN TOUCH! BOLD MAGAZINE 81


INSPIRING YOUTH

INSPIRING YOUTH FINLEY HOPLEY-WILLCOCK WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT GROWING UP IN MILDURA? I love the area; I like the slow pace of life out here near the river. I feel connected to the community here, there are no strangers in Mildura just people you haven’t met yet. WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW? I currently work for headspace Mildura as the LGBTQIA+ Project Officer. I facilitate our Alphabet Soup group, which is a social support group for LGBTQIA+ youth aged between 12 to 25, and I am also a peer mentor. Outside of headspace I also work with Mallee Pride and do some volunteer work with Transgender Victoria. WHERE DO YOU WANT TO BE IN 5 YEARS? That’s a really hard question to answer, in five years I still want to be in Mildura working to make our community more inclusive. I’m not too worried about what I’m doing as long as I can say that I’m helping people and giving back to the community!

82 BOLD MAGAZINE

WHAT INSPIRES YOU MOST? The people I work with! I get to work with some fantastic people in Mildura who are all aiming to make Mildura a better place for everyone, and that really inspires me too. WHO HAVE BEEN SOME INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE IN YOUR LIFE? There are a lot of inspirational people in my life. My family are a great source of motivation and connection for me, and my Nanna in particular is always driving me to strive more and get out of my comfort zone. Also, the many people I have worked with at headspace Mildura, I will always be grateful to Larni (my first manager) who started Alphabet Soup and to Teresa who has given me so much support to continue the group.


STORY

want to be a part of our magazine?

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT boldmildura@gmail.com BOLD MAGAZINE 83


STORY

small small steps steps can can make make a a big big difference difference

4. 4.

Eat Eatwell well

meal without any processed foods. a whole meal without any processed foods. • Try • Trya whole and make a nutritious meal with a friend. creative and make a nutritious meal with a friend. • Get • Getcreative

We Wehave haveincluded included aafew fewof ofour ourown ownto to get getyou youstarted. started.

1.1.

5. 5.

Get Getinto intolife life

Stay Stayactive active

to to read something funfun - a- chapter of of aa 5 minutes read something a chapter • Take • Take5 minutes

to to thethe park with your family and a walk park with your family and • Go • Goforfora walk

book, a comic, oror magazine. book, a comic, magazine.

and letlet it show - listen to to music that groove and it show - listen music that • Feel • Feelthethegroove makes you smile. makes you smile.

2. 2.

BACK COVER ••

play a game of of frisbee. play a game frisbee.

Breathe and flex - take a moment to to stretch Breathe and flex - take a moment stretch your muscles. your muscles.

6. 6.

Learn Learnskills skillsfor for tough toughtimes times

Get Getenough enough sleep sleep

mind? It can help to to write it down. your mind? It can help write it down. • Something • Somethingononyour breathing and take 2020 deep, calming breaths. your breathing and take deep, calming breaths. • Slow • Slowyour

and trytry to to getget upup at at thethe same time each day. alarm and same time each day. • Set • Setananalarm minutes of of deep breathing in in bed before a few minutes deep breathing bed before • Practice • Practicea few

3. 3.

you drift off.off. you drift

7. 7.

Create Create connections connections

Cutting Cuttingback backon on alcohol alcoholand andother otherdrugs drugs

you trust to to talk about your feelings with. someone you trust talk about your feelings with. • Find • Findsomeone with your family playing a board game oror time with your family playing a board game • Spend • Spendtime

with other activities at at times you find it it busy with other activities times you find • Stay • Staybusy

doing a puzzle. doing a puzzle. 84 BOLD MAGAZINE

hard to to say no.no. hard say

forfor early thethe next day to to help keep plans early next day help keep • Make • Makeplans you onon track. you track.

Profile for BOLDmildura

ISSUE 9 - SP/SU20  

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