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where “the cowboys are the stars.”This rodeo is out in the heat and dust of August and has, itself, been around for more than 80 years. Yee-haw! There are two other PRCA rodeos in the valley in June, and one of them has new digs on Hwy 55 about a mile past the entrance to the Avimor community. The Eagle Rodeo is a 3-day event in early June, now at its new location, followed later in the month by the Meridian Lions Rodeo. Just because the Boise Valley is becoming more metropolitan doesn’t mean we don’t know how to cowboy up!

OTHER TEMPTATIONS You really can’t finish this list without adding the interpretive center at the World Center for Birds of Prey south of Boise and the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. The interpretive center is one of the best places in the world to

learn about these raptors and see the results of The Peregrine Fund’s breeding program. It’s also working on an expansion that will triple the size of the center and will open in 2019. The conservation area near Kuna is a perfect way to see these birds in the wild along the northern ridge of the Snake River Valley. While you’re in the area, be sure to stop at Celebration Park to see more birds and to experience Idaho’s only archaeological park, with petroglyphs that range in age from 100 to 10,000 years. You can also take a walk across the Snake River on the Guffey Railroad Bridge that was built in 1897 to carry ore from Silver City and sheep to woolen markets. If you’re still out for a drive, head over to Bruneau Sand Dunes and try your hand at sandboarding on the unique sandy feature. Another event that gets oohs and ahhs from all ages is the Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic at Ann Morrison Park usually around

the first weekend of September. There’s nothing quite so neat as about 50 hot air balloons heading into the skies on the last day of the event. The Nite Glow Spectacular is also especially cool. With Famous Potatoes proudly printed on our license plates, and with our Famous Idaho Potato Bowl, we clearly don’t shy away from our agricultural history of spuds and fries. So if you can dare the weather, head downtown on New Year’s Eve for the Idaho Potato Drop, complete with live music, fireworks and a warming atmosphere, no matter the temperature. If you need any more to do, go to the Western Idaho Fair in August for an Ice Cream Potato, or just plain go out and find something else that is so cool that you want to live here all the time.

Boise's Iconic Historic Neighborhoods Harrison Boulevard

Warm Springs Avenue

Harrison Boulevard, one of Boise's most picturesque thoroughfares, is named for President Benjamin Harrison, who signed the Admissions Act making Idaho a state. His visit in 1891 prompted the City Council and local landowner Jeremiah Brumback to rename 17th Street in honor of the 23rd president. As Boise boomed in the first decades of the 20th Century, many of the City's most prominent citizens built their homes on the Boulevard, resulting in a superb collection of architectural styles. With the addition of the median parkway and street lights in 1916, the City Engineer called Harrison Boulevard a "model road." This unique combination of stately homes and medians make Harrison Boulevard one of Boise's most historic and beautiful neighborhoods.

The Warm Springs Avenue neighborhood began to emerge in the 1890s, soon after Kelly Hot Springs, for which the street was named, were tapped to provide water for Boise's fire hydrants. The prominent owners of the water line built their mansions on the street, pumping in the natural hot water from east of Table Rock for use in their homes; these were among the first houses in the world to utilize geothermal sources for heat. The homes on Warm Springs Avenue are distinctive and grand, and designed in diverse architectural styles. The combination of stately homes and geothermal heat makes this area one of Boise's most historically significant local districts, as well as one of the most unique in the western states.

• 1980: Listed on the National Register of Historic Places • 1989: Designated as a local historic district by Boise City Hyde Park Growing from the needs of the surrounding North End Neighborhood, Hyde Park became Boise's first suburban shopping area, focused around the nexus of 4 early subdivisions. Located more than a mile from downtown, the area was a thriving commercial district from the turn of the century, providing two barbers, a pharmacy, meat market, bicycle shop, hotel, shoe shop, milliner, dyer, dairy, post office, bakery, plumber and lumber yard. Streetcar service supported the district, connecting it to the surrounding neighborhood and downtown.

• 1982: Listed on the National Register of Historic Places • 1980: Designated as a local historic district by Boise City

• 1979: Listed on the National Register of Historic Places • 1996: Designated as a local historic district by Boise City Old Boise The area known as Old Boise sprang up as a commercial district in the Original Townsite as early as 1864, catering to miners, military men and settlers. Although most of the original buildings were replaced by those we see today between 1890-1920, this area still contains the largest concentration of historically and architecturally significant commercial buildings in Boise. Although the district contains a variety of architectural styles, the fairly uniform size and scale of its buildings provide a cohesive appearance.

• 1978: Listed on the National Register of Historic Places • 1980: Designated as a local historic district by Boise City BOISECHAMBER.ORG

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Profile for Boise Metro Chamber

2018 Boise Valley Spotlight Magazine  

The Boise Valley Spotlight magazine is our annual membership directory. Together with our publishing partner, the Idaho Statesman, we share...

2018 Boise Valley Spotlight Magazine  

The Boise Valley Spotlight magazine is our annual membership directory. Together with our publishing partner, the Idaho Statesman, we share...