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8 DAYS OUT WEEK IN REVIEW JOS H GR OS S

WEDNESDAY JUNE 6 Festivals & Events PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP, SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Part of The Idaho Loud Writers’ Program. Includes a performance poetry workshop followed by an all-ages poetry slam. For more information, email cheryl_maddalena@ yahoo.com. There is a $25 prize for the haiku champ. 6 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, boisepoetry.com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632. SPLASH BASH POOL PARTY— Join the kick-off of weekly Splash Bash pool parties, featuring food, drinks and live music by Rebecca Scott. All ages welcome. Open to the public. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-3434611, owyheeplaza.com.

On Stage WAR HORSE—The winner of five Tony Awards is based on Michael Morpurgo’s novel and was the inspiration for Steven Spielberg’s film. It tells the story of a horse enlisted to help the English in World War I and a young man’s quest to bring the horse home. Tickets available at idahotickets.com. See Arts, Page 34. 7:30 p.m. $45-$75. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Workshops & Classes COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY COACHING—Do computers make you anxious? You can get free one-on-one help through the library’s computer volunteer technology coach program. Coaches can help with questions about email, the Internet and Microsoft Office products, including Word, Excel and Publisher. Call 208-570-6900 to schedule a free one-hour, one-on-one session with a volunteer coach. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, boisepubliclibrary.com. E-READER PETTING ZOO— Learn about the features of popular eReaders and how to use them to download books from the library. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995, boisepubliclibrary.org. FIT AND FALL PROOF CLASS— Increase mobility and independence by improving lower body strength, endurance, flexibility and bone mass, which can help reduce the risk of falling. 9-9:45 a.m. FREE for Nampa Rec Center members, $30 non-members. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

18 | JUNE 6–12, 2012 | BOISEweekly

BW staffers got themselves to the Greek on June 2.

CULTURE VULTURES Last weekend was all about community. From the Greek Food Festival to the Central Bench Spring Festival, Boiseans banded together to spotlight their shared interests. Visual Arts Collective kicked things off with a joint opening from Boise artists Erin Cunningham and Eli Craven called Wither and Bloom. Not only do Cunningham and Craven share studio space the Black Hunger collective, they also share a particular fascination with death, which was on display in the series. According to Boise Weekly Staff Writer Andrew Crisp, Cunningham took inspiration for her two vibrant oil paintings of flowers from an Idaho City graveyard, “where she took photos of flowers, left on gravestones, each decaying at the rarely visited cemetery.” Craven, on the other hand, repurposed and rephotographed images from 1980s magazines. “I was looking at magazine pages of people, in instances of death or condolence, where there’s grievance or comforting someone,” Craven explained. The joint exhibition will remain up through Tuesday, July 31. Check back in BW for a full review of the show from freelancer Christopher Schnoor. Boise Art Museum hosted Community Day on June 2, which highlighted the museum’s latest exhibition, Meet Me at the Center of the Earth by Nick Cave. According to BW intern Amy Merrill, “guests were greeted with bold colors, unique materials and hair—human hair.” In addition to perusing Cave’s Soundsuits—comprised of buttons, sequins, doilies and brightly died human hair—attendees also viewed 34 unique soundsticks contributed by area artists, which will be on display on the exterior of BAM until Friday, Aug. 31. Cave’s exhibit will remain up through Sunday, Nov. 4. Also on June 2, the third-annual Central Bench Spring Festival sprang up at Cassia Park. According to BW intern Jessica Murri, “booths from all sorts of nonprofit organizations attracted festival-goers and food trucks lined the parking lot.” Sarah Cunningham, president of the Central Bench Neighborhood Association, said that at least 30 different nationalities live in the Bench area, and the Central Bench Spring Festival celebrates them all. In addition to tea leaf readings and African drumming, the fest featured performances from a Bosnian dance troupe and Mexican folklorico dancers. Across town, the Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church hosted another cultural celebration: the 31st annual Greek Food Festival. BW New Media Czar Josh Gross waited in the blazing sun to get inside, where “the promise of fresh souvlaki, spanakopita and dolmas steamed and wafted from the grill, siren-like, promising a taste of paradise.” Gross spoke with one of the festival’s volunteers, who estimated that 4,000 people attended the festival. “We’re not very good business people. This all just sort of came together around us,” she said. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 50  

Idaho's Only Alternative

Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 50  

Idaho's Only Alternative