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INSIDE OUR 2017 CCR SUMMIT IN ORLANDO

Dive in

John Thomas, CEO Pinch A Penny

How Pinch A Penny is changing the pool & spa retail game

Exclusive Inside: Not your dad’s body shop New high-rise rises Leading engineering & roofing manufacturers highlighted

Check out our

Kitchens

Magazine and Supplement inside

March/April 2017 • www.ccr-mag.com

Official magazine of


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pecifier, contractor, architect, installer, project estimator, material purchaser, product manufacturer, building owner. We all feel the satisfaction when a project comes together as planned ... and our reputations go up a notch. That’s why AC•Tech puts so much emphasis on actually, physically “being there” when it counts. It’s one thing to manufacture specialty coatings that have been engineered to perform. It’s quite another to invest in the technical expertise and field experience necessary to make these coatings actually meet the FIELD performance SPECIFIED. It’s one thing to provide a toll-free number to respond to problems and warranty claims after something goes wrong. It’s quite another to work with a specifier to design an appropriate system, to counsel a project manager in the most cost-effective application

protocol, and to train installers to overcome an unexpected concrete slab issue before it cascades into a catastrophic flooring failure. So, we may advertise that AC•Tech “specializes in preventing excessive moisture, alkalinity, and oil contamination from causing commercial flooring failures in renovation, remodeling, and tenant improvement projects.” And we may try to hype our industry awards for product and process innovation in moving moisture mitigation to Division 3 in ground-up, fast-track construction projects. But, our measure lies in our attitude. We believe that helping everyone to do it right the first time is what builds success, reputation, and that “atta boy” feeling when all is said and done. And who doesn’t like that feeling?

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March/April • 2017 Vol. 16, No.2

82

26 FEATURES

26 Dive in  How Pinch A Penny is changing the game for today’s swimming pool retailers 82  Not your dad’s body shop  State-of-the-art facility draws rave reviews from customers, insurance companies and employees alike

116

116  New high-res rises  Hilton complex requires survey technology to ensure its place among historic buildings 122  When it comes to specifying ceramic tile  For commercial projects... Let’s talk Turkey!

100  The Grovery Game  5 keys to hiring a construction manager you can trust

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March/April • 2017 Vol. 16, No.2 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Atlanta 22  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Dallas

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS 38  Top engineering firms

18

66

52  Leading roofing manufacturers/suppliers

SPECIAL SECTION

Commercial Kitchens 85  The difference you can taste  How 83 years down the road Carvel’s brand is still pulling in the fans 94 Kid friendly  Pueblo School District solves water woes Federal Construction 105  From the ground up  Inside the building of the United Arab Emirates’ Embassy Education Affairs facility 112 Rising up  Flood prone community bound for greatness

85

DEPARTMENTS

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 126 Leadership 128 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 130 Ad Index 131 Product Showcase 132 Publisher’s Note

105 4

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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

Just build, baby A

tlanta has two of them. Los Angeles is adding one. And now Las Vegas is getting one. It's all about the stadiums in today's construction landscape. Or at least is feels that way. When NFL owners approved the relocation of the Oakland Raiders to Las Vegas by a vote of 31-1 in March, the league handed America's biggest playground the keys to what surely will become a construction boon.

All told, construction on these projects is slated to begin in next two years, with an estimated completion date of at least seven to eight years away. And there's something else happening. All of this construction madness is even inviting conversation to one of the area's biggest debates – will light rail or rapid transit system ever connect metro Atlanta with the Cobb/Cumberland area?

Here’s the thing – new construction begets new construction. In Atlanta, the arrival of the new Braves’ stadium is helping to deliver even bigger commercial and residential developments to the area. That's what's happening in Atlanta right now, as economic development leaders in Cobb County, the new home to the Braves, say the commercial and residential development inspired by the stadium is progressing at an overwhelming pace. Here's the thing – new construction begets new construction. In Atlanta, the arrival of the new Braves' stadium is helping to deliver even bigger commercial and residential developments to the area. Two office towers, a hotel, and two residential towers are all scheduled along the I-75 corridor near the stadium. A parking lot will replace a wooded area nearby.

You can open a similar playbook for the greater Las Vegas area, where a slate of new commercial businesses will complement an already booming downtown area. Tis’ the season, or so it seems, for stadium building. Mike Burke, CEO of engineering, consulting and project management firm Aecom, recently said that it is time to be bullish on the North American infrastructure market. He said with state and local spending plans set to increase, the time is now. Looking ahead, it will be interesting to see how the developments around these stadium developments continue to progress. It also will be wise to see what professional team owners take notice and investigate how to get into the game. So why not? Why not just build, baby. CCR

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 772.232.6614 SCC MISSION Create FINAL 5.21:Eagle qrt pg FINAL

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678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com

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678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 CCRP MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Kristen Corson • kristenc@ccr-people.com 770.990.7702

Luxurious design elements of Massimo-Dutti’s first U.S. store and its largest worldwide - include integrated marble floors, highend millwork, custom lighting, fabric wall coverings and even a life-size horse mannequin. These elements all combine to create a luxury retail environment.

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We’re ready to create when you are. Call Joseph Rotondo, Vice President 914.244.9100, x319 or visit www.schimenti.com.

General Contractor. Construction Management. Remodel Program. New York I New Jersey I New England CIRCLE NO. 6

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

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EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS

RESTAURANTS

AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England

RON BIDINOST Vice President of Operations Bubbakoo’s Burritos Corporation

DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes

GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A

BROOKS HERMAN Project Manager of Construction Academy Sports + Outdoors STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company BRYAN NOVAK Sr. Director of Engin eering, Estimating, Quality Assurance Wal-Mart Stores

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development

KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

STEVE JONES

International Director JLL MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

JOHN LAPINS Partner, Geolo Capital DENNIS MCCARTY Vice President, Technical Services, Construction InterContinental Hotels Group, the Americas

ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

10

GINA NODA President Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

DAVID SHOTWELL Sr. Director of Construction and Facilities Cook Out

JANIS WILLIAMS Director of Store Facilities Tuesday Morning

Cumberland Farms

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT

JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury

MICHAEL TIERNEY Director of Construction

MATT SCHIMENTI

BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp.

GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership

ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels

SCOTT OFFERMANN Managing Director Global Occupier Services Cushman & Wakefield LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations & Project Management Interserv Hospitality Solutions JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Herschman Architects STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA MIKE AUTENRIETH Academic Director Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management The International Culinary School at The Art Institute International Minnesot DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 8


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail Wal-Mart Wal-Mart has opened two new convenience stores in Arkansas and Texas under its newest fuel and convenience concept as part of a larger strategy to capture more of the c-store market. The 2,500-squarefoot spaces include a hot food bar, soft-serve ice cream, a selection of grocery staples and a walk-in beer cooler. Apple Apple will expand its glass-walled, cube-shaped flagship on New York City’s Fifth Avenue from about 32,000 square feet to 77,000 square feet. Apple has taken up temporary residence in the former FAO Schwarz space next door, which will become an Under Armour store when Apple’s permanent space is renovated. Kohl’s Kohl’s aims to move some of its larger stores into smaller spaces to cut overhead and boost profits without closing stores and exiting markets altogether. After closing 19 stores in 2016, the retailer began testing a 35,000-square-foot store format.

Dollar General Dollar General is looking to add 1,000 stores to its roster this year, including a distribution facility in Georgia. It also plans to open a 1 million-square-foot distribution center in Wisconsin. Target Target plans to invest $7 billion over the next three years to cut prices and speed up initiatives, including building more smaller-format stores. Kohl’s Kohl’s aims to move some of its larger stores into smaller spaces to cut overhead and boost profits without closing stores and exiting markets altogether. The retailer closed 19 stores last year, and began testing a 35,000-square-foot store format. TJX TJX, the parent of T.J. Maxx, Marshalls and HomeGoods, will open a new home goods retail concept this year and encourage consumers to shop at both the new retailer and the company’s HomeGoods chain. The off-price retail operator hasn’t released the name of the new chain, which will open in four locations this year.

Hospitality Hyatt Hyatt plans to build the portfolio of a couple of its brands, including adding a dozen hotels to its Hyatt Centric through 2019 and its recently acquired Miraval brand, which has resorts in Arizona, Massachusetts and Texas.

Hilton Worldwide Hilton Worldwide plans to open a 196-room, 12-suite hotel in Surrey, UK, in 2021. Bandstand Square Developments will manage the amenity-filled property, which will be within walking distance of the Woking train station and less than 30 minutes from London.

Ashford Hospitality Prime Ashford Hospitality Prime laid out a plan for its growth through the acquisition of more luxury hotels.

Ryman Hospitality A water park complex that Ryman Hospitality has planned for its Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center will cost $90 million and cover more than 217,000 square feet, including water slides, food and bar service, and a live entertainment area.

Marriott International Marriott International is testing new concepts at Aloft and Element hotels, two boutique brands created by Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. At Element, Marriott is testing the concept of communal areas for groups of four guest rooms, and Aloft is debuting new healthy dining options.

12

Miraval Group Miraval Group has added Travaasa Austin Resort to a growth agenda that includes resorts in California and Massachusetts. The Texas property, acquired from an Amstar Group subsidiary, will be renamed Miraval Austin following the development and renovation process.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


AroundtheIndustry

(continued)

Restaurants Hooters Hooters Management will open a new fast-casual concept called Hoots near Chicago. The new digs will include a full bar, servers of both sexes and a scaled-back menu featuring chicken wings and a few other popular dishes. Customers of the 75-seat eatery will order at the counter.

ALDI ALDI will add up to 1,500 square feet of space for more fresh foods such as produce, baked goods, dairy and meat at its stores, which currently are about 18,000 square feet. The move is part of the discount grocer’s $1.6 billion plan to upgrade most of its 1,600 stores.

Wendy’s Wendy’s will add 1,000 new restaurants in the next three years, with a flexible new design that will fit into smaller spaces. The chain will seek out nontraditional spaces outside of its typical suburban locations.

In-N-Outa Burger In-N-Out Burger has grown to 32 eateries in Texas since entering the market in 2011 and now aims to enter the Houston market.

Starbucks Starbucks will make its debut in Italy late next year with a 25,500-square-foot Roastery store in Milan. The U.S.-based coffee chain was originally going to partner with Italian company Percassi to open one of its traditional stores first, but plans changed after the high-end Roastery concept proved successful in Seattle.

Freshii Freshii plans to more than triple the number of franchised locations within three years. Next Door Kimbal Musk plans to open a chain of restaurants he started in Boulder, Colo., called Next Door. The chain plans to open 50 locations by 2020.

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CIRCLE NO. 10

MARCH : APRIL 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

36,000 The number of construction jobs that were added in January – the highest level since November 2008, according to an analysis of new government data by the Associated General Contractors of America. The number comes as employers increased pay in an effort to address a chronic worker shortage. INSIDE OUR RETREAT: EXECUTIVES OUTLINE WHAT TO EXPECT IN 2017

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Craig Murray VP Real Estate Operations Dental Care Alliance

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Exclusive Inside: Modeling today’s smart cities World-class resort opts for world-class mosaic design Leading architecture & fixture manufacturers revealed Check out our Official magazine of

Kitchens

Magazine and Supplement inside

January/February 2017 • www.ccr-mag.com

WD Partners inadvertently was omitted from the “Leading Architecture Firms Report” in our January/February issue. Their numbers would have ranked it No. 8 on the Retail listing and No. 3 on the Restaurant listing. For more information on the global brand strategist, designer and architectural firm, visit them online at wdpartners.com. The correct listing also is available in our online issue, which you can find at www.ccr-mag.com. Commercial Construction & Renovation regrets the error.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

CIRCLE NO. 11


Did you

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According to Fitch Ratings, smaller hotel brand owners and operators are flexing their balance sheets to support rooms system growth to stay relevant amid industry consolidation and increasing competition from alternative accommodation providers. Fitch says this could weaken the credit profiles for smaller lodging C-Corp issuers by increasing leverage and adding more volatile owned and leased assets, and contingent obligations in the form of off-balance sheet performance and loan guarantees. Fitch expects more consolidation in the sector involving smaller issuers, which poses merger and acquisition event risk for bondholders.

1.6

The amount, in billions, that discount grocer ALDI will spend to update about 1,300 stores in the United States. The upgrades include windows that will let in more natural light, higher ceilings and wider first aisles. The retailer is looking to boost its monthly shopper count to 60 million by 2020, up from the current 40 million.

Our signage will get your brand noticed. From metal tackers, Artlite® and NeonFree® illuminated signage to unique dimensional fixtures and displays, May Group offers an unbeatable range of solutions, all made in the USA.

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CIRCLE NO. 12

MARCH : APRIL 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Demand outlook for luxury hotels strong H otel operators continue to invest billions of dollars of new development and acquisition initiatives to appeal to a growing sect of affluent travelers. According to analysts from STR and Tourism Economics, the expected supply growth (+2%) for the U.S. hotel industry will outpace demand (+1.7%) in 2017. This will lead to a slight decline in occupancy (-0.3%), they say, with similar performance projections expected in 2018. The analysts said, however, the number of new hotels added in the luxury segment has been minimal and income growth still looks strong. The luxury segment is projected to report the largest increases in average daily room rates (+3%) and revenue per available room (+2.8%), they say.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

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CIRCLE NO. 14

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Meet me at Ye Olde Pub CCRP Nation returns to the ATL

I

f one of the oldest pubs in Atlanta isn’t the best place to hold a networking event, what is? To give it a try, the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) crew converged on the Ye Olde Dunwoody Tavern to spend an evening of catching up and talking shop. The neighborhood hangout served as the ideal backdrop for the event, which was sponsored by StoreFloors & JLL. If you want to get your name on the CCRP networking list in 2017, contact Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com. Deron Breeze, Fairmont Sign Company; Bret Hanks, Ameritech Facility Services; Ben Hill, Ameritech Facility Services; David Corson, CCR; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors

REGISTERED COMPANIES: American & Interstate Signcrafters

Discovery Point

Hooters

Porcelanosa

The Shopping Center Group

Ameritech Facility Services

Elro Signs

Interstate Signcrafters

Rogers Electric

Titus Construction LLC

ArcVision

Equipment Management Group

JLL

Singleton Construction

Bridgestone Retail Operations

Fairmont Sign Company

McGovern & Associates

SMS Cooperative

Carvel

Federal Heath

Mid-South Roof Systems

Storefloors

Chain Store Maintenance

Feed Restaurants

Orange Sparkle Ball

The Beam Team

Window Film Depot

Continental Restaurant

Fi Companies

OxBlue

The Home Depot

ZipWall

UHC Construction Services Wallace Engineering

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: JLL Ken Demkse, Senior Vice President Multi-site Project Management 3344 Peachtree Road NE Suite 1100 Atlanta, GA 30326 Ph: (404) 964-8901 ken.demske@am.jll.com

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

Storefloors Julia Versteegh, Vice President of Marketing & Business Development 6480 Roswell Road Atlanta, GA 30328 Ph: (404) 610-4008 juliav@storefloors.com www.storefloors.com


When the specs call for terrazzo, call the person who possesses the right skill, experience, and training – your NTMA contractor. The Pearl Hotel – NYC I James A Prisco, Architect I Photography by David Laudadio

CIRCLE NO. 15

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association www.NTMA.com 800.323.9736


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

2.

1.

4.

3.

5.

6.

1: Michael Crawford, The Beam Team; Brad Thurman, Wallace Engineering; Jana Monforte, Wallace Engineering; Kevin Fleming, The Beam Team 2: Dan Belling, Federal Heath; David Carmona, Porcelanosa USA; Sarah Sullivan, JLL 3: Ed Lawler, Fi Companies; Greg Mooney, ArcVision

7.

4: Mike Morelli, American & Interstate Signcrafters; Ken Demske, JLL; Jeff Ansel, Mid-South Roof Systems; Karl Uftring, American & Interstate Signcrafters 5: Margaret Harritt, JLL; Leslie Burton, UHC Construction Corp 6: Matt Smith, Federal Heath; John Nenos, Consultant; Anthony Zarcone, Consultant 7: Caitlin Madden, Storefloors; Mindy Tucker, Storefloors; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors; Frank Rhodes, Elro Signs

8.

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8: Bill Faul, Federal Heath; Ian Bannister, Window Film Depot; Mike Mosby, Window Film Depot; Isyol Cabrera, Carvel Ice Cream

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


CIRCLE NO. 16


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Lone Star Nights Dallas plays host to the CCRP crew

T

here may not be a better way to spend an evening than sitting right smack dab in the middle of some Texas cool. That’s where The Ranch at Las Colinas in Irving comes in. The restaurant with the “all everything” Southwestern flare welcomed the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) networking crew with open arms. If you want to sample some of the country’s most interesting and entertaining hot spots with your industry colleagues, join CCRP today. For more information on how to get involved, contact Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

REGISTERED COMPANIES: ACT Construction

DAM Media & Design

Fogo de Chao Churrascaria

Kieffer Signs

Sonic Drive In

American & Interstate Signcrafters

El Rancho Supermercado

Genesis Lighting Solutions

May Group

TD Ameritrade

Ameritech Facility Services

Elemental LED

GRB Service Systems

Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc

The Beam Team

Chain Store Maintenance

EMG Corp

HFA

North American Signs

The McIntosh Group

Command Center

Faubion Associates

Interstate Signcrafters

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, Inc

Tuesday Morning

Core States Group

Federal Heath

Jones Sign

Sargenti Architects

Uncle Julio’s Corp

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR:

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

May Group Dalana Morse, Marketing Manager 1200 Forum Way South Fort Worth, TX 76140-5012 Ph: 817.336.5671, ext 137 dmorse@maygroupusa.com


dedicated to the art of engineering. Wallace Engineering Structural and Civil Consultants Tulsa | Kansas City | Oklahoma City | Denver | Atlanta wallacesc.com

CIRCLE NO. 17


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

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5.

7.

6. 1: Dwight Enget, Command Center; John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; Shalotta Armstrong, Command Center; Wade Whitener, The Beam Team 2: Jeremy Cueller, Ameritech Facility Services; Nicole Pipkin, Sargenti Architects; Adam Nelson, Ameritech Facility Services; Sunny Ham, Sargenti Architects 3: Wayne LaMothe, ACT Construction; Alexandra Anderson, Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc. 4: Melisa Baum, Core States Group; Magen Bybee, Genesis Lighting Solutions; Lisa Peterson, Federal Heath 5: Bob Witken, Uncle Julio’s; Corp; Joshua Gordon, Travis Mechanical; Mike Gordon, Fogo de Chao

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8.

9.

6: Randy Davis, North American Signs; Dalana Morse, DAM Media & Design; Eric Johnson, May Group 7: Mike Morelli, American & Interstate Signcrafters; Rod and Debbie Lynch with Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc 8: Richard Flores, El Rancho Supermercado; Tony Scardino, Popeyes 9: Kirk Stateson, Kieffer Signs; Grady Taylor, Uncle Julio’s Corp

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


Today’s Construction Demands Better Scheduling

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CIRCLE NO. 18


How Pinch A Penny is changing the game for today’s swimming pool retailers By Michael J. Pallerino

I

t’s no surprise that Pinch A Penny Pool Patio Spa’s family owned approach to business is rooted in its family owned business structure.

The Pinch A Penny story began when the Thomas family opened a discount store in a Clearwater, Fla., industrial park in 1975. Over time, the store evolved into a full-time, full-service retail pool supply store that offers everything from chemicals, equipment, patio accessories, giftware, toys and floats. In 1976, the brand began issuing franchises by promoting a “family-owned” culture dedicated to providing its customers with unprecedented value, quality and service. Today, led by CEO John Thomas, the company has more than 230 across the Southeast and Texas.

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MARCH : APRIL 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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DIVE IN Each store features a fully trained staff of experts, continuing education programs and the products needed to make pool care a routine part of life. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Thomas to get his take on where the Pinch A Penny Pool Patio Spa brand is heading.

Give us a snapshot of Pinch A Penny Pool Patio Spa brand?

Pinch A Penny Pool Patio and Spa is the world’s largest swimming pool retail, service and repair franchise, offering a full line of products, as well as residential cleaning and repair services. With more than 230 stores located across the Southeast, our company offers customers a one-stop shop for all of their pool and spa supply needs with one of the most complete lines of pool chemicals, maintenance equipment, as well as parts and accessories. The stores also carry games, toys, floats, grills, and more.

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Today’s consumers have access to a vast amount of technology and data right at their fingertips for researching and buying new products or services.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

What type of consumer are you targeting?

As a specialized retailer, we’re targeting customers who are first and foremost pool and spa owners. These consumers actively seek out advice and information about proper maintenance and care, giving us the opportunity to not only leverage our 42-year history of industry expertise, but also build long-lasting relationships over the lifetime of their pool or spa. Today, we offer an even more customized shopping experience that encourages repeat purchases, while attracting and retaining more loyal customers.

How does the design of the stores cater to how today’s consumers shop?

Our store design is predicated around customer service. From the moment customers walk through the doors of a Pinch A Penny, they are greeted and directed to the appropriate section of the store that best fits their needs. Similar


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DIVE IN to that of a supermarket, the store floor plan has been strategically designed in such a way that creates a friendly, effective and interactive shopping environment.

Walk us through how and why it designed the way it is? Pinch A Penny stores come in many shapes and sizes, so every store has to be treated individually, starting with the unique physical space. Then we focus on where we intend to locate bleach storage and filling since swimming pool-grade bleach is a key item sold through our stores. After that, we focus on locating the parts-room, water testing area, and cash register areas to create optimal flow for the consumer, maximize space for inventory management, and avoid consumer congestion in any one area.

We are continuing to focus on how we can further enhance our customer-centric business model.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

Our stores have been designed to reflect various elements of our lifestyle brand inspired by the beauty of a swimming pool. This includes our proprietary water tile flooring and warm, vibrant color palette, which creates a welcoming and inviting atmosphere for the customer. Merchandise is sectionalized and clearly labeled for easy identification. We want to make sure that every customer that visits a Pinch A Penny has a great in-store experience, so they can get the most out of their backyards. Our prototype works well in end-cap, inline or freestanding spaces between 1,500 and 6,000 square feet, with most locations averaging 2,400 to 3,000 square feet.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business? Regulations from many governing authorities and timing to get permits. We are no different than anyone else.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

Last year, we rolled out a LED lighting program to allow for a cost savings on energy consumption. LED technology is extremely energy efficient, requires little maintenance and is good for the environment. Approximately

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


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DIVE IN information they need to keep them coming back for more.

Why did you pick the locations you did for your stores?

The old adage of “Location, Location, Location” is still true. We are a destination store, and as such, we don’t have to be at the corner of “Main Street” and “First Avenue.” And since we are usually located in strip centers, our focus is to find the best plaza near where the majority of swimming pools are located, and look to have good parking, truck access and some visibility.

What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

40 percent of the franchise system, including new stores, are now using the new LED light system and have seen reductions in their energy bills due to the switch. As more and more stores make the decision to convert, we are proud to be doing our part to minimize wasted energy and consumption.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

Convenience is king in today’s retail landscape. Retailers should pay attention to bridging the in-store and online shopping experience to offer customers the best of both worlds.

For more than 40 years, our brand has been a go-to for trusted expertise on pool supplies and service. Although our footprint has grown, the franchise model has allowed us to remain “local,” while the care and knowledge of our owner-operators continue to position us as a market leader. As the competitive landscape evolves, along with the way consumers want and expect to be marketed to, it is critical, now more than ever, that our brand continues to evolve to keep up and maintain market dominance. We now have an opportunity to capture greater marketshare because of the growing demand for greater personalization and customization of the retail shopping experience. This approach will ensure we are always attracting new – and in many cases younger – customers to maintain healthy growth.

Are you optimistic about what you see in the retail sector?

We are very optimistic about what’s ahead for the retail industry. There is always room to enhance the customer experience, and as technology and personalization continue to shape the retail sector, we must react and adapt to this demand by providing customers with the

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

Our growth is based on a strategic expansion plan while identifying the right franchisees to grow our national footprint. All of our locations are owner-operated to ensure the highest quality customer service. As part of our expansion plans, we’re now seeking qualified candidates to become franchisees and drive growth in select cities across Texas, Louisiana, Georgia, Mississippi and Florida.

What trends are you seeing?

Millennials are continuing to shape the retail experience. While this generation may not be that different than any other, this digitally savvy group craves attention and yearns for greater personalization when it comes to shopping. As a result, we’ve learned to adapt our business model to meet their needs through an extensive data-driven digital marketing approach and offer more opportunities for customer interaction.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” retail store in today’s competitive landscape?

Today’s consumers have access to a vast amount of technology and data right at their fingertips for researching and buying new products or services. As a result, our value proposition has adjusted to align with ever-changing consumer preferences to bridge the online and in-store shopping experience, thus creating a highly interactive and personalized customer experience. In addition, having a highly trained and knowledgeable staff is crucial in our industry and expected by today’s consumers. We


$FRA-600_Commercial_ConstRenov_7x9.75_PA-Diamond-JanFeb2017.indd 1 CIRCLE NO. 21

1/24/17 4:46 PM


DIVE IN are a relationship-based business and having a great product line is simply not enough to build a loyal customer following.

What is today’s consumer looking for?

Convenience is king in today’s retail landscape. Although most consumers with busy lifestyles may prefer online shopping, there are still those that appreciate and need the traditional shopping experience. Face-to-face interaction with store associates is necessary when pool owners need help solving or preventing problems. Retailers should pay attention to bridging the in-store and online shopping experience to offer customers the best of both worlds.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Describe a typical day.

For me there really is no such thing as a typical day. After our annual franchisee convention wraps up in early January, I hit the road to visit every location. I try to be in the office at least one day out of the week, and there are some weeks that I need to be in the office. But, there is nothing like spending one-on-one time with our franchisees to see how they are doing, and to find out what we are doing that needs improvement. Later in the summer, my travels slow down, and I spend more time in the office catching up, and working with our executive team. We make sure that we remain focused on growth, success, planning for the future, and supporting the franchise system.

Tell us what makes the Pinch A Penny brand so unique?

We are continuing to focus on how we can further enhance our customer-centric business model. With the continued growth of technology and fierce competition in the marketplace, our personalized customer experience and guest service must continue to evolve to differentiate us from the rest.

Our people. From our store owners and their employees, to all of the folks within our office, distribution and manufacturing group; we are very blessed to have great people. And it is our people that allow for us to provide superior customer service and expertise. While our brand may connote discount prices, which was and is part of our DNA, our brand is unique because of the customer experience. CCR

One-on-one with... John Thomas, CEO Pinch A Penny What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Watching new franchisees who are often petrified of what lies ahead become successful. While it takes years to watch the evolution take place, seeing people fulfill their dreams, be successful and be happy through a system you lead is very rewarding.

What was the best advice you ever received?

Hard to say, I have had lots of great advice, so there is no one piece that deserves the title of “best.” But, my father and many other successful retailers have taught me to believe that the customer is always right. And even though we all know that is not always the case, this advice will serve you well in retail.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why.

Integrity, work ethic and compassion. You have to have a moral compass that points north or you cannot

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

earn the respect of others. People will not follow your lead if they don’t respect you. You need to be willing to work as hard as anyone in your system. And, you have to care as much about the people around you as you do yourself. Whether it is your employees, franchisees, customers or suppliers; they are all people who have lives, challenges and circumstances that go beyond the job. Your business relies on them to allow for growth and success.

What’s your favorite vacation spot and why? Any place I can be with my wife and kids.

What are you reading now?

“Shaken” by Tim Tebow. As a man of faith and a Gator fan, it’s a good read.

How do you like to spend your down time? With my family – the kids keep me pretty busy.


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SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING

Survey spotlights top engineering firms

I

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$52,600,000.00 $51,645,423.00 $31,000,000.00 $29,200,000.00 $28,300,000.00 $17,500,000.00 $12,000,000.00 $10,009,000.00 $6,500,000.00 $5,906,000.00

AECOM................................................... $57,000,000.00 DLR Group.............................................. $12,300,000.00 3MG........................................................ $5,200,000 Stantec Consulting Inc........................... $3,994,111.00 TLC Engineering for Architecture, Inc..... $3,763,695.00 Wakefield Beasley & Associates............ $3,000,000.00 Kuhlmann Design Group, Inc.................. $2,200,000.00 S&ME..................................................... $2,000,000.00 Core States Group.................................. $1,302,838.00 Becker Engineering, PC.......................... $1,000,000.00

RESTAURANT

Henderson Engineers, Inc................. Stantec Consulting Inc..................... S&ME.............................................. HFA.................................................. WD Partners.................................... DLR Group....................................... Wakefield Beasley & Associates....... GFD Group....................................... AECOM............................................ CEI Engineering Associates, Inc........

FEDERAL

HOSPITALITY

RETAIL

Top Ten Totals

WD Partners..................................... Core States Group............................. Interplan, LLC................................... GFD Group........................................ Henderson Engineers, Inc.................. Stantec Consulting Inc...................... Aedifica Case Engineering................ CESO Inc........................................... Dunham Associates, Inc.................... DLR Group........................................

AECOM....................................... $143,000,000.00 DLR Group.................................. $23,000,000.00 Stantec Consulting Inc................ $8,651,808.00 S&ME......................................... $4,000,000.00 Henderson Engineers, Inc............ $2,000,000.00 GFD Group.................................. $1,500,000.00 EFI Global................................... $1,442,325.00 TLC Engineering for Architecture, Inc...................... $1,118,908.00 Dunham Associates, Inc.............. $750,000.00 Wakefield Beasley & Associates. $750,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

f you’re looking for the commercial construction industry’s leading engineering firms, our annual listing gives you everything you need – and more. Our exclusive report provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies in the areas of retail, restaurant and hospitality. If your company was not on the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

Jacobs...................................... $10,900,000,000.00 AECOM..................................... $3,183,000,000.00 Stantec Consulting Inc.............. $366,263,046.00 Henderson Engineers, Inc.......... $101,820,000.00 GFD Group................................ $76,050,000.00 EFI Global................................. $65,269,753.00 Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber................................. $65,000,000.00 TLC Engineering for Architecture, Inc.................... $56,695,851.00 DLR Group................................ $54,100,000.00 WD Partners............................. $46,000,000.00

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

$14,300,000.00 $10,443,541.00 $8,704,441.00 $8,690,000.00 $5,000,000.00 $3,125,957.00 $2,332,000.00 $1,500,000.00 $1,500,000.00 $1,300,000.00


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CIRCLE NO. 24


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING 3MG Allied Industrial Marketing Inc. Manuel Ray / Principal P.O. Box 9023772 103 Tetauan St. Old San Juan, PR 00901 787-723-4442 www.3mg-pr.com mray@3mg-pr.com Year Established: N/A, Number of Employees: N/A, Retail: $N/A Hospitality: $5,200,000, Restaurant: $N/A, Federal: $N/A Other: $N/A, Total: $5,200,000, Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 4, Specialize In: Hotels Leading Clients: Black Diamond; Luxury Resorts

Susan Houdek/Vice President W67 N222 Evergreen Blvd., Suite 209 Cedarburg, WI 53012 262-618-2403 Fax: 262-618-2303 www.alliedindustrialmarketing.com shoudek@alliedindustrialmarketing.com Year Established: 2003, Number of Employees: 2 Retail: $ N/A, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A Federal: $N/A, Other: $N/A, Total: $N/A Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education Industrial, Leading Clients: N/A

AECOM Becker Engineering, PC

Beth Myers-Graham/Vice President 1999 Avenue of the Stars Suite 2600 Los Angeles, CA 90067 513-608-7989 Fax: 877-660-7727 www.aecom.com beth.myers-graham@aecom.com Year Established: 1990, Number of Employees: 87,000 Retail: $6,500,000, Hospitality: $57,000,000 Restaurant: $N/A, Federal: $143,000,000 Other: $2,976,500,000, Total: $3,183,000,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 1000+ Specialize In: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education, Leading Clients: Confidential

AEdifica Case Engineering Darrell Case/President 796 Merus Ct. St Louis, MO 63026 636-349-1600 Fax: 636-349-1730 www.aedificacase.com dcase@aedifica.com Year Established: 1995, Number of Employees: 63 Retail: $1,713,000, Hospitality: $60,000 Restaurant: $2,332,000, Federal: $40,000 Other: $3,657,000, Total: $7,802,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 568 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education, Leading Clients: Wingstop, AT&T, Starbucks, Five Guys Burger and Fries, Domino’s, Pot Belly, Bonefish Grill, Core Power Yoga

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John Becker/Principal 777 Sunrise Hwy., Suite 300 Lynbrook, NY 11563 516-561-5922 Fax: 516-823-0219 www.bepc.us Dpellerito@bepc.us Year Established: 1995, Number of Employees: 20 Retail: $1,000,000, Hospitality: $1,000,000 Restaurant: $1,000,000, Federal: $N/A Other: $N/A Total: $3,000,000, Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 700 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Large Commercial Structures, Leading Clients: RNC, Mega Contracting, Parkside Construction, Roger and Sons Construction, Solar Energy Systems

CEI Engineering Associates, Inc. Chris Rogers/Principal/VP 3108 SW Regency Parkway, Suite 2 Bentonville, AR 72712 479-273-9472 Fax: 479-273-0844 www.ceieng.com crogers@ceieng.com Year Established: 1973, Number of Employees: 95 Retail: $5,906,000, Hospitality: $5,000,000 Restaurant: $886,000,000, Federal: $N/A Other: $3,603,000, Total: $10,400,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 350 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education, Sports Facilities, Leading Clients: TBC Corporation, Walmart, Firestone/Bridgestone, Love’s Travel Stops, Circle K, 7-Eleven, Corner Store

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


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CMYK / .eps

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SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING CESO Inc. Steven R. Olson/Vice President Akron, OH 330-933-8820 www.cesoinc.com olson@cesoinc.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 128 Retail Billings: $5,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000 Restaurant Billings: $1,500,000, Federal: $ N/A Other Billings: $12,500,000, Total Billings: $20,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 300 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Bloomin Brands, Speedway, Love’s, Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club, Kohl’s, Tim Hortons

Classic Engineering Mike Kavanagh/Mechanical Consultant 100 Grandville Ave. S.W., Suite 400 Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-742-2810 Fax: 616-742-2814 www.classicengineering.com mkavanagh@classicengineering.com Year Established: 1998, Number of Employees: 14 Retail: $N/A, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A Federal: $N/A, Other: $N/A, Total: $N/A Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: N/A Specialize In: Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Office Leading Clients: White Lodging, Concord Hospitality, Subway

Construction Management Inspection, LLC Lance Luke/Principal Engineer P.O. Box 240275 Honolulu, HI 96824 808-422-2132 Fax: 808-377-9200 www.hawaiibuildingexpert.com lanceluke@hawaiibuildingexpert.com Year Established: 2007, Number of Employees: 5 Retail: $N/A, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A Federal: $N/A, Other: $N/A, Total: $N/A Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 8 Specialize In: Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education, Condominium & Apartment Buildings, Leading Clients: N/A

42

Core States Group Kevin Behnke/Director of Business Development 3039 Premiere Parkway, Suite 700 Duluth, GA 30097 813-319-8755 www.core-eng.com info@core-eng.com Year Established: 1999, Number of Employees: 228 Retail: $3,339,948, Hospitality: $1,302,838 Restaurant: $10,443,541, Federal: $N/A Other: $26,816,596, Total: $41,902,923 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 1,332 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: Radisson, CVS, Wal-Mart, McDonald’s, Panera Bread, 7-Eleven, Bloom Energy, Greenskies, TD Bank, Chase Bank, Citibank, Intel

Delta G Consulting Engineers, Inc. George SanJuan/President 707 N.E. 3rd Ave. Fort Lauderdale, FL 33304 954-527-1112 Fax: 954-527-7505 www.deltag.net Gsanjuan@deltag.net Year Established: 1992, Number of Employees: 23 Retail: $N/A, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A Federal: $N/A, Other: $N/A, Total: $1,200,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: Over 1,000 Specialize In: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education, Leading Clients: Greshem Smith Partners, Corgan

DLR Group Rachael Murie/Brand Comm. Manager 520 Nicollet Mall, Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55402 612-977-3500 www.dlrgroup.com rmurie@dlrgroup.com Year Established: 1966, Number of Employees: 1000+ Retail: $17,500,000, Hospitality: $12,300,000 Restaurant: $1,300,000, Federal: $23,000,000, Other: $N/A Total: $54,100,000, Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 234, Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Sports, Performing Arts, Offices, Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


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aedificacase.com CIRCLE NO. 26


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING Don Penn Consulting Engineer

Jenny Waugh/Marketing Operations Director 1515 Arboretum Dr. S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49546 616-575-3824 Fax: 616-464-3993 www.ftch.com info@ftch.com Year Established: 1956, Number of Employees: 390 Retail: $5,500,000, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A, Federal: $N/A, Other: $59,500,000, Total: $65,000,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 42 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: AMC, Hertz, Meijer

Dunham Associates, Inc.

Michael Morrison/Principal 520 S. Main St., Suite 2531 Akron, OH 44311 330-572-2158 www.gpdgroup.com mmorrison2gpdgroup.com Year Established: 1961, Number of Employees: 560+ Retail: $10,009,000, Hospitality: $485,000 Restaurant: $8,690,000, Federal: $1,500,000 Other: $55,366,000, Total: $76,050,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 1,200+ Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: Racetrac, Meijer, CVS, Yum Brands, PNC Bank

Jay Rohkohl/President/CEO 50 S. Sixth St., Suite 1100 Minneapolis, MN 55402 612-465-7550 Fax: 612-465-7551 www.dunhameng.com info@dunhameng.com Year Established: 1960, Number of Employees: 123 Retail: $ 4,250,000, Hospitality: $250,000 Restaurant: $1,500,000, Federal: $750,000 Other: $13,250,000, Total: $20,000,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 1,500 Retail, 250 Other, Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education, Office, Data Center Leading Clients: Best Buy, Dollar Tree, Men’s Wearhouse, Rue 21, Life Time Fitness

EFI Global Heather Suttle/Marketing Manager 411 N. Sam Houston Parkway East, Suite 350 Houston, TX 77060 281-358-4441 Fax: 281-358-2517 www.efiglobal.com heather_suttle@efiglobal.com Year Established: 1971, Number of Employees: 380 Retail: $4,566,965, Hospitality: $721,162 Restaurant: $N/A, Federal: $1,442,325 Other: $58,539,301, Total: $65,269,753 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 22,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education, Leading Clients: N/A

44

Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber

Michelle Judkins/Vice President 1301 Solana Blvd., Building 1, Suite 1420 Westlake, TX 76262 817-328-5917 Fax: 817-251-8411 www.donpenn.com mjudkins@donpenn.com Year Established: 1991, Number of Employees: 34 Retail: $2,800,000, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A Federal: $N/A, Other: $3,200,000, Total: $6,000,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 1,000 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Education, Other Leading Clients: CVS, T-Mobile, Metro PCS, Planet Fitness, Aldo, Ann Taylor, Bassett, AT&T, Advance Auto, Disney, NYX, ToysRUs, YSL

GPD Group

Henderson Engineers, Inc. Melissa Read/Communications Manager 8345 Lenexa Dr. Lenexa, KS 66214 913-742-5000 Fax: 913-742-5001 www.hei-eng.com info@hei-eng.com Year Established: 1970, Number of Employees: 656 Retail: $52,600,000, Hospitality: $700,000 Restaurant: $5,000,000, Federal: $2,000,000 Other: $41,520,000, Total: $101,820,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 2112 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education, Sports, Leading Clients: Walmart, Target, Sprint, Academy Sports, Nike, Ulta, Sprouts, Verizon, Whole Foods, Tiffany & Co., Dave and Busters, Office Depot

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


EMPLOYEE OWNED / CLIENT CENTRIC WE ADD VALUE THROUGH OUR TAILORED APPROACH AND FULL SERVICE CAPABILITIES

ARCHITECTURE | BUILDING SURVEYS | CIVIL ENGINEERING | COMMISSIONING | CONCEPTUAL DESIGN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT | DUE DILIGENCE | ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING | ENVIRONMENTAL GENERAL CONTRACTING | GEOTECHNICAL | INTERIOR DESIGN | LAND SURVEY | MECHANICAL / PLUMBING ENGINEERING | PLANNING AND ZONING REPRESENTATION | PROJECT MANAGEMENT | PROTOTYPE MANAGEMENT | RENDERINGS | STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING | SUSTAINABLE DESIGN | VALUE ENGINEERING

» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 27

GPD GROUP® 800.955.4731 www.gpdgroup.com


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING HFA Chris Horton/EVP/CFO 1705 S. Walton Blvd., Suite 3 Bentonville, AR 72712 479-273-7780 www.hfa-ae.com info@hfa-ae.com Year Established: 1990, Number of Employees: 230 Retail: $29,200,000, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $225,000, Federal: $N/A, Other: $N/A, Total: $29,450,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 475 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: Walmart, Stripes, Loves

Hixson Architecture, Engineering, Interiors Scott Schroeder/Manager, Client Development 659 Van Meter St. Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-241-1230 Fax: 513-241-1287 www.hixson-inc.com info@hixson-inc.com Year Established: 1948, Number of Employees: 130 Retail: $2,000,000, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A Federal: $N/A, Other: $20,500,000, Total: $22,500,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 10 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: Saks, Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s, GGP, Lord & Taylor

Interplan, LLC Patrick Ringlever/Business Development Manager 604 Courtland St., Suite 100 Orlando, FL 32804 407-645-5008 Fax: 407-629-9124 www.interplanllc.com pringlever@interplanllc.com Year Established: 1972, Number of Employees: 132 Retail: $4,813,119, Hospitality: $30,000, Restaurant: $8,704,441 Federal: $N/A, Other: $61,000, Total: $13,608,560 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 1,150 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Banks Leading Clients: N/A

46

Jacobs Brad Simmons, FAIA/Vice President, Buildings & Infrastructure 1999 Bryan Street, Suite 1200 Dallas, TX 75201 (214) 638-0145 Fax: (214) 638-0447 www.jacobs.com brad.simmons@jacobs.com Year Established: 1947, Number of Employees: 54,000 Retail: $N/A, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A Federal: $N/A, Other: $N/A, Total: $10,900,000,000.00 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 631 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurant, Education, Mixed-Use, Transportation Facility Concessions, Banks, Salons, Post Office Leading Clients: N/A

The JDL Group, Inc. Bryan Autullo/Facilities Design Group Director of Operations 360 W. Dussel Dr. Maumee, OH 43537 419-725-7161 Fax: 419-725-7160 www.thejdigroup.com bautullo@thejdigroup.com Year Established: 2002, Number of Employees: 70 Retail: $40,750, Hospitality: $25,350, Restaurant: $27,260 Federal: $326,300, Other: $9,719,555, Total: $10,139,215 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 35 Specialize In: Education, Industrial, Manufacturing, Glass, Automotive, Food, Government, Chemical, Refining Leading Clients: BP-Husky, Marathon, General Mills, Potash Corp, BGSU, Johns-Manville, Honda, ODOT

Kuhlmann Design Group, Inc. Darrell Abernathy/Vice President, Director of Business Development 66 Progress Parkway St. Louis, MO 63043 314-434-8898 Fax: 314-434-8280 www.kdginc.com dla@kdginc.com Year Established: 1974, Number of Employees: 50 Retail: $500,000, Hospitality: $2,200,000, Restaurant: $400,000 Federal: $250,000, Other: $2,350,000, Total: $5,700,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 185 Specialize In: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education, Federal Government, Municipal Leading Clients: Seneca Gaming Corporation, Radisson, Pieology, DESCO, Isle of Capri Casinos, Hard Rock International, Schnuck Markets, Inc.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


Looking, Planning a project in Puerto Rico

Construction Administration • Project Management • Inspection

CIRCLE NO. 28

Manuel Ray, P.E. PO BOX 9023772 • San Juan, PR 00902-3772 787.723.4442 / 375.5770 Fax: 787.723.4447 mray@3mg-pr.com


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING Little Diversified Architectural Consulting Jeff Roman/National Director of Engineering 5815 Westpark Dr. Charlotte, NC 28217 704-525-6350 Fax: 704-561-8700 www.littleonline.com jeff.roman@littleonline.com Year Established: 1964, Number of Employees: 385 Retail: $2,250,000, Hospitality: $250,000, Restaurant: $250,000 Federal: $N/A, Other: $7,750,000, Total: $10,500,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 365 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education, High Performance/Sustainable Buildings Leading Clients: Sonic Automotive, Bank of America, BB&T, Wells Fargo, UnitedHealth Group, Publix, Food Lion, First Citizens Bank

Merritt Engineering Consultants, P.C. Heather Cerone/Marketing Director 28-08 Bayside Lane Bayside, NY 11358 718-767-0923 Fax: 718-767-4920 www.merrittengineering.com info@merrittengineering.com Year Established: 1986, Number of Employees: 32 Retail: $N/A, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A Federal: $N/A, Other: $N/A, Total: $7,200,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 242 Specialize In: Building Envelope Restoration and Structural Design for Commercial Offices/Commercial Space, Healthcare, Residential, Education Institutions and Banking Facilities Leading Clients: JP Morgan Chase, Jones Lang LaSalle for JP Morgan Chase, Cushman & Wakefield, Cushman & Wakefield for Verizon, Specialty Management for Hospital for Special Surgery, Valley National Bank

Michael Brady, Inc. Louis Cortina/President 299 Weisgarber Rd. Knoxville, TN 37919 865-584-0999 www.michaelbradyinc.com louise@mbiarch.com Year Established: 1990, Number of Employees: 90 Retail: $1,000,000, Hospitality: $200,000, Restaurant: $600,000 Federal: $N/A, Other: $9,300,000, Total: $11,500,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 200+ Specialize In: Healthcare, Restaurant, Education Leading Clients: Pilot Travel Center, Ruby Tuesday’s, BoJangles

48

P2S Engineering Kevin Peterson/President/CEO 5000 E. Spring St. Long Beach, CA 90815 562-497-2999 Fax: 562-497-2990 www.p2seng.com stephan.freiakruse@p2seng.com Year Established: 1991, Number of Employees: 164, Retail: $N/A Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A, Federal: $N/A Other: $25,673,809, Total: $25,673,809 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 54 Specialize In: Healthcare, Education, MEPT Full-Service Design Leading Clients: University of California System, Cal State University System, Port of Long Beach, The Boeing Company

S&ME Bobby Darnell/Businees Development 3201 Spring Forest Rd. Raleigh, NC 27616 770-476-3555 Fax: 770-476-0213 www.smeinc.com bdarnell@smeinc.com Year Established: 1973, Number of Employees: 1,100 Retail: $31,000,000, Hospitality: $2,000,000, Restaurant: $575,000 Federal: $4,000,000, Other: $N/A, Total: $135,000,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 200+ Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Drug Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Leading Clients: N/A

Stantec Consulting Inc. Mary Jepsen/Marketing & BD Lead, Commercial 135 S. LaSalle St. , Suite 3100 Chicago, IL 60603 920-278-3217 www.stantec.com mary.jepsen@stantec.com Year Established: 1954, Number of Employees: 22,000+ Retail: $51,645,423, Hospitality: $3,994,111, Restaurant: $3,125,957, Federal: $8,651,808, Other: $298,845,747, Total: $366,263,046 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 6,897 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education, Airports, Attractions, Arts & Entertainment, Automotive, Civic, Justice, Mixed-Use, Office/Workplace, Research/ Labs, Transit, Warehouse/Light Industrial, Leading Clients: The Irvine Company, IBM, Grant Thornton, Infor Global Solutions, Gyro, Marriott, Tesoro, State of California, Brookfield Residential, Walmart Canada, Walmart Stores, E&J Gallo Winery, Bristol-Myers Squibb, IKEA Properties, McDonald’s, Ivanhoe Cambridge, Starwood Retail Partners, One Properties

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


CIRCLE NO. 29


SPECIAL REPORT

ENGINEERING Steen Engineering, Inc.

Mark Brengman/President 5430 Douglas Dr. N. Crystal, MN 55429 763-585-6742 Fax: 743-585-6757 www.steeneng.com • steen@steeneng.com Year Established: 1993, Number of Employees: 30 Retail: $N/A, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $N/A Federal: $N/A, Other: $N/A, Total: $4,200,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 100 Specialize In: Senior/Multi-Family Housing Leading Clients: N/A

The McIntosh Group

Karen MacCanell/Senior Associate, Director of Business Development 1850 S Boulder Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119 918-585-8555 Fax: 918-583-7282 www.McIntoshTransforms.com karenm@mcintoshtransforms.com Year Established: 1998, Number of Employees: 25 Retail: $2,500,000, Hospitality: $265,000, Restaurant: $850,000 Federal: $N/A, Other: $115,000, Total: $3,800,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 382 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Leading Clients: Atrium Hospitality, Marathon Oil, Anonymous National Banking Client

TLC Engineering for Architecture, Inc.

Cheryl Maze/Corp Marketing & BD Manager 255 S. Orange Ave., Suite 1600 Orlando, FL 32801 407-841-9050 www.tlc-engineers.com • cheryl.maze@tlc-eng.com Year Established: 1955, Number of Employees: 385 Retail: $1,380, 471, Hospitality: $ 3,763,695, Restaurant: $119,660, Federal: $1,118,908, Other: $50,313,117, Total: $56,695,851 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 638 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education, Aviation, Office, Mixed Use, Judicial, Etc., Leading Clients: HKS, SOM, Perkins+Will, HOK, SBS, Leo A. Daly, Skanska, Beck, Flad, Brasfield & Gorrie, Walt Disney World, Stantec

Wakefield Beasley & Associates

Michel Lentz/Principal- Director of Mixed Use/Retail Studio 5200 Avalon Blvd. Alpharetta, GA 30009 770-209-9393 www.bassociates.com • mlentz@wbassociates.com Year Established: 1980, Number of Employees: 160 Retail: $12,000,000, Hospitality: $3,000,000, Restaurant: $500,000 Federal: $750,000, Other: $10,000,000, Total: $26,250,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 125 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education, Leading Clients: N/A

50

Wallace Engineering Brad Thurman/Principal & CMO 200 East Matthew Brady St. Tulsa, OK 74103 800-364-5858 Fax: 918-584-8689 www.wallacesc.com bthurman@wallacesc.com Year Established: 1981, Number of Employees: 145 Retail: $5,000,000, Hospitality: $500,000, Restaurant: $234,000 Federal: $16,000, Other: $13,1700,000, Total: $18,920,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 839 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Casinos, Education, Leading Clients: Walmart, Autozone, Love’s Country Stores ,Nike, Lidi, Bridgestone Retail Operations, Aldi, Fresh Thyme Farmers Markets

Ware Malcomb Chris Strawn, P.E./Principal 10 Edelman Irvine, CA 92618 949 660-9128 Fax: 949-863-1581 www.waremalcomb.com cstrawn@waremalcomb.com Year Established: 1972, Number of Employees: 435 Retail: $139,740, Hospitality: $33,360, Restaurant: $61,421 Federal: $47,760, Other: $3,449,523, Total: $3,731,544 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 134 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education, Office, Industrial, Science & Technology, Auto, Residential, Retail, Master Planning Leading Clients: N/A

WD Partners Mark Bateman/VP, Business Development 7007 Discovery Blvd. Dublin, OH 43017 614-634-7000 Fax: 614-634-7777 www.wdpartners.com mark.bateman@wdpartners.com Year Established: 1968, Number of Employees: 350 Retail: $28,300,000, Hospitality: $N/A, Restaurant: $14,300,00 Federal: $N/A, Other: $3,400,000, Total: $46,000,000 Number of completed commercial projects by 12/31/16: 2,296 Specialize In: Big-box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Restaurant, Convenience/Fuel Leading Clients: Wal-mart, Ikea, The Home Depot, Sonic Automotive, CVS

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


ARCHITECTURE ARCHITECTURE ENGINEERING ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

CIRCLE NO. 30

www.greenbergfarrow.com www.greenbergfarrow.com


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING

Leading Roofing manufacturers/ suppliers highlighted

I

n today’s highly competitive landscape, having your finger on the pulse of the companies you need for a project is vital. When it comes to roofing, our annual listing shines a light on the marketplace’s leading manufacturers in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. The report provides you with the contact information and contact person at each of the reporting firms. If you want to be a part of next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. Alpine SnowGuards

289 Harrel St. Morrisville, VT 05661 Jolene Ciosek/Marketing 888-766-4273 Fax: 888-766-9994 www.alpinesnowguards.com • info@alpinesnowguards.com Roofing Product Type: Snow Guards Markets Served: Commercial

APV Engineered Coatings

Erin Brown / Marketing Manager 1390 Firestone Parkway Akron, OH 44301 800-772-3452 www.apvcoatings.com • sales@apvcoatings.com Roofing Product Type: Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

ATAS International Inc.

John Pospischil / Marketing Manager 6612 Snowdrift Rd. Allentown, PA 18106 610-395-8445 www.atas.com • jp@atas.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Shakes/Shingles, Tiles Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

Atlas Roofing

2000 Riveredge Pkwy NW, Ste. #800 Atlanta, GA 30328 Diane Peoples/Marketing Communication Manager 770-952-1442 Fax: 770-952-3170 www.atlasroofing.com • dpeoples@atlasroofing.com Roofing Product Type: Asphalt, Shakes/Shingles (Asphalt) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Other

52

Bade Roofing Company Inc.

David Bade / Owner 3806 Lemay Ferry Rd. St.Louis, MO 63129 314-892-1331 Fax: 314-894-3267 www.baderoofing.com • dave@baderoofing.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes(SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Synthetic, Concrete, Shakes/Shingles, EcoGreen Roofing Systems, Tiles, Snow Guards, Coatings, Roof Curbs Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

The Bilco Company

Steve Weyel / Advertising Manager 370 James St. New Haven, CT 06513 203-672-0957 Fax: 203-672-8657 www.bilco.com • stevew@bilco.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Roof Curbs, Roof Hatches, Sky Lights, Fire Vents Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

CertainTeed Roofing

Justin Finneran / Social Media Specialist 20 Moores Rd. Malvern, PA 19355 610-893-6024 Fax: 610-341-7859 www.certainteed.com • Justin.Finneran@saint-gobain.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes(SBS or APP), Synthetic, Asphalt, Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


Chicago Clamp Company 2350 South 27th Ave. Broadview, IL 60155 Kevin Barry/Sales Manager 708-343-8311 www.ChicagoClampCompany.com kevin.barry@chicagoclampcompany.com Roofing Product Type: Roof Curbs, Equipment Support Frames Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Coated Metals Group Carmen Burnard / Marketing Assistant 301 Yard Dr. Verona, WI 53593 608-826-0356 Fax: 608-826-4264 www.cmgmetals.com • cburnard@cmgmetals.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Steel Coil & Sheets, Aluminum Coil & Sheets, Copper Coil & Sheets Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

CompanyCam Marcus Plouzek / Business Development 809 P St. Lincoln, NE 68508 402-450-4613 www.companycam.com • hello@companycam.com Roofing Product Type: Software Markets Served: Hospitality, Corporate, Commercial, Federal Government

DaVinci Roofscapes Kathy Ziprik / PR Rep 13890 W 101st St. Lenexa, KS 66215 800-328-4624 Fax: 913-599-0065 www.davinciroofscapes.com Roofing Product Type: Synthetic (Shake & Slate) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Religious

Duro-Last Roofing, Inc.

Tara Gerhardt / Marketing Manager 525 Morley Dr. Saginaw, MI 48601 800-248-0280 www.duro-last.com • tgerhard@duro-last.com Roofing Product Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

EcoFasten Solar

42 Edgewood Dr. Holland, NY 14080 Edwin Staroba/Managing Director 716-537-3153 www.ecostarllc.com • estaroba@ecostarllc.com Roofing Product Type: Synthetic, Shakes/Shingles Markets Served: Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

EcoStar LLC

Edwin Staroba, Managing Director 42 Edgewood Dr. Holland, NY 14080 716-537-3153 www.ecostarllc.com • estaroba@ecostarllc.com Roofing Product Type: Synthetic, Shakes/Shingles, Eco -Green Roofing Systems, Markets Served: Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

EMG

Blake Brosa / Senior Vice President 17200 N. Perimeter Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85255 800-733-0660 Fax: 410-785-6220 www.emgcorp.com • bbrosa@emgcorp.com Roofing Product Type: Roof Assessment Consultant Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Engepoli/Skylux

Cassio Pissetti / Pesident Maria Geronasso do Rosario Colombo, Brazil 55-41-3055-5353 Fax: 55-41-3055-5353 www.engepoli.com • cassio@engepoli.com Roofing Product Type: Skylights Markets Served: Commercial, Industrial

Everroof Drexel Metals David Luna / National &

Brian Partyka / President 1234 Gardiner Ln. Louisville, KY 40213 888-321-9630 Ext: 115 www.drexmet.com • bpartyka@drexmet.com Roofing Product Type: Snow Guards, Clamps for attaching almost anything to standing seam metal roofing Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

International Sales Manager 8550 W. Desert Inn Rd., Suite 102-520 Las Vegas, NV 89117 702-966-9961 Fax: 702-534-2238 www.everroof.com • sales@everroof.com Roofing Product Type: Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Any structure with a flat roof

MARCH : APRIL 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

53


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING F-Wave Flex Membrane International Corp.

Mark Hinterlong / VP of Sales & Marketing 921 S. Burleson Blvd. Burleson, TX 76028 817-754-9021 Fax: 817-754-9020 www.f-wave.com • m.hinterlong@f-wave.com Roofing Product Type: Synthetic, Shakes/Shingles, Slate Shingles, Non -Asphaltic Shingles Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Steep Slope Roofs

John Doye / President 2670 Leisez’s Bridge Rd. ,Suite 400 Leesport, PA 19533 610-916-9500 Fax: 610-916-9501 www.flexroofingsystems.com • jdoyle@flexmembranes.com Roofing Product Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

GAF 1 Campus Dr.

Fabral, an OmniMax Parsippany, NJ 07054 International, Inc. Company Arlene Marks, Marketing/PR

Kit Emert / VP, Business Development & Government Relations 303 Research Dr. ,Suite 400 Norcross, GA 30092 717-391-6602 www.fabral.com • kemert@euramax.com Roofing Product Type: Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

973-317-5851 www.gaf.com • amarks@gaf.com Roofing Product Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified, Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes, (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Concrete, Shakes/Shingles, EcoGreen Roofing Systems, Coatings, Markets Served: Commercial

Garland Fall Protection Dist. 3800 E 91 Street

Howie Scarboro / CEO 7436 Evesborough Ln. Trinity, FL 34655 863-703-4522 www.fallpd.com • sales@fallpd.com Roofing Product Type: Fall protection Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

FiberTite Roofing Systems

Michelle Miller / Marketing Manager 1000 Venture Blvd. Wooster, OH 44691 330-262-1111 Fax: 330-263-6950 www.fibertite.com • mmiller@seamancorp.com Roofing Product Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Data Centers, & Food Processing

Firestone Building Products

Kelly Bradley / Account Executive 535 Marriott Drive Nashville. TN 37214 312-661-1050 www.firestonebpco.com • kbradley@cbdmarketing.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings Markets Served: Commercial

54

Cleveland, OH 44105 800-321-9336 Fax: 216-641-0633 www.garlandco.com • info@garlandind.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes, (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Asphalt, Snow Guards, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Grease Guard LLC Beth Lenz / Vice President of Sales 2019 Corporate Lane, Suite 119 Naperville, IL 60563 800-913-7034 Fax: 630-548-9610 www.greaseguard.com • beth.lenz@rooftopsolutions.com Roofing Product Type: Rooftop Grease Containment Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

GSSI Sealants, Inc. Miguel Pena / Sales 1420 N. Post Oak Rd. Houston, TX 77055 832-778-6400 Fax: 832-778-6401 www.gssisealants.com • miguel@gssisealants.com Roofing Product Type: Sealants, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government, Metal Roofing

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


H S IG H E L T F A EM D H P E R IN G MAX TEMP 250ยบF NON-SLIP SURFACE Ultra HT Wind & Water Sealโ„ข is the premium high temperature underlayment designed to keep you cool in the most extreme conditions. Discover all the advantages that Ultra HT offers on your next project.

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(800) 882-7663 CIRCLE NO. 31


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING Gutterglove Robert Lenney / President & CEO 8860 Industrial Ave. , Suite 140 Roseville, CA 95678 916-778-8777 Fax: 916-624-5029 www.gutterglove.com • robert@gutterglove.com Roofing Product Type: Stainless Steel Gutter Guards Markets Served: Retail, Commercial, Contractor

Headwaters Inc. Robin Anderson / Technical and Training Manager 10701 River Front Parkway, Suite 300 South Jordan, UT 84095 801-380-6091 www.headwatersroofinggroup.com robinanderson@headwaters.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Synthetic, Shakes/ Shingles, Eco_Green Roofing Systems, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/ Government, Residential

Highland Commercial Roofing Rick Cunningham / President 5105 Heintz St. Baldwin Park, CA 91706 866-880-5252 Fax: 888-867-0799 www.highlandroof.com • info@highlandroof.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes(SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Synthetic, Asphalt, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Roof Curbs, Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

IKO Manufacturing Jeff Williams / Brand Director, North America 235 West South Tec Dr. Kankakee, IL 60901 866-315-3105 Fax: 815-936-9696 www.iko.com • jeff.williams@iko.com Roofing Product Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes(SBS or APP), Asphalt, Shakes/Shingles, Snow Guards, Coatings, Polylsocyanurate Insulation (PIR), Roof Cover Boards, Reflective Roof Systems, Vapour Barriers and Accessories that include Adhesives, Mastics and Sealants Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

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IMETCO Josh Younger / Marketing Specialist 4648 S. Old Peachtree Rd. Norcross, GA 30071 770-908-1030 Fax: 770-908-2264 www.imetco.com • info@imetco.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal / Government

LM Curbs Clint Funderburk / VP Marketing 827 Fisher Rd. Longview, TX 75602 903-297-2148 Fax: 903-759-3598 www.lmcurbs.com • clint@lmcurbs.com Roofing Product Type: Snow Guards, Roof Curbs Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

MainSource Roof Management Jeff Ansel / Business Development P.O. Box 45718 Atlanta, GA 30320 770-500-9681 www.mainsourcemgt.com • jeffa@mainsourcemgt.com Roofing Product Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Major Industries, Inc. Mark Mitchell / Marketing Director 7120 Stewart Ave. Wausau, WI 54401 715-842-4616 Fax: 715-848-3336 www.majorskylights.com • mmitchell@majorskylights.com Roofing Product Type: Skylights Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

MBCI Heather Hollis / Brand Manager 14031 W. Hardy Rd. Houston, TX 77060 877-713-6224 Fax: 281-445-8110 www.mbci.com • info@mbci.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


CIRCLE NO. 32


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING McElroy Metal Ken Gieseke / Marketing/Business Development VP 1500 Hamilton Rd. Bossier City, LA 71111 318-747-8071 Fax: 318-747-8099 www.mcelroymetal.com • info@mcelroymetal.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Shakes / Shingles- Metal, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Snow Guards, Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

Metl-Span Amanda Storer / Marketing Brand Manager 1720 Lakepointe Dr., Suite 101 Lewisville, TX 75057 877-585-9969 Fax: 972-420-9382 www.metlspan.com • info@metlspan.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

MFM Building Products P.O. Box 340 Coshocton, OH 43812 David Delcoma/Product Marketing Manager 800-882-7663 Fax: 740-622-6161 www.mfmbp.com • info@mfmbp.com Roofing Product Type: Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Underlayments, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Mid-South Roof Systems 5020 Old Dixie Rd. Forest Park, GA 30297 Jeff Ansel/Business Development 404-361-5154 Fax: 404-361-5213 www.mid-southroof.com • estimating@mid-southroof.com Roofing Product Type: Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM) Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial

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Morin Corporation Peter Faulk / Marketing 685 Middle St. Bristol, CT 06010 860-584-0900 Fax: 860-582-7500 www.morincorp.com • peterf@morincorp.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc. Lynette Collins / Marketing Administrator 1195 Prince Hall Dr. Beloit, WI 53511 800-786-1492 Fax: 608-365-7852 www.mulehide.com • lynette.collins@mulehide.com Roofing Product Type: Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Roof Drains, Maintenance & Repair Products, Roofing Insulation, Fasteners, Edge Metal and Accessories, Cover/Barrier Boards, Under Layments, Adhesives Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

North American Roofing Brian Sliva / National Account Manager 14025 Riveredge Dr. Tampa, FL 33637 616-250-3701 www.naroofing.com • bsliva@naroofing.com Roofing Product Type: Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Synthetic, Coatings, Solar Panelssdxc, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

OMG Roofing Products Sam Everett / Director of Communications 153 Bowles Rd. Agawam, MA 01001 800-633-3800 www.omgroofing.com • severett@olyfast.com Roofing Product Type: Commercial roof accessories for all types of systems, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING PAC-CLAD Petersen

Red Built

1005 Tonne Rd. Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 Rob Heselbarth/Director of Communications 847-981-4707 Fax: 847-956-7968 www.pac-clad.com • rheselbarth@petersenmail.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Snow Guards Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

Cornelia Sprung 200 E. Mallard Dr. Boise, ID 83706 866-859-6757 www.redbuilt.com • csprung@redbuilt.com Roofing Product Type: Open Web Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

Plasteco, Inc.

Dave Lawlor / North American Sales Manager 8024 Esquesing Line Milton, Ontario Canada L9T 6W3 905-878-8474 www.roxul.com • dave.lawlor@roxul.com Roofing Product Type: Insulation, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

Jonathan Ultis Fallguard Manager 8535 Market St. Houston, TX 77029 713-673-7710 www.skylightscreens.com • jonathan@plasteco.com Roofing Product Type: Fallguard Skylight Safety Screens for all Manufacturer’s Skylight Models, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

Progressive Materials 540 Central Ct. New Albany, IN 47150 Josh McKain/Marketing Director 812-944-7803 Fax: 812-944-7804 www.pmsilicone.com • josh@pmsilicone.com Roofing Product Type: Coatings, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal/Government

PS Doors Mark Haaland / Sales 1150 S. 48th St. Grand Forks, ND 58201 877-446-1519 www.psaccesssolutions.com • 4psinfo@psdoors.com Roofing Product Type: Roof Curbs, Roof Hatch Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

Quantum Smart Solutions, LLC. Edward Faulkner / Vice President of Sales 4835 Veterans Memorial Hwy. Holbrook, NY 11741 631-285-3520 Fax: 631-648-9739 www.quantum-smart.com • sales@quantum-smart.com Roofing Product Type: Smart Chute Construction Debris Removal System Markets Served: Roofing/ Construction

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ROXUL Inc.

Royal Adhesives & Sealants Jim LaBenne / Marketing Manager 4401 Page Ave. Michigan Center, MI 49254 517-841-7000 Fax: 517-764-6697 www.royaladhesives.com • jim.labenne@rascp.com Roofing Product Type: Roof Curbs, Accessories, Adhesives, Sealants Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

S-5! Keith Lipps / Marketing & Sales 8655 Table Butte Rd. Colorado Springs, CO 80908 888-825-3432 www.s-5.com • klipps@s-5.com Roofing Product Type: Snow Guards, Clamps for attaching almost anything to standing seam metal roofing Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

Situra Inc. Chauntelle Facey / Project Specialist 2916 Walden Ave., Suite 400 Depew, NY 14043 888-474-8872 Fax: 416-622-0212 www.situra.com • situra@situra.com Roofing Product Type: Waterproof Expansion Joints Markets Served: Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


CIRCLE NO. 34


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING Skyco Skylights Ken Fournier / Marketing Manager 2995 Airway Ave. Costa Mesa, CA 92626 949-629-4090 Fax: 949-629-4088 www.skycoskylights.com • info@skycoskylights.com Roofing Product Type: Industrial and Custom Skylights Markets Served: Industrial

Snoblox-Snojax Howie Scarboro / National Sales Manager 671 Willow St. Lemoyne, PA 17055 800-sno-jax1 www.snojax.com • sales@snojax.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Snow Guards, Solar Panels, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

SOLEC Matt McNelis / VP Sales 129 Walters Ave. Ewing, NJ 08638 609-883-7700 Fax: 609-883-5489 www.solec.org • sales@solec.org Roofing Product Type: Coatings, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal /Government

SOPREMA Sara Jonas / Marketing Manager 310 Quadral Dr. Wadsworth, OH 44281 330-334-0066 www.soprema.us • sjonas@soprema.us Roofing Product Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM),, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Adhesives, SBS Modified Bitumen Laminated Coverboards, Primers and Vapor/Air Barriers, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal / Government, Historical Renovation

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Southeastern Metals Mfg. Co. Inc. Jim Horton / Product Dev. Manager 11801 Industry Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32218 904-696-4653 Fax: 904-696-4207 www.semetals.com • jwhorton@semetals.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Shakes/Shingles, Solar Panels, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal / Government

Stealth Bond Jim Horton / Product Dev. Manager 11801 Industry Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32218 904-696-4653 Fax: 904-696-4207 www.stealthbond.com • jwhorton@gibraltar1.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Shakes/Shingles, Solar Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal / Government

SunTegra Mark Paille / Director of Sales 181 Westchester Ave., Suite 400B Port Chester, NY 10573 914-249-9364 www.suntegrasolar.com • info@suntegrasolar.com Roofing Product Type: Shakes / Shingles, Tiles, Integrated Solar Roof Shingles and Tiles, Markets Served: Commercial

Sunvek Roofing Sabrina Leon / PR Account Executive 2514 E. Mohawk Ln. Phoenix, AZ 85050 623-434-9039 www.sunvekroofing.com • anitam@sunvek.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Asphalt, Concrete, Shakes/Shingles, Tiles, Coatings, Roof Curbs, Emulsion Silicone, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal / Government, Churches

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


CIRCLE NO. 35


SPECIAL REPORT

ROOFING TAMKO Building Products, Inc. Ron Cook / Director of Corporate Communications 220 W. 4th St. Joplin, MO 64802 417-624-6644 www.tamko.com• ron_cook@tamko.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Synthetic, Asphalt, Coatings, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal / Government

Topps Products, Inc. James Thomas / Vice President of Government/International Sales and Business Development P.O. Box 515 Stilwell, KS 66085 913-685-2500 Fax: 913-851-9700 www.toppsproducts.com • jthomas@toppsproducts.com Roofing Product Type: Synthetic (Rubber), Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Coatings, Caulking, Sealants, Waterproofing Products Markets Served: Commercial, Federal / Government

Tremco Roofing and Building Maintenance Bob Spreat / Director, Messaging and Marketing Communications 3735 Green Road Beachwood, OH 44122 216-766-5646 www.tremcoroofing.com • bspreat@tremcoinc.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems, Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Asphalt, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Fluid applied Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal / Government, Any commercial, Industrial, Public and Government Market

United States Gypsum Co. Corvette Morales / Marketing Communications Manager 550 W. Adams St. Chicago, IL 60661 312-436-6218 www.usg.com • cmorales@usg.com Roofing Product Type: Roof Cover Board Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal / Government

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Unity Surfacing Systems Erick Prinz / Sales/ Marketing Manager 3997 Route 9W (P.O. Box 9) Saugerties, NY 12477 877-41-UNITY Fax: 845-246-1700 www.surfacingsystems.com • sales@surfacingsystems.com Roofing Product Type: Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Tiles, Rubber Pavers, Markets Served: Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Federal / Government, Residential Complexes Interlocking, Unitary Rubberized Safety Surfacing, Flooring & Pavers

VELUX USA Brian Grohe / National Marketing & Communications Manager 104 Ben Casey Dr. Fort Mill, SC 29708 803-396-5700 www.veluxusa.com Roofing Product Type: Skylights, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Western Specialty Contractors Jessica Gitto / Business Development Representative 1637 N. Warson Rd. St.Louis, MO 63132 314-427-1637 Fax: 314-593-9924 www.westernspecialtycontractors.com jessicag@westerngroup.com Roofing Product Type: Built-Up Roofing Membranes (BUR), Polymer Modified Bitumen Sheet Membranes (SBS or APP), Single-Ply Membranes (PVC, TPO, EPDM), Spray Polyurethane Foam Based (SPF), Synthetic, Concrete, Eco-Green Roofing Systems, Tiles, Coatings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Federal / Government, Historic

Western States Metal Roofing Stacy Rubio / Sales Manager 901 W. Watkins Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85007 602-495-0048 Fax: 602-261-7726 www.metalforroofing.com • stacy@metaldeck.com Roofing Product Type: Metal Panel Roof Systems Markets Served: Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


OPEN

CIRCLE NO. 36

DESIGN SPACE MINDS


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Orlando bound

The land of Disney plays host to 2017 CCR Summit

Not far from where the world meets to get their Disney groove on, some of the industry’s leading commercial construction executives spent three days emerged in all things education and networking. The 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit featured in it all – networking, attending AIA accredited seminars and absorbing tons of educational insights. The event, sponsored by Commercial Construction & Renovation magazine, was held at the JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes Hotel in Orlando, Fla., in January.

Kicking off with the annual table top cocktail party and dinner, the Summit featured rounds of competitive foot golf, a fishing and skeet shooting tournament. Oh, and there was all of that educational and networking stuff, too, including key AIA accredited seminars, one-on-one vendor/end user meetings and several keynote speakers. On the following pages is a snapshot of one of the industry’s most anticipated events.

Bringing the thunder Foot golf tourney brings the ‘beast mode’ out in attendees It's a precision sport. That's what they'll tell you if you ask about footgolf. Hit the links in this game, and your weapon of choice is your feet. Armed with a soccer ball, a golf cart and as many strong kicks as they could muster, attendees of the 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit took the greens for an amazingly entertaining round of footgolf. They kicked, punted and tapped their way through the course until one group was crowned the winner. To note: There were no hamstring injuries reported). Golf 2nd Place: Kelly Burnette, F&D Commercial; Dedrick Kirkem. John Varvatos Enterprises; Jeff Mahler, L2M; Fatima Hakim, Ashley Stewart; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors; Matthew Boynton, Heartland Restaurant Group

Golf 1st Place: Tyler Skaggs, Buffalo Wings & Rings; Craig Murray, Dental Care Alliance; Brad Gaskins, The McIntosh Group;, Jason Lechtenberger, TD Ameritrade; Marc Champagne, Tatte Bakery; Mike Pallerino, CCR

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

Golf 3rd Place: Rob Sargenti, Sargenti Architects; Sean Coakley, TD Ameritrade; Donnie Wheeler, Orscheln Farm & Home; Laura Gross, American Signature Furniture; John Stallman, Lakeview Construction; Ron Volske, Orscheln Farm & Home


Dinner is served What better way is there to kick off a Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit than to gather the masses around vendor table tops, an open bar and a set of full course buffets? The 2017 Summit welcoming party also featured the annual scavenger hunt, where attendees visited each booth to get their cards stamped as part of an after-dinner drawing. Winners got to donate their proceeds to their favorite charity.

CCR 2017 charity winners George Farrelly, Aarons Rents: Big Brother, Big Sister Gary Rissler, G. Rissler Development Solutions: St. Judes Children’s Hospital Isyol Cabrera, Focus Brands: Speranza Animal Rescue Michol Brandon, Crestpoint Co,: Autism Awareness Gart Kaganowich, TD Bank: Habitat for Humanity of Broward County Aaron Ancello, TD Bank: Cor Unum Meal Center Dedrick Kirkem, John Varvatos Enterprises: New York Homeless Association Richard Huff, Hospitality Reality Services: Wounded Warriors (Not pictured) Ron Bevilacqua, Alex and Ani, Smile Train

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Round and round ... Juggling information to achieve better innovations Innovation is one of the most frequently heard business buzzwords of the 21st century. The constantly accelerating pace of change in technology, and its impact on customer and client needs, necessitates that all organizations must know how to innovate or else risk becoming irrelevant. But what exactly is meant by innovation? And how can innovation apply to your role in designing better stores? Len Ferman helped answer this question in a unique presentation at the 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit at The JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes Hotel in Orlando, Fla. To note, Len is the former head of ideation at Bank of America and a World “Joggling” Champion (running while juggling). He spent 25 years managing innovation at Fortune 100 companies prior to founding Ferman Innovation and becoming an adjunct professor of marketing at the University of North Florida.

Qualitative research can be used to learn about the outcomes your customers desire and the problems and challenges they presently experience. In addition, this type of research can be used to understand what the barriers are that prevent high potential prospects from doing business with you today. Many customers however can’t fully articulate or don’t even recognize the problems they encounter in stores, restaurants and hotels. And that’s why ethnographic or observational research is also advised. By observing customers, you can identify problems and challenges which represent opportunities for new solutions.

Step No. 2 – The Ideate Phase

Building on the Explore phase, the goal of the Ideate phase is to generate a large number of ideas to solve for the customer needs and market opportunities previously identified. Len advocates using a variety of creative exercises with all your team members in order to generate a vast array of ideas. Anyone can be creative when an expert facilitator guides the process and employs the various brainstorming techniques and insightful questions that draw out ideas from your team.

Step No. 3 – The Evaluate Phase

During his presentation, Len combined his mastery of juggling and innovation – even helping attendees take a shot at learning how to juggle. All the while, he related each step in learning to juggle to a step in the innovation process. Helping innovate for better designs for stores, hotels and restaurants is critical to winning business and delighting clients. And Len’s Idea TournamentTM process can help any organization create winning designs.

Step No. 1 – The Explore Phase

Len stresses this is the most important step as you seek to understand customer needs and identify market opportunities.

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Starting with hundreds or even thousands of ideas from the Ideate phase, the Evaluate phase enables you to objectively narrow down and select a few ideas that are most likely to be successful. Len applies a scoring tool in which all ideas are rated against a set of customized criteria. Once ideas are narrowed down to a manageable set, then written concepts that describe the idea in customer language are crafted. If a low cost prototype can be developed that is even better. The concepts or prototypes are then tested with customers in research to identify the winning concepts for development. Great innovations can be achieved by anyone and any organization by following the principles of Len’s Idea TournamentTM process. Len proved to the group that anyone can learn to juggle (as most in the audience did) by following his steps to learning. And, as Len can attest, anyone can learn to innovate by following these three simple steps. CCR

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


Creating value in ever-evolving times The role of chain store construction leaders is always changing, leaving executives constantly having to shift and embrace this change. During the recent 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, Steve Jones, International Director, JLL Project and Development Services, facilitated a discussion between a panel of top chain store leaders on how they are creating value for their companies and shareholders. In the midst of seemingly constant change, the overall consensus is that listening to your audience’s needs, collecting feedback and integrating that feedback in future plans is the key to success.

to get real, genuine answers allows you to truly understand what motivates them.” – Daniel Wisk, VP of Facilities and Construction at The HERTZ Corporation “It’s all about relationships. Value certainly means different things to each stakeholder, and you need to find a win-win for everyone involved to achieve the desired result. In order to do this, it’s essential to have concise and consistent communication to

Here are some highlights of what they had to say:

When thinking about creating value, which audience(s) are top of mind?

“A lot of it comes down to societal impact. How the business engages itself in society and prioritizes societal needs is key for any company. Every business exists to create value, and a focus on corporate social "It’s all about relationships. allow for strong relationships among the responsibility automatically assists in the project team.” – Caleb Rodgers, Senior Value certainly means growth and success of that company’s Project Manager of Construction, West different things to each profitability. It’s not just about value for Region, RaceTrac one person, but creating value on a larger stakeholder, and you scale.” – LJ Mohan, CEO of LJ Advantage How do you measure and need to find a win-win LLC and former Vice President, Facilities report on the value you create? for everyone involved to Management and Energy Engineering at “Measurement can take many forms, both Ralph Lauren achieve the desired result." tangible and intangible. The tangible come “We implement a bottom up approach. in more traditional performance metrics, – Caleb Rodgers, Senior Project Manager of We need to understand what creates value both financial and operational. The intanConstruction, West Region, RaceTrac for the end user – your customers or guests gible can be shown in how an end user – and once that is realized, you can reverse perceives the value they receive, making up to the C-suite. There are multiple audiences, but in order to create those harder to capture.” – Ralph Lauren’s Mohan a profit and create value for shareholders, you need to reach the end “Every company has standard KPIs, but there are other vehiuser first.” – Ron Bidinost, Senior Director of Franchise Operations for cles of feedback such as online reviews and third party websites Marie Callender’s that can help determine thoughts on an organization as a whole. You must then take that feedback and communicate it out in You’ve defined who you’re creating value for, but order to determine what’s working and what could be improved.” how do you determine what is valuable to them? – The HERTZ Corp.’s Wisk “It’s essential to put yourself in the shoes of your audience. It “You have to build in checkpoints along the way to comes down to asking your different stakeholders what’s important review the results and make adjustments as needed to ensure to them, while also realizing that the things they find valuable might you are achieving the value creation you’re aiming for.” – be completely aligned or slightly different. But having a conversation RaceTrac’s Rodgers. CCR

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

• SUMMIT COVERAGE


INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Not everyone is a permit runner Why it’s important to know how to navigate the permit process

Building permits are the most important and most often overlooked part of the construction process. Most people don’t even know how to get a permit, let alone why they need one. The permit process is not self-evident. and mistakes can be extremely costly. If you care about getting your project done right, on-time and within budget, it’s crucial to learn how to navigate the permit process the right way. Or, at the very least, hire a professional to get your permits.

The due diligence process is the most important part of obtaining a permit. It can make or break your construction project.

The municipal environment is changing in many ways: third party reviewers, ADA requirements, changing building codes, etc. Not everyone is aware of these changes. If you’re not aware, you’re going to be delayed. And that can be catastrophic. The due diligence process is the most important part of obtaining a permit. It can make or break your construction project. Knowing what’s required and by whom and how to go about doing it in the proper sequence will save you tons of money and time. The entitlement process has a lot of moving parts, so you need to have patience not to stray from best practices because you are excited, or pressured, to get a new project going as fast as possible. We understand that you want to do this, because you want to do your job well, because that is what you do best.

You make the best real estate deals, you draw the best set of plans, you design the award-winning stores and you build the best restaurants. But it is dangerous to schedule your construction timelines before you know anything about the municipal approval process. Not knowing about the permit process can cost you 3 or 4 days in construction delays and more importantly, lost sales per project. It all sounds grim, doesn’t it? How many projects do you have in a year? How many days of lost sales is that? Every day lost adds up quickly. Not everyone is a permit runner. If you’re a project manager, you are too busy, way too busy to be messing around with building department comments and changes that need to be made, or even worrying about a building permit at all. If you’re an architect, GC, sign company, restaurant owner or retailer, the last thing you want to do is stand in line or be put on hold with a building department over a permit problem. So, how seriously are you taking the permit process? If you’re not taking permits seriously, maybe you need to. If you’re not up for digging in and educating yourself or, you’re turning over getting your permit to someone who doesn’t know all the ins and outs, maybe you need to use a professional. Working in all 50 states and Canada, Permit.com offers permit expediting services, due diligence, sign code information, and myriad web based data components to general contractors, architects, engineers, project management firms, developers and retailers within the commercial and retail construction industry. It also works with groups in the sign industry, multi-site residential and commercial project management companies, architecture, engineering, general and subcontractor, developers, mall and shopping center management, value center management, restaurants, office and industrial building. Servicing the retail industry for more than 25 years, Permit.com provides real value and significance to its customers, vendors and municipalities daily. We chose the commercial and retail construction industry, sign industry and multi-site project management industry because the stakes are high and our customers need their permits done perfectly. CCR

Vaun Podlogar is the founder of State Permits Inc.

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By Vaun Podlogar

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


Top 10 Project Risks A look at changes and strategies for 2017

By Robert Moore

Managing the inherent risks of developing, designing and building commercial properties is the primary responsibility of the leaders attending the Commercial Construction & Renovation conference. In this session, the industry professionals in attendance shared their challenges and experiences to create a list of the top current risk concerns and potential solutions to best manage them. The main question asked was, “As we move forward into 2017, what has changed and what is contributing (new or increased) to your risk?

With acknowledgement of the risks we face, it is imperative we all have some form of systematic risk assessment in place. Whether a defined and outlined process or simply by implementing Best Practices guidelines. As Winston Churchill said, “Plans are of little importance – but planning is everything.”

While the session did not develop a specific Top 10, the main areas of risk discussed were: Government – Both political (immigration, trade agreements and budget priorities) and regulatory (confusion about and consistency between Federal and State). Globalism – The continued economic expansion into a global economy will continue to alter business and bring with it risk.

With acknowledgement of the risk we face, it is imperative we all have some form of systematic risk assessment in place.

Demographics – Today’s workforce differs greatly from prior generations, creating risk of how best to align your business to their consumption choices, how to engage them to work productively and how shortages of workers in our industry pressures schedules, quality and budgets. Technology – The evolving and expanding dependence on technology can and will lead to increased risk to online malice for organizations or aging workers falling behind the adoption curve.

The session participants discussed the possible approaches to risk assessment, adopting processes of evaluating risk, benchmarking for comparison, and establishing systems to control or limit risk, including the use of appropriate contracts, an appropriate insurance program, alignment with all involved parties, regulatory compliance, and utilization of skilled and qualified people in all contributing positions. CCR

Robert Moore is president of Gray/Retail Contractors Association.

MARCH : APRIL 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

SUMMIT COVERAGE •

Finding your seat at the table Building and sustaining sustainable brand experiences The question are interesting ones: How do today’s construction and facilities leaders create all of those sustainable built environment and brand experiences? How do designers and architects present to the C-Suite? How do they align with field operations for cost and time efficiency while protecting the brand experience? During the recent 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, some of the industry’s leading executives weight in on the topics. The roundtable discussion, “A Seat at the Table,” offered insights on the art of bringing brands straight to today’s consumers. The panelists included Marc Champagne, Director of Construction & Facilities at Tatte Bakery & Cafe; Dedrick Kirkem, Facilities Manager at JV Enterprises; Isyol E. Cabrera, Director Design and Construction at Carvel; and Sean Coakley, VP, Director of U.S. Facilities at TD Bank.

I find it is all about customer service and regardless of what department your in you are in the customer service business only each of us have different customers. If we are able to service customers by meeting or exceeding their expectations than we remain relevant and our department and our industry is recognized. In my experience our industry has its good times and its bad times which will never go away. How you manage your customer will determine how good the good times are and how bad the bad times are. – Marc Champagne, Director of Construction & Facilities, Tatte Bakery & Cafe We take social media by storm, you can use Facebook, snapchat, twitter, Instagram and reach out to millions of people for free and promote yourself, we are also hosting different events for our promotions during this year, we are partnering with other known brands and key products for innovation. Carvel is getting a lot of attention lately specially in NY & NJ because of Fudgie 40th birthday, this is our biggest event this year. Every year in April we do Carvel Free Cone Day to show appreciation for our loyal customers so that day for a few hours we give away a free Jr. Cone and we also tie this event with a corporate social responsibility.” We are constantly teaching our franchisees about great customer service and make sure that they offer a great experience at their shoppes so the customer keeps coming back and telling other friends and family members about us. – Isyol E. Cabrera, Director Design and Construction, Carvel It’s a hard pill to swallow, but in order to sustain a calm work environment and work with what we have (so to speak), I feel that it must come from ourselves to set examples in order for our subordinates to follow suit and take pride in their positions which can only help us grow individually as well. – Dedrick Kirkem, Facilities Manager, JV Enterprises

Following is a snapshot of their insights: These are crazy times in our industry. I find there are the operators out there that just want to ‘do it themselves.’ And then there are the operators that understand they need a professional to direct and manage construction & facilities.

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Doing more with less will never go away. We have to focus on informing and educating our clients on what we do for them. Giving them insight to all that we deliver, and how, increases our credibility and positions us as the subject matter expert’s and a trusted partner that they will turn to when they are pressed to reduce costs. When you do this you turn them into your partner and your advocate and together you work towards finding solutions to the issues of the day. – Sean Coakley, VP, Director of U.S. Facilities at TD Bank

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


It’s Only Pain “You’ve got cancer.” It’s a fear that each of us have. A fear that causes different reactions from different people. When 21 year old Alabama football player Taylor Morton heard the news, the reaction is not what you would think. Morton, the lunch keynote speaker for the 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit at The JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes Hotel in Orlando, Fla., in January, felt, as he recalls, a peace beyond all understanding. “I had been in situations in my life before where I knew that God was in control,” he told attendees. “It was a little nerve-racking to hear the news, but I had a peace in my heart about it because of just knowing that God was in control of everything in my life.” At first, Taylor visited the emergency room with intense abdominal pain that was diagnosed as appendicitis. Hours after he arrived, doctors performed an emergency appendectomy. It wasn’t until he returned for a routine post-operative exam that he learned his appendicitis was caused by a slow-growing cancerous tumor and that the disease had spread into the wall of the organ and into his colon. Taylor summoned the strength for his fight from the experience he had after his brother, Trent, was killed in a four-wheeling accident in 2007. The inseparable brothers had built a bond that still drives Taylor today – a bond that carried him through his playing days and several National Championships with Nick Saban and the Crimson Tide. “I felt like nothing after that,” he recalled. “I didn’t know what to think, what to do. I felt sick at my stomach.” In Trent’s pocket that day was a card with the words, “Never, never quit” written on it, along with a Bible verse from Philippians 3:14, which read: “I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus.”

Respond – At some point in our lives, we will have to respond to adversity. The true character of a person is not found when everything is going great, but the true character of a person is found when adversity strikes. I had to respond when I was knocked down on April 1, 2007. When my younger brother was killed in a four-wheeler accident. I was faced with a choice, to lay down or to get back up and keep moving? What will you do? I chose to get back up and keep moving. Because as it is said in the great Rocky movie series: “It’s not about how hard you can hit, but about how hard you can get hit and keep getting up.” Fight – If you respond well and have no fight in you, why are you even in the ring? Being diagnosed with cancer at the age of 20 is something that should never happen, but it happened to me. My oncologist told me that I would have to go through surgery to see if they could get everything. My whole mindset was that I was going to fight through this no matter what the outcome. Cancer is a horrible disease and it takes way too many lives each year, but you do not lose when

You have to finish. You must keep fighting and you must press on. You must finish, because after all it is only pain.

The verse and the No. 13 are tattooed on his arm as a reminder of the brother he lost. The other reminder is the inspirational book he wrote, “It’s Only Pain: But It’s Real and It Hurts.” Each page is testament to the journey he continues to walk every day. Here, in Taylor’s words, is the inspirational path he encourages everyone to follow:

cancer kills you , you win by choosing to fight every single day. The same for any adversity in your life. You do not lose just because that adversity is happening to you, you win because you choose to fight every single day. Finish – You have to finish. Up to this point you have done well, but it all goes to waste if you do not finish. A few days after my brother’s four-wheeler accident, my family brought to me everything that was found in his pocket. He had a card in his pocket with the phrase on it that said “Never, Never Quit” no matter how tough life get you cannot quit. You must keep fighting and you must press on. You must finish, because after all it is only pain. CCR

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You were saying... Vendors, end users go face-to-face in one-on-one meetings Ask attendees of the 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit what event is the most eagerly anticipated, and the answer always lands on the one-on-one meetings. The intimate meetings enable vendors and end users to spend 15 minutes of face time to discuss potential business opportunities.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


PULL (or something like that) Drinks. Dinner. Dessert. Shoot. Yes, you read that right. As part of the final night’s dinner festivities of the 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit, attendees participated in the “CCR Laser Skeet Shooting Challenge.” The concept replicates actual skeet shooting – from the Italian made over under shot guns to the skeet launcher. The only difference is that the shots are duplicated with laser, and the sound comes from a high-tech scoreboard that calculates “hits.” Laser Skeet winners: Left to right: Jay Vaitkus, ASSA ABLOY; Caleb Rodgers, RaceTrac Petroleum; Alice Chandler, Taylor Bros. Construction; Jennifer Ferris, Federated Service Solutions Inc; Tomas Palomar, Porcelanosa USA; Susan Courter, R.E. Crawford

Top Shooter Jennifer Ferris, Federated Service Solutions Inc.

Reeling ‘em in...

You can say this about the links at the JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes Hotel in Orlando, Fla. – they are versatile. You can golf on them with your clubs or your feet, or, you can fish off their banks for some large-mouth bass. With the help of JW Marriott’s G. Loomis Pro Staff, attendees of 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit got to try their hand a little fishing in the early morning light. 1st Place : Tyler Skaggs, Buffalo Wings & Rings 2nd Place: Michol Brandon, Crestpoint Company 3rd Place: Jason Lechtenberger, TD Ameritrade Fishing Tournament sponsored by United Sign Systems.

MARCH : APRIL 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS 3M

3M Center Building 220-12E-04 St Paul, MN 55144-1000 (651) 736-3529 Sandy Schichel / Bus Dev Mgr sjschichel@mmm.com www.mmm.com Graphics/Banners/Wraps

Ambiance Radio

79 East Daily Drive, Suite 263 Camarillo, CA 93010 (805) 512-9825, ext 5 Bradley Newberger / President bradley@ambianceradio.com www.ambianceradio.com Audio/Music

American & Interstate Signcrafters

171 Freeman Ave Islip, NY 11751 (877) 278-0700 Lisa Johnson / VP ljohnson@interstatesigncrafters.com www.interstatesigncrafters.com Signage/Architectural Building Products

Ameritech Facility Services

1500 Airport Drive, Suite 200 Ball Ground, GA 30107 (470) 983-0055 Ben Hill / Business Development/National Accounts ben.hill@ameritechfs.com www.ameritechfs.com Remodels/Renovations

ASSA ABLOY

110 Sargent Drive New Haven, CT 06511 (800) 377-3948, Ext.6 New Haven / National Accounts nationalaccounts@assaabloy.com www.assaabloy.com Security

CDO Group

333 Harrison St. Oak Park, IL 60304 (708) 383-0586 Anthony Amunategui / President anthony@cdogroup.com www.cdogroup.com Project Management

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Columbia Forest Products

7900 Triad Center Drive, Suite 200 Greensboro, NC 27409 (336) 456-8657 Richard Poindexter / Specialty Products Manager rpoindexter@cfpwood.com www.cfpwood.com Architectural Building Products

Core States Group

3039 Premiere Pkwy, Suite 700 Duluth, GA 30097 (770) 242-9550 Kevin Behnke, Director of Business Development info@core-eng.com www.core-eng.com Project Management, Architecture, Engineering, Construction

Cosentino NA

2245 Texas Drive, Suite 600 Sugar Land, TX 77479 (281) 494-7277 Steve DeBerardino / A&D Director, North America steved@cosentino.com www.cosentino.com Surfacing Materials

DWM Construction & Renovation

2 Northway Lane Latham, NY 12110 (888) 396-9111, Ext. 225 Bennett Van Wert / National Sales Manager bvanwert@dwminc.com www.dwminc.com Facility Maintenance/Renovations

Egan Sign

1100 Berkshire Blvd, #200 Wyomissing, PA 19610 (610) 816-7605 Michelle Weaver / Director of Sales & Mkt michelle.weaver@egansign.com www.egansign.com Signage

F&D Commercial

2233 Lake Park Drive, Suite 400 Smyrna, GA 30080 (678) 570-1200, Cell: (678) 570-1200 Andrew Remm / Director of Commercial aremm@flooranddecor.com www.fdcommercial.com Hard Surface Flooring Supplier

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


Federated Service Solutions Inc.

Identicom Sign Solutions

30955 Northwestern Hwy Farmington Hills, MI 48334 (248) 539-9000, Ext. 3550 John Brown, Director of Sales jbrown@federatedservice.com www.federatedservice.com Cabling/Data, Low Voltage

24657 Halsted Road Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (248) 344-9590, ext 222 John DiNunzio / President jdinunzio@identicomsigns.com www.identicomsigns.com Branding/Signage

FCP Services

Identity Management

3185 Terminal Drive Eagan, MN 55121 (612) 201-4353 James Loukusa / President jloukusa@fcpservices.com www.finalcoatpainting.com General Maintenance and Repair Contractor/Renovations/Painting

JLL

Georgia PrintCo

3344 Peachtree Rd NE Suite 1200 Atlanta, GA 30326-4800 (678) 428-9526 Steve Jones / Inter Director steve.jones@am.jll.com www.jll.com Project Management

90 South Oak St. Lakeland, GA 31635 866-572-0146 Drew Barry/Director of Marketing drew@georgiaprintco.com • www.georgiaprintco.com Sign/Signage

GPD Group

Lakeview Construction

520 South Main Street, Suite 2531 Akron, OH 44311 (330) 572-2100 Michael Morrison / Principal mmorrison@gpdgroup.com www.gpdgroup.com Architects/Engineers/Planners

10505 Corporate Drive Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (262) 857-3336 John Stallman / Marketing Manager john@lvconstruction.com www.lvconstruction.com General Contracting

Hermitage Lighting 3640 Trousdale Drive Nashville, TN 37204 (615) 843-3394 JD Ryan / Account Manager jdr@hlg.co www.hlg.co Lighting

1702 Minters Chapel Road, Suite 114 Grapevine, TX 76051 (817) 912-0039, ext 103 Jonathan Urick jurick@identitybusiness.com www.identitybusiness.com Signage

Mats Inc

Toll Free: 800-264-3383 www.hermitagelighting.com Nashville, Tennessee SPECIALIST IN RESTAURANT AND RETAIL LIGHTING DESIGN

ICON 1418 Elmhurst Road Elk Grove, IL 60007 (847) 631-3210 Kevin Hughes / SVP Sales & Marketing khughes@iconid.com www.iconid.com Signage, Maintenance, Refresh/Remodel Construction

179 Campanelli Pkwy Stoughton, MA 02072 (781) 573-0272 Tim Theroux / Senior Mgr Nat Account Development ttheroux@matsinc.com www.matsinc.com Matting/Flooring

National Pavement

3081 US 11 De Kalb Junction, NY 13630 (315) 287-4400 Bob Vacsulka / Nat Accounts bob.vacsulka@nationalpavement.com www.nationalpavement.com Pavements

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS


INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS North American Signs

R.E. Crawford

3601 W. Lathrop South Bend, IN 46628 (574) 237-6167 Randy Davis / National Accounts rld@northamericansigns.com www.northamericansigns.com Signage

6650 Professional Pkwy West Sarasota, FL 34240 (941) 907-0010 Susan Courter / Dir of Bus Dev scourter@recrawford.com www.recrawford.com General Contracting

Permit Place

Rebcor Construction

13400 Riverside Drive, Suite 202 Sherman Oaks, CA 91423 (818) 786-8960 Mike Robinson / President mrobinson@permitplace.com www.permitplace.com Permitting

900 Heritage Drive, Suite 925 Pottstown, PA 19464 (609) 661-9636 John Files / President jfiles@rebcorconstruction.net www.rebcorconstruction.net General Contracting

Philadelphia Sign

Regency Lighting

707 West Spring Garden Street Palmyra, NJ 08065 (503) 830-3841 Nate Doney / National Sales Executive ndoney@philadelphiasign.com www.philadelphiasign.com Signage

9261 Jordan Ave Chatsworth, CA 91311 (800) 284-2024 Mark Heerema / Senior Dir of National Accounts mark.heerema@regencylighting.com www.regencylighting.com Lighting

Porcelanosa USA

Rockerz Inc

600 Route 17 North Ramsey, NJ 07446 (305) 715-7153 David Carmona / Sales Director dcarmona@porcelanosa-usa.com www.porcelanosa-usa.com Architectural Building Products

100 Commonwealth Drive Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 612-6520 Robert Smith / Dir of Business Development rsmith@rockerzinc.com www.rockerzinc.com Polished Concrete Services

Prime Retail Services

S. Moraitis & Associates

3617 Southland Drive Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511 Michael Edmundson / Vice President medmundson@primeretailservices.com www.primeretailservices.com General Contracting/Installations

120 N. Green Street, Apt #4-F Chicago, IL 60607 (312) 342-5730 Sophia Moraitis / Business Development smoraitis@sma-law.com www.sma-law.com Construction Legal Services

Protos Security

Sargenti Architects

90 Town Center Street, Suite 202 Daleville, VA 24083 (540) 798-7958 Kris Vece / Dir of Client Relations krisvece@protossecurity.com www.protossecurity.com Security Guards

461 From Road Paramus, NJ 07652 (323) 775-2404 Melanie Gifford / Director of Business Development Mgifford@sargarch.com www.sargarch.com Architecture Firm

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State Permits Inc

319 Elains Court Dodgeville, WI 53533 (608) 553-0336 Vaun Podlogar / President vaun@permit.com www.permit.com Permitting

Storefloors

6480 Roswell Road Atlanta, GA 30328 (404) 610-4008 Julia Versteegh / VP Marketing & Business Development juliav@storefloors.com www.storefloors.com Flooring

Taylor Bros. Construction 4555 Middle Road Columbus, IN 47203 (812) 379-9547 Jeff Chandler / Vice President jchandler@tbcci.com www.tbcci.com General Contracting/Millwork

The Beam Team

1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 Tim Hill / Executive Vice President Business Development timhill@thebeamteam.com www.thebeamteam.com Installation/Construction

The Blue Book Network

P.O. Box 500 Jefferson, NY 10535 (800) 431-2584 Kelly Carpentierei / Network Events Manager kcarpentieri@mail.thebluebook.com www.thebluebook.com Information Provider/Project Management Tools Lanyard Sponsor

The McIntosh Group

1850 S. Boulder Ave Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 585-8555 x320 Karen MacCannell / Senior Associate, Director of Business Development karenm@mcintoshtransforms.com www.themcintoshgroup.com ADA Services/Architectural Firm

Transceramica

314 West Superior Chicago, IL 60654 (813) 334-3302 Joy Klein / Director of Key Accounts jklein@transceramica.com www.transceramica.com Flooring

UHC Construction Services

153 East Aurora Road, #155 Northfield, OH 44067 (216) 544-7588 Leslie Burton, Director of Business Development lburton@uhccorp.com www.uhccorp.com General Contracting / Seminar Break Sponsor

United Sign Systems

206 Tower Drive Oldsmar, FL 34677 (813) 448-5290 Thomas L. Cummings III / Chief Marketing Officer TC3@usigns.com www.usigns.com Signage / Bass Fishing Tournament Sponsor

USGN Inc

1430 East Missouri Ave., Suite 269 Phoenix, AZ 85014 (602) 668-6880 Russ Otten / VP Sales & Marketing russ@usgn.net www.usgn.net Construction Software

Window Film Depot

4939 Lower Roswell Road, Suite 100 Marietta, GA 30068 (678) 801-9572 Ian Bannister / Director of Business Development ian@windowfilmdepot.com www.windowfilmdepot.com Window Film

ZipWall

37 Broadway Arlington, MA 02474 (800) 718-2255 Matthew C. Hete / Vice President of Sales matt@zipwall.com www.zipwall.com Dust Barrier System

MARCH : APRIL 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS


INDUSTRY EVENTS

REGISTRATION LIST

360 LLC 3M 3M Aaron’s Academy Sports & Outdoors Alex And Ani All American Pet Resort Ambiance Radio Ambiance Radio American Signature Furniture American Signcrafters/Interstate American Signcrafters/Interstate Ameritech Facility Services Ameritech Facility Services Ashley Stewart ASSA ABLOY ASSA ABLOY Bridgestone Retail Operations Buffalo Wings & Rings Carvel Ice Cream CDO Group Celestial Meetings Cici’s Pizza Circle K Clarks Americas Clarks Americas Columbia Forest Products Construction Solution Consulting Continental Restaurants Core States Group Core States Group Cosentino NA Crestpoint Companies Crestpoint Companies Cumberland Farms Dental Care Alliance DFC Global Corp Driven Brands Shared Services Driven Brands Shared Services DWM Construction & Renovation DWM Construction & Renovation Egan Sign Egan Sign El Rancho Supermarkets Enterprise Holdings Inc F&D Commercial F&D Commercial Federated Service Solutions Inc Federated Service Solutions Inc Feed Restaurants Final Coat Painting Firebirds Wood Fired Grill Firehouse Subs Floyd’s 99 Barbershop Fogo De Chao Fred’s G Rissler Development Solutions Georgia Printco GPD Group GPD Group Grand Casino Hinckley Heartland Restaurant Group Hermitage Lighting Hermitage Lighting Hertz Global Hilliker Corp Hospitality Realty Services Hudson Group Hudson’s Bay Company ICON ICON Identicom Sign Solutions Identity Management JLL JLL John Varvatos Enterprises Lakeview Construction Lakeview Construction Lapels Dry Cleaning Lee Health System Level Office

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Principal Marketing Development Manager Bus Dev Mgr Project Mgr Construction Project Mgr Sr Director Store Planning & D Dir Of Franchise Development President EVP Of Ops Retail Facilities Mgr VP Sales Bus Dev/National Accounts CEO Facility Mgr Dir Of Bus Dev - Power Operators National Accounts Construction Mgr Field Construction Associate Director Of Design & Construction President Owner Senior Construction Mgr Site Development Snr Mgr Retail Construction & Maintenance Mgr Construction & Maintenance Specialty Products Manager President Owner Texas Director Of Business Development Dir of Construction Director, Corporate Accounts Dir of Real Estate Architect Dir of Construction VP Real Estate/Ops Dir of Construction Project Coor/Franchise Development Project Coor Director of Projects COO Bus Dev Dir of Sales & Mkt Dir of Construction Dir of Corp Ops/Facilities Nat Account Mgr. Director Director Of Sales President CEO President Director of Construction Construction Services Mgr Director of Facilities Facilities Maintenance Mgr Construction Project Mgr President Director of Marketing Project Mgr Project Mgr VP of F & B Construction Mgr Account Manager Account Manager VP Facilities & Construction Real Estate President Construction Project Control Mgr DVP Of Facilities VP National Accounts VP National Accounts President National Account Business Development Inter Director Retail Multi-Site Project And Development Services Facilities Mgr President Marketing Manager VP Construction Interior Designer Corporate Design Coor.

Lingate Hospitality VP Admin-Sales-Ecommerce Lucky’s Market Snr VP Construction & Development Marie Callender’s Snr Dir of Ops & Admin Mats Inc Snr Mgr Nat Account Development National Pavement Nat Accounts National Pavement Nat Accounts New York & Company Dor Of Construction & Store Development North American Signs Business Developement/Sales North American Signs National Accounts Orscheln Farm & Home Eastern Store Facilities Mgr Orscheln Farm & Home Store Development/Construction Management Orscheln Farm & Home Western Store Facilities Mgr Panda Restaurant Group VP Construction Panda Restaurant Group Exec Dor of Construction Permit Place President Philadelphia Sign National Sales Executive Philadelphia Sign Sales Porcelanosa USA Sales Director Porcelanosa USA Inter. Division Primanti Bros Construction Prime Retail Services Consultant Protos Security Dir of Client Relations RaceTrac Petroleum Senior Project Manager - New Store Construction RaceTrac Petroleum Snr PM of Construction, West Region RE Crawford Dir of Bus Dev RE Crawford VP Ready & Inspired Inc Author Rebcor Construction Exec Dir of Bus Dev Red Robin Gourmet Burgers & Brews Dir Of Construction Regency Lighting Snr Dir Of National Accounts Regency Lighting Director Of National Accounts RLJ Lodging & Trust VP Ops Rockerz Inc Dir of Operations Rockerz Inc Dir of Business Development Rosati’s Pizza Dir of Construction & Development S. Moraitis & Associates Business Development Salata COO Sargenti Architects Business Development Sargenti Architects Owner Southern Deli Holdings Dir Of Construction Starboard Group Dir Of Facilities & Construction State Permits Inc Snr PM State Permits Inc President Steak N Shake Director of Construction Storefloors VP Marketing & Business Development Subway Of Eastern Pa Development Mgr Subway Of Eastern Pa COO Target Principal -Building Regulatory Strategy Tatte Bakery Dir Of Construction & Facilities Taylor Bros. Construction Vice President Taylor Bros. Construction Subcontract Administrator TD Ameritrade Project Mgr TD Bank VP TD Bank VP Facilities Ne TD Bank VP Asset Reinvestment TD Bank VP - Regional Dev Services The Beam Team Exec VP Bus Dev The Blue Book Network Marketing Manager The Mcintosh Group Principal The Mcintosh Group Snr Associate, Business Development Transceramica Dir of Key Accounts Transceramica Nat Sales Mgr UHC Construction Services Bus Dev Mgr. UHC Construction Services Bus Dev Mgr Under Armour Snr Mgr Global Store Development USGN Inc CEO Verizon Wireless Assoc. Dir Design & Const Wawa Inc Construction Project Mgr Which Wich Dir Development & Project Mgmt & Logistics Which Wich Dir of Construction Window Film Depot Dir of Bus Dev Window Film Depot SE Market Mgr. Woodforest National Bank VP, Dir Of Branch Services Woodforest National Bank Facilities Dept Mgr Zipwall VP Sales

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


SAVE THE DATE JANUARY 10-12, 2018 • DAYTONA BEACH, FL. HILTON DAYTONA BEACH OCEANFRONT RESORT

WANT TO ATTEND AS AN END-USER OR SPONSOR... Contact David Corson 678.765.6550 or e-mail davidc@ccr-mag.com End-Users (retailers, hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc.) will receive complimentary hotel, airfare, transportation

www.ccr-summit.com

CIRCLE NO. 37

Sponsored by:


Not your dad’s body shop State-of-the-art facility draws rave reviews from customers, insurance companies and employees alike By Stacy Cox Photography by Waldorf Photographic Art

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T

his is not a typical body shop and that is exactly what Paul Walker had in mind.

Walker’s Automotive Collision Repair, a 50,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility that opened in 2016 in Knoxville, Tenn., is the culmination of a lifelong dream for founder and CEO Paul Walker. Walker’s dreams started when he was asked to paint tractors as a teenager for his grandfather’s garage, and he took his initial ambitions and turned them into his own 15,000-square-foot body shop in Seymour, Tenn. After 25 years in the business, he purchased a six-acre lot in neighboring Knoxville and came to the Knoxville architecture and design team at Studio Four Design to help them turn his vision for an atypical body shop into a reality. The goal for Walker’s Automotive Collision Repair was simple enough: Create, develop and build a body shop that included a vehicle repair facility, paint booths, staging areas for vehicles before and after repair, customer hospitality lounge, rental office, reception area, staff office, estimator offices, break room, multi-purpose training room, and associated restrooms and support spaces. The grand scale of the facility also needed to be able to encompass later growth that could be used for expansion purposes, including the possibility of a shopping center on the property. The distinctive building design that was created by the team at Studio Four Design, along with the construction teams at Merit Construction, was to provide a unique experience for customers and employees, as well as for insurance companies that would be a part of the customer repair process. The stereotype of a body repair shop often is a dirty, dingy, poorly lit space that is cramped for all involved. This new design offers a comfortable, inviting, brightly lit atmosphere that features light colors, highly polished, reflective walls and floors, with large windows that bathe the open repair spaces with natural light. The importance of creating an open, inviting space was not lost on the team at Studio Four Design. Body shops often drive most of their business from insurance companies, many of which want to work with businesses that offer excellent customer service experiences for their own clients. The most technological advanced and welcoming body shops are more likely

to be referred by insurance companies, which is why this new building was designed with customer and employee satisfaction in mind, while still offering the ability for repairs to be completed quickly and efficiently. In the spirit of creating something different for the facility, the design team created a design whose outside featured a combination of concrete surfaces, aluminum composite material panels and fiber cement panels with an aluminum storefront glazing system. The two-story customer service area and administration portion of the building, which fronts the main highway, defines the point of

To help enable a feeling of comfort, the lobby reception desk is attractively paneled and comfortably furnished.

entry while concealing the more industrial feel of the pre-engineered metal building repair shop behind.

Welcome Center

To help enable a feeling of comfort, the lobby reception desk is attractively paneled and comfortably furnished. Windows in the lounge allow customers to observe work in progress in the service center, which uses the latest in automotive repair technologies. The large windows into the service area are a major source of positive feedback from customers, because the openness creates a feeling of trust for customers by allowing them to see the technicians at work. In addition, customers meet with estimators in a uniquely designed area in the lobby that allow for free conversation about their vehicles. In addition, the original design called for space for four estimators, which was expanded to six to meet demand.

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NOT YOUR DAD’S BODY SHOP To assist customers who need a replacement vehicle, Enterprise Rental Company established an office in the lobby. This additional customer service options makes Walker’s Automotive Collision repair the only collision repair shop in East Tennessee with a full-time rental car representative on site to help make the auto repair process easier for customers. Every detail of the facility was meticulously thought through by the client and the design team, including the artwork that adorns the interior of the building. The artwork has personal ties to the company and include details of cars and car parts, along with artistic views of Knoxville, that help create a more personal connection for customers and complete the engaging feel of the space.

The end result in the design process is that Walker’s has increased the number of insurance referrals, while maintaining their staff, who find the workspace to be easier to maneuver and welcoming than other companies that they have worked with in the past. The shop incorporates best practices in their business, including the use of improved and efficient spray guns, reductions in shop emissions, better respiration protection for painters and overall improvements in mixing room ventilation. Two Blowtherm paint-drying booths provide the latest diagnostic and testing equipment to ensure thorough repair to every damaged area of the car. A dust collection system, that utilizes sanding machines connect to a central vacuuming system, keeps the work space virtually dust free. While Walker admits he was skeptical about the polished floors that the designers recommended, he changed his mind after viewing similar examples. Walker now says the white walls and polished floors are one of the most commented features in the space. He is a big fan of how it presents the business to customers and insurance adjusters.

To better serve the day to day operations of the mechanics, the work space was expanded for easier access for specific repair functions.

Second story strong

To facilitate a more welcoming environment for the team of technicians onsite, Studio Four Design created a learning center on the second floor. This unique space allows Walker’s team of technicians to receive the ongoing training necessary to maintain their gold certification. The service area highlights the modern look of the building with sleek white walls and polished concrete floors that are accented by LED lighting to create a more thorough welcoming experience for customers. To better serve the day to day operations of the mechanics, the work space was expanded for easier access for specific repair functions.

Merit Construction began the building process in 2015, with an immediate goal of placing 40,000 square feet of foundation and getting the pre-engineered metal building in place as quickly as possible, to provide more dry area for material receiving and storage. Concrete work also included concrete foundation retaining walls and a two-story concrete poured stairwell. This was all in place by the winter of 2015, and construction was completed within a year. The overall construction cost was $2.2 million. The new Walker operation opened in January 2016 at 10606 Kingston Pike in Knoxville, and the success of the facility has exceeded expectations, with plans in place to design another location in the coming year. And while the expenditures on the facility may have been higher than if a traditional shop was created, the amount of repeat business from customers and referrals from insurance companies has proven that regardless of what industry you are working in, good design is good for business. CCR

Stacy Cox, AIA is president and director of business development for Studio Four Design, a top architecture firm specializing in body shop design, based in Knoxville, Tenn. To view some of their recent body shop designs, visit studiofourdesign.com or contact her at scox@s4dinc.com.

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SPRING 2017

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens The difference you can taste Jim Salerno VP of Operations & Training

How 83 years down the road Carvel’s brand is still pulling in the fans

Isyol E. Cabrera, director of design and construction

Also Inside: Adapting service stations for new uses

A special supplement to:

Photography by Carmelo Cunsolo, FX Photo-Graphics, Inc.


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The difference you can By Michael J. Pallerino

A

taste

flat tire. Would you believe that’s where it all started for Tom Carvel. When the air in one of the tires on his first ice cream truck fizzled out, Carvel had two choices – close up shop or keep on selling.

You know how this ended up, right? Carvel kept on keeping on, eventually creating a style of ice cream that changed the game. That softer, creamier, lighter taste served as the foundation for a new way of serving ice cream – the first retail ice cream franchise. And that broken down truck? It became the first Carvel ice cream shoppe. For the past 83 years, the Carvel has continued to innovate and grow, all the while holding true to its founder’s original idea to serve fresh, authentic ice cream and hand made cakes that keep people coming back for more. Today, the Atlanta-based company currently operates more than 400 franchised and food service locations – and growing. Commercial Kitchens sat down with Isyol E. Cabrera, director of design and construction, to get her take on the Carvel brand and why it’s still America’s favorite ice cream stop.

How 83 years down the road Carvel’s brand is still pulling in the fans

Special thanks to Carvel franchisee owner Patrick Sangermano, 9360 West Commercial Blvd in Sunrise, Fla., for letting us set up our cover photo there.

MARCH : APRIL 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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THE DIFFERENCE YOU CAN TASTE

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS Give us a snapshot of the Carvel brand?

Carvel is an iconic ice cream brand among the FOCUS Brands portfolio. We are the leading brand in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and southern Florida, with over 400 locations on the east coast. Carvel… America’s Freshest Ice Cream is well known for premium soft-serve ice cream, signature ice cream cakes like Fudgie the Whale and Cookie Puss, and take home treats such as Flying Saucers. The special combination of chocolate and vanilla ice cream, separated by a layer of chocolate crunchies, and decorated with icing or custom edible images is what separates the brand among competitors.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

Our biggest opportunities are to keep growing in our existing markets and to expand to new markets with the help of our sister brands.

Our target consumer is anyone who loves ice cream with a primary focus on family celebrations.

How does the design of Carvel cater to what today’s consumers are looking for?

The new 80th anniversary Carvel shoppe design is family-friendly, open and inviting with a modern flare, featuring the broad variety of high quality products that are made fresh at Carvel shoppes every day.

Walk us through how and why it is designed the way it is?

Our vision was to create a clean, simple, modern ice cream shoppe where the delicious products are the hero. When guests walk in, the first thing they see is a bright, modern and inviting design with rich Carvel red colors and high quality finishes. As they walk up to the counter, they see the broad variety of scooped ice cream flavors, delicious toppings and a new menu board that features promotional flavors and a variety of shakes, Dasher Sundaes, Carvelanches, cups and cones. We also feature our famous Carvel cake wall that highlights cakes for key holidays and special occasions. We created a layout that is functional for our customers but also operationally effective. Our intent from the very beginning was to create something that would be relevant for a long time, so our franchisees don’t have to worry about refreshing or re-imaging any time soon.

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CIRCLE NO. 38


THE DIFFERENCE YOU CAN TASTE

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Take us through your construction and design strategy. Great real estate is always the beginning of our process. We look for locations where we can be part of the neighborhood. Our design and construction process is not complicated but it is unique compared to other brands. We aim to create a space where our customers have a great experience and feel at home. We focus on a buildout that can be timely, as our franchisees’ ROI is a top priority to us.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

We’re constantly looking at the latest equipment and materials that are energy efficient as well as environmentally friendly.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

Carvel shoppes can be found in densely populated areas like the boroughs of New York and in the neighboring suburbs. We typically look for a population of approximately 50,000 with convenient access to the location. Neighborhoods with families are key. High visibility to satisfy the impulse buyers is very important and aim to locate in areas where moms and families frequent.

Our biggest opportunities are to keep growing in our existing markets and to expand to new markets with the help of our sister brands. For example, you can find Carvel ice cream in select Cinnabon bakeries and Auntie Anne’s Pretzels. In addition, we’ve had a lot of interest from existing franchisees to add new Carvel locations. Our flexibility in venue and footprint is a big opportunity. We can develop a full franchise location in 800 to 1,200 square feet, an express franchise (fountain ice cream menu) in under 300 square feet that could be a small Carvel shoppe or inside of another food venue.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

Are you optimistic about what you see today in the marketplace?

Give us a rundown of the market’s layout.

It varies by area. In certain states, we need to allow more time for permitting. Identifying the right general contractor is also critical. Our goal is to have recommended contractors that are familiar with Carvel and our processes. We’re also conscious of the escalating cost of equipment. We have a team that actively evaluates new equipment options and works to make sure our franchisees get the best price possible.

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I’m very optimistic about today’s marketplace. Carvel has had record growth in the last three-plus years. We’ve always been known for the best soft-serve vanilla and chocolate ice cream and the very best cakes. Now we’re known for exciting soft-serve ice cream flavors like Oreo, Reese’s, Pumpkin, and more. We’re also known for our broad variety of handmade scooped ice cream, amazing shakes and indulgent Dasher Sundaes.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


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Architecture | Prototype Development | Sustainability © 2017 All rights reserved. CCR3-417 CIRCLE NO. 39

®


THE DIFFERENCE YOU CAN TASTE

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

Our growth plan is to continue to add locations in our existing markets – New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, Florida and into neighboring markets including Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.

What trends are you seeing?

In construction, I’m seeing trends in more energy efficient equipment, local repurposed materials and more minimalistic designs.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” shopping environment in today’s competitive landscape? Great product, excellent customer service and an inviting, warm and comfortable environment, so we can put a smile on everybody’s face.

What is today’s consumer looking for?

Today’s consumer is looking for brands that they know. Brands that represent quality; with great service in a clean environment. Our design lends itself to all of that.

Support existing and new franchisees during new build-outs or remodels so we continue to grow and expand as well as continuing to research the best equipment for our franchisees.

Describe a typical day.

When I ‘m not traveling, my day usually starts with a phone call either from a franchisee, a vendor or someone in operations. After that, I review drawings for new build-outs or remodels. Meetings and more phone calls fill the rest of my day. Sometimes I get to do ice cream tasting.

Tell us what makes the Carvel brand so unique?

Carvel is an iconic brand that has been around for 83 years. We’re a favorite because of the exceptional variety of freshly made ice cream treats, novelties and ice cream cakes that are perfect for any occasion. Many of our customers grew up with Carvel and now they’re making Carvel part of their friends, children and grandchildren’s’ lives. Our neverending commitment to be an innovation leader driven by the creativity of our chef, Dave Fenner, always keeps us fresh and exciting. CCR

One-on-One with... » Isyol E. Cabrera

Director, Design and Construction, Carvel

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? It’s to see a design go from paper to reality.

What was the best advice you ever received? If your dog doesn’t like that person, you shouldn’t like them either.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? You were a pain in my neck during construction, but now that it is completed, I can see why you were such a pain.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why.

Respect – this is the foundation for all good partnerships. Communication – you should be able to communicate clearly. Strong character – you will need to be strong to make the easy decisions, but you will need to be stronger to make the bad ones.

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What is the true key to success for managers today?

The ability to recognize the talent on their team and encourage them to grow.

What’s your favorite vacation spot and why?

Margarita Island (Venezuela). I used to go every year with my friends back in high school and college.

What are you reading now?

“Love Your Life, Not Theirs” by Rachel Cruze. It offers seven money habits for living the life you want, and how easy it is to get into the game of comparison and keeping up with the Joneses, and make really bad financial decisions.

How do you like to spend your down time?

My husband and I are very involved in Pet Rescue, so we try to help as much as we can.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


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CIRCLE NO. 40


Kid friendly Pueblo School District solves water woes

I

By Dan Vastyan

f you were to overlay an annual rainfall map of the United States with that of a water hardness map, they’d be eerily similar. With a few exceptions, the drier the area, the harder the water.

But the worst states, Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, are in a class all their own when it comes to hard water scale. Mechanical contractors in these states are all accustomed to dealing with the issue, as are sales representatives, wholesalers and commercial maintenance crews. Water is considered moderately hard at four grains per gallon (GPG), and very hard at 10 and up. Anything above 18 GPG is considered extremely hard. While normal residential plumbing and domestic hot water systems can function properly with very mild levels of water hardness, it gets out of hand quickly when the GPG rises. More so if there’s specialized equipment involved.

Outside the school, the flag hung at half mast for the victims that died in the Washington Navy Yard shooting the day before.

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» CCRS 2017 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 41


KID FRIENDLY

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Commercial “combi” ovens or steamers, those professional cooking appliances that combine the functionality of a convection oven and a steam cooker – when running in humidified hot air or atmospheric steam mode – are especially susceptible to scale buildup. The familiar crusty white scale forms quickly when water is heated, and even faster when it evaporates, leaving the minerals (calcium carbonate) to adhere to the closest surface. Scale can quickly coat all heat exchange surfaces of these appliances, prolonging the amount of time it takes to heat food, and using more energy to do so. It can also shorten equipment lifespan.

Nobody likes a late lunch

In Pueblo, Colo., the school district searched for several years before finding a solution to the scale issue plaguing the 27 combi ovens in their kitchens. Like many districts, Pueblo City Schools prepares food in their four high school production kitchens, then distributes it to the 23 smaller schools, where it’s re-thermalized. “There was major scale buildup in the combi ovens in all the district’s kitchens,” says Jill Kidd, director of food services at Pueblo City Schools. “The manufacturer of the first combi ovens we purchased insisted that we didn’t need filters or water treatment. Those units lasted six months.” After replacing the ovens, three different filtration and treatment systems were used, but each was either ineffective or used plastic fittings that broke shortly after installation. After problems persisted, Kidd contacted Paul Gradishar, president of Grady’s Restaurant and Bar Supply in Pueblo. “We work extensively with the school district, supplying the bulk of their kitchen equipment,” Gradishar says. “The scale problem was so bad, and with the fittings constantly breaking, our list of options was exhausted. I contacted Bob Reihmann, at The Redstone Group, to see if he had a trick up his sleeve.” The Redstone Group is a leading manufacturer’s sales agent for the commercial foodservice industry. Operating out of Englewood, Colo., the company has five locations throughout the West. Paul Gradishar, president of Grady’s Restaurant and Bar Supply, and Jill Kidd, “The call came just shortly after we acdirector of food services at Pueblo City Schools, stand near a combi oven, one of quired the Watts OneFlow line of equipment, many that was plagued by hard water scale issues. supplied through Dormont,” Reihmann says. “We’d seen the effectiveness of OneFlow systems on a number of occasions, and this seemed like the perfect application for it.” Within a week of contacting Reihmann, Gradishar supplied one dozen point-of-use OneFlow tanks to the high school’s maintenance department, which installed the systems quickly to treat water for the combi ovens. Kidd says the school’s maintenance department had no trouble installing the units. One thing was certain: They were happy not to deal with scale problems on a daily basis. “Since we’ve installed the OneFlow systems, scale buildup hasn’t been an issue,” Kidd says. Today in Pueblo, there are no more bagged lunches or late deliveries from the high school. Hot meals now are prepared and delivered on time, and maintenance staff that had been tasked with fixing scale issues are now free to handle other projects throughout the facility.

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ARCHITECTURE

PROTOTYPES

ACCESSIBILITY

SITE SELECTION

PROCESS

The McIntosh Group mcintoshtransforms.com

918.585.8555

info@mcintoshtransforms.com CIRCLE NO. 42


KID FRIENDLY

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

The Pueblo City Schools plumbing department installed template assisted crystallization water treatment units on the combi ovens in the high school. Custodian Jarrod Romero inspects the systems periodically to ensure proper operation.

Cook Loretta Lewis is able to safely prepare food for all the district’s schools without the concern of whether or not the combi ovens will operate properly.

The science of it

Watts OneFlow technology employs template-assisted crystallization (TAC) media within specially designed, reinforced cartridges or tanks. The media are specially manufactured beads the size of some powdered laundry detergents. The systems are sized by flow rate, with applications as small as 1 GPM for point-of-use scale prevention, to multiple-tank applications for larger volume needs. For example, Fort Sill Army Base in Oklahoma has a OneFlow system capable of conditioning water at a rate of 900 GPM.

At one of the point-of-use systems, custodian Jarrod Romero turns the water off at the end of the day. Before OneFlow systems were used, a water leak prompted the school to make overnight shutoff a standard procedure.

TAC technology excludes the use of chemical additives and eliminates discharge and waste water that are byproducts of the brine cycle in a water softener.

TAC media starts out as polymeric beads (resin) in the 20 to 40 mesh size range. Catalytically active sites, or templates, are “imprinted” or coated on bead surfaces through a batch-coating process. The template initiates an interaction between hardness ions (calcium and magnesium) and their counter-ions (bicarbonates), so they combine to form inert nanometer-sized “seed crystals.” This process, called nucleation, occurs when dissolved molecules or ions dispersed throughout a solution gather to create clusters in the sub-micron size range. The crystals provide an enormous area for preferential growth of remaining hardness ions still in solution. “Low-energy heterogeneous transfer” then begins. The remaining dissolved ions reach their solubility shift, attach to the seed crystals and continue harmlessly downstream and out of the building. TAC technology excludes the use of chemical additives and eliminates discharge and waste water that are byproducts of the brine cycle in a water softener. It's a green solution that involves no use of electricity and results in zero pollution. Plus, compared to water softening systems, installation and maintenance costs are minimal. A simple inlet/outlet connection is all that’s required; no pumps, meters, or valves are needed. Another advantage of TAC systems over a traditional water softener is their ability to operate effectively at trickle flow rates. TAC media always are used in upflow designs, so they are not subject to low-flow channeling or high-flow pressure drops. In traditional water conditioning systems, hard water "bypass" occurs through channeling if the flow is considerably less than the design rate. That's because water finds the path of least resistance through the media, and comes in contact with minimal amounts of resin. TAC technology successfully prevents this. With the help of Grady’s Restaurant and Bar Supply and The Redstone Group, Pueblo City School District is saving money, salt and water. While school staff are pleased, the students and taxpayers in Pueblo are the ultimate beneficiaries. CCR

Dan Vastyan is a regular contributor to Commercial Construction & Renovation magazine. Common Ground is a marketing communications brokerage that covers the commercial construction market.

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CIRCLE NO. 43 © 3M 2017. All rights reserved. 3M and Envision are trademarks of 3M.


The Grocery Game

5 keys to hiring a construction manager you can trust By Tim Jackson, Todd Scharbert & Scott Leadbetter

W

hat makes building a grocery store different from other kinds of construction? A lot, actually. But here’s the more important question: How badly will it hurt your bottom line to hire someone who doesn’t understand grocery store construction?

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The question isn’t whether the wrong contractor will give you headaches, put you behind schedule or make you wrangle with budget-busting change orders. The question is when. Grocery store construction requires a skill set that not every builder possesses. When a GC unfamiliar with or unprepared for the rigors of grocery store construction is hired for a project, it can be an extremely time-consuming and challenging endeavor to resolve the resulting issues. No one wants that role. Don’t assume that a contractor’s bonding capacity, insurance limits or company brochure tell the whole story. Here is five things you should look for when hiring the construction manager for your next grocery store project:

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


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Kingsmen Projects US 1824 Monrovia Avenue, Suite D Costa Mesa, CA 92627-4581 949 642 2555 • www.kingsmenprojects-us.com CIRCLE NO. 44

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Mark Badhwar • 949 887 1968 • markbadhwar@kingsmenprojects-us.com Stephen Hekman • 619 719 8950 • stephenhekman@kingsmenprojects-us.com


THE GROCERY GAME

No. 1: The Corporate Mindset

A lot of retail builders look good on paper. With dozens of similar-looking retail facilities to their credit, they seem like they would be up to the challenge of building a grocery store. How different could their experience building similar types of facilities be? It could be vastly different, as it turns out. Electronics stores, apparel retailers or even strip centers aren’t just different building types. They’re bid, brokered and managed with an entirely different mindset. Many contractors in the retail market sector are used to unstructured, informal deals with their local clients, and they are used to managing projects on the fly. When contractors like this are presented with the rigorous documentation standards that grocery store clients demand, a lot of them just can’t adjust.

No. 2: Maintenance of Non-Stop Operations

Many grocery stores operate 24 hours per day, and none of them can let construction negatively impact sales volume, ever. Grocery shopping is very habitual. Consumers want predictability and ease – to find everything where they expect it to be, without any fuss from the moment they enter the parking lot until they get home with their purchases. If customers’ habits are disrupted, they’ll shop elsewhere. It’s very hard to win back people who feel disenfranchised. Wayfinding is so important. Signage needs to indicate the building’s temporary entrances. Maps can be printed and handed out, showing customers where departments have been relocated. If stores can assign staff to help customers navigate the store, that is immensely helpful – and the on-site construction team should share daily updates with them at the start of each shift. Done correctly, aboveand-beyond service, provided by the contractor and store staff working hand in hand, can earn customer loyalty.

No. 3: A Command of the Latest and Greatest

Be sure to find out whether your contractor has experience working with national clients. Ask whether he is used to maintaining rigorous, detailed reports or posting daily logs using proprietary project management software that is similar to yours. The construction industry is embracing technology faster than ever before, but it’s still behind the times in some ways. Working with a contractor who understands the value of accurate, thorough, searchable project information will cause you less trouble than working with one who knows the building type but doesn’t "get it" when it comes to standardized documentation.

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If customers’ habits are disrupted, they’ll shop elsewhere. It’s very hard to win back people who feel disenfranchised.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017

Does it feel like the speed of the grocery store renovation cycle is gaining momentum? You’re not imagining things. It’s a necessary part of keeping up with customer demands and marketplace competition. Instead of facelift projects coming along every seven to 10 years, they’re happening as often as every four years now. And grocery stores are no longer cookie-cutter identical. Customization is key. One neighborhood may have a higher demand for produce, and another may need to carry more international food selections. Some locations have vast prepared foods departments while others get by with traditional deli counters. Local consumer trends have a direct impact on store design decisions, even to the point of changing layouts mid-construction. It is an important skill to anticipate a grocers’ needs and be nimble enough to accommodate those changes – all while minimizing disruption to the schedule. It also can impact phasing priorities. Do not mess with operations that could impact pizza sales going into the weekend, and never, ever take the rotisserie offline. People count on food being in the store and ready for them when they need it. When people are inconvenienced, they won’t give their “usual” store a second chance. That’s how competitive it is in many marketplaces today.


We Build Brands. One Store at a Time. One Turn-Key Solution for Custom Store Fixtures, Millwork and Graphics Nationwide Installation and Maintenance

RandalRetail.com CIRCLE NO. 45


THE GROCERY GAME

Whether the grocery store project is greenfield new construction, urban infill, site expansion or phased renovation, hire a team that knows their stuff. Work with a contractor who has a proven track record of complex construction scheduling and phasing. Furthermore, choose a contractor who can be flexible and responsive to operations’ ever-changing needs. This is the key to making the building process run smoothly, even in the face of unforeseen challenges. Builders who only have retail clients may not know how to handle construction projects that transparently.

No. 4: Equipment

Expertise

Diverse experience is what helped ICI win their first grocery client, in more ways than one. Our restaurant and car dealership experience proved that we know how to manage owner-provided, long lead-time equipment. Just like the coolers, ovens, ranges and hoods in restaurants; or like the automotive lifts and other vehicle service machinery at a dealership, refrigeration can make or break a grocery store project. If your contractor isn’t used to coordinating with national vendors or purchasing from client-prequalified vendors, take heed. The same goes for contractors not accustomed to temporary utility relocations. Temporary coolers need power. Ovens need gas lines and ventilation. Setting up swing areas takes some forethought. Relocation logistics have to be accounted for in the project schedule.”

No. 5: Work Ethic & Ingenuity

The lack of trade professionals is an eminent crisis for our industry. It’s getting harder and harder to find reliable, quality trade workers. The economy of the last decade has caused a mass exodus from the field. It makes subcontractor pre-qualification more important than ever before. It used to be that hiring a local builder with established subcontractor relationships was a sure way to get the best trades

on your project. Today, however, having a strong process in place is more important than the so-called home-team advantage. Sure, there are some areas of the country that are more provincial than others, but we don’t run into that very often anymore. Subcontractors want to work with construction managers they can trust – who will treat them fairly, manage them ethically, and pay them promptly. Not every contractor is cut out to travel, but our process travels well. The process starts with the paperwork. AIA A305 forms, recent financial statements, and EMR and DART statistics narrow the field of some poor performers. Reading the company’s approach to on-site safety and quality assurance is enlightening, as well. The key is to be diligent about who you allow on your job site. Subcontractor defaults aren’t as common as they have been over the last several years, but you’re still at risk whenever you choose subs based on the low number alone. Hiring a new subcontractor mid-way through a project kills the momentum of the whole job. It just can’t be allowed to happen, so we do whatever it takes to prevent it. That starts with procurement and doesn’t stop until the warranty period and beyond. Who do you want to cross the finish line with? Whether the grocery store project is greenfield new construction, urban infill, site expansion or phased renovation, hire a team that knows their stuff. To build within budget and without complications, work with a contractor who can provide pre-construction services and demonstrate their added value. From budgeting and value engineering to logistical strategizing and project sequencing – the upfront engagement for pre-construction services will save you time and money. Most of all, they will save you frustration and ensure that projects are built to your specifications, the first time and every time thereafter. CCR

Tim Jackson, LEEP AP BD+C, is VP of Operations at International Contractors Inc. (ICI); Todd Scharbert is a project manager specializing in retail construction at ICI; and Scott Leadbetter, CPC, LEED AP, is a Project Manager. The Elmhurst, Ill.-based ICI is a general contracting and construction management firm that has built more than $75 million in restaurants and over $250 million in retail construction.

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SPRING 2017

ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

SUPPLEMENT

From the ground up Inside the building of the United Arab Emirates’ Embassy Education Affairs facility

A special supplement to:

ALSO:

Flood prone community bound for greatness


From the ground up Inside the building of the United Arab Emirates’ Embassy Education Affairs facility By Addison Nottingham

W

hen the United Arab Emirates Embassy needed a new facility, staff called the Washington, D.C.-based multidisciplinary firm, ACG Architects, to renovate and expand a vacant, century-old Ambassador’s residence on Massachusetts Avenue. Embassy staff use this reworked building for typical day-to-day operations, including hosting meetings and conferences. It also will act as a Majlis gathering space. Additionally, the building serves as a center for students who come to the United States from the UAE. 106

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • FROM THE GROUND UP

The ACG team faced several construction challenges in delivering this diplomatic and culturally sensitive project, which included: Historic Preservation – The project is located within the Massachusetts Avenue Historic District, which required that everything on the exterior be restored as faithfully as possible to its original 1912 condition. The building also was restructured and re-leveled to include parking and the interior space was reconfigured into a modern and open floor plan to increase functionality. LEED Gold Rating sustainability goal – Numerous initiatives were taken to achieve this rating including low-flow plumbing and irrigation systems, high recycled content building materials and a construction waste recycling program. Additionally, the space was daylighted with light from the large windows in the existing building and floor to ceiling glass in the addition, FSC sourced wood was used throughout and a high SRI/green roof system was installed. Environmental factors – The building’s restoration was complicated by differential settlement issues caused by voids and fissures in the soils along Rock Creek Park. This had caused significant cracking in the existing masonry walls and contributed to floors that were out of level by more than four inches. The scope of work included stabilizing structural issues, repairing the historic fabric of the building exterior, and renovating the building’s interior to modernize the space for offices, meetings rooms and student facilities. This required a re-design of the interior layout to increase useable square footage and flexibility.

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Additional goals included building exterior spaces, adding a parking garage and providing barrier-free access to the building. Considering UAE’s commitment to the environment, it was essential to both the client and ACG Architects to achieve LEED Gold certification – which meant upgrading the building with sustainable systems for improved performance, energy savings and occupant comfort. The expansion and alterations to the existing building required extensive approval from the Foreign Missions BZA, and included reviews by D.C.’s Historic Preservation Office, the Commission of Fine Arts, the U.S. Department of State, D.C.’s Department of Transportation and the U.S. National Park Service. The abandoned Ambassador’s home contained 8,900 square feet of unused space. Composed of four floors and a basement, the home had significant cracking in its masonry walls, damaged windows, floors that were uneven (off by four inches), a non-functional mechanical and plumbing system, and devastating roof leaks that rendered the space inhabitable. Because it was originally scaled as a private residence, there was only one onsite parking space, which significantly impaired its potential to be utilized as a work and education center. It was a huge engineering challenge to stabilize the existing masonry structure, which had suffered damage from foundation settlement issues caused by voids and fissures in the soils along Rock Creek Park. The team repaired the cracking in the façade and walls, and where it was necessary, the brick and stone lintels were replaced. The foundation of the existing building was stabilized and underpinned with a series of deep foundation piles. Since the building was constructed more than 100 years prior, it was riddled with small rooms that were not suitable for commercial use. In response to this challenge, the design team developed a steel frame structure, which was installed inside the exterior masonry walls, and allowed the interior of the building to be open and flexible. This modern space now can structurally accommodate the owner’s current and future configuration needs. Additionally, the steel frame allowed for each of the floors to be independently leveled.


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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • FROM THE GROUND UP

Due to its location in the Massachusetts Avenue Historic District, the project required the team to restore the exterior as faithfully as possible to its original 1912 condition. Modern elements were designed to minimize their impact on the historic composition. For example, the ADA ramp leading into the building matches the iron patterns found on the original façade. Another challenge included minimal site access. As a result of the insufficient space to pre-position materials onsite, many of the deliveries were unloaded and moved directly into place. Limited access to the rear of the property was particularly challenging as that’s where the four-level addition and below grade garage was constructed. Through the 10-foot-wide corridor that previously served as a single-car garage, we excavated the below-grade parking area and constructed the concrete-framed addition.

• Low flow plumbing fixtures used to reduce potable water consumption for the building by 36 percent over a conventionally designed building. • Native and drought resistant plantings as well as use of high efficiency irrigation system components used to reduce the potable water consumption for the building by 52 percent over a conventional building • Improvements in building envelope performance as well as HVAC system component efficiencies were used to reduce the energy consumption of the building by more than 20 percent when compared to a conventional building. • Through an active program of recycling and waste management, 89 percent of the on-site generated construction waste was diverted from the landfill.

Innovative strategies

LEED elements that contributed to the sustainability goal included: employee shower and changing facilities; water-saving low-flow plumbing fixtures and irrigation system; energy saving fixtures and mechanical systems; high recycled content building materials; regionally sourced building materials; reduced Heat Island Effect by 100 percent parking provided below grade and combination High SRI/Green Roof System; implementation of construction waste recycling program; daylighting of the space and unobstructed views to the exterior from workspaces; FSC sourced wood and a commitment to 100 percent green power. Highlights of sustainable strategies, include: • Locating the Chancery Annex on the Massachusetts avenue corridor of the city allows for significant access to public modes of transportation. Project location has double the required access to public transportation lines as is required for the base credit allowing the number of required spaces to be reduced by approximately one third.

One-hundred percent of on-site parking located below grade and under cover. Even though the project site is quite small, through the use of an car lift/elevator we were able to provide access to limited area parking garage below the building Improve indoor environment for occupied spaces by providing adequate natural daylight, over 95 percent of regularly occupied spaces in the building receive ample (controllable) daylight. Organizationally, the project was arranged so that the addition to the historic building designed around a small courtyard space allowing light to penetrate into the historic building. Ribbon windows and large sections of curtainwall in the addition allow the space to be light filled with a majority of occupied spaces two exterior walls. Improve indoor environment for occupied spaces by providing increased connectivity of the interior of the building to the exterior garden and Park. More than 98 percent of the occupied spaces of the building have direct line of sight access to the building exterior and beyond Energy performance improved through use of latest VRF (variable refrigerant flow) mechanical equipment. Prior to purchase, a newer and more efficient series of VRF units became available on the market. The system was re-specified in order to take advantage in manufacturing improvements to the technology to increase system efficiency. Re-use of substantial portions of the existing building structural elements (58 percent) was desirable to maintain historic character of the building and reduce impacts to environment through haul off and replacement with new construction materials. CCR

Addison Nottingham is a principal at Anderson Cooper Group Architects, a Washington, D.C.-based firm committed to providing innovative and creative concepts that meet its client's vision. ACG Architects focuses on the development of functional solutions for the hospitality, residential, commercial, retail and diplomatic markets

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CIRCLE NO. 47


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION

A fire rescue vessel in operation in the aftermath of the flooding brought about by Hurricane Floyd in Bound Brook, New Jersey in September 1999. Credit: New York District, USACE.

Rising up Flood prone community bound for greatness By JoAnne Castagna

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I

n September 1999, before becoming Mayor of the Borough of Bound Brook, N.J., Robert Fazen woke up to the sound of helicopters hovering over his house. He soon realized they were news helicopters televising the flood damage caused by Tropical Storm Floyd.


This significant development will help protect residents from experiencing another Floyd, and will drastically reduce their flood insurance and improve Bound Brook’s economy.

A century long struggle

For the past century, Bound Brook and the surrounding region has been subjected to severe and sometimes devastating flooding resulting in $2.5 billion (1996 dollars) in damages, wide spread resident evacuations, injuries and deaths. In 2000, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began construction on the Green Brook Flood Risk Management Project. The Corps is working in collaboration with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Middlesex, Somerset and Union Counties in New Jersey, the Green Brook Flood Control Commission and other partnering agencies. The project is expected to provide comprehensive flood protection to the entire Green Brook Basin that covers 65 square miles in north central New Jersey and includes 14 municipalities in Middlesex, Somerset and Union counties. The basin is a depression in the land surface that experiences flooding from the Raritan River and its tributaries, the Middle Brook, Green Brook, Bound Brook and Stony Brook during heavy rain and storm events.

“Downtown Bound Brook was like a warzone with flooded businesses and apartments and out of control fires,” Fazen says. “Police were in motor boats navigating the flooded streets rescuing residents from second story apartments, cars were floating down Main Street and fire department boats were moored to street lamp poles, hosing down store fires.” The rescue continued for days and the physical recovery took months. The mental state of Bound Brook was changed. “We all wondered if our downtown would ever recover,” he says. Today, Fazen is pleased that Bound Brook has recovered. Recently, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, and partnering agencies, he completed the Bound Brook portion of the Green Brook Flood Risk Management Project. CIRCLE NO. 48

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • RISING UP

The most severe flooding has occurred in downtown Bound Brook, within the Borough of Bound Brook in Somerset County. Besides Floyd, the basin was flooded in Aug. 2, 1973, by a big storm, and from April 15-17, 2007, by a Nor’easter. The project includes constructing an elaborately engineered system of levees, flood walls, closure gates and pumping facilities throughout the Green Brook Basin. In addition, channels are being modified, buildings are being flood proofed, voluntarily bought out or demolished, bridges are being raised and demolished, and wetland mitigation is being performed. The project is designed to provide flood protection up to a 150 year storm event. “This is a flood whose strength and water height is predicted to occur, on average, about once in 150 years,” says Robert Greco, project manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District.

A closure gate located on East Street in Downtown Bound Brook in the Borough of Bound Brook is working well during Hurricane Irene in 2011. Credit: USACE.

Floodwall located near Brook Industrial Complex in the Borough of Bound Brook, New Jersey during Hurricane Irene in 2011. Credit: USACE.

Heading into the home stretch

The project as a whole still is in progress, but the Bound Brook portion is completed. Greco explains the completed work, “To prevent water from the Raritan, Middle Brook and Green Brook Rivers from flooding the Borough of Bound Brook we constructed levees and floodwalls around the borough.” “We also constructed an interior drainage system that includes pump stations and interior drainage pipes that will convey the water on the protected side to the pump stations during a rain event,” Greco says. In July 2016, flood insurance requirements changed in the Borough of Bound Brook. Fazen says approximately 500 properties no longer will be required to pay flood insurance and the value of those properties along with all the properties in the Borough of Bound Brook will increase 10 percent to 20 percent. Reduced flood risk is bringing new business to the Borough of Bound Brook and increasing its economy. Greco said that this is evident by the presence of stable businesses moving onto Main Street in Downtown Bound Brook and the development of two major apartment complexes. “Potential flooding has always inhibited outside investment and with the threat of flooding reduced, development is accelerating,” Fazen says. Fazen says new development projects also are no longer burdened with state flood regulations and flood insurance costs. Bound Brook residents like Alberto Torregroza who has lived in the Borough of Bound Brook for 26 years and raised five children there is satisfied with the work done in Bound Brook and the reduced flood insurance. “This is great news that we have been waiting for years to hear,” Torregroza says. The significant reduction of our flood insurance will help us save money. The insurance may even be totally eliminated. Now we can improve the appearance of our homes and the entire town with continual maintenance and redevelopment plans.” Torregroza’s family has been flooded out of their Bound Brook home several times since 1992. This included experiencing the devastation caused by Tropical Storm Floyd. “The completion of this flood project will prevent us from seeing another major storm such as Floyd,” Torregroza says. “When there are children involved in these difficult and trying situations as was the case with our family, it is an indescribable state of confusion, disbelief and financial hardship that affects the entire family and everyone in the community.” The residents of Bound Brook are ecstatic. “We always had the threat of flooding in our minds,” Fazen says. “With this project, residents feel a sense of safety.” Torregroza says Bound Brook is a beautiful town and they are grateful to all the parties involved for their efforts and determination to get this done. “We are really going to see this community prosper, grow and improve its quality of life.” FC

Dr. JoAnne Castagna is a Public Affairs Specialist and Writer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. She can be reached at joanne.castagna@usace.army.mil. Follow her on Twitter at Blocked http://twitter.com/writer4usacenyc

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N

orfolk, Virginia has a history of adapting to change.

With beginnings in 1636, the city has undergone war, epidemics, fires and economic depression to grow into the state’s second largest city. It's also the region's economic hub and home to the U.S. Naval Station – the largest Navy base in the world, spanning approximately 3,400 acres. The city’s building stock and architecture have evolved. The Colonial town’s first medieval English-style wood and frame construction with wide chimneys and thatch roofs were replaced in time by the iconic Neoclassical federal style architecture with elements of columns in the porticoes and classic motifs over doorways and windows. The look exists today in the city’s many preserved red brick public buildings and residencies. The challenge in urban development, architectural design and city planning has always been how to respect the historical, while meeting the needs of contemporary living. By Jeff Winke The Norfolk Hilton and Conference Center is the newest high-rise in the city’s downtown. Topping out at more than 230 feet, the structure will dominate the Norfolk skyline, while respecting the historic buildings it abuts. The $126 million public/private initiative is expected to transform the corner of Main and Granby Streets. Called The Main, the project is scheduled to open in 2017. The new facility will have 380,000 square feet of space and will include a 22-story luxury hotel, a 50,000-square-foot conference center known as The Exchange at The Main and three premier restaurants. The hotel will have 10 luxury suites and a presidential suite among its 300 guest rooms. Amenities will include an indoor pool, business center, one grand ballroom that can accommodate 1,500 guests, a junior ballroom and car service with a 300-space parking deck. The developers say the Exchange at The Main will be one of the most technologically advanced and secure meeting facilities in the United States. It will be certified by the International Association of Conference Centers and will meet standards for Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities in order to accommodate the security needs of clients like government agencies and defense contractors. No comparable facility in the Mid-Atlantic region holds both designations.

Hilton complex requires survey technology to ensure its place among historic buildings

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NEW HIGHRISE RISES Managing the process

The $126 million public/private initiative is expected to transform the corner of Main and Granby Streets.

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Managing the construction and ensuring that the more than 30 contractors working on this large, complex project is the construction management firm W. M. Jordan Company, based in Newport News, Va. The structure being constructed is a 22-story building with the mix of various contractors on the site, which meant the timing and sequencing of efforts was critical. Add to the challenge that the creative architectural design has many supports that have an angle – which tosses out the expectation it would be perpendicular from a level baseline. “It was crucial to establish the building control lines that all the contractors could rely on,” says Dwayne Sellars, Virtual Construction Manager, with W. M. Jordan Company, “The building is an L-shape, with two contrary angles to make that shape. It’s not truly an L, since the column lines don’t run north-south through the building continuously.“ W. M. Jordan does not self-perform work, but with this project there was a quality control concern that construction errors would be too costly to discover after the fact – it needed to be prevented. It had to think outside its norm. “There was too much potential for an error to occur that could have had very expensive repercussions down the line,” Sellars says. “That’s why we decided to invest in the robotic total station.” With the help of Atlantic Laser Supply, Chesapeake, Va., W. M. Jordan Company purchased the Sokkia SX-105T robotic total station that features auto-tracking technology, Windows CE 6.0 with Topcon MAGNET Field software, RED-Tech reflectorless measurement and an advanced angle measurement system. This was W.M. Jordan’s first Sokkia robotic total station. It owns and has used other Sokkia and Topcon technologies and total stations for years. “We initially purchased the Sokkia robotic total station for quality control and that use alone more than made the investment worthwhile, since there were several concrete slabs and sleeves that were off and we caught before the pours,” Sellars says. “We prevented some hugely costly mistakes from occurring. We also found many other beneficial uses for the technology.”


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NEW HIGHRISE RISES W. M. Jordan Company used the Sokkia robotic total station for: • Building control lines • Resections • Pile layout and as-built • Utilities layout • Foundation layout • Wall layout, metal stud wall checks • Quality Control of driven piles and edge of slabs pre-pour • Embed layout • Custom ceiling layout

The Robotic Total Station Factor

W. M. Jordan Company has owned and used robotic total stations before, but on this project, it was the company’s first time using a robotic total station for field work. “There’s obviously a time- and cost-saving story behind each of our uses of the Sokkia but the as-built of utilities is worth elaborating on,” Sellars says. “Because the complex is a zero lot line in downtown Norfolk, we worked with the city on the timing and how best to relocate utility boxes to fit with the needs and design of the new structure. We surveyed every box and then reviewed that with the city and the utility companies for logistics and accommodating the demands of our schedule while also ensuring minimal if any interruption of service to the neighboring buildings.”

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On the front end of the project, W.M. Jordan used Autodesk Point Layout software to place points inside the building information model and to bring points captured in the field back into the model for comparison. Initially, Sellars was on site for the first month to troubleshoot and manage the process, while project engineer Austin Tempus learned the powerful software and its capabilities. “Quite honestly, the project is being completed with less risk and better quality because we’re using the Sokkia SX105T robotic total station and AutoDesk software,” Sellars says. “David Rowe, our field manager with 35-plus years of surveyor experience, really jumped in and took responsibility for applying the robotic total station to the best benefits of the project.” The Norfolk Hilton and Conference Center is on schedule to open this year. While the high tech, mixed-use, entertainment, meeting, dining and hotel destination is being completed the anticipation appears to be mounting as evidenced by its increasing number of “likes” on the facility’s Facebook page and the number of hits to its YouTube virtual tour. The addition of The Norfolk Hilton and Conference Center to Norfolk’s cityscape will definitely create a new chapter in this historic Colonial town. CCR Jeff Winke is a construction writer and author of the “The PR Idea Book.”


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MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS www.communicatorsintl.com | info@communicatorsintl.com CIRCLE NO. 52


One-on-One with Ahmet Yamaner

By Ron Treister

Photo: KUTAHYA SERAMIK ONIX

When it comes to specifying ceramic tile for commercial projects, LET’S TALK TURKEY!

T

urkey has a history of ceramic production reaching back thousands of years, from the primitive sculpture of prehistoric Anatolia, to the ornaments and crockery of the Hitites, and the elaborate hand-painted tiles of Iznik. In the middle of the 20th Century, an era of mass-production began as Turkish ceramic producers built factories to manufacture ceramics on a large industrial scale. Since then, the quantity/quality of ceramics produced in Turkey has continued to grow. Currently, the country is one of the top five world producers of ceramic tile material. As well as being a world leader in ceramic production, Turkey utilizes some of the world’s most sophisticated technology and manufactures some of the most innovative products found globally. And, Turkish ceramic producers work closely with some of the world’s most talented designers in order to create exciting new products that are both beautiful and functional.

Turkishceramics, the association of Turkish ceramic manufacturers, was established in 1997 with a specific goal: to raise awareness of the quality of Turkish ceramics around the world. At Coverings 2017, which took place in Orlando, Fla., in April, Commercial Construction & Renovation caught up with Ahmet Yamaner, president of Turkishceramics, to get his take on why and how Turkish tile products should be considered for American commercial projects. CCR: How big is your industry as opposed to larger tile producing nations such as Italy and Spain? Yamaner: Turkey is one of the top tile producing countries in the world. Of those selling quality materials to the states, only Italy, Spain, Mexico and possibly Brazil are larger in that respect.

Ahmet Yamaner, President of Turkishceramics, the worldwide promotional arm of the Turkish Ceramics Industry, along with writer, Ron Treister of Communicators International, Inc.

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CCR: How many years have Turkish manufacturers of ceramic tile been focusing on the United States? Yamaner: The best answer I can give is that our association began coming to the Coverings exposition as a group in 2000. Our strategy has always been very straightforward. Our collective focus very basic: Factories listened to both customers and prospects in the states, and thus, were able to produce tile materials not just for the “world market,” but specifically for the specific tastes of American clientele.


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ONE-ON-ONE WITH AHMET YAMANER CCR: In your estimation, how advanced from a technology standpoint is the Turkish tile producing sector? Yamaner: We are very up-to-date with all of our equipment. Much of it is state-of-the-art, fully automatic, with most of the production line machinery, including the kilns produced in Italy. Our members know that to produce the best materials, they must use the best equipment.

For example, if a hotel with 500 rooms wants to renovate its guest baths, now there is no reason to rip out old tile. Think of not only the time-savings with these materials, but also, no longer having to deal with the messiness and cleanup that is part of the demolishing of old tile process.

CCR: What are some of the advantages that U.S. buyers will glean from ordering Turkishceramic tile products? CCR: What is your target market in the United States? Yamaner: Here is one great example: Our biggest export customer, Yamaner: Too many tile manufacturers/suppliers try to be everything to for years, has been Germany. The buyers in that country are exeverybody. That course of action ultimately results in bad business dealtremely professional and 100 percent exacting relative to what they ings and bad business feelings. Whereas there are exceptions, of course, want. If our producers do not manufacturer our tile products to these such as the way companies sell to national accounts (which generally are exact specifications, our buyers in that country will not be satisfied. dealt with as an individual situation), but for the most part, our members Germany has set a very high level of expectation for us. As a focus upon U.S. distributors... which buy from them and, in turn, sell to result, our workers are quite meticulous and want to deliver products their various client categories. These can be architectural and design, with this same precision for their customers in the States. building owners and contractors specializing in And clearly, we believe in long-term commercial construction projects. relationships. Currently, many of these exist between Turkish producers and top CCR: What are some of the special American distributors. A good example is products we will see this year coming Scott Levy, President of Arley Wholesale, from Turkey? one of America’s largest tile and stone Yamaner: Many of our factories are distributors. Levy recently said that his firm, producing larger format porcelain tile, which which services 26 East Coast/Mid-Atlantic perfectly emulates natural wood flooring, states, has been working for many, many but it has the performance characteristics of years with Turkish manufacturers. He finds porcelain, which means the product will last them to be highly professional, technologyears and years with only minimal mainteically advanced and most of all, being able nance required. These durable materials, to produce tile materials skewed to meet which are perfectly calibrated and rectified the demands of his demanding customer Emirhan Buzcularli of Ege Seramik and are rated to be harder than natural base at an affordable price. describes his firm’s “fabric look” granite, are now being made in sizes as tile material. large as 36 inches x 48 inches. CCR: If there could be one last stateStone look porcelain tile in larger formats ment you’d really want to convey to the Turkey is one of the top are very popular now, as well. Both of these commercial construction and renovatile producing countries in tion sector, what would it be? beautiful replicas of stone and wood are achieved by technologically advanced, high-defithe world. Of those selling Yamaner: We are not only focusing on marnition inkjet printing techniques to achieve the keting our products, but also want American quality materials to the amazing likeness to natural wood and stone. buyers to be comfortable with our unique Porcelain tiles with the look of textured ways of doing business in a personalized states, only Italy, Spain, fabric have become a hot commodity, as We want the American buyers to know Mexico and possibly Brazil way. well. The U.S. hospitality marketplace is more about us, to feel comfortable when specifying this product category, in particuare larger in that respect. visiting with us personally... and, also, to be lar, for wall applications. aware that they’ll be getting a bit of history Also manufactured in Turkey is the new rage, very large format when purchasing products from a country with a ceramics tradition thin porcelain panels, which are being produced in sizes such as 8 dating back thousands of years. feet x 10 feet, (and larger) and can be only a few centimeters thick. We believe in doing business the right way. We look forward to These products, due to their size, offer a more monolithic look for long-term relationships that translate into long-term, mutually benefiwall applications in particular… and, save time and money since cial partnerships. We realize the success of our customers equals our they can be installed right over existing wall tile. success, as well. CCR Ron Treister is President/Founder of Communicators International, Inc., a marketing communications firm headquartered in Jupiter, Fla. For three decades, his firm has worked with major accounts focusing on the commercial construction sector. He may be reached at: rlt@communicatorsintl.com

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2017

Schedule: February 23rd: Atlanta March 23rd: Dallas April 13th: Charlotte May 18th: Minneapolis June 22nd: Los Angeles July 13th: Boston July 27th: Denver August 24th: Nashville September 14th: New York City October 12th: Philadelphia November 30th: Phoenix * Event dates may be subject to change

For information about membership or events, contact Kristen Corson, kristenc@ccr-people.com • 770.990.7702 For information about co-sponsoring an event, contact David Corson, davidc@ccr-mag.com • 678.765.6550

www.ccr-people.com www.ccr-mag.com CIRCLE NO. 54


LEADERSHIP

LEADERSHIP

by Grace Daly

All knowledge is useless unless applied By Grace Daly

I

n the past decade, there has been a shift and focus on leadership approaches that affect all industries. Emotional intelligence has been the buzzword on blogs, editorials, books and talk shows. Emotional intelligence, the skill in perceiving, understanding, and managing emotions and feelings, is recognized as a vital leadership trait, just as important as the education and experience of an individual. With this style of leadership that promotes compasGrace Daly is the founding sion and inspiration comes host of ShopTalk360.com, the the push and pull of whether industry podcast show. With or not emotional intelligence more than 20 years directing can be learned. And, if so, design, construction and facil- my question is how many ities for national retail brands, of these individuals choose to apply this knowledge into Daly’s current role as intereveryday practice? viewer, author and business During my career in coach celebrates the leaders construction and facilities many in our industry she fondly years ago, I’ll never forget one refers to as her family. Please incident that clearly described feel free to reach out to her at this. I was transitioning to leave a Grace@GraceDaly.com brand chain and my team was to report to another director. During office desks moves, two of my team members came to me, excited to propose sitting next to each other. One had expertise in the HVAC trade, while the other excelled in presentation skills. So the thought was that they would both have desks next to each other to cross train and share their innate skills with the other. Well, that sounded like a no brainer to me. This request was simple – they were not asking for raises, title changes, or responsibility or territory changes. They just wanted to change their seating so that they could learn from each other. I agreed with them, and was thrilled for their continued desire to learn and grow. Later on that afternoon, I relayed this to their future supervisor. He looked at me plainly, reiterated the how and why for this proposed seating arrangement, and then with the most smug look on his face gave me a flat out no. “It’s not happening,” he said. When I asked why, he said it because he said so. There was no good business reason to deny this request – he was just flexing his muscles. With his director’s title, MBA and all the industry certifications he had hanging on his wall, he chose to let his ego rule. His decision created an uninspiring work environment that eventually chased out many of the long-term employees.

So, did he have low emotional intelligence, or had he chose not to use it? And if one does have emotional intelligence and chooses not to use it, does that mean he really doesn’t possess that quality? I guess to this day I’ll never know, but I learned a very important lesson. A person’s intentions will always be revealed in his actions. The bottom line is emotional intelligence may be present, learned or acquired. You can go to webinars for it and earn a certification, but ultimately, it has to be chosen to be practiced and applied daily. The fact remains that at the end of the day people who have “power” over other people to make decisions that affect their paychecks, their livelihoods and yes, even which desks they are allowed to sit in – all boils down to the individual’s intentions. And intentions are always derived from whether they’re operating from an ego or non-ego domain. It dawned on me why this “leader” was not well liked or well received in the industry. He was a jerk, and I think he actually enjoyed having that reputation. Similar to what is said about money, it is not the root of all evil. Money only magnifies the type of person you are. If the person is a jerk – money allows him or her to be a bigger jerk. If the person is kind, money allows him or her to be kinder; more generous. I find the responsibility of a leader to be the same. The responsibility or “power” that you possess as a leader only magnifies who you are. Emotional intelligence, whether intrinsic or learned, still has to be applied in order to be effective.. CCR

The responsibility or “power” that one possesses as a leader only magnifies that person. Emotional intelligence, whether intrinsic or learned, still has to be applied in order to be effective.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


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PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Q2 2017

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE: Hooters

Abilene, TX

$3,000,000.00

6,785

New Construction

Taco Cabana #2036

Katy, TX

$800,000.00

3,060

New Construction

Q2 2017

First Watch

Dallas, TX

$300,000.00

3,756

Remodel

Q2 2017

Jimmy John's #2984

Oklahoma City, OK

$150,000.00

1,438

Remodel

Q2 2017

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS: Harbor Freight Tools

Edmond, OK

$1,500,000.00

15,200

New Construction

Q3 2017

Aldi #173

Houston, TX

$1,200,000.00

17,000

New Construction

Q2 2017

Walmart Supercenter #128-218

Jonesboro, AR

$846,000.00

149,704

Remodel

Q2 2017

Pet Supplies Plus

Cedar Park, TX

$450,000.00

14,320

Renovation

Q2 2017

Foot Locker #25170

Tucson, AZ

$250,000.00

4,960

Remodel

Q2 2017

Tempe, AZ

$100,000,000.00

335,066

New Construction

Q2 2017

Goodnight Commons Family Apartments

Austin, TX

$30,000,000.00

230,239

New Construction

Q3 2017

600 Building Redevelopment

Corpus Christi, TX

$25,500,000.00

150,000

New Construction/Remodel

Q3 2017

Paris Bank Tower

Paris, TX

$15,000,000.00

37,000

Remodel

Q2 2017

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE: The Local

HOSPITALITY: Embassy Suites Hotel and Convention Center

Jonesboro, AR

$50,000,000.00

220,000

New Construction

Q2 2017

Capitol Avenue Boutique Hotel Redevelopment

Little Rock, AR

$17,000,000.00

61,424

Remodel

Q3 2017

Residence Inn by Marriott

Scottsdale, AZ

$12,000,000.00

77,000

New Construction

Q4 2017

La Quinta Inn & Suites

San Antonio, TX

$4,750,000.00

49,470

New Construction

Q2 2017

EDUCATION: Hopi Elementary School

Phoenix, AZ

$20,000,000.00

90,000

New Construction

Q3 2017

Atoka Public Schools - New Atoka Sports Facility

Atoka, OK

$4,057,711.00

9,757

New Construction

Q2 2017

Texas A and M University Corpus Christi Engineering Lab

Corpus Christi, TX

$2,300,000.00

8,750

New Construction

Q2 2017

Madison Middle School - Gymnasiums and Locker Room Renovation

Albuquerque, NM

$1,898,000.00

14,500

Renovation

Q2 2017

Q2 2017

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY: New Public Safety Facility

Lawton, OK

$30,000,000.00

97,400

New Construction

Dallas District Headquarters Renovation

Dallas, TX

$7,544,679.00

60,000

Renovation

Q2 2017

Fire Station #2 Relocation

Desoto, TX

$5,000,000.00

14,200

New Construction

Q4 2017

Memorial Hermann Northeast Hospital New Patient Tower

Humble, TX

$120,000,000.00

123,000

New Construction

Q2 2017

UNM Hospitals Operating Room F Renovation and Equipment Installation

Albuquerque, NM

$700,000.00

1,248

Renovation

Q3 2017

Earle Arkansas Family Health Clinic - Dental Clinic Addition

Earle, AR

$500,000.00

1,600

Addition/Renovation

Q2 2017

Heartland Dental

Mesa, AZ

$340,000.00

4,295

Remodel

Q3 2017

MEDICAL:

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


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AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

3MG......................................................................47....................28

Lightfair................................................................111...................47

3M Illuminated Sign Solutions................................99....................43

Mapes...................................................................31....................20

AC•Tech............................................................CVR2-1.................1

May Group.............................................................15....................12

Ad Art/Genesis Light Solutions...................................9......................7 Aedifica ................................................................43....................26 Asta Powerproject..................................................25....................18

Metro Ceramics....................................................131...................57 The McIntosh Group...............................................97....................42 MFM Building Products..........................................55....................31

The Blue Book......................................................119...................50 NAC Products.......................................................123...................53 Bostik....................................................................29....................19 Calpipe Security Bollards......................................109...................46 Ceso......................................................................35....................22 Commerical Construction & Renovation People 2017.......................................125...................54 Commerical Construction & Renovation Retreat 2017......................................127...................55 Commerical Construction & Renovation Summit 2018......................................81....................37 Construction Data Co. (CDC).................................129...................56

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association.................19....................15 Newton...................................................................3......................2 Quantum Smart Solutions......................................63....................35 Randal Retail Group..............................................103...................45 Retail Contractors Association...............................115...................49 Redbuilt.................................................................65....................36 Rockerz Inc....................................................... 7, 36-37..............4, 23

Commicators International Inc..............................121...................52

Rubbermaid...........................................................21....................16

CONSTRUCT-ED.....................................................59....................33

Salsbury.................................................................8......................5

Construction One....................................................5......................3

Schimenti..........................................................8, CVR4..............6, 59

Controlled Power...................................................16....................13

SGA Design Group.................................................91....................39

Core States............................................................41....................25 Fall Protection........................................................61....................34 Fast Signs..............................................................89....................38

ShopTalk 360.........................................................13.....................9 Snoblox-Snojax......................................................57....................32 SuperBright LEDS ................................................120...................51

The Garland Company..........................................113...................48 Wagner..................................................................13....................10 Georgia Printco......................................................95....................41 GPD Group.............................................................45....................27 GreenbergFarrow...................................................51....................30 Henderson Engineers.............................................39....................24

Wakefield Beasely..................................................49....................29 Wallace..................................................................23....................17 Warner Bros.........................................................CVR3..................58

Kingsmen.............................................................101...................44

Wolverine Building Group.......................................93....................40

Lakeview Construction, Inc....................................11.....................8

WoodWorks...........................................................33....................21

Laticrete................................................................17....................14

ZipWall..................................................................14....................11

130

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


Metropolitan Ceramics®

Call 678.765.6550: Call anytime. If no one answers, leave a detailed message and be sure to include your name, phone number and/or email address so we can contact you if we have any questions.

Canton, OH

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NEW Slip Resisting Tile Metropolitan Ceramics® is the leading manufacturer of low absorption, high quality unglazed quarry tile in the USA.

Moving?: Please let us know eight weeks in advance to make sure you do not have interruption in service. Remember to include both your old and new contact information.

With the addition of XA Abrasive to their QUARRYBASICS® product line, Metropolitan Ceramics® introduces the next evolution of slip resisting tile. XA Abrasive combines two grip enhancing additives in one tile for decades of slip resisting performance.

Duplicate Issues?: If you are receiving multiple copies of Commercial Construction & Renovation, please let us know. And please include information from both mailing labels. A subscription to Commercial Construction & Renovation is your subscription to better-design, better-built and better-maintained facilities.

Use XA Abrasive anywhere spills/moisture and heavy traffic combine to create slip fall concerns. Commercial kitchens and food prep areas are two prime examples of spaces that would benefit from using XA Abrasive.

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MARCH : APRIL 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

131

PRODUCT SHOWCASE

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Keeping the momentum moving ahead B usiness and sports have much in common. You have preseason, regular season and the playoff season. And then it's time to reload and rest your battered body of the athletes until it's time to jump back on the horse and do it all over again. Retailers, restaurants and hoteliers follow the same process. They must keep their facilities looking fresh and up to date with the best building products possible. These projects must be energy efficient, sustainable, maintenance free and affordable to help the bottom line of the budget – the ultimate score card for any successful project. Commercial brands must make sure they use the best and most strategic vendors in their process. That's similar to sports teams, who have to draft the right players to get the job done right the first time. And then they build momentum through consistency. So, whether a customer visits a facility in Florida, New York or Los Angeles, the facility must be appealing and inviting. There are just too many competitors out there that can entice your customers if your facility doesn't hit the mark. In sporting terms, that's a win for your team.

No matter the sport, you play as you practice. Same for the commercial sector. You must plan, collaborate, be flexible when the road gets bumpy with those unexpected hindrances and overcome diversity to cross the finish line. And it’s not just crossing the finish line, you have to complete project on time, under budget and with a minimal punch list to make money. In every sport, there are always teams at the top of their game. Year in and year out, they keep winning. Players retire, get injured or leave for other opportunities. And when they do, they must replace them with rookies and veteran players to retool the roster. The same is true in the commercial sector: Whether it's retailers, restaurants or hotel brands, there are brands that are always at the top of their game. They all use similar paint, concrete, drywall, cable and roofing materials, etc., but one company does it better than the others. This past fall, we launched a new high school lacrosse program in what will be a dynasty down the road. We only won one game this season, but there were many close games, some decided by only a goal. Each game, we improved, learning to cut down the mental errors and mistakes. In those close games, a play here and there determined the outcome. At every practice, we tell our players that it's not what you don’t have, it's what you do with what you have. Never, ever quit. One thing is for sure, maintaining a positive outlook on the horizon is key, especially as we grow the program. If you're not having fun, win or lose, you'll never get better. Losing builds character and winning takes you to the next level/ It can be contagious. It keeps your team craving that next victory. Remember – there is no “I” in team. We always break our huddle before the fourth quarter and give a “1,2, 3, Finish Strong” cheer. Enjoy the spring and summer ahead. We wish your firm much success in the second half of the year. Soon, the holiday season will be upon us with a scorecard ready to tell you who won and who lost. Here’s to good health, prosperity and safe travels the rest of 2017. CCR

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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One thing is for sure, maintaining a positive outlook on the horizon is key. If you’re not having fun, win or lose, you’ll never get better.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MARCH : APRIL 2017


CIRCLE NO. 58


CIRCLE NO. 59

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR March April 2017  

CCR March April 2017