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BOISE WEEKLY AU G U S T 1 9 – 2 5 , 2 0 1 5

LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

“I’ve kicked those biggest, fittest dudes’ asses.”

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Epistolary Plea

A teacher’s letter to Superintendent Ybarra asks for better school funding

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Girls on Fire Recruiting more female firefighters

VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 0 9

FEATURE 10

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Impotent Jest

David Foster Wallace biopic sacrifices soul for hero worship

FREE TAKE ONE!


2 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, John Rember Interns: Patty Bowen, Micah Drew, Shannon Heller, Justin Kirkham, Hannah Loveless, Emily Peters, Keleah Pinto, Sarah Rosin Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com Buzz Valutis, buzz@boiseweekly.com Public Relations Intern: Stacy Marston Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Adam Rosenlund, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2015 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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EDITOR’S NOTE FIRED UP I recently spent the 45-minute flight from Boise to Spokane, Wash., staring out the window of a Southwest 737 into a brown haze. I think I saw the ground maybe three times—including at takeoff and landing. They say the Northwest is on fire, and they’re not kidding. Even after the hour-plus drive from Spokane to the far north of the Idaho Panhandle, the sun was an angry red dot in the sky. It stayed that way for all three days I was there, choking the locals who are used to clean mountain air and night skies exploding with stars. I hadn’t heard the word “apocalyptic” so many times since I sat through a lecture from an evangelical stump-preacher on the eve of Y2K. In conditions like these, the normally friendly looking forests of northern Idaho feel like time bombs, and I can promise I lit no campfires during my stay. There were a lot of wildland firefighters in town when I was visiting the area, and no shortage of toasts being drunk to their bravery. I was one of the toasters, and if I had a vote, this year’s Time magazine Person of the Year would be the hot shot. Time changed its annual honorific from “Man of the Year” to “Person of the Year” in 1999, and when it comes to firefighters, the gender-neutral term is especially appropriate. In this week’s feature article, by Boise Weekly staff writer Jessica Murri (see Page 10), we take a look at the women who suit up and march into fires across the region. Specifically, why there aren’t more of them, either in the backcountry or working for the Boise Fire Department. While it is a priority for Boise Fire Chief Dennis Doan to recruit more women onto his force, Murri found he faces an uphill struggle—not because of physical barriers, but a cultural mindset in which women simply don’t consider firefighting as a career choice. Judging by recent fire seasons, we’re going to need all the help we can get. Unfortunately, fire seems to a growth industry. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Kinga Britschgi TITLE: “But A Dream Within A Dream” MEDIUM: Digital Composite Work ARTIST STATEMENT: In my digital art pieces I love surrealism, magical realism and dark whimsy. I almost always create “story-pictures”: mostly figurative pieces which in the end often result in surrealistic, mysterious images with lots of layers of meanings to interpret them.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

TOWERING INFERNO AS FIRES BURN ACRO S S THE NORTHWEST, THE U.S. FO REST SERVICE ANNOUNCED THAT THE COUNTRY IS NOW AT FIRE PREPAREDNES S LE VEL 5 WITH ONLY A HANDFUL O F B L A ZES C O NTA I N E D A N D MORE THAN 90 OTHERS BURNING AWAY. MORE FIRE UPDATES AT NE WS/CIT YDESK.

SENTENCED The former owner of Boise restaurant Barbacoa was convicted of felony drug possession last week, stemming from a June 2014 arrest. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail. More on News/Citydesk.

NAME GAME Boise residents are again being asked to help name a passel of foothills trails, though this time suggestions come with a list of rules. Name submissions can be filed online. Details on News/Citydesk.

LEWD A former soccer coach at Blackfoot High School has been charged with seven felony counts of lewd conduct with a minor. They’re not the first allegations, either. More on News/Citydesk.

OPINION

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OPINION BADGER T BERNIE The argument for socialism of the soul BILL COPE I asked Cope if I could borrow his column. Told him I had some hypocrite a**hole I needed to interview, and that it was important. Dopey said he wasn’t sure he should let me because I swear too f***ing much, but I offered to mow his g**d*** lawn this week in trade, and he caved. I knew he would. Cope f***ing hates to mow his law. I got him to shake on it before I sprung the kicker on him, that he was the hypocrite a**hole I needed to interview. He blubbers, “But Baaaawb, I ain’t no hypocrite a-hole!” So I tell him that’s why he should let me interview him, to tell his side of the story. That’s all it took. Cope f***ing loves to tell his side of the story. ••• Cope, you’ve made the claim, repeatedly, that you are some sort of liberal or progressive. Is that correct? Yes, Bob. You know that. Jeez, I’ve never tried to hide the fact I am a liberal, a Democrat… a “progressive,” if you will… and that my left-ofcenter leanings are not only the foundation of my column, but are also the basis for my sense of what is right and wrong in both politics and my personal behavior. In fact, I would say that... Are you a socialist to any great degree? A socialist? Uh, I don’t know if it’s a “great degree,” but yeah. A little. Like, when it comes to health care, I’m definitely a socialist. Absolutely. I believe we need... Then would it be correct to call you a socialist in the Bernie Sanders model? Gosh, Badger. Are you gonna let me finish answering what I believe about... I don’t give a flying f*** what you believe, Cope. I’m just trying to find out why the f*** you’re supporting Clinton instead of Bernie Sanders. Everything you’ve written, years and years of it, would lead people to assume you were a true-blue progressive. Pro-union, pro-working class, pro-public education, pro-environment, pro-every-f***ing-thing that pro-gressives are pro on. But all you ever talk about is Hillary. Not one f***ing word about Bernie. In my book, that makes you a hypocrite a**hole! Holy Cow, Bob. You don’t have to be so mean about it. Just because I support a candidate who isn’t 100 percent in sync with me on every single issue doesn’t make me a hypocritical a-hole. That’s the way radicals think, Bob. You know, like those right-wingers, how they’re always trying to push RINOs out of their crappy party. Does it make RINOs hypocrites if they aren’t as nutsy as those Tea Party nuts? Cope, the f***ing point is, if you’re confident that what you believe is the truth… is the very foundation for what you believe is right and wrong, even, like you said… then to not support the candidate most aligned with your values is not only hypocritical, it’s f***ing immoral! BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Yeah, but Bob, the thing is, maybe there are more than one truths a fella might feel he should consider, don’t you think? Don’t you dare try to get Socratic on me, g**d***it. This is a simple matter of standing up for what you think is right and best for the people of this f***ing country. Yeah. Sure. But don’t you think it’s possible that maybe the best thing and the right thing for the people of this country… at this moment in history, in the big huge picture of everything all put together… is that we finally get around to having a woman president? Are you saying Clinton should be elected simply because she’s the woman in the race? F***, Cope, why not Fiorina? And if that Palin dunce were the only woman running?... would you support her? Of course not, Bob. I wouldn’t support just any old woman just because she’s a woman. That’d make me an idiot. But Hillary is as qualified, or more so, than any man in this thing. That’s what has the Republicans so scared. They know she’s better than any of them. They also know that once America has a woman president, the whole culture of this country is going to take another big jump toward universal egalitarianism. Universal egalitarianism? Did you make that up? Nah. Found it on the Internet. But you know what I mean, Women and girls would no longer feel there were limits to how far they can go or how much they can grow. It’s like what Barack Obama has done for African-Americans, and I think it’s probably why the right hates him so much. He’s living proof they will never have an exclusive claim to the kingdom. And Hillary would be the same thing, Maybe even bigger. A giant, giant step in the right direction. And I think it’s important America takes that step. At least as important as the stuff Bernie Sanders is talking about. It’s like total societal socialism instead of just economic socialism. Societal socialism, huh? Did you find that on the Internet, too? Nah. I made that up, but I honestly think it’s what we need. A big growth spurt in our collective consciousness. You know, Bob, most of what a president does in office fades with time and people forget the details. But no one will ever forget that we’ve had our first Catholic president, our first black president and that we’re a bigger, better country because we crossed those lines. It’s time… way past time, I’d say… to give women that boost. Don’t you think? Aaaah, s***! This f***ing interview isn’t going at all the way I expected. Gee, I’m sorry, Bob. But… uh… you’re still going to mow my lawn. Right? BOISEweekly | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | 5


OPINION

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AH, WILDERNESS Were paradise enow JOHN REMBER Like many Idahoans, I was surprised at how quickly Congressman Mike Simpson’s wilderness bill passed the U.S. House and Senate and was signed into law by the president. Like many Idahoans, I have conflicting feelings about it. My first feeling is relief. The Boulder-White Clouds National Monument has been derailed for now, as has the inevitable push for its transformation into a national park. Environmental protections established under the 1972 Sawtooth National Recreation Act continue. Wilderness study areas have been released for multiple use, which means areas outside the wilderness boundaries can be flexibly managed to enhance what’s inside them. (Firebreaks and fuel reductions illustrate this principle. So do road maintenance, construction of campgrounds and transfer camps, and watershed improvement.) Established migration routes for motorized hominids have been preserved. My second feeling? Schadenfreude, with regard to the Idaho Conservation League and the Wilderness Society. These organizations staked their reputations on the need for national monument protections, when stronger protections were already in place under existing laws. They made deals with mountain bikers and other interest groups that would have deeply damaged the concept of wilderness in the White Clouds and elsewhere. They encouraged the perception that the area needed emergency protection when the only emergency in this 43-year-old controversy involved threats to the continued largesse of the Pew Foundation. Assertions that the national monument was a deliberate feint to ensure passage of a wilderness bill should be greeted with a monumental dose of skepticism. The ICL and Wilderness Society compromised their principles and played fast and loose with the hopes and dreams of their donors. They abandoned Mike Simpson for former Lockheed lobbyist Cecil Andrus. In sporting terms, this is known as betting on the wrong horse, and they should think about their methods, motives and company before asking for donations to “protect” the next suddenly endangered piece of Idaho real estate. More schadenfreude: The city of Stanley has accepted four acres of critical winter elk habitat to be used for low-cost housing for seasonal employees. Crimes against nature come with the property, and it will be interesting to see how the city council likes being in the landlord business when the paychecks go away in September, but the seasonal workers don’t. My third feeling is a bitter certainty that the new legislation will spiritually and physically

injure the area it is designed to benefit. Wilderness designation doesn’t exist in a vacuum. People can and do use wilderness to transform the wild into saleable goods. When Ketchum realtors start touting the proximity of view lots to the Hemingway Wilderness (soon), or when a hiking boot is named the Mike Simpson (not so soon), the Boulders and the White Clouds will be ready for the commodity indexes. It can get worse, as more corporations and chambers of commerce get involved. I don’t know exactly how much increased traffic these wild places will see, but like President Obama, I think it will be a boon for the tourist industry. Unlike Obama, I don’t think that’s a good thing. Industrial tourism produces toxins, usually when it—like algae—blooms. Any wild area that comes to its attention suffers through the wear and tear of a human population explosion. That’s the reason the White Clouds and the Boulders, as non-wilderness, have been less trampled than the Sawtooths, which have been a wilderness since 1972. I had hoped that the White Clouds could avoid industrial tourism’s survey crews, but with the passage of Simpson’s bill, that hope is gone. The bill does not appropriate funds for the Forest Service to buffer the wildernesses from new visitors. Boots on the ground are required to protect the wild from boots on the ground. It’s not likely Simpson will be able to pressure the Region 4 office in Ogden, Utah to reallocate resources to protect the BWC from its new designation. Against entrenched bureaucracy the gods themselves struggle in vain. My fourth feeling—grief—has to do with the times these wildernesses have been born into. At some point in a civilization’s decline its laws become magical thinking. The 1964 Wilderness Act specified that human artifacts and presences should be temporary in American wilderness, but the atmosphere itself has become a human artifact and 7 billion humans are on the planet. It’s no longer possible to go into the Sawtooths without meeting tourists trying to get away from other tourists. It’s no longer possible to predict the seasons, or depend on the thickness of the ice on wilderness lakes, or remember the location of once-permanent snow fields, or use the word forever. The 1964 Act, a beautiful and noble piece of legislation, has been gutted by circumstance. There are no villains here, unless industrial civilization itself is a villain—in which case it’s Godzilla and we’re Bambi, and the best thing we can do is to grab a loaf of bread, a jug of wine and someone we love, and make as much a paradise of wilderness as we can, while there’s still time. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


ADAM RO S E NLUND

DEAR MS. YBARRA

NEWS

CITYDESK

We need more funds. Sincerely, Troy, Idaho

Title 9, Chapter 10, Section 2 of Boise City Code is also known as its anti-camping ordinance.

JESSICA MURRI The letter had been written, but Renae Bafus had second thoughts about sending it. That is, until she received a goodbye email from a fellow teacher at north-central Idaho’s Troy JuniorSenior High School. Bafus’ colleague had lost her job and would be looking for a job teaching elsewhere. Bafus said it was one loss too many for Troy, a school district near Moscow with 293 students. “That was the straw that broke the camel’s back,” Bafus said. So she sent the four-page letter she had written to Idaho Superintendent of Public Instruction Sherri Ybarra. “I have held onto this letter for days wondering if it is the right thing to do,” Bafus wrote in the letter. “But tonight, as I received notification of yet another teacher at Troy leaving, I am saddened and disheartened and feel it is time to send you my letter. I am writing to make sure you are aware of what my school district is going through and with this knowledge I hope you will work to make changes on how schools are funded.” Bafus reminded Ybarra the Troy district had— every school year in the past decade—turned to voters to approve a levy to help fund education. In many Idaho communities, school levies are used for projects like building a library or funding a new program. In Troy, the levy was needed to keep the lights on. In March, the district once again turned to the community, asking to approve a $1.3 million levy. “We have expenses going up,” Bafus said. “A need for special education, transportation, our food program does not make ends meet, our utilities are rising. All those things combined, and to keep education where it was, we need more money.” Bafus said Troy had always been supportive of the school and passed the levy each year—but not this year. Voters were asked again in May to approve a scaled-down version of the levy for $1.2 million. Again, the levy failed. Soon after, Bafus lost her job teaching business and computer applications at Troy JuniorSenior—a job she held for more than a decade. She was also the school adviser for Business Professionals of America. Making matters worse, her husband’s position as the football coach was also cut. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISE’S ‘ANTI-CAMPING” ORDINANCE RETURNS TO FEDERAL COURT

So far, in 2015, seven Troy educators either lost their positions or saw their jobs reduced: positions teaching music, business, athletics and agriculture; student council; student counselors; and art, among others, were eliminated. The only teachers retained at the school were those teaching math, science, English and other core classes. Bafus’ letter to Ybarra detailed the school’s plight and insisted districts shouldn’t continue relying on levies to avoid teacher layoffs. She wrote adequate funding should come directly from the Idaho Legislature and, it’s a constitutional mandate to provide a high quality education to Idaho’s students. “It is hard for me to fathom how the state is trying to micromanage teacher salaries yet there is no system in place to evaluate the benefit of the 136 tax breaks that are $1 billion more than our entire K-12 budget,” Bafus wrote. After nearly a month, Ybarra replied with a letter of her own. “[A]s an educator, know that you are supported and I have walked in your shoes,” Ybarra wrote. “What you can count on is my voice in advocating for education in Idaho and listening to the concerns of educators throughout my term as superintendent. I have said time and time again, I am not a politician but a lifelong [educator] who understands the hard work that you do.” Ybarra later told Boise Weekly she was “proud” of Bafus for sending her letter, adding that she receives many letters and emails from teachers around the state who are concerned about school funding. “The funding formula is left up to the legislators,” Ybarra said. “That does not mean

that I am not an advocate, which I truly am. That means I will turn over every leaf, turn over every rock, shake every tree, dig down in the couch cushions for every dime we can get for educators. I make sure I am present at the table, interjecting myself in guiding these discussions looking for solutions.” Bafus said those solutions are long overdue and relations between Troy schools and the community have turned downright “rotten.” “There were ‘Vote No’ signs put up around town,” said Bafus. “I was angry at first that they wouldn’t stand behind our school and fund it. I felt horrible for the kids and parents still there. It’s a very scary feeling, like the carpet is going to be pulled out from under you. To not have sports or the classes you were looking forward to taking… I guess it just got to be too much [to ask for].” Bafus said when a second vote came around in May, dozens of Troy students picketed the polling center, urging people to pass the levy. Their efforts didn’t work. In her response to Bafus, Ybarra wrote that Idaho lawmakers had “provided equity.” She added, “I believe the more important question concerning the Idaho Legislature is continuing to move towards adequacy in funding.” When asked if Ybarra was implying the state hadn’t provided adequate funding for schools, the superintendent was reluctant to answer the question directly. “You know, it’s a really long conversation,” Ybarra told Boise Weekly. “It’s a vertical and horizontal conversation. At the state level, we 8 talk about equity. The state has provided equity, but when you talk about the horizontal

The city of Boise will return to court to once again defend its controversial anti-camping ordinance. Passed in 2009 and amended in 2014, the ordinance has already been subject to legal scrutiny, and on Thursday, Aug. 20, U.S. Magistrate Judge Ronald Bush will summon attorneys representing the city of Boise, Idaho Legal Aid Services and the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty to argue the constitutionality of Title 9, Chapter 10, Section 2 of Boise City Code. The hearing at the U.S. Courthouse in Boise stems from a years-old lawsuit brought by a group of homeless individuals and comes after the U.S. Department of Justice weighed in on the matter, pushing the controversy into the national spotlight. National Public Radio, the Washington Post and other media outlets across the U.S. picked up the story when the DOJ wrote in an Aug. 6 “statement of interest” it was not in favor of any rules banning the homeless from sleeping outside, because those rules effectively criminalize homelessness, particularly in situations when people have nowhere else to sleep. “Sleeping is a life-sustaining activity—i.e., it must occur at some time in some place,” the department wrote in its statement. “It should be uncontroversial that punishing conduct that is a universal and unavoidable consequence of being human violates the Eighth Amendment.” Eric Tars, senior attorney for the NLCHP, called the DOJ filing, “huge,” adding homelessness was “becoming more visible in communities, and when homelessness becomes more visible, there’s more pressure on community leaders to do something about it.” The federal lawsuit was filed in 2009 following adoption of the anti-camping ordinance. When Boise officials tweaked the rule in Sept. 2014 by introducing a “special order” prohibiting enforcement unless shelters are full, the suit was 8 dismissed. The plaintiffs were having none of it, saying their argument was BOISEweekly | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | 7


CITYDESK

ADAM RO S E NLUND

NEWS SOMEBODY LIED

Proving prison is operating constitutionally now Idaho’s burden The city of Boise will be asked to defend its “anticamping” ordinance Thursday, Aug. 20.

with the ordinance, not the mechanics of how it would be enforced. So 7 they took their case to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which agreed with the plaintiffs and sent the matter back to U.S. Court. The view from Boise City Hall, however, is the DOJ has it all wrong, and the premise of its filing in the case “is incorrect,” according to Mike Journee, spokesman for Boise Mayor Dave Bieter. “It’s rare that our community’s service providers have no capacity—typically only during extreme weather events,” Journee said. “And when that does happen, city ordinance prohibits law enforcement officers from writing tickets. Those officers keep close tabs on what service resources are available and, every opportunity they get, they encourage those experiencing homelessness to take advantage of those resources.” Vanita Gupta, principal deputy assistant attorney general at the DOJ, said enforcement of such an ordinance is “poor public policy.” “Needlessly pushing homeless individuals into the criminal justice system does nothing to break the cycle of poverty or prevent homelessness in the future,” Gupta said. “Instead, it imposes further burdens on scarce judicial and correctional resources, and it can have long-lasting and devastating effects on individuals’ lives.” Meanwhile, more major American cities will be keeping a close eye on the proceedings in Boise. According to the Los Angeles Times, city officials there said they are looking to dial up strict enforcement of an anti-camping ordinance after the metropolis experienced a 12 percent rise in its homeless population during the past two years. Tars said any efforts to criminalize citizens without homes are destined to fail. “Homelessness never left town because somebody gave it a ticket,” he said. “The only way to end homelessness is to make certain everybody has access to affordable, decent housing.” —George Prentice 8 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

GEORGE PRENTICE The ruling was blistering. Writing how the evidence was “clear and convincing,” U.S. District Judge David Carter slapped the state of Idaho with sanctions Aug. 11 in the wake of an alleged cover-up at the Idaho State Correctional Institution. During a federal court hearing in July, a string of witnesses accused the state of altering or destroying medical records, using so-called “dry cells” and shuffling prisoners to deny them access to court-ordered investigators. “Attempts to mislead the Court strike at the heart of the judicial process,” wrote Carter. Deep in the judicial order—on Page 18 of the 19-page document—was perhaps the most stunning passage in Carter’s ruling: “Defendant [Idaho Department of Correction] shall have the burden to prove that there are no ongoing constitutional violations, that the relief ordered exceeds what is necessary to correct an ongoing constitutional violation.” In other words, IDOC has the burden of proof moving forward in the now-decades-old Balla vs. Idaho lawsuit, which alleged inadequate and inappropriate medical care. “That’s really huge and quite frankly, the single-most important part of Carter’s ruling,” said Boise attorney Andrew Schoppe. “The Department of Correction might have an impossible task. They’ve got to work crazy hard to show the court that they’ve rectified and remedied all of the constitutional issues.” Schoppe is the Boise-based attorney who successfully sued IDOC on behalf of his client, former IDOC clinician Diana Canfield, who blew the whistle on her former employer. She won a

lawsuit in Ada County Court against IDOC earlier this year and was a key witness July 22-23 in the federal hearing. During the federal case, Canfield and other former clinicians said they saw prisoners’ medical records altered or even scrubbed by IDOC superiors. What’s more, dry cells—called “barbaric” by a court-ordered investigator—were found to have been used regularly at ISCI but were mysteriously empty when investigators audited the prison. “The judge’s ruling has demonstrated once again that IDOC has indeed allowed corruption and misuse of power to deny basic human rights to incarcerated people,” Canfield told Boise Weekly following Carter’s ruling. “This is a victory for all the brave people who risked retaliation for telling the truth, and ultimately for the integrity for the state of Idaho.” In essence, Carter told IDOC it must reset the clock for a new round of court-ordered investigations. In page-after-page of the ruling, Carter wrote he believed the “consistency and credibility” of the mounds of evidence against IDOC and it had “crossed the line” in its attempts to manipulate previous investigations. “Honestly, I think going forward, we’re going to see more eruptions of bad news coming

from the prison, probably more than ever,” said Schoppe. “Keep in mind that before this, the court presumed that IDOC was following the rules. Going forward, the court is forever going to be skeptical. I don’t see this going well for them. Where there’s smoke, there’s fire.” For his part, Kevin Kempf, the Director of IDOC, insists the wrongdoings are in the past. “Please know this,” Kempf wrote in a response to the ruling. “The actions that Judge Carter ruled IDOC took with improper purpose occurred in 2011 and 2012. We now have new people and new policies in place. “We have nothing to hide,” he wrote, adding he was disappointed the Balla case—which in 2012 found IDOC had not provided adequate health care for prisoners—will continue. “But I remain determined to bring it to a close.” Schoppe said a number of people still working for Kempf were in positions of power during the worst of IDOC’s troubles—a fact confirmed by Carter. “The few people mentioned in Carter’s ruling couldn’t have done this alone. In fact, we know for a fact that prior complaints had risen to the top,” said Schoppe. “But they did nothing to change things. Well, they’re going to need to change their culture now, in a big way.”

piece, that’s getting down to the local piece, the levies. That’s where we start having conversations about what adequacy looks like.” Asked if the exodus of Idaho teachers weighs heavily on her—knowing experienced educators were being laid off because there isn’t enough money to go around—Ybarra said, “When it comes to kids, I am always concerned.” Finally, when asked if she had personally

witnessed good teachers leave Idaho because of inadequate funding, Ybarra turned the conversation to focusing on “resources and achievement.” As for Bafus, there is still one chance she may get her job back in Troy. In a last ditch effort, the school district will turn to the voters again on Tuesday, Aug. 25, asking to approve an even-leaner levy—$995,000. If approved, it would not restore all teaching positions, but Bafus and her husband

would get their jobs back. “Usually I work on things all summer long but this summer, I’ve not done anything,” Bafus said. “I’m kind of bitter about spending the time on something that I don’t even know exists. … I’m just crossing my fingers, hoping that this passes and we can keep on advocating for education support at the state level and try to heal our community.”

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CITIZEN JERE

NING MY L AN HAM

MATTHEW HAYWARD AND JENNA CARPENTER Opera Idaho’s ‘music man’ (and woman) GEORGE PRENTICE The Music Man may well be the consummate American musical. There is hardly a marching band in the country without “76 Trombones” in its repertoire. “Goodnight My Someone” is a classic lullaby, “Till There Was You” was included on two albums recorded by The Beatles (the only Broadway song they ever recorded) and “Ya Got Trouble” is considered by some to be the first rap song. Opera Idaho is set to showcase American musical comedy’s most hummable score when it presents The Music Man in concert on Friday, Aug. 21 at the Egyptian Theatre and again on Monday, Aug. 24 at the Idaho Shakespeare Festival Amphitheater. Prior to one of their final rehearsals, Jena Carpenter (playing famously fussy librarian Marian) and Matthew Hayward (portraying music man Harold Hill) sat down with Boise Weekly to talk about their musical journeys and presenting an American classic. Let’s begin with your personal and musical roots. Jenna Carpenter: I was born and raised in Boise. Mom and dad own a software company, Silver Creek Software [which specializes in financial management systems for produce wholesalers and distributors]. I have four siblings and half-siblings, and I’m somewhere in the middle. I took piano and voice lessons and did a few things with Music Theatre of Idaho. Matthew Hayward: I’m a Seattle boy. No one else in my family is really musical, but my grandmother took me to the theater nearly every weekend. When I graduated high school, I wanted to be a trauma surgeon, but all the while I was singing and taking voice lessons, and I thought one day, “I really like this.” Which schools did you choose? Carpenter: I studied music at Vanderbilt University. I studied abroad for a semester [in Austria]. I was soon recruited to study with someone there and I started to get into productions there. Hayward: I studied at the New England Conservatory of Music. I figured if I was going to do this, I wanted to go big. I did my undergrad and grad studies there. I was in a number of school productions and performed in a number of summer festivals back East. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Is there such a thing as a traditional career path for an opera singer? Hayward: You find a teacher you trust. Maybe you take some auditions and possibly some competitions. And then more auditions, and more and more. At one point, do you need an agent or manager? Carpenter: I’m in the works of doing that now. Hayward: I was with a manager for eight years—that was definitely a turning point for me. I’m flying solo these days. Plus, I’m on the voice faculty of Portland State University. Honestly, managers are having a hard time getting work for singers nowadays. Is that because there are fewer companies or fewer productions? Carpenter: Both. Yes, in the United States. Hayward: And there is an insane number of really good American singers. Does that mean you have to debate whether to leave the U.S. just so you can get more work? Hayward: I’ve sung in Europe a few times over the years. I have family in Austria and have taken a number of auditions when I’ve been there. Carpenter: Right now, I think every single

singer ponders going to Europe. My husband is German. We have a place in Stuttgart [Germany], and I’m probably there at least two- to threemonths a year. Are you fluent in German? Carpenter: Absolutely. Many European nations subsidize the arts and opera in particular. I lived in Mannheim, Germany, and there must have been six separate opera houses within an hour’s vicinity. I’ve performed there often. I even sang West Side Story and My Fair Lady in Germany. Wait a minute… in German? Carpenter: [Singing] Ich hatt’ getanzt heut’ Nacht [“I could have danced all night”]. American musicals are very popular in Germany. So why do you think we’re seeing a renaissance of American musical productions, particularly with opera companies? Hayward: It’s the great American songbook: Rodgers and Hammerstein, Irving Berlin, Cole Porter and, of course, Meredith Wilson. Speaking of Meredith Wilson, I’m pretty sure most Americans know about half of the score of The Music Man. Carpenter: I had forgotten how many of these songs, which I’ve loved for years, are in this show. How difficult is Harold Hill’s song, “Ya Got Trouble”? It has be one of the trickiest songs in musical theater. Hayward: I’ve been having… let’s just say, some trouble. I think my wife knows the songs better than I do now. Honestly, half of this stuff is like rap. The hardest parts for me are the talking sections of “Ya Got Trouble.” Remind us of how this production will be presented. Carpenter: It’s a concert version. A narrator will bridge the songs together. We have a spectacular chorus. And you’ll be performing in two very distinct venues. Hayward: I love to sing in the Egyptian. Carpenter: And we’re really excited for the Shakespeare amphitheater. I know they’re in the middle of a number of productions out there, so I hope we get some extra time out there for rehearsal. I’m presuming you’ve both been in your share of very passionate operas, and The Music Man is filled with plenty of its own passion, as well. Ultimately, it’s a love story with a big brass band. Carpenter: It’s all in the music. Hayward: The music leads you. Honestly, you don’t have to do much with a score this beautiful. BOISEweekly | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | 9


INTO THE FIRE

Fire agencies have a burning desire to recruit females, with little luck JESSICA MURRI

A

t work, Molly Leadbetter repels out of helicopters. She carries a pack weighing nearly 119 pounds (around five pounds less than Molly herself). She walks into wildfires and when she gets there, the 25-year-old spends 16 hours digging trenches, clearing fuels and containing fires burning thousands of acres of Idaho wilderness. She is, by definition, a bad ass. “It gets hot,” Leadbetter said. “You’re next to the fire, you’re sucking in smoke, burning your eyebrows digging a hot line. Suddenly, I’m like, ‘Why do my ears hurt so bad?’ My earrings get really hot.” Molly and her 27-year-old sister, Kate, have worked on wildland fire crews for six and seven years, respectively. They’ve fought fires across the West and work a grueling schedule of 14 days on, two days off, throughout the summer. They’re used to being outnumbered by men—usually at a 10-1 ratio—and they’ve both been the only woman on their crews. Molly and Kate both said they are surrounded by women who are physically strong enough to tackle wildland firefighting, yet have seen a decline in the number of women in their field. It’s a problem fire agencies across the country, from wildland firefighting organizations to city fire departments, are dealing with. “I think, initially, a lot of women are like I was: They think they’re not fit enough or don’t think they can do it,” Molly said. “I tell every girl, ‘You could do fire.’” The Leadbetter sisters grew up in a family of fire. Both of their parents fought wildland fires and at age 19, Kate continued the tradition. She was a slight 120 pounds and an athlete in high school. She had done some trail crew work but nothing like the physical endurance fighting fire requires. Kate’s first fire flared up in Utah and moved fast. “I jumped out of the truck, and I had this big heavy pack on, and I almost collapsed,” she said. “We call it ‘yard sale-ing,’ when your stuff is flying everywhere, and you’re trying to pick it up … and you’re trying to do your job, and you’ve forgotten your tool. That’s when I realized I needed to change my training regimen to be more than running.”

10 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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Molly fought her first fire two years after Kate’s. “Kate told me for, like, three years that I wasn’t physically fit enough to fight fire,” Molly said. “Then I was looking for a job, having no idea what to do and finally my mom was like, ‘Molly, you can do fire. Don’t listen to Kate; you’ll be fine.’” Today, Molly works for the Payette National Forest based out of New Meadows. Her heliattack crew travels all around the West and she works alongside two other women. Kate, in her first summer away from fires in seven years, is working in Boise as an arborist. The sisters work six months a year and devote their off-time to staying in shape. “Especially for women, you really have to train because you don’t want to be the slowest person on the crew,” said Kate, who has worked for various hot shot crews in Alaska, Colorado, Utah and Idaho. In the off-season, she exercised two hours per day, six days per week. Her workout included cardio, weights, circuit training and long runs. Even on vacations to Mexico and Cuba, Kate did her daily sit-ups and push-ups. It paid off when she hiked the long, steep, shadeless mountains of the Salmon-Challis National Forest clearing brush to slow forest fires. “I would never admit that something was hard because I was on a hot shot crew,” Kate said. Wildland firefighting is a lifestyle as much as a job, and it comes with added pressures for women, which includes living with as many as 25 men for an entire summer. Everyone is tired and no one has taken a shower in weeks. There’s not much to do around the camps except sleep and talk. “Everything is very out in the open,” Kate said. “You dig a latrine and go to the bathroom in the same place. Everyone’s just wildly dirty. It doesn’t bother me.” While the living conditions can be grubby and the talk can be less than polite—“Think of the most disgusting thing you’ve ever heard a guy say, times 14—and 24/7,” Molly said—the camaraderie is often as fierce as the fires. “I think the more miserable fires, the better it bonds you,” Kate said. “There’s something really gratifying about the physical work because these days, there’s so many office jobs and not so many opportunities to be out in the field, working with the land. Out there, you’re doing something and actually seeing the product of your work.”

TRIAL AND ERROR Boise Fire Chief Dennis Doan has devoted the past eight years to diversifying his department. He is passionate about getting more women on the city’s firefighter force, but he calls those efforts “frustrating” and “challenging.” The Boise Fire Department has 268 firefighters: only one is a woman. At its peak, the department employed four women, but they either retired or left. The first female firefighter BOISE WEEKLY.COM

for the Boise Fire Department wasn’t even hired until 1993. It’s a gender makeup reflected in the national average. Doan said about 2.5 percent of city firefighters nationwide are women. “We’ve put a lot of time into it, but it takes a long time to turn the tide,” he said. Going through the process to become a firefighter is strenuous. First, there is a written test made up of 100 questions about personality, math, mechanics and English. The test has nothing to do with firefighting but candidates need to score at least 99 percent to move on to the oral exam, which is an interview by a panel of firefighters. They ask why applicants want to be firefighters and what would make them good at it. They watch for certain character traits and look for a strong work ethic. The process used to include a physical test, but Doan eliminated it in an effort to make recruitment easier. “When I took the test 26 years ago, it was a lot different,” he said. “There was this dummy that was, like, 175 pounds. You had to pick it up, throw it over your shoulder, and run up five flights of stairs and down five flights of stairs. We looked at that and we said, ‘How often do you pick somebody up and throw them over your shoulder and run up and down stairs?’ Like, zero. We work in teams. You don’t carry them over your shoulder because the smoke and hot gases are up high.” After the original physical test was phased out, the Boise Fire Department introduced a more realistic test, which included pulling a dummy to safety, dragging a hose around a corner, crawling through a box and using a sledge hammer to hit a target. “Then we said, ‘Why do we even need that?’ Doan said. The second test was dropped, too. After an aspiring firefighter passes both the written and oral exams, he or she undergoes an FBI background check and visits the fire department doctor for a physical exam to test overall strength, lung capacity and heart condition. “If you met the minimum medical standards, we would hire you,” Doan said. The process is long and competitive. The written test is offered only every two years and hundreds of hopefuls turn out for a limited number of positions. If an applicant makes it through the testing, he or she is added to a list. When someone from the force retires, the first person on the list is hired. In the meantime, Doan is doing everything he can think of to create a more inviting atmosphere for women. In the past few years, he has offered mentorships to women interested in the field and hosted a two-day academy at which 20 women learned more about the job. “Only a couple of those took the test,” Doan said. “You can see our struggle. We got 20 women in there, then, last March, we tested 604 individuals, and four of those were women.” 12 Doan said it isn’t a matter of women not BOISEweekly | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | 11


JES SICA MURRI

Ashley Rosenbaum, BFD’s only female firefighter: “I didn’t grow up seeing women on a firetruck.”

being capable of doing the job. They’re not getting tripped up by the physical require11 ments or training. He said most women simply don’t consider becoming firefighters. “We’re swimming upstream,” Doan said. “We need females on our engines so that little girls look up to and see a girl on the fire engine and say, ‘That’s what I want to be.’ Right now, when we go to schools, they see a white male. Even though we tell them they can be firefighters, that little girl still sees a white male on the fire engine.” Kate Leadbetter said she has interest in joining the Boise Fire Department, but while it involves fire, it’s a completely different profession. She said wildland firefighters usually receive no training in fighting structure fires, and few certifications carry over. “They both say the word ‘fire,’ and that’s pretty much where it ends,” Molly added. “I disagree with that statement,” Doan said. “If I have female wildland firefighter saying that’s the only similarity, then we haven’t done a good job letting them know what being a firefighter is about.” The similarities, according to Doan include the chain-of-command structure and the emphasis on teamwork. Boise Fire Department also has brush trucks, since it must defend the wildland-urban interface. Doan thinks it could take more than a generation before the gender gap in his department starts to narrow, but he plans to continue striving to get more women on the force. “When we have an engine go out on a call, our community is not all white males, right?” he said. “We need to be able to relate to them. [The lack of women] is hurting our department and it’s hurting our community. We really have to focus on this.” 12 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

‘THERE’S ONLY ONE OF ME’ Ashley Rosenbaum is the only woman firefighter on the Boise Fire Department, and people notice. “Every time I go to the grocery store on duty, people whip their heads around,” she said. “They don’t see females working as firefighters, so they’re surprised to see a girl walking through the store.” Rosenbaum joined BFD in 2007, but before she started testing in 2005, she never imagined she’d become a firefighter. She grew up in Eagle, graduated from high school and attended Boise State University, where she studied health promotion. It was only while working as a bartender at Texas Roadhouse that the thought of becoming a firefighter occurred to her. “A training captain would come into the restaurant pretty often and started talking to me about firefighting. I kind of blew him off,” she said. “I had my own thing going on.” Then one of the guys she worked with started the testing process and her interest was piqued. The captain talked her into coming down to the training facility, where they put her in firefighter turnouts and let her pull the hose up the tower. She worked with extraction tools and fell in love. “This is awesome,” she told them. “Sign me up.” Two years and four or five tests later, Rosenbaum was on the job with BFD. Now she balances her full-time job with three children at home—a 5-year-old, a 2-year-old and a 6-month-old. Rosenbaum’s husband is also a firefighter with the Eagle Fire Department. They each spend 10 days a month working, 10 days a month taking care of the kids on their own and 10 days a month at home together. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


She often has to wait until after 8 p.m.—when all the kids are in bed—to tackle her daily workout. “For 10 days, I’m like a single mom,” she said, “but for 10 days, he’s a single dad, too.” Her shifts are 48 hours at a time, with 96 hours off in between. Still, Rosenbaum rarely gets to fight fire. Most calls the department respond to are medical emergencies. Her last fire was a car fire almost a month ago. She can’t remember the last time she fought a structure fire. In the meantime, she keeps herself busy on the hazmat and airport teams. Rosenbaum said her time with Boise Fire Department has been fulfilling, despite being the only woman in the ranks. “I’ve never had anything negative,” she said. “I felt a little more pressure because I’m a female, but it wasn’t anything that anyone else put on me. It was more self-imposed. I think being a female, being the only one, you represent everybody. If you’re male, it’s like, ‘Well that guy can’t do the job.’ If I can’t do the job, it’s more like, ‘Oh, she can’t do the job,’ and it correlates to me being a female.” Her biggest beefs are with ill-fitting equip-

ment and clothes. The uniforms are made for men, which means the crotch in her turnouts sags and the jacket practically engulfs her. Her other concern comes from fire station accommodations—something Doan has committed to fixing. “When I first started, the fire house had a large dormitory with one bathroom and one big shower,” Doan said. “Some stations are still just a big dorm,” Rosenbaum said. “There are curtains so you have privacy, but it’s an open area and I know some men don’t feel super comfortable having a female in the room. I’m sure my husband doesn’t really love it either.” The fire bond that passed in November 2014 aims to fix the problem. All new stations are built with individual rooms and separate, gender-specific bathrooms. Older stations around town are being renovated to match. “Most of it accommodates me,” Rosenbaum said. “There’s only one me.” That’s something Rosenbaum would like to see change. She said she tries to recruit women all the time, but they don’t see that they can do the job—a job Rosenbaum plans to retire from.

“I didn’t grow up seeing women on a firetruck,” she said. “There’s not enough of me. I need more females.”

BARRIERS While more women gravitate toward wildland firefighting, the challenges for women in the field go beyond strength and hard work. Kate Leadbetter said she has observed a fundamental difference in the way men and women communicate, and she suspects not having the same confident swagger held her back from promotions. Molly Leadbetter said most of the crews she’s worked on haven’t had a hint of sexism, but it’s not unheard of among wildland firefighters. “I think there’s a lot of crews that are making really big strides in creating an environment that’s healthy for everyone,” Molly said. “Then there are some crews that are sliding backwards and stuck in the past. There’s some crews where if you make one mistake—a mistake anyone would make—they judge you much more harshly.” Kate was hesitant to talk about gender

barriers in her career, but Molly jumped in to put a fine point on the issue. “[Kate has] had to work twice as hard to get an average amount of praise,” Molly said. “If she was a guy working as hard as she was working, she would have gone a lot farther.” They both agreed that Kate should have been promoted to positions that work with chainsaws, which usually go to the largest, fittest men. “She met every requirement that should have put her on saw and it didn’t,” Molly said. “Because they’re like, ‘You’re just this little slip of a thing, you can’t do it.’ Instead it’s like, ‘No, we’re going to get this big dude with a beard to do it.’” “Even though he can’t make it up the hill and I can,” Kate added. “I’ve kicked those biggest, fittest dudes’ asses.”

Say goodbye to SHIP. Say hello to

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CALENDAR WEDNESDAY AUG. 19

hearted and fun-filled evening of improv with Jared Stull and Training Ground Productions. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-888-4433. facebook.com/ events/1618587658415702.

Festivals & Events CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET— Wednesdays through Sept. 23. 3-7 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, Corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell, caldwellidfarmersmarket.com. CWI WELCOME WEDNESDAY— Enjoy back-to-school festivities in Nampa and Boise. 4-7 p.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho Ada County Campus Pintail Center, 1360 S. Eagle Flight Way, Boise; and College of Western Idaho Nampa Campus, 5500 E. Opportunity Drive, Nampa. 208-562-3000, cwidaho.cc.

On Stage COMEDY ON BROADWAY—Head to downtown Meridian for a light-

FELL RUNNER AND TRUE STORY—Fell Runner is a Los Angelesbased rock band that creates music that is asymmetrically rhythmic while simultaneously melodic and danceable. 7 p.m. $7-$10 adv., $10-$13 door. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, sapphireboise.com. ISF: KING LEAR—Through Aug. 27. 8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—Through Sept. 12. 8 p.m. $9$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

THURSDAY, AUG. 20

The truth—and the science fiction—is out there.

URQUIDES FAREWELL SHOW—With Portland’s math-rock masters The Mercury Tree and Boise newcomers Western Daughter. 8 p.m. $5. The Olympic, 1009 Main St., Boise, 208-342-0176.

Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery. com.

GROUP F/64: REVOLUTIONARY VISION—Through Oct. 25. 10 a.m.5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Art

LAURA MCPHEE: HOME AND THE WORLD, A VIEW OF CALCUTTA—Through Aug. 30. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-7265079, gailseverngallery.com.

MELISSA ‘SASI’ CHAMBERS: TARP ART—Through Oct. 31. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Reel Foods Fish Market and Oyster Bar, 611 Capital Blvd., Boise, 208-342-2727, melissasasichambers.com.

AMY PENCE-BROWN: MONSTERS—Through Sept. 30. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Bricolage, 418 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-3718, bricoshoppe.com. CO-CREATION PROJECT—Through Sept. 27. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. DEBORAH OROPALLO: HEARTLAND—Through Aug. 30. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-7265079, gailseverngallery.com. DEFYING GRAVITY: INTERVENTIONS IN CLAY—Through Sept. 18. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley

LAUREN KISTNER: LINE, COLOR AND TEXTURE—Through Aug. 31. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery. com. LILY MARTINA LEE AND MARTA LEE: HALF SISTER—Through Sept. 13. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4263049, finearts.boisestate.edu. MARCIA MYERS: RICHES OF REMEMBRANCE—Through Aug. 30. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Gail Severn

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, AUG. 21-30

#Don’tEatABunchOfFoodOnAStickRightBeforeGoingOnTheVertigo

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY CERAMICS KAY HARDY AND GREGORY KASLO COLLECTION—Through March 13, 2016. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. ONE SQUARE MILE FINE ART SHOW—Through Aug. 31. 10 a.m.5 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208-888-9898, finerframes. com. PAUL VEXLER: RIBBONS— Through May 8, 2016. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

RICHARD C. ELLIOTT: LANGUAGE OF LIGHT—Through Oct. 4. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. SALLY DEMASI: THE COLORS OF IDAHO—Through Sept. 7. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Crossings Winery, 1289 W. Madison Ave., Glenns Ferry, 208-366-2313, crossingswinery. com. TVAA: HUNTING AND GATHERING—Through Oct. 16. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org. WEATHER OR NOT—Through March 20, 2016. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Sports & Fitness TAMARACK COLLEGE SEASON PASS SALE—For $99, college

SATURDAY, AUG. 22

If you love the outdoors, yurt going to love this festival.

JOHN SCALZI AT THE LIBRARY

WESTERN IDAHO FAIR

IDAHO OUTDOOR RECREATION FESTIVAL

Science fiction has the power to remind us of how small humans are against the backdrop of the cosmos. Stories about androids, cloning and human augmentation challenge our dayto-day attitudes toward technology. At sci-fi’s forefront is Hugo Award-winning author John Scalzi, whose Old Man’s War novel series—a tale of augmented soldiers protecting human colonists against a slew of alien races—has gained worldwide recognition for its originality and depth. He’ll be at the Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium Thursday, Aug. 20, at 7 p.m. to discuss his latest work, The End of All Things, the latest installment in the Old Man’s War series , which covers a series of alien attacks against Earth and its colonies. The event is courtesy of BPL and Rediscovered Books. Thursday, Aug. 20, 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

This year’s theme for the Western Idaho Fair is #ShareMyFair, a perfect marriage of contemporary and classic. The Fair opens Friday, Aug. 21, kicking off with a 4-H livestock competitions, and wraps up Sunday, Aug. 30 with a performance from hypnotist Michael Mezmer. In between, check out entertainment ranging from BMX trick riders to concerts. This year, see singer-songwriter Jerrod Niemann, rockers Theory of a Deadman and platinum-selling country artist Gary Allan. (An appearance by rock icon Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo was canceled because of a medical issue). The fair has more games, rides and food than a person could get to even if they went every day and stayed from open to close. We think it’s worth a try, though. Aug. 21-29, 8 a.m.-11 p.m.; Aug. 30, noon-9 p.m.; FREE-$9. Western Idaho Fairgrounds, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208287-5650, idahofair.com.

Even if you’ve lived and played in Idaho your whole life, this year’s Idaho Outdoor Recreation Festival at Eagle Island State Park will provide tips and ideas you’ve never thought of. The park will be filled with food vendors and kids activities, and the day will be filled with seminars and product demonstrations, including a cold-water immersion lesson about the dangers of frigid waters and what to do if you find yourself trapped. Also catch a presentation on the six Idaho City yurts available through the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation for summer and winter stays, an intro to a wide range of outdoor clubs for like-minded recreationists and more. Enter for a chance to win a two-night stay at the rustic Idaho City Backcountry Yurts. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., $5 per vehicle, Eagle Island State Park, 4000 W. Hatchery Rd., Eagle, 208-514-2254, parksandrecreation.idaho.gov.

14 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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CALENDAR students will have unlimited access to the mountain for the 2015-16 winter season. The special price is good through Nov. 16. $99. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy 55, Donnelly, 208325-1000, tamarackidaho.com.

THURSDAY AUG. 20 Festivals & Events FOOTHILLS MED SPA GRAND OPENING—Join the party at the grand opening of Foothills Med Spa in downtown Boise, where you’ll find simple, noninvasive solutions for all of your skincare concerns. Call to RSVP. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Foothills Med Spa, 115 W. Main St., Ste. 201, Boise, 208-286-2327, foothillsmedspaboise.com.

On Stage COMEDIAN BOB ZANY—8 p.m. $15. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. IDAHO HORROR FILM FESTIVAL JAWS FLOAT— Have you ever wanted to watch Jaws while floating around a pool? Now you can. IHFF is hosting a special screening of this iconic horror film, so take your swimsuit and towel and get ready to be terrified of the water again. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Boise Racquet and Swim Club, 1116 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-376-1052, idahohorrorfilmfestival.org.

COMMUNITY LIBRARY LIT CRAWL—Help the Community Library celebrate 60 years of service with this fun crawl through Ketchum for tastes of literature, art and food at each library location (Main Library, Gold Mine Consign, Gold Mine Thrift and The Sun Valley Museum of History) and The Elephant’s Perch, Chapter One Bookstore and Iconoclast Books. Maps and food/beverage passes are available at all library locations. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE, $10 food/beverage pass. The Community Library Ketchum, 415 Spruce Ave., Ketchum, 208-7263493, comlib.org/lit-crawl.

Talks & Lectures LIFE IS LONG, ART IS LONGER: PROTECTING AND PLANNING YOUR ART LEGACY—Panel discussion of the changing trends in collection management and valuation practices within the art market, and the myriad approaches to art legacy planning for both collectors and artists. Email gallery@ochigallery.com to RSVP. 6 p.m. FREE. Ochi Gallery, 119 Lewis St., Ketchum, 208-7268746, ochigallery.com.

Citizen BOOT CAMPAIGN PUSHUPS FOR

CHARITY—Help Skyline Home Loans NW celebrate the opening of its new Meridian branch by joining city officials and local members of the military for the 90-second Pushups for Charity Contest. You can get sponsored and raise money for veterans or just join in the fun and donate. 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Skyline Home Loans NW, 3681 N. Locust Grove, Meridian, 208-9178060, skylinehomeloansnw.com.

Food UNITED WAY FLAPJACK FEED—Your full tummy will help the agency continue providing innovative, sustainable solutions in education, financial independence and health. 7:30-10 a.m. $5 suggested donation. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, UnitedWayTV.org.

FRIDAY AUG. 21 Festivals & Events WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—It’s August and that means the Western Idaho Fair is back, with all the sin-

MILD ABANDON

Get Your

By E.J. Pettinger

Tickets

ISF: KING LEAR—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Student Packages Now!

STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE— Through Aug. 22. 8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-4625523, starlightmt.com.

Dial “M” for Murder

May 29–Aug 2

By Frederick Knott Sponsored by Hawley Troxell and Idaho Public Television

The Tempest

Art

Sponsored by Parsons Behle & Latimer and Scene/Treasure Magazines

JUDAS ARRIETA: BOISELAND— Through Aug. 22. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365, judasarrieta.com.

The Secret Garden

July 3–Aug 30

Book and lyrics by Marsha Norman, music by Lucy Simon, based on the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Literature AUTHOR JOHN SCALZI— Rediscovered Books hosts bestselling sci-fi author John Scalzi, who will speak about his new book, The End of All Things, the direct sequel to 2013’s The Human Division. A book-signing will follow the program. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, rdbooks.org.

June 4–July 24

By William Shakespeare

Sponsored by Truckstop.com and Boise Weekly

King Lear

Aug 7–27

By William Shakespeare Sponsored by ArmgaSys, Inc. and Boise State Public Radio

The Fantasticks Photo Credit: Robyn Cohen*, Aled Davies*, King Lear (2015). *Member Actors’ Equity. Photo by DKM Photography.

Sea Se e son son Sp S ons on orr

Se so Sea son on Pa Partn rtners tnerss

Season Sea son Me Media dia Partn Partners rtn t ers e

Sept 4–27

Book and lyrics by Tom Jones, music by Harvey Schmidt

Sponsored by Holland and Hart LLP and 107.1 K-HITS

Check ouut ou o r website at

idahhoshakespearee.org or ccal alll 33 3366-92 9 211 M–F M–F,, 10 1 am t o 5 pm

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | 15


CALENDAR fully yummy fried foods you avoid the rest of the year. Plus the return of crowd favorites, Vertigo and White Water Flume. Through Aug. 30. Noon-11 p.m. FREE-$9 gate, $1-$70 ride tickets. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, idahofair.com.

historic Bishops’ House haunted? Find out with the International Paranormal Reporting Group. All proceeds go to The Bishops’ House to assist with much needed upkeep and repairs. 7 p.m.-midnight. $25. Bishops’ House, 2420 E. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-342-3279, thebishopshouse. com.

On Stage

BOISE FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 10th and Grove, Boise, 208-345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com.

COMEDIAN BOB ZANY—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $17.50. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. F.U.S.E. DANCE—Enjoy a night of entertainment featuring hip-hop, jazz, Latin ballroom and contemporary dance. 8 p.m. $8-$25. PowerHouse Event Center, 621 S. 17th St., Boise, 208-331-4005, fusedance.weebly.com. ISF: KING LEAR—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. OPERA IDAHO: THE MUSIC MAN IN CONCERT—Conman Professor Harold Hill is on the prowl again as Opera Idaho brings you its sixth production of a musical in concert. 7:30 p.m. $24-$48. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-387-1273, operaidaho.org. SAWTOOTH VALLEY GATHERING—Two-day music and arts festival in Pioneer Park. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. $25, $50 weekend pass. Stanley, Idaho, 1-800-878-7950. sawtoothvalleygathering.com. STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

CAMELOT: A FALL FORMAL—Enjoy an evening of merriment, grub, drink and a bit of magic hosted by A Social Place. For ages 15 and older. Due to limited space, tickets will be required; call or email to RSVP. 6:30 p.m. $5. Meridian Senior Center at the Park, Julius M. Kleiner Park, 1920 N. Records Way, Meridian, 208-391-1050, asocialplace.org. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-3499, seeyouatthemarket.com. IDAHO OUTDOOR RECREATION FESTIVAL— Enjoy FREE seminars on outdoor recreation, product demonstrations, vendor booths, information booths from nonprofits and state and federal agencies, plus food and beverages. 10 a.m.6 p.m. FREE park entry with the Idaho State Parks Passport. Eagle Island State Park, 2691 Mace Road, Eagle, parksandrecreation. idaho.gov. NAMPA FARMERS’ MARKET—9

a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square, Intersection of 14th and Front streets, Nampa. PATRIOT TOUR 2015—Team Never Quit presents Patriot Tour 2015, which brings together faith, family, service, sacrifice and community. 7:30 p.m. $30-$250. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, 208-387-1273. teamneverquit.com/patriot-tour. SUNNYSLOPE WINE TRAIL FESTIVAL—Featuring 10-plus wineries, live music, local food and artisans. 2-6 p.m. $20 adv., $25 door. Caldwell Train Depot, 701 Main St., Caldwell. WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Noon-11 p.m. FREE-$9 gate, $1-$70 ride tickets. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, idahofair.com.

On Stage ARTISTS 4 SAMANTHA BENEFIT CONCERT—Local bands perform to help Samantha Thomas with medical expenses. 2 p.m. $10. Crooked Flats, 3705 Idaho Hwy. 16, Eagle, 208-258-6882. COMEDIAN BOB ZANY—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $17.50. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. F.U.S.E. DANCE—8 p.m. $8-$25. PowerHouse Event Center, 621 S. 17th St., Boise, 208-331-4005, fusedance.weebly.com. ISF: THE SECRET GARDEN— Through Aug. 30. 8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Art TRACE AND RESTORE EXHIBITION AND ART TALK WITH JUANITA EXIGA-WYATT—Enjoy a one-night exhibition of new work created during Exiga-Wyatt’s residency at Surel’s Place. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 206-407-7529, surelsplace.org. WOOD RIVER VALLEY STUDIO TOUR ARTISTS RECEPTION—Meet the artists participating in the Wood River Valley Studio Tour. 5-8 p.m. FREE. NexStage Theatre, 120 S. Main, Ketchum, 208-726-2985.

SATURDAY AUG. 22 Festivals & Events BISHOPS’ HOUSE PARANORMAL INVESTIGATION—Is the Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

16 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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CALENDAR Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Festivals & Events

SAWTOOTH VALLEY GATHERING—11 a.m.-11 p.m. $25, $50 weekend pass. Stanley, Idfaho, 1-800-878-7950. sawtoothvalleygathering.com.

WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Noon-11 p.m. FREE-$9 gate, $1-$70 ride tickets. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, idahofair.com.

STARLIGHT MOUNTAIN: THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE—8 p.m. $9-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmt.com.

Literature AUTHOR JULIE WESTON—The Idaho author will sign copies of her book Moonshadows, a mystery set in the Idaho wilderness, at the Saturday Farmer’s Market. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229. rdbooks.org/ saturday-market-events.

SUNDAY AUG. 23

On Stage COMEDIAN BOB ZANY—8 p.m. $15. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. GREAT PEACOCK—The Nashville-based Americana outfit hits Boise for the first time in support of their new album Making Ghosts. With the Oliphants. 7 p.m. $8. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, theduckclub.com. ISF: THE SECRET GARDEN—7 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Art

3RD ANNUAL WOOD RIVER VALLEY STUDIO TOUR—10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. wrvstudiotour.org.

Sports & Fitness 10TH ANNUAL XTERRA WILD RIDE OFF-ROAD TRIATHLON—Test your mettle with a 3/4-mile swim, 9.2-mile MTB laps and 10K trail run, about 25 miles total distance. Packet pick-up 12:30-6:30 p.m. on Aug. 22 at Gravity Sports, McCall. 9 a.m. $100-$150. Ponderosa State Park, East Lake Drive, SH 55-Miles Standish Road), McCall, wildrockiesracing.com.

MONDAY AUG. 24 Festivals & Events WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—12-11 p.m. FREE-$9 gate, $1-$70 ride tickets. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650. idahofair.com.

On Stage

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

OPERA IDAHO: THE MUSIC MAN IN CONCERT—7:30 p.m. $24-$48. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221. operaidaho.org. TESTAMENT OF LOVE CONCERT—Sponsored by the Interfaith Alliance of Idaho, this community concert aims to express love and support for the LGBT community. 7 p.m. FREE. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-3437511.

TUESDAY AUG. 25 Festivals & Events WESTERN IDAHO FAIR—Noon-11 p.m. FREE-$9 gate, $1-$70 ride tickets. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650. idahofair.com.

On Stage

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

ISF: KING LEAR—8 p.m. $12-$44. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Art

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

LILY MARTINA LEE AND MARTA LEE: HALF SISTER ARTIST RECEPTION—4:30-6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208426-3049, finearts.boisestate. edu.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | 17


LISTEN HERE

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY AUG. 19 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: THE RAVENNA COLT—With Mississippi Marshall and The Juke Daddys. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza ANDY CORTENS TRIO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

AAF: THE RAVENNA COLT, AUG. 19, GROVE PLAZA For the past couple of years, the lineup for Alive After Five each week has been a local band opening for a national (or even international) act. This year, amid the dust and plastic fencing surrounding the construction of the massive City Center Plaza, the more-intimate AAF has had a similar set-up with a few exceptions: headlining locals Hollow Wood and Amuma Says No, for example. On Aug. 19, the exception will have an exception with headliner The Ravenna Colt, fronted by former-global-guitarist-turned-local rocker Johnny Quaid. Quaid and his family moved to Boise about five years ago. Although he’d been through once with My Morning Jacket, Quaid couldn’t have guessed he’d end up raising his kids here. “Some doors opened, and all of a sudden we were here,” Quaid said in a March 2015 interview with Boise Weekly. “Literally, I’m not exaggerating, we completely fell in love with [Boise].” —Amy Atkins With Mississippi Marshall and The Juke Daddys. 5 p.m., FREE. Grove Plaza, 850 W. Front St., theravennacolt.com.

18 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

BEN BURDICK TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers BOISE COMMUNITY BAND CONCERTS IN THE PARK—7 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park BRANDON PRITCHETT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Reef EMILY TIPTON—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper FELL RUNNER AND TRUE STORY—7 p.m. $7-$13. Sapphire Room JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE JUKE DADDYS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow KMFDM—8 p.m. $20-$40. Knitting Factory MIKE CRAMER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

NED EVETT BAND—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CAMP—With Sly Moon Sutra and Star Warrior. 7 p.m. $7. WaterCooler

BROTHERS OF THE BALADI—7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

PAMELA DE MARCHE AND FRIENDS—7 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Penthouse

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CHARLEY JENKINS—With Brook Faulk and Johnny Shoes. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Village at Meridian

PATRICIA FOLKNER—6 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain-Parkcenter

GIGGLEBOMB—9:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

PHIL FRIENDLY—9 p.m. $5. The Shredder

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: SHAKIN’ NOT STIRRED—6 p.m. $6-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

ROSEBERRY SUMMER CONCERTS: DRY BUCK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Roseberry

HIGHWAY 16 LIVE: JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—6 p.m. FREE. Crooked Flats

SEAN HATTON AND BERNIE REILLY—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SLY MOON SUTRA—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Bella Aquila

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

SONS OF THUNDER MOUNTAIN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

URQUIDES—With The Mercury Tree and Western Daughter. 8 p.m. $5. The Olympic

THURSDAY AUG. 20 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 BOURBON DOGS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

CHIEF BROOM—With Lost Summer and Aphorist. 8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage COOK AND ROSE—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS—10 p.m. $7. Reef FOUL WEATHER ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—6 p.m. FREE. The Record Exchange FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole

WENDY AND THE ROADIES AND THE RODEO ROBBERS—9:30 p.m. $5. Liquid

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

FRIDAY AUG. 21

JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ANGIE AND TESS—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar BLAZE AND KELLY—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE LIKE ITS—9 p.m. FREE. Cylos THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s REX MILLER, LAWSON HILL AND RICO WEISMAN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE ROB HARDING—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SAWTOOTH VALLEY GATHERSHON SANDERS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper SLACKLINE—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La A TASTY JAMM—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s TOM TAYLOR—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

SATURDAY AUG. 22 4 HOUR ROMANCE—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar ARTISTS 4 SAMANTHA BENEFIT CONCERT—2 p.m. $10. Crooked Flats BED AND DARK SWALLOWS—7 p.m. $7. Neurolux

MUSIC FROM STANLEY: FIONA LURAY—5 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SWEET BRIAR—2 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

MONDAY AUG. 24 CHUCK SMITH AND NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CIG (CHAD GINSBURG OF CKY)—7 p.m. $10. The Shredder MOSS ROSES—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar SEAN HATTON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BLACK COBRA AND SLUMM—9 p.m. $8. The Shredder

TUESDAY AUG. 25 BERNIE REILLY—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION FORUM—6 p.m. FREE. Sapphire RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: SUMMER CANNIBALS—With A.J. Davila and Clarke and the Himselfs. 7:30 p.m. $7. Neurolux RATIONAL ANTHEM—With P36 and The Useless. 8 p.m. $5. The Shredder REFLECTIONS—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar SOUL SERENE—7 p.m. FREE. SockeyE-Cole

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper BRIAR BOOTS—4 p.m. FREE. Artistblue CAMDEN HUGHES TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers CIRCUIT DES YEUX—With Marisa Anderson. 8 p.m. $8-$10. MING

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

Ernest Hemingway

EMILY STANTON TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. Edge Brewing JEREMY JENSEN—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District JOEL KASSERMAN AND THE ELEMENTS—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

Festival

JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JOY RIDE—6 p.m. FREE. Sandbar LAMB OF GOD—6:30 p.m. $20$65. Revolution MIKE RUTLEDGE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s SANDRA CAVENNAUGH AND REX MILLER—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La STELLAR TIDE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Fairview THIS END UP—8 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s THOMAS PAUL AND FRIENDS—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

SUNDAY AUG. 23 DOUGLAS CAMERON—11 a.m. FREE. Sandbar GREAT PEACOCK—With the Oliphants. 7 p.m. $8. Neurolux KISSEE AND LOVEGUNZ—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

SUMMER CANNIBALS, AUG. 25, NEUROLUX In the video for Summer Cannibals’ “Something New” (Show Us Your Mind, New Moss, March 2015), singer-guitarist Jessica Boudreaux shoots bric-a-brac and mementos of a failed relationship with her trusty Crosman 760 Pumpmaster (one of the finest air guns ever made), gets her hair chopped, her neck tatted, loads up on shots and beer, trashes a coffee shop full of kale-chomping hippies, wins an eating contest and defeats an old scrapper in a knife fight. Matching the breakup-fueled carnage is a frenetic fuzz-punk score that NPR compares to The Thermals, with which the Portland, Ore.-based foursome has toured, and Sleater Kinney, which has also recorded with Portland engineer Larry Crane. Comparisons to other bands only go so far; Summer Cannibals has a sound all its own and an oeuvre that goes beyond simply shredding. The band displays true vocal skill, with the kind of heartbreaking, end-of-the-night-in-a-seedy-bar exhaustion that is as melancholy as it is sweet. —Zach Hagadone With AJ Davila and Clarke And The Himselfs and Friends, 7 p.m., $7. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux. com.

2015

September 10 – 12 TH E

COMMUNITY

RARY

Est. 1955 • Ketchum, Idaho

For more information and registration: www.comlib.org/hemingwayfestival hemingwayfestival@comlib.org (208) 726-3493 ext. 123

Wattis Dumke Foundation

•Keynote Speaker: Amanda Vaill, author of Hotel Florida •Scholarly Presentat ions •Historical Tours

Hemingway at the Edges BOISEweekly | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | 19


SCREEN GENIUSES AT WORK: THE END OF THE TOUR AND LISTEN TO ME MARLON

The smart bet is on only one of two new films GEORGE PRENTICE In spite of their celebrated talent, Marlon Brando (left) and David Foster Wallace (portrayed by Jason Segal, right) both distrusted celebrity. Two new films, opening Friday, Aug. 21, consider that dichotomy.

Before you think about going to see The End of the Tour, one of the most buzzed-about films of sky, known for his work in Rolling Stone, The New Brando who rushed to the stage to accept a 1955 late summer, you need to answer two quesYork Times and on National Public Radio. Lipsky Best Actor award for On the Waterfront. This is tions: 1. Do you love watching two people do but one of the many layers of complexity explored shadowed Wallace near the end of a 1996 book little more than talk for two hours? 2. Do you adore David Foster Wallace? Unless you answer tour, which is the centerpiece The End of the Tour. in another film opening this week, Listen to Me Marlon, a documentary well-worth the full price both with a resounding “yes,” I’m compelled to My issue with this film is that sees its two main subjects through a worshipful lens, so when either of admission. tell you the new Wallace biopic, The End of the Many of my own memories of the late Mr. man reveals a glimpse of mortality or even absurTour, isn’t worth full-price admission. Brando (who died in 2004) included watching For the record, I was a great admirer of the late dity (they’re both obsessed with junk food, bad some of his cringe-worthy performances near the television and masturbation), the two celebrated Mr. Wallace (who committed suicide in 2008), end of his career, as in 1992’s Christopher Columwriters come across as cerebral frat boys. in particular, for his 1996 novel Infinite Jest, bus and 1996’s The Island of Dr. Moreau. And To be clear, my unfavorable opinion of this considered by Time magazine as one of the best don’t forget his trainwreck 1994 CNN interview novels of the 20th century. Additionally, I have no film is not shared by many of the nation’s critics. with Larry King (if you haven’t seen it yet, it’s a Rotten Tomatoes has registered a 93 percent issue with films containing an excessive amount YouTube classic). By most accounts, Brando was critics’ approval. Rolling Stone calls the movie of dialogue and little-to-no action (My Dinner the actor of the 20th century, barnstorming Broadwith Andre and Frost/Nixon are two of my all-time “riveting.” The New York Times claims, “This one favorites). Unfortunately, while screening The End is just about as good as it gets.” way in 1947’s Streetcar Named Desire, achieving My frustraof the Tour, I repeatedly asked motion picture superstardom in tion with The myself, “Why am I watching the 1950s, and causing screen THE END OF THE TOUR (R) LISTEN TO ME MARLON (Not End of the Tour this?” and, more importantly, sensations in The Godfather Written by Donald Margulies, Rated) is how its script “Why should I care about any and Last Tango in Paris, both directed by James Ponsoldt approaches Directed and co-written by of this?” released in 1972. Starring Jason Segal, Jesse Stevan Riley but never truly Wallace is worthy of a bi“People were looking for Eisenberg engages some opic. He was one of the greatest rebellion,” Brando once said. Opens Friday, Aug. 21 at The Opens Friday, Aug. 21 at The Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., 208ripe topics, minds of his generation, and his “I happened to be in the right Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., 208342-4288, theflicksboise.com. including obliterary influence will continue place at the right time and in 342-4288, theflicksboise.com. session, popular for decades to come. the right state of mind.” culture and You may have heard about It’s one of the countless Jason Segel’s portrayal of Wallace in The End of the literary celebrity (something Wallace vehemently gems we see and hear in Listen to Me Marlon, Tour—the same Jason Segel from How I Met Your distrusted). To that end, I can’t help but think which is crafted from a treasure trove of clips that the author would have despised this failed Mother, Knocked Up and Sex Tape. Here, Segel’s found in a bunker outside of his home years after performance is committed and even career-chang- cinematic attempt. his death. This captivating documentary includes Marlon Brando also famously defied celebrity. Brando musing on his early years, the highs and ing. Unfortunately, his co-star Jesse Eisenberg is… More than a few critics had their own pushback well, Jesse Eisenberg, turning in the same perlows of 50 years of filmmaking and his tragic when it came to Brando and his Caesar-like formance we’ve seen a half-dozen times since we personal life—including his son’s conviction for refusal to claim the acting crown he was destined first spotted him in 2005’s The Squid and Whale. murder and his daughter’s suicide. to wear. Brando refused to accept his 1973 Best Now, 20 films later, his nervous nerd character is We’ll never see the likes of Brando again, but Actor Oscar for The Godfather, but his detracwearing pretty thin. Listen to Me Marlon gives us a little something to tors were quick to remind us this was the same Eisenberg plays journalist/author David Liphang on to. 20 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

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WINESIPPER

BW

A IS FOR ALBARINO Galicia, on the far northwest corner of the Iberian peninsula, is home to the Rias Baixas wine region. In the humid climate, the thickskinned, white variety Albarino thrives, producing a rich and aromatic wine. A few decades back, the wine was almost unknown outside of Spain. Since then, it has gained a cult following, which is not surprising, given the excellent quality of the wines. The increased demand coupled with a limited supply has had the usual effect: inexpensive Albarino is an oxymoron. However, considering it’s one of the finest white wine varieties, the price is not unreasonable. Here are the panel’s top picks: 2014 ALBARINO DE FEFINANES, $30 Opens with beautiful floral aromas of soft honeysuckle, orange and cherry blossom, as well as apricot and mango. In the mouth, this Albarino reveals creamy tropical fruit marked by lemon custard, papaya, orange and lime. Those rich flavors are perfectly balanced by crisp acidity coming through on the finish. 2013 BURGANS ALBARINO, $19 When first poured, this one shows a bit of spritz, with pin-prick bubbles clinging to the glass. Tangerine and sweet lime aromas are backed by mineral and a pleasantly intriguing touch of petrol. Mineral notes color the palate as well, along with pear, citrus and green apple. The lingering finish is round and ripe. 2012 LEGADO DEL CONDE ALBARINO, $19 Deep, dark aromas are a heady mix of ripe apple and honeyed pear. It’s a bit softer on the palate with subdued acidity balancing smooth, stone fruit flavors. Touches of lime, apple, mineral, chalk and lemon zest come through on the persistent finish. —David Kirkpatrick

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OFFICE HOURS

ADOPT-A-PET

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com MINERVA: I’m a purr-ific, fun and verbose little sweetie. Let’s chit-chat and cuddle.

BELLE: I’m a soft sweetheart who loves being brushed and petted—let me show you.

EMMA: I’m a fun, spunky and friendly gal. Let’s promise to spoil each other forever.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. MUFASA: 5-month-old, male, domestic shorthair. Curious, playful and affectionate. Loves to be held and have his belly rubbed. (Kennel 100#29326794)

TILLY: 6-month-old, female, domestic shorthair. Gentle, affectionate, loves to be cuddled. Doesn’t seem to mind the company of other cats. (Kennel 318- #29340018)

VELMA: 10-month-old, female, domestic shorthair. Sweet and loves to be cuddled. She would love to be your personal lap cat. (Kennel 103 #29357570)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT ROLLIE: 7-year-old, male, pit bull terrier mix. Mature, gentle, dog with a low energy level. Good with other dogs. Best for a family with older kids. (Kennel 312 - #27850058)

BUBBA: 10-month-old, male, hound mix. High energy level, needs an active family with older kids. Obedience training is recommended. (Kennel 305 – #29228167)

ROSCOE: 7-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. Friendly and loves to sit on laps. Would do best in a home with kids 6 and older. (Kennel 330#29234143)

Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

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NYT CROSSWORD | AS IT WERE ACROSS

23 *Triple Crown winner who himself sired a Kentucky Derby winner 25 When repeated, an aerobics class cry 26 ____ bar 28 New faces 29 Rejecting higher authority? 33 Dodger manager with two World Series rings 34 Shout from the crow’s-nest 37 Seminary subj.

1 Engaged 10 Jacques who was “alive and well and living in Paris” 14 Island near the Mariana Trench 18 Pueblo Indian rite 19 Places for light gatherings? 21 Mario who played Enrico Caruso 22 *Pricey wrap 1

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BY DON GAGLIARDO AND ZHOUQIN BURNIKEL / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

38 Giggle syllable 40 Prefix with state 41 “____ seen enough!” 42 “Skedaddle!” 44 Impressed with 47 Village V.I.P. 51 *Carpenter’s tool with a cord 54 “Dogs” 56 Single 57 Black rock 11

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1 Ones holding hands? 2 French act 3 Comment before “Be that way!” 4 Stamping need 5 Some campaign purchases 6 D.C. ballplayer 7 It’s worth 100 smackers 8 Patisserie buy 9 Sunken, as eyes 10 Low voices 11 It may be lined with mailboxes: Abbr. 12 Different rooms in a museum, maybe

13 *Smidgen 14 Cooker with a dial 15 Having no head 16 Luxury Hyundai 17 Gaping things 20 Relative of the Contour Plus 21 Poe poem 24 Like “Annabel Lee” among all Poe poems 27 See 89-Down 30 Wielder of the hammer Mjölnir 31 Lower chamber 32 Some stadium noise 34 Slimming surgery, informally 35 River through Bristol 36 *Tom Seaver, e.g. 39 At 3,000 feet above sea level, the highest provincial capital in Italy 43 ____ cake (dim sum staple) 45 *Dr. Seuss’ genre 46 Mysterious sighting 48 *Challenge for a righthanded golfer 49 Newsman David 50 Brings up 52 John McCain, for one 53 Sports org. with the teams Sun and Sky 55 In the mail 59 Wing 61 Household brand name with a lowercase first letter 64 Crib strip 66 Google Wallet alternative 68 Kind of switch 69 They hover over some icons 70 In the know 71 Release to the public, informally 73 Pad thai ingredient 74 Coal locale 77 Actress Diana nicknamed the “Blonde Bombshell” 79 Strong sideless wagon

83 *W.W. II propagandist 84 Suit to ____ 86 Directive in some automated messages 88 Holy Land line 89 With 27-Down, firm figure: Abbr. 91 “Stop your nonsense!” 93 Funny-car fuel, informally 95 Danish king who conquered England 97 Boondocks 99 Catch in the North Atlantic 103 Tough going 106 Al Jolson standard 108 “Aw, c’mon” 109 Songstress Eydie 110 “You’re ____ One, Mr. Grinch” 111 Köln coin L A S T H U B S

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113 “Same here” 114 Stars, at the Forum 115 Letter-shaped girder 116 Sounds of scolding 119 Put on board 120 Grieg’s “____ Death” 121 Violins and violas: Abbr. 123 U.S.’s largest labor union, in brief 125 Oscar-nominated Joaquin Phoenix film 126 “The Two Towers” denizen Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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DOG PETTING SERVICE Do you not have enough time to pet your dog? Does your dog crave more love and attention than you can give? Call me and I will devote 30-60 minute sessions of my time petting and loving your dog nonstop. Rates are $7 an hour, tips are appreciated. Call Derek 208-573-9772. ONE STOP EXOTIC REPTILE SHOP Boise’s Rock’n Reptile carries an exotic variety of reptiles and amphibians: chameleons, dart and tree frogs and green tree python just to name a few. Specialty orders custom cages available! Open Tues-Sat 10-6, Sun 12-5 and Mon appt. only. Come in and see us today: 2210 S. Broadway Ave. or call J.C. at 571-0400.

TATTOO SUPPLIES AND BODY JEWELRY Symmetry Studio & Supply is a new business located in Meridian that specializes in tattoo supplies and body jewelry. I focus on high quality product that speaks for itself, at a price that makes you happy to look again and again and again. It’s my job to make you happy to walk in the door.

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GHOST WRITER FOR HIRE! Need help writing your Book or Blog? call us at 208-243-2846. LET ME PAMPER YOU! You know your favorite part of going to the salon is the shampoo. Why not take a day off from washing your hair and let me do it for you instead? I love washing hair, I offer free shampoos, and I will come to you. If interested please email me at: sja7840@gmail.com.

CAREER TRAINING

CUIZEN PIZZA BOX OVEN Here’s one pizza box you’ll never throw away. With its shape and color, the CuiZen Pizza Box Oven could masquerade for any of the scores of delivery boxes out there, but this stainless steel 1,200-watt device will stay in your kitchen long after the cardboard carriers have been thrown away. The CuiZen cooks fresh pizza in 13-15 minutes and $49.99 Available from Amazon, Best Buy, frozen in 10-27 minutes Target, Sharper Image, Walmart with no preheating necessary. The best part is the oven’s rotating plate, which assures an even bake and reheating a slice or two (or four) in the Pizza Box Oven is a snap. —George Prentice

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SERVICES OFFERED Retired airline professional providing errand services in the Boise, Meridian, Eagle areas. Pricing starts at 20.00 per service. Feel free to call to discuss your situation. I look forward to assisting you! Thanks Bob. M-F 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

BW MUSIC LESSONS PIANO LESSONS! Dedicated piano teacher seeking new students. Located off Marigold in Garden City, Beginner-Intermediate. Contact Peggy: 941-4080 or pianopeggy0@gmail.com.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’d probably prefer to stay in the romantic, carefree state of mind. But from what I can tell, you’re ripe for a new phase of your long-term cycle. Your freestyle rambles and jaunty adventures should now make way for careful introspection and thoughtful adjustments. Instead of restless star-gazing, I suggest patient earth-gazing. Despite how it may initially appear, it’s not a comedown. In fact, I see it as an unusual reward that will satisfy you in unexpected ways.

of the 10-year-long Trojan War. The cause of the conflict was the kidnap of Helen of Troy, reputed to be the world’s most beautiful woman. And yet nowhere in the Iliad is there a description of Helen’s beauty. We hear no details about why she deserves to be at the center of the legendary saga. Don’t be like the Iliad in the coming weeks, Gemini. Know everything you can about the goal at the center of your life. Be very clear and specific and precise about what you’re fighting for and working towards.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In accordance with the current astrological omens, I recommend the following activities: Sing a love song at least once a day. Seek a message from an ancestor in a reverie or dream. Revisit your three favorite childhood memories. Give a gift or blessing to the wildest part of you. Swim naked in a river, stream, or lake. Change something about your home to make it more sacred and mysterious. Obtain a symbolic object or work of art that stimulates your courage to be true to yourself. Find relaxation and renewal in the deep darkness. Ruminate in unbridled detail about how you will someday fulfill a daring fantasy.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The comedian puppets known as the Muppets have made eight movies. In The Great Muppet Caper, the muppets Kermit and Fozzie play brothers, even though one is a green frog and the other a brown bear. At one point in the story, we see a photo of their father, who has the coloring and eyes of Kermit, but a bear-like face. I bring up their unexpected relationship, Cancerian, because I suspect that a similar anomaly might be coming your way: a bond with a seemingly improbable ally. To prepare, stretch your ideas about what influences you might want to connect with.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The ancient Greek epic poem the Iliad is one of the foundation works of Western literature. Written in the eighth century BCE, it tells the story

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): English author Barbara Cartland published her first novel at age 21. By the time she died 77 years later, she had written more than 700 other books. Some sources

24 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

say she sold 750 million copies, while others put the estimate at 2 billion. In 1983 alone she churned out 23 novels. I foresee a Barbara Cartland-type period for you in the coming months, Leo. Between now and your birthday in 2016, I expect you to be as fruitful in your own field as you have ever been. And here’s the weird thing: One of the secrets of your productivity will be an enhanced ability to chill out. “Relaxed intensity” will be your calming battle cry. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): ‘’On or about December 1910, human character changed,’’ wrote English author Virginia Woolf in 1924. What prompted her to draw that conclusion? The rapidly increasing availability of electricity, cars and indoor plumbing? The rise of the women’s suffrage movement? Labor unrest and the death of the king? The growing prominence of experimental art by Cezanne, Gauguin, Matisse and Picasso? The answer might be all of the above, plus the beginning of a breakdown in the British class system. Inspired by the current astrological omens, I’ll borrow her brash spirit and make a new prediction: During the last 19 weeks of 2015, the destiny of the Virgo tribe will undergo a fundamental shift. Ten years from now, I bet you will look back at this time and say, “That was when everything got realigned, redeemed and renewed.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The greatest and most important problems of life are all in a certain sense insoluble,” said psychologist Carl Jung. “They can never be solved, but only outgrown.” I subscribe to that model of dealing with dilemmas, and I hope you will consider it, too—especially in light of the fact that from now until July 2016 you will have more power than ever before to outgrow two of your biggest problems. I don’t guarantee that you will transcend them completely, but I’m confident you can render them at least 60 percent less pressing, less imposing and less restricting. And 80 percent is quite possible. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Hundreds of years ago, Hawaiians celebrated an annual holiday called Makahiki. It began in early November and lasted four months. No one worked very much for the duration. There were nonstop feasts and games and religious ceremonies. Communitybuilding was a featured theme, and one taboo was strictly enforced: no war or bloodshed. I encourage you Scorpios to enjoy a similar break from your daily fuss. Now is an especially propitious time to ban conflict, contempt, revenge and sabotage as you cultivate solidarity in the groups that are important for your future. You may not be able to make your own personal Makahiki last for four

months, but could you at least manage three weeks? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Located in Ann Arbor, Mich., the Museum of Failed Products is a warehouse full of consumer goods that companies created but no one wanted to buy. It includes caffeinated beer, yogurt shampoo, fortune cookies for dogs and breath mints that resemble vials of crack cocaine. The most frequent visitors to the museum are executives seeking to educate themselves about what errors to avoid in their own companies’ future product development. I encourage you to be inspired by this place, Sagittarius. Take an inventory of the wrong turns you’ve made in the past. Use what you learn to create a revised master plan. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.” Virtually all of us have been guilty of embodying that well-worn adage. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, quite a few of you Capricorns are currently embroiled in this behavior pattern. I am happy to report that the coming weeks will be a favorable time to quit your insanity cold turkey. In fact, the actions you take to escape this bad habit could empower you to be done with it forever. Are you ready to make a

heroic effort? Here’s a good way to begin: Undo your perverse attraction to the stressful provocation that has such a seductive hold on your imagination. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Everything I’ve ever let go of has claw marks on it,” confessed the late, great author David Foster Wallace. Does that describe your experience, too? If so, events in the coming months will help you break the pattern. More than at any other time in the last ten years, you will have the power to liberate yourself through surrender. You will understand how to release yourself from overwrought attachment through love and grace rather than through stress and force. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Most people love in order to lose themselves,” wrote Hermann Hesse in his novel Demian. But there are a few, he implied, who actually find themselves through love. In the coming months, Pisces, you are more likely to be one of those rare ones. In fact, I don’t think it will even be possible for you to use love as a crutch. You won’t allow it to sap your power or make you forget who you are. That’s good news, right? Here’s the caveat: You must be ready and willing to discover much more about the true nature of your deepest desires—some of which may be hidden from you right now. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


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WAFFLE ADDICTION FOOD TRUCK! New Food Truck “Waffle Addiction” is now open at the corner of Fairview and 5 Mile in the K-Mart lot . We specialize in Sweet and Savory Waffles. Our current menu features: Fresh Glazed Strawberry Belgians, Italian Stuffed Pizza Waffles, Cinnamon Bun with Cream Cheese/White Chocolate, Maple Glaze with fresh cooked bacon, Red Velvet with Dark Chocolate and the old time favorite Plain Belgian with Honey Cinnamon butter. We are open from 7:00 AM to 2:30 PM Monday thru Friday and 9:00 AM-4:00 PM on Saturday, Come by and check us out for some killer waffles. ALL NATURAL Olive oils & balsamic vinegar. Test 7 different infused & 3 fused olive oils. Choose from lemon, blood orange & green chili. And taste white & black balsamic vinegars. Only at Olivin, olive oil & vinegar taproom, 218 N. 9th, Boise. 344-0306.

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Case No. CV NC 1506832 ANOTHER NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minors)

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FOR SALE BW SHOP HERE EVER HEARD OF VIVID ROOTS? Broncos AND Vandals coming together to make the world a better place! Every product sold at www.vividroots.com helps raise money to build sustainable water systems in developing countries of Central America. Check out the site to see how four local college students have made it easy for everyone to make a difference in someone’s life. HEALING ARTS Reiki and Gemstone Jewelry! Order one of our best selling Reikiinfused gemstone bracelets today: free shipping! scarfgems. com or 208-999-7978.

Gaven Robert Salladay. The reason for the change in name is: because: Biological father terminated legal rights Garrett Salladay adopted him legally and we want him to share a last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on Sept. 15, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: July 20, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB Aug 5, 12, 19 and 26, 2015. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Addryan James Newberry, Jasmine Alleese Newberry and Casheas Warner. Legal Names of children.

LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email classifieds@boiseweekly.com or call 344-2055 for a quote. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Gaven Robert Velasquez. Legal Name of child Case No. CV NC 1511807 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Gaven Robert Velasquez, a minor, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to

A Petition to change the name of (1) Addryan James Newberry, and the name of (2) Jasmine Alleese Newberry, and the name of (3) Casheas Warner, all minors, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The names will change to (1) Addryan Sanchez, (2) Jasmine Sanchez and (3) Casheas Sanchez. The reason for the change in name is: Father has been absent 7 years with no support. The kids would like for us to all share the same name as to be a family. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Sept. 1, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: June 30, 2015. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB August 5, 12, 19 and 26, 2015.

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THOUGHT WE WERE FRIENDS Who gives out her best friend’s number to a guy she doesn’t know? Do you know anything about him? Would you go out with him? No! So don’t send him my way! BTW I looked him up on Idaho repository. He got caught for pooping in public… twice! Who does that? YOU OTTER KNOW! You’re a horrible representative of our community- what a colossal waste of money and effort. You’ve burdened us long enough- GET OUT OF OFFICE! And shame on those who voted for you time after time.

ARE YOU TRYING TO REHOME YOUR CAT? Submit your information & a photo to info@simplycats.org We will post it on the Simply Cats website on our OUT of FACILITY page. Simply Cats Adoption Center 208343-7177. XXOO You make my day brighter with your smile & I love the way you make heart shaped pancakes. E+M=forever.

ADULT

COMMUNITY BW CONFESSIONS YOU FARTED IN WHOLE FOODS You were the tall brunette with near perfect body that farted in the bread section last night. I was the tall guy next to you who asked, “was that you?” You quickly replied “No”! I tried to get rid of the stench by waiving two loafs of ciabatta bread. You proceeded to storm off in an angry manner. You are beautiful and even if you are a liar and fart like a Clydesdale, I’d love to meet up sometime.

JEN SORENSEN HOBO JARGON

TED RALL

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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | 25


PAGE BREAK TOP 10

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

World’s richest billionaires by net worth 1. Bill Gates (U.S.): $79.2 billion

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

2. Carlos Slim Helu (Mexico): $77.1 billion 3. Warren Buffett (U.S.): $72.7 billion 4. Amancio Ortega (Spain): $64.5 billion

Dear Minerva, I love my boyfriend of 10 years more than anything, with the exception of our son. A few years ago, my boyfriend wanted to try an open relationship. I agreed, to make him happy, but I am not. He sees a friend on occasion because he has a mysterious fetish he doesn’t want to involve me in, even though I’ve always been accepting of his fetishes. It makes me feel as though he has something to hide. What should I do? —Curiosity Quandary

FORECAST

#boiseweeklypic

“At tempt s to mislead the C our t strike at the hear t of the judicial proce s s and c annot be ig nored.”

5. Larry Ellison (U.S.): $54.3 billion

— U. S . D I STRI CT C O U RT

6. Charles Koch (U.S.): $42.9 billion

JUDGE DAVID CARTER

7. David Koch (U.S.): $42.9 billion 8. Christy Walton (U.S.): $41.7 billion

I N H I S AUG . 1 1 RULING AGAINST THE IDAHO DEPA RTM E NT O F C O RREC -

9. Jim Walton (U.S.): $40.6 billion

TION FOLLOWING A SY S -

10. Liliane Bettencourt (France): $40.1 billion

TE M I C EF FORT TO C OV E R UP THE MA N IPUL ATIO N OF

Source: Forbes The World’s Billionaires List 2015

Dear Curiosity, I have an arrangement with two friends in a committed relationship. Friend No. 1 is allergic to bleu cheese. Friend No. 2 despises Mexican food. Occasionally I go out with Friend No. 2 specifically to eat bleu cheese. We don’t take Friend No. 1, so he won’t have an allergic reaction. We never tell Friend No. 1 the details, he only knows we feasted on the forbidden, pungent goodness. Every so often, Friend No. 1 and I sneak away to a favorite Mexican restaurant and stuff our faces, which would disgust Friend No. 2. Sometimes the things we love are not always the things that our partners love. If the curiosity is killing you, try to think about it as something he doesn’t want to burden or disgust you with. If this arrangement isn’t working, then tell him. If you have a child together, you should be able to talk about it.

A C O U RT- A PP O I NTE D I N VESTIGATOR AND TAMPER

U.S. states with the lowest Medicaid spending in 2012

REC ORDS .

1. Wyoming, $0.6 billion

4. Montana, $1 billion

“Sandpoint police

5. New Hampshire, $1.3 billion

just murdered my

6. Alaska, $1.4 billion

brother.”

7. Vermont, $1.4 billion

Yes: 17.99%

— U N I DE NTI F I E D MA N C A P -

No: 78.84%

9. Idaho, $1.5 billion

TURED ON VIDEO FOLLOW -

I Don’t Know: 3.17%

10. Delaware, $1.6 billion

ING A SANDP OINT P OLICE-

8. Hawaii, $1.5 billion

INVOLVED SHOOTI NG THAT SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT “Do you care that Idaho will add another area code by 2018?”

2. N. Dakota, $0.8 billion 3. S. Dakota, $0.8 billion

Taken by Instagram user solitary_bibliophile.

WITH INMATE MEDICAL

Source: Pew Charitable Trusts, 2014

LEF T O N E MA N DE A D.

Disclaimer: This online poll is not i ntend ed to b e a s c i enti f i c s a mp l e o f l o c a l, statewi d e o r n a ti onal op i ni on.

356,268

35,000

5,035

3,146

113

17

Number of people with mental illness in American prisons in 2012

Number of mentally ill patients in state psychiatric hospitals in 2012

Approximate number of abandoned mines in Idaho

Number of sworn law enforcement officers in Idaho in 2008

Number of school districts in Idaho

Number of U.S. police K-9s killed in the line of duty so far in 2015

(Treatment Advocacy Center/National Sheriffs’ Association)

(Treatment Advocacy Center/National Sheriffs’ Association)

(Bureau of Land Management, EPA)

(2008 Census of State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies, U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics)

26 | AUGUST 19–25, 2015 | BOISEweekly

(idaho.gov)

(Officer Down Memorial Page, odmp.org)

9.3%, 20.9%, 29.6%

83.3 MILLION, 95.6 MILLION

Idaho’s adult obesity rate in 1990, 2004 and 2013, respectively

Number of pet dogs and pet cats in America in 2012, respectively

(stateofobesity.org)

(American Pet Products Association)

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The Café is open T-F, from 11am-1pm. Menu can be found at www.lifeskitchen.org or 208.331.0199.

Come see us at the Western Idaho Fair August 21-30th. Mention this ad and get a free pint of chocolate milk (while supplies last). Ask about our New Customer Specials.

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Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 09  
Boise Weekly Vol.24 Issue 09  

Girls On Fire: Recruiting more female firefighters