Issuu on Google+

Monroe 2–Orleans BOCES Transition Program


W

elcome to the Monroe 2–Orleans BOCES Transition Program! We

hope that you will find this brochure to be a useful tool as you learn about the various transition opportunities that we have to offer. There are four classroom options that provide opportunities for career readiness in conjunction with focusing on transition curriculum. BELL and Project SEARCH are two additional opportunities that students can apply for. While the descriptions represent typical programs, all programs are individualized to meet each student's needs and can include various elements. In addition, the classroom and career readiness opportunities available to a student can vary from year to year depending on skills obtained and supports needed.

03/14


Table of Contents Overview of the Transition Program................................................. 4 Village Plaza 1........................................................................................ 6 Village Plaza 2........................................................................................ 8 Paul Road.............................................................................................. 10 Roberts Wesleyan College...................................................................12 Bridge to Earning, Learning, & Living (BELL).................................14 Project SEARCH™................................................................................16 Career Readiness Opportunities.......................................................18

Information For more information regarding BOCES 2 programming, please contact the program supervisors at: - Transition: (585) 352-2664 - Project SEARCH: (585) 352-2450 - Career Readiness Opportunities (Activities of Daily Living Center, Work Activities Center, Work Study, and Career Skills Center): (585) 352-2675 - Career and Technical Education: (585) 352-2698

3


Overview of the Transition Program Mission Statement The Transition Program is for students aged 18-21. It provides community-based learning experiences using a person-centered planning approach, so that each student may maximize his or her individual potential. This program utilizes community resources designed to help students develop functional life and work skills and promote a healthy lifestyle. Our goal is to help all our students to be, to the fullest extent possible, self-advocating, independent, self-determining functional members of society.

Student to Staff Ratio Typically 12 students are assigned to one special education teacher and one teaching assistant. Some students may have needs that require a 1:1 aide in order to support skill development, if approved on their Individualized Education Program (IEP). Transition specialists work with students in all classrooms.

Parent Involvement Parents and guardians are an integral part of the Transition Program. It is important for the Transition teams and families to work closely together in order to help students achieve their goals. Components include meetings four times a year using a person-centered approach, parent-teacher conferences and Committee on Special Education (CSE) meetings.

Referrals Transition programs must be approved by the student’s CSE. Once the school district refers a student, Monroe 2–Orleans BOCES will recommend the appropriate classroom placement depending on the skills, strengths, needs and goals of the student. For more information on the referral process, please contact the Monroe 2–Orleans BOCES Central Referral Coordinator at (585) 352-2468.

4


Components of Transition The Transition Program uses the Life Centered Education (LCE) curriculum as a framework, which includes daily living skills; self-determination and interpersonal skills; and employment skills. Teachers may use additional instructional materials and resources when working with students on skill development.

Daily Living Skills

1. Managing Personal Finances 2. Selecting and Managing a Household 3. Caring for Personal Needs 4. Demonstrating Relationship Responsibilities 5. Buying, Preparing and Consuming Food 6. Buying and Caring for Clothing 7. Exhibiting Responsible Citizenship 8. Utilizing Recreational Facilities and Engaging in Leisure

Employment Skills

Self-Determination and Interpersonal Skills

9. Choosing and Accessing Transportation 10. Understanding Self-Determination 11. Being Self-Aware 12. Developing Interpersonal Skills 13. Communicating With Others 14. Good Decision Making 15. Developing Social Awareness 16. Understanding Disability Rights and Responsibilities 17. Knowing and Exploring Employment Possibilities 18. Exploring Employment Choices 19. Seeking, Securing and Maintaining Employment 20. Exhibiting Appropriate Employment Skills

For more information regarding the Transition Program, contact the program supervisor at (585) 352-2664

5


Village Plaza 1 Overview This program is designed for students with multiple needs, whose skills may range from ambulatory to non-ambulatory and verbal to non-verbal. Picture symbols are displayed individually to support comprehension of schedule and objects. The classroom design includes a sensory room, two bathrooms (with one having a changing table and hoyer lift), a kitchen area, washer/dryer area, computer/ technology area and a separate occupational therapy/physical therapy room. Augmentative communication creates learning for communication, academics and daily living skills. Some examples include: use of switch and cause/effect devices; use of digitized voice output and switch devices; use of various sensory and sound objects; and picture symbols.

Examples of skills taught • Sequencing and cause/effect skills • Early literacy and environmental print awareness • Money identification/management (i.e. sorting and identifying coins) • Gaining attention, listening and staying on tasks • Increasing vocalizations and vocabulary development • Expressing immediate needs • Developing question/answer dialogue and increasing interactions with others • Developing personal space and social boundaries skills • Participating in leisure activities

6


Supports available • Full-time nurse on-site • Full-time speech/language therapist (therapy is embedded in the program) • Students typically receive a variety of related services, such as occupational therapy, physical therapy, music therapy, autism specialist and assistive technology

Expectations/Rigor • Students often participate in Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and/or Work Activities Center • Independence is promoted for all students, realizing that some may have physical restrictions. Typical goals for independence include: o Self-help skills o Feeding tasks o Ambulation skills o Hand-eye accuracy o Choice making o Visually attending to tasks and people o Safety awareness

Community outings Students will have the opportunity to be involved in volunteer experience in the community (i.e. Meals on Wheels and Spencerport Food Pantry) as well as participate in classroom group outings to local grocery stores, restaurants and retail stores to work on daily functional skills. There is always staff supervision. There are community based instruction outings (field trips) in the greater Rochester area.

Transportation/Mobility Students are dependent upon private or public transportation. They are brought to and from the program by their school district’s transportation.

7


Village Plaza 2 Overview This program is designed for students with different ranges of cognitive, physical and emotional development. Students begin to learn the skills necessary for the adult world, in terms of employment, daily living and interpersonal/selfdetermination. Students typically participate in a half-day instructional and half-day career readiness program which can consist of differing elements (volunteering, work study, Activities of Daily Living Center, Work Activities Center, or Skills and Trades courses). In the classroom, students participate in academic instruction, social-communication/language groups, job club, transition-specific topics and health-related topics. The classroom consists of a learning center with a Smart Board, a kitchen area and a separate occupational therapy, physical therapy room.

Examples of skills taught • Managing personal finances (purchasing, ordering, tips and taxes) • Household management (appropriate use of household appliances/tools) • Caring for personal needs (proper grooming, basic health care) • Meal planning, food preparation and cooking • Exhibiting responsible citizenship • Leisure and community activities (planning recreational activities and inviting others to join) • Interpersonal skills (listening to and responding to others, establishing friendships, appropriate behaviors) • Following directions and maintaining attention to tasks • Self-management of emotions related to stress/ frustration/anger/anxiety • Career skills, such as how to seek and maintain employment, appropriate work habits, awareness of quality of work

8


Supports available • Full-time nurse on-site • Part-time speech/language therapist (therapy is embedded in the program) • Some students receive related services, such as counseling, occupational therapy, physical therapy, music therapy, autism specialist and assistive technology

Expectations/Rigor • Students are challenged to acquire the skills that will help them to be independent, productive adults

Community outings Students will have the opportunity to participate in classroom group outings to local grocery stores, restaurants and retail stores to work on daily functional skills. There is a high degree of staff supervision for education and training purposes. There are also community based instruction outings (field trips) in the greater Rochester area.

Transportation/Mobility Students are dependent upon private or public transportation. They are brought to and from the program by their school district’s transportation. Occasionally, a student will pursue obtaining their own driver’s license and/or learning how to use public transportation.

9


Paul Road Overview This program is designed for students with varying ranges of cognitive and emotional development. Students focus on skill building in the areas of daily living, interpersonal/self-determination and employment. Full-time mental health support is available to the students. Students typically attend the classroom for a half-day and a career readiness experience the other half-day. This usually includes work study, and/or Skills and Trades courses. In work study, most students are placed in enclave settings with four or five students and one job coach, with a goal to work independently with a drop-in job coach. The long-term goal for most students after they exit the program is to be referred to adult agencies for supported competitive employment in the community.

Examples of skills taught • Social skills and maintaining healthy relationships • Managing emotions and mental health • Managing personal finances (budgeting, maintaining a bank account) • Making good decisions and being a responsible citizen • Career exploration and job readiness

10


Supports available • Full-time mental health support • Part-time speech/language therapist (consultation is delivered as part of the program) • A few students may continue to require other related services

Expectations/Rigor • Students are challenged to acquire the skills that will help them to be independent, productive adults • Students work to understand how to handle the mental health challenges that they may come across

Community outings The program is located within walking distance of numerous retail outlets (restaurants, shopping). There are community van trips and all-day community experiences (i.e. the downtown library for career exploration, Rochester International Airport). Collaboration and participation in community fundraisers is encouraged.

Transportation/Mobility Students are typically brought to and from the program by their school district’s transportation. The program has a supervised mobility training focus using the RTS bus system. There is a Driving Club to help students practice for the NYS Permit and Driver’s Licensing.

11


Roberts Wesleyan College Overview This program is designed for students with varying ranges of cognitive development. Students focus on skill building in the areas of daily living, interpersonal/self-determination and employment. Students typically attend the classroom for a half-day and a career readiness experience the other half-day. This usually includes work study, and/or Skills and Trades courses. In work study, most students are placed in enclave settings with four to five students and one job coach, with a goal to work independently with a drop-in job coach. The long-term goal for most students after they exit the program is to be referred to adult agencies for supported competitive employment in the community.

Examples of skills taught • Interpersonal skills (listening to and responding to others, establishing friendships, appropriate behaviors) • Managing finances and a household • Increasing self-awareness and communicating one’s needs • Career skills (how to seek and maintain employment, appropriate work habits, awareness of quality of work)

12


Supports available • Part-time speech/language therapist (consultation is delivered as part of the program) • A few students may continue to require other related services

Expectations/Rigor Students are challenged to acquire the skills that will help them to be independent, productive adults.

Community outings Students may have community outings related to employment preparation.

Transportation/Mobility Students are typically brought to and from the program by their school district’s transportation. Students may practice for the NYS Permit and Driver’s Licensing and/ or learn how to use public transportation.

13


Bridge to Earning, Learning, & Living (BELL) Overview The Bridge to Earning, Learning, & Living (BELL) program is a two-year certificate program offered at Roberts Wesleyan College. It is a partnership between the College, CP Rochester, and Monroe 2–Orleans BOCES, funded through the TPSID grant (Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities). Dedicated to promoting superior academic, social and vocational experiences, the BELL Program guides students toward an array of learning opportunities. Potential students who have district CSE approval must apply for acceptance into the BELL program.

Examples of skills taught • Exhibiting responsible citizenship • Academic participation (study skills, attendance and assignment completion) • Interpersonal skills (listening to and responding to others, establishing friendships, appropriate behaviors, engaging in college social events)

sleyan Co lle We g rts

e

Ro be

• Career skills (how to seek and maintain employment, appropriate work habits, awareness of quality of work, following directions to complete work without direct supervision)

an

14

Rochester CP

rle Monroe 2–O

Bridge to E arning, L earning, & L iving sB OC E

S


Supports available In addition to the classroom teacher and teaching assistant, students have access to an academic advisor, educational coaches, peer mentors, job training and transition specialists.

Expectations/Rigor Students are required to participate in academic course work (enrollment in college courses for credit or auditing), vocational experiences (paid and non-paid work on or off campus), and social experiences (social clubs, sports, activities). Independence is highly promoted, and students can generally use the same campus facilities as Roberts Wesleyan students.

Community outings Students may have community outings related to employment preparation.

Transportation/Mobility Students are typically brought to and from the program by their school district’s transportation. Students may practice for the NYS Permit and Driver’s Licensing and/or learn how to use public transportation.

15


Project SEARCH™ University of Rochester Medical Center Overview Project SEARCH is a partnership between educational partner Monroe 2–Orleans BOCES, business partner University of Rochester Medical Center and agency partner ARC of Monroe. Through participating in unpaid internship experiences, students with developmental disabilities learn transferable work skills in order to obtain and keep supported competitive employment. The student interns participate in up to three individualized internships in the host business, including required training periods before each new internship experience. Project SEARCH is designed to be a students’ final year of high school eligibility. Potential students who have district CSE approval must apply for acceptance into Project SEARCH, as well as apply to ACCES-VR and OPWDD.

Examples of skills taught • Students focus on skills that will best prepare them to seek, secure and maintain employment • Classroom instruction and training, designed to support internship skills building, occurs at the beginning and end of each day and for a week prior to each new internship placement. In order to seek, secure, and maintain employment, focus areas of skill building include:  self-regulation and selfdetermination  foundational and technical skills required for safe employment  safe workplace mobility  interpersonal communication skills  health and wellness  employment skills

16


Supports available The teaching assistant and agency employment specialist work in the host business as job coaches supporting interns on their internship sites and linking back to classroom instruction. No related services are provided at Project SEARCH; if a student has a related need, the team will work with the intern and family to access community-based services.

Expectations/Rigor As Project SEARCH operates entirely within the host business which has committed to helping prepare work-ready interns; this program is rigorous. There are expectations that student interns have a desire to work, are capable of selfmanagement, are able to take direction from supervisors and are willing to learn from their experiences.

Community outings During training periods, interns may have community trips related to employment preparation.

Transportation/Mobility

For more information regarding Project SEARCH, contact the program supervisor at (585) 352-2450

Understanding that employment requires people to prepare for consistent, safe transportation to work, Project SEARCH interns receive Individualized Mobility Assessments to determine options for getting to and from Project SEARCH at URMC. Generally, interns are assessed capable of safe community travel using public transportation and are successfully trained and no longer dependent on school bus transportation by mid-year.

17


Career Readiness Opportunities Students may have the opportunity to participate in Career Readiness Opportunities. These opportunities are offered in conjunction with a Transition classroom placement. They provide students with an opportunity to gain valuable skills in the areas of daily living and employment.

Activities for Daily Living Center The ADL Center is an 1,800 square foot ranch house which provides a home setting where students can work on personal hygiene and grooming skills, meal preparation, household maintenance, home economics and recreational skills. The physical space includes a bedroom, kitchen, bathroom, livingroom and laundry area and is modified for students having significant fine and gross motor difficulties.

Work Activities Center At the WAC, students develop work habits required on job sites and are involved in meaningful and challenging work experiences based on their abilities and needs. Jobs are task analyzed to allow the students to be able to complete all or part of a given job. Students concentrate on manual, perceptual and behavioral work skills, and may work both individually and cooperatively on job components. An evaluation is completed to determine possible placement in the program. Students may be paid according to Department of Labor guidelines for the work they complete. Students attend either morning or afternoon sessions up to five times per week.

18


Work Study This is an individualized learning experience comprised of shadowing and/or work opportunities in a variety of community-based settings, with job coaching support to create a targeted transition process to ready students for employment. Paid and unpaid work/training opportunities may be provided, and there are opportunities for targeted skill building in the Career Skills Center.

Skills and Trades Courses (part of the Career and Technical Education department) These courses are designed for students with special needs, including but not limited to those identified by Committees on Special Education. In order to meet student needs, Services and Trades courses have a classroom aide and smaller student to teacher ratios (approximately 15:1). These courses include a Job Club curriculum designed to develop transferable skills and provide career planning. Course curriculums are directly aligned to viable employment options and include industry aligned performance activities. For more information, please contact the program supervisor at (585) 352-2698.

Career Readiness Opportunities (ADL, WAC, and Work Study): (585) 352-2675

19



BOCES 2 Transition Program Brochure