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SEE WHAT YOU MISSED AT OUR WOMEN’S AND CCR EXECUTIVE RETREATS

Watch. Play. Shop. Stay. Craig Delasin, CEO, Urban Retail

Inside Atlanta’s sprawling new sports entertainment destination

Exclusive Inside: 5 tips to implement and improve green spaces New Vegas steakhouse steps up its game with sizzling floor design

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November/December • 2017 Vol. 16, No.6

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88

28 FEATURES

88  Five-star squared 28 Watch. Play. Stop. Stay.  New Vegas steakhouse steps up its  Inside Atlanta’s sprawling new sports game with sizzling floor design entertainment destination 40  2018’s to-do lists set  Commercial construction executives eye future with positive mindsets

118  Doing Business IRL  Adapting convention centers for the digital era

140  Green thumb 62  Turning the corner  5 tips to implement and improve  Attendees discuss the continued green spaces advancement of women in the workplace Cover and feature photos by: BOC design, Inc.

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November/December • 2017 Vol. 16, No.6

SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 20  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Philadelphia 24  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – New York

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

92  Leading Security Manufacturing 104  Leading Signage Firms

SPECIAL SECTION

155

20

Commercial Kitchens 121 Serve. Enrich. Exceed.  Why the Firebirds Wood Fired Grill brand is not your father’s steakhouse 132 Shine it on  Striking lighting helps illuminates iconic brew house Philadelpia Sign 136 Consistently Bringing Brands to Life Since 1911 Federal Construction 143 Shields up  Army Corps builds foundation for resiliency

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150 Boarding Call  Design, products and expertise collide to help McCarran Airport International gate expansion project land on time Craft Brand and Marketing 155 Made in Boston  How Night Shift Brewing became one of Beantown’s favorite craft breweries 162 Odds: 3.000 to 1  Let’s face it –sometimes new product fail. But when they hit, the rewards are worth the ride. 166 Music and Beer  CBAM looks at which came first – and why it matters

DEPARTMENTS

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 171 Leadership 172 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 174 Ad Index 176 Publisher’s Note


CIRCLE NO. 4


EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

What if you could...

W

hat if you could? It’s a question that each of us ask ourselves every day. What if you could change your mind? What if you could alter the

direction you took on your last project or the decision you made last week? Last year? What if you could change the moment? In today’s ever-changing economic and cultural landscape, there are a lot of what ifs. More for some, less for others. That’s why the question is the great equalizer. It reminds us of what we did and said yesterday. Pretty deep, right? More for some, less for others. Re-evaluation is part of the natural reflection we all walk through when the calendar threatens to turn the page to a new chapter. You do it more than you think. You really do. You assess the details of a project. You think about what move is the most time and cost efficient. You run each and every step through your thought process until you make the move you make. And it’s over. Until it isn’t. Here’s the thing. It’s never too late. Professionally. Personally. It doesn’t matter. While we don’t always get a “Mulligan,” we do get the opportunity to assess the decisions we make. Tony Robbins once said, “Stay committed to your decisions, but stay flexible in your approach.” That flexibility – the space we give ourselves to evaluate new information as it becomes available to us – is an important tenet in the road to success. You know what comes next – We learn from our mistakes. Or, as Oscar Wilde so eloquently put it, “Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.” So, remember this as you begin to build the blueprint for your professional and personal growth in 2018: Responding to change often requires adjusting your approach to meet those bumps in the road you didn’t expect to find. Keep an open mind. Build flexibility. Consider the alternatives. And be receptive to change if change is what’s needed. Here’s to a 2018 that helps each of us find the way we want to go.

In today’s ever-changing economic and cultural landscape, there are a lot of what ifs. More for some, less for others. That’s why the question is the great equalizer. It reminds us of what we did and said yesterday.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury JENNIFER GRIESER Sr. Store and Corporate Facilities Manager Tuesday Morning LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design MICHAEL TIERNEY VP of Construction & Planning

Cumberland Farms

HEALTHCARE BROOKS HERMAN Senior Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

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RESTAURANTS RON BIDINOST Vice President of Operations Bubbakoo’s Burritos Corporation GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp. DAVID SHOTWELL Restaurant Consultant

HOSPITALITY

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield STEVE JONES

International Director JLL

JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

JOHN LAPINS Partner, Geolo Capital

JIM SHEUCHENKO

GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations RLJ Lodging & Trust ISYOL E. CABRERA Manager, Design & Plan Review, Food & Beverage. Architecture + Design Team IHG

President Property Management Advisors LLC

CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President EMG

CONSULTANT GINA NODA President Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Herschman Architects STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA

President CESO, Inc.

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA MIKE AUTENRIETH Academic Director Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management The International Culinary School at The Art Institute International Minnesot DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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ARCHITECTURAL CANOPIES


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail Hy-Vee Hy-Vee is looking to test a new concept in Iowa that combines a large-format convenience store and a small-format grocer. The two proposed Hy-Vee Fast & Fresh stores would include a selection of groceries and fresh prepared foods, a Hy-Vee Market Grille Express, a coffee shop and fuel stations.

Build-A-Bear Build-A-Bear Workshop is building a bigger presence in tourist spots from the St. Louis Science Center, to Walt Disney World, and next to the Empire State Building. In a push to combat falling mall traffic, the retailer has also launched shops on 25 Carnival cruise ships and will open holiday shops in five Bass Pro stores.

Century 21 Stores Discount department store Century 21 Stores in New York City will debut a new in-store shop dubbed Next Century. The stores feature a more polished atmosphere and a lineup of designer goods. The shop, with a separate entrance from the main store, also offers amenities such as a nail art bar, and a coffee and tea bar.

Target Stores Target is opening about 12 small-format urban stores in high-profile cities, including Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia and Los Angeles. Some stores will offer goods and amenities aimed at young professionals, including organic groceries, workout wear and a Starbucks. It also will makeover 1,000 of its 1,800 stores in the next three years, up from the 600 announced earlier this year.

Bed Bath & Beyond Bed Bath & Beyond, which bought the Harmon beauty retail chain in 2002, recently renamed the growing division as Face Value and Beyond. The newest of the division’s 55 stores opened on New York City’s Upper West side, with a mix of beauty brands and home goods. Coach Coach’s game plan to reverse sliding sales and restore the brand’s luxury luster is proving successful. The plan, which included making its products scarcer in department stores, taking greater aim at the luxury market with new fashion offerings and finding new ways to connect with Millennials, could provide a model for other luxury brands.

Burberry British “accessible” brand Burberry has a new strategy of turning it into a true luxury brand like Givenchy and Bottega Veneta. The plan includes refreshing its stores, enhancing its digital offerings and decreasing its lower-end wholesale collaborations. Everlane Online fashion retailer Everlane will open its first two brick-and-mortar stores in New York City and San Francisco. The shops will give the brand a way to win over new customers, and give existing shoppers a place to see and touch the pieces before buying.

Restaurants Auntie Anne’s Mall-based pretzel chain Auntie Anne’s is expanding its focus on catering and food trucks to boost sales as mall traffic declines. The chain, which has upward of 1,200 U.S. units and around 500 international locations, is also experimenting with delivery in some markets, and may eventually offer it nationally. Next Level Burger Next Level Burger aims to build the plant-based burger chain to 1,000 units in the first decade. The concept, which launched in 2014 in Oregon, will build standalone stores and also add more units inside Whole Foods Market stores. Bareburger Bareburger, known for serving exotic meats such as boar and ostrich, is slimming down its protein offerings and will open a vegan restaurant by next year. Fatburger FAT Brands, parent of the Fatburger chain, is gearing up to go public with plans to raise about $24 million for expansion. The chain expects to grow from 300 to 500 restaurants.

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Smoothie King Smoothie King will open 16 locations in the Cincinnati area during the next five years, with one store already under construction in Fairfield, Ohio. The expansion includes standalone drive-thru store models that will be the first of their kind for the brand in that area. Red Robin Red Robin Gourmet Burgers has created a delivery-only concept called Red Robin Express on Chicago’s Michigan Avenue. The test concept will feature several of the chain’s popular menu items and, in addition to direct delivery, will offer catering services and thirdparty delivery through providers such as DoorDash and Amazon. Pei Wei Fast-casual chain Pei Wei Asian Diner moved its headquarters to Irving, Texas, when it separated from its sibling brand, Arizonabased P.F. Chang’s China Bistro. It plans to revamp the brand and its operations. Chipotle Mexican Grill Chipotle Mexican Grill will open fewer new restaurants next year as it focuses on the fundamentals at existing locations.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


AroundtheIndustry

(continued)

Hospitality Best Western Hotels & Resorts Best Western Hotels & Resorts is wooing upper-midscale guests with a new soft brand. BW Signature Collection by Best Western has locations in New York City and Vermont, with a third hotel expected in the Pacific Northwest.

AccorHotels/Orient Express AccorHotels plans to establish Orient Express Hotels as a real brand with a high-end, boutique positioning. Accor has purchased a 50 percent stake in the brand, and the Orient Express name could be extended beyond hotels to furniture, luggage and silverware.

Best Western International Best Western International is planning a multipurpose hotel near its Phoenix headquarters that will showcase the company’s range of brand offerings, while operating as a full-service property. The new hotel will also function as a real-world training site.

Marriott/Edition Marriott and Ian Schrager plan to open seven Edition Hotels worldwide next year. Edition, a joint venture between Schrager and Marriott, debuted in 2008.

Dream Hotel Group The Dream Hotel Group currently has 10-plus Unscripted Hotels in the works. The new brand will have Dream’s signature vibe and design features, but will be found in secondary markets.

Intrigue Management company Interstate Hotels and Resorts has unveiled its own brand, Intrigue Hotels and Resorts. Manhattan, Boston and Dublin are among locations for the new venture by Interstate, which manages more than 400 hotels across 10 countries.

Aman Hotels Aman Hotels is awaiting final approvals to create a hotel inside New York’s Crown Building. This will be the company’s first urban property in the United States.

Selina The Selina hotel and hostel chain has set its sights on Mexico, with plans to open 30 properties there within the next two years. The company already has properties in Colombia, Panama, Nicaragua, Guatemala and Costa Rica.

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Eateries specializing in pie are popping up across the country, as consumers seek comfort in nostalgic, handmade dishes. Yes, you read that correctly. The new wave of dessert shops offer classicsAll information must be provided. The publisher reserves the right to determine qualification for a free subscription. and creative re-imaginings of old favorites, such as flights of mini pies served in shot glasses.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


“We don’t want to be in a position where we are reacting after the fact. You will see us have similar price points in the marketplace in anticipation of what’s to come from some of our major competitors.” – Jack in the Box CEO Lenny Comma regarding the emphasis on discounting among his competitors

The Numbers Game

187,000 The number of hotel rooms expected to be built in the United States, according to STR, which broke down the pipeline and how it relates to existing supply and future projections. STR’s data is comprised of three categories: rooms in construction, rooms in the final planning stage and rooms in the planning stage.

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NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Did you

know

Restoration Hardware’s new $26 million RH West Palm Beach gallery includes a rooftop restaurant atop four floors of high-end furniture, fixtures and other home goods. The brainchild of Chicago restaurateur Brendan Sodikoff, the eatery includes a wrap-around patio and wine bar.

2.4

The percentage increase in U.S. hotel demand for 2017, according to research by STR and Tourism Economics. The data shows that the number will hit 65.7 percent for the year.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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CIRCLE NO. 15


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Their No. 1

I

n a recent Foursquare survey, Starbucks ranked highest among the 50 rated chains based on customer loyalty. The rankings took into consideration things like how often consumers visited and how much they spent. Rounding out the Top 5 were McDonald's, Dunkin' Donuts, Tim Hortons and Chick-fil-A.

“What’s most important to note is that global investors are still seeing great opportunity and safety in U.S. real estate, with hospitality being one of the major investment sectors.” – Ten-X Commercial’s managing director Anthony Falor on why the U.S. market remains a safe haven for hotel investment

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 16


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

BULLSEYE

CCRP goes all ax throwing in Philly

T

hey threw axes. Yes, you read that correctly. It’s the kind of thing attendees at Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) events come to expect when they meet for a night of networking. This time around, CCRP Nation converged on Urban Axes in the heart of downtown Philadelphia. And, as you know, they threw axes. If you’re looking to add axe throwing (or any other kind of networking) to your 2018 to-do list, connect with Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

Axe Throwing Champion: Mat Shook, Horizon Building Solutions.

REGISTERED COMPANIES: Burlington Stores Chain Store Maintenance Connect Source Consulting Group Destination Maternity Horizon Buildng Solutions JLL Jones Sign

L2M La Colombe Coffee Roasters Macerich Mats, Inc. MedExpress National Flooring Rebcor Construction

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR:

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ShopCore Properties

UHC Corp

Spencer Gifts

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Subway

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Window Film Depot

JLL Kevin Campbell: Senior Project Manager 1650 Arch Street, Suite 2500 Philadelphia, PA 19103 Ph: 215. 828.4694

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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INDUSTRY EVENTS

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4.

6.

1: Leo Couchara, Tricon Construction, Rich Carlucci, Tricon Construction; Ron Kaplan, formerly Burlington Stores

4: Nicole Sheppard, National Flooring Systems; Phil Gittinger, UHC Corp; Cynthia Hirsch, Sargenti Architects

2: Nellie McDermott, Jones Sign; Jim Malin, Urban Neon; Joe Deluca, formerly Destination Maternity

5: Craig Weber, Carney Contracting; David Corson, CCR

3: Mat Shook, Horizon Building Solutions; Laura Riendeau, Chain Store Maintenance; John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; Kevin Campbell, JLL, Peter Stigi, Window Film Depot

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7.

6: Jeff Mahler, L2M; Gina Noda, Connect Source Consulting Group; Tom Walsh, Macerich 7: Jim Malin, Urban Neon, Tim Theroux, Mats Inc.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 18


New York, New York Porcelanosa flagship store plays host to CCRP

L

ocated in the heart of Manhattan, the Porcelanosa flagship store served as the ideal backdrop for the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) event’s annual trek to New York City. The building, known until recently as the Commodore Criterion, was constructed during the First World War. For an extended period, it served as the headquarters of the General Outdoor Advertising Company. Later, it was renamed the Gilbert Hall of Science and became the premises of the toy company, A,C, Gilbert. If you want to take part in such historical networking endeavors in 2018, contact Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or Thank You to Our via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com. Make plans to join us at CCRP Minneapolis, MN – May 11th, 2017

Make plans to join us at CCRP July 27th, 2017 in Denver, CO

Thank You to Our CCRP Charlotte Sponsors:

CCRP Charlotte Sponsors: THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

Thank You to Our CCRP Boston Sponsors:

INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Little Diversified Schimenti Construction JoeCCRP Rotondo, Vice President Architectural Consultancy Make plans to join us at 650 Danbury Road Jeff Roark - Principal Partner Minneapolis, MN – May 11th, 2017CT 06877 Ridgefield, 5815 Westpark Drive Ph: 914-244-1900, ext 319 Charlotte, NC 28217-3554 rotondo@schimenti.com (704) 525-6350 jroark@littleonline.com

Porcelanosa USA

600 Route 17 North Thank You to Our Ramsey, NJ 07446 CCRP BostonAndrew Pennington/National Sales Director 201-995-1310 Sponsors: Ph: www.porcelanosa-usa.com

Construction One, Inc. Don Skorupski, Business Development 101 E Town St, Suite 401 Columbus, OH 43215 Ph: 480-528-1145 dskorupski@constructionone.com

24

apennington@porcelanosa-usa.com

PixelFLEX Retail Contractors Association Carol Montoya, CAE Make plans to join usDavid at Venus, Director of Marketing 700 Cowan Street Executive Director CCRP JulySuite 27th, COTN 37207 Nashville, 2800 Eisenhower Avenue, 2102017 in Denver, 800-930-7954 Alexandria, VA 22314 www.pixelflexled.com Ph: 703-683-5637 sales@pixel-flex.com carol@retailcontractors.org

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

7.

6.

1: Dino DeLaurentis, Merlin Enyertainment; Michael Ho; JLL; Grace Daly, ShopTalk 360; Dean Nichol, East to West; Tony Maldanado, Chico’s

4: Diwght & Maria Enget with Command Center; Nick Tellez, Newark Police Department

2: Robert Smith, Rockerz Inc; Andy Frank, National Flooring Systems; Samra Savioz, Marco Contractors; Nicole Sheppard, National Flooring Systems; Robyn Smith, Rockerz Inc.

5: Y.E Smith, Little; Tomas, Palomar, Porcelanosa; Jeff Roark, Little

3: Porcelanosa Team: Carlos Monsonis, Lauren Randazzo, Sara Barsoom, Tomas Palomar, Marisa Bordonaro, Brandon Hoffman, David Carmona, Carolina Vasquez, and Natacha Santiago.

6: David Venus, PixelFLEX; Eric Balinksi, Synection 7: John Cornely, Mannington Commercial; Mike Cheyney, Rolland Security & Door

REGISTERED COMPANIES: 4urspace A. R Services Aeropostale ArcVision Ashley Stewart ASSA ABLOY Au Bon Pain Bed, Bath & Beyond B-Free Hanger & Display Bloomingdale’s Bonobos Chain Store Maintenance Charter Communications Chick-fil-A Chico’s

Command Center Hunter Building Corp Connect Source Independent Floor Testing Resource Group Interstate Signcrafters Cornell Cookson JLL Cornell Storefront Systems John Varvatos Enterprises Crossville Little Davis Marketing Loews Hotels DKNY Macy’s East to West Sales Mannington Commecial Elro Sign Company Marco Contractors Ferragamo Marjam Supply Foot Locker Company, Inc H&M Merlin Entertainment H2 Hospitality National Flooring Systems Horizon Retail Construction North American Sign

Pacifica Contractors Philadelphia Sign Pipp Mobile PixelFlex Porcelanosa USA Premium Outlets/Simon PRET Prime Retail Services ProCoat Products Quest Service Group Retail Maintenance Specialists Rockerz Inc Rolland Safe & Lock Company, LLC

Rose Paving Schimenti Construction ShopTalk 360 South Water Signs Stifel Storefloors Synection TD Bank Tricarico Vineyard Vines Warby Parker XpresSpa

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

25


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1.

2.

4.

3.

5.

6.

7.

1: Brandon Finkenhoefer, Rose Paving; Laura Riendeau, Chain Store Maintenance; John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; Greg Mooney, ArcVision

6: Nic Tricarico, Tricarico; Kim Goldovich, Corenll Storefront Systems; Gona Noda, Connect Source Consulting Group; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors; Tim Andreson, Vineyard

2: George Holz, Warby Parker; Lisa Schwartz, ProCoat Products; Larry Schwartz, IFTI; Tom Sternfeldt, Warby Parker

7: Tom Fenton, Schimenti Construction; Stefano Sanchini, 4URSPACE

3: Michael Corson, Stifel; David Corson, CCR

8: Joe Rotondo, Schimenti Construction; Rick Migliorelli, JLL; George Holz, Warby Parker

4: Dan Klacik, Bonobos; Chris Hodnick, Pipp Mobile; Nic Tricarico, Tricarico; Rob Rusher, Aeropostale; Jennifer Sussman, Tricarico

9: Sean Holmes, H2 Hospitality; Nate Doney, Philadelphia Sign; Jon Lewis, PixelFLEX

5: Leo Deonarine, Macy’s; Karen Padavatton, WSP; Marisa Bordonaro, Porcelanosa; Gregg Gerstman, Quest Service Group

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10.

9.

8.

10: Valeria Valenzuela, ASSA ABLOY; David Carmona, Porcelanosa; Kerrie Crimmins, Rolland Safe & Lock Company, LLC

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


nationalflooring.com

Yes... our floors are that nice.

CIRCLE NO. 19

Have you heard? We’ve redesigned our entire brand...from the floor up. To celebrate, we’re offering you a $1000 rebate on your next flooring project. Take a stroll around our website. Check out our new products and services. And when you’re ready to save $1000 on your next project, give us a call for a FREE value engineering assessment.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


Watch. Play. Shop. Stay.

Inside Atlanta’s sprawling new sports entertainment destination

T

By Michael J. Pallerino

wo-hundred acres. That's how much space has been allotted to a new sports/entertainment/retail complex in Atlanta designed to host anything and everything sports

related. The $300-million complex – called Atlanta Sports City (ASC) – will be able to accommodate nearly two dozen sports, ranging from baseball and soccer, cricket and weightlifting.

And don't let the sports motif distract you – Atlanta Sports City is more than just fields and small venues for youth sports and competitions. Included in the design is a 15,000-seat soccer stadium, more than 200,000-squarefoot indoor athletics facility, and 330,000-plus square feet of retail space. ASC plans to promote event hosting for a variety of activities, including concerts, graduations, job fairs, sporting and special needs events. In addition, a two-story, 140,000-square-foot retail space will house a welcome center, expansive food hall, TopGolf Swing Suites and yet-named sports retailer. You can add to that nearly 40 retailers, restaurants and bars, too. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Vaughn D. Irons, Master Developer of Atlanta Sports City & Stonecrest Landing, to get his thoughts on how developments like this are helping change

the game where sports meets entertainment and retail head-on.

Give us a snapshot of the Urban Retail Properties and Atlanta Sports City brands?

Urban Retail Properties LLC, was formed over 40 years ago. It is a national leader in the third-party management of retail properties, including regional malls similar to The Mall at Stonecrest, power centers, community centers and big box portfolios. With CEO Craig Delasin at the helm, Urban Retail currently manages 58 retail properties in 21 states, comprising of nearly 18 million square feet. Atlanta Sports City is the new 200-acre mixed use sports entertainment destination. Atlanta Sports City offers a full spectrum sports experience from competition to food & beverage coupled with retail and hospitality amenities. In partnership with

Atlanta Sports City Soccer Stadium

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

29


WATCH. PLAY. SHOP. STAY. Atlanta Sports Connection, sporting events, tournaments, camps and leagues from the youth, recreational, collegiate and professional level call Atlanta Sports City home

What type of tenants do you work with?

Urban Retail has strong, extensive relationships with national, regional and local retailers as well as department stores and big boxes. Our Urban Retail/Atlanta Sports City collaboration is developing an over 300,000-square-foot expansion to Stonecrest Mall called Stonecrest Landing. The Landing connects the new Atlanta Sports City with the existing Mall. There, our focus is on food, beverage and entertainment concepts. In October we announced new tenants SeaQuest, MMA Bar & Grille and Top Golf Swing Suites.

We are looking to bring in new, exciting concepts that will complement our existing tenant mix in the mall and strengthen our commitment to the community as the place to watch, play, shop and stay. Before the announcement of the partnership, The Mall at Stonecrest had already began a transformation in 2017, with Victoria's Secret opening its new store concept, H&M taking over 20,000 square feet and the opening of Round 1, a 50,000-square-foot family entertainment destination with bowling, arcade games, billiards and karaoke.

What are some of the biggest issue today related to the leasing side of the business today?

The shrinking pool of tenants. But at the same time, this has allowed us to think outside the box to develop this partnership between Urban Retail and Atlanta Sports City. It’s a perfect match with one entity bringing tons of foot traffic and the other providing entertainment options during the downtime. The influence of technology and social media on tenants is also an issue of note. We are also collaborating on new approaches that use technology to not just capture memories but as a component of the experience. Through that experience it will help us drive our visitors to the tenants making our center more attractive to prospective tenants.

Aerial View, Atlanta Sports City

Give us a snapshot of both the new construction, and renovation/expansion segments?

The overall project includes four major components: • Building the 200 acre sports complex •Renovating an existing 145,000-square-foot former department store into a sporting goods store and food hall. • The 300,000-plus square-foot Stonecrest Landing Mall expansion • The continuation of the Stonecrest Mall transformation

Front Row L-R: COO, Atlanta Sports Connection, Zeric Foster; CEO, Urban Retail, Craig Delasin; Commissioner Greg Adams; CEO, Atlanta Sports Connection, Patrick Henderson; Master Developer, Atlanta Sports City & Stonecrest Landing, Vaughn Irons; Executive Director, Discover DeKalb, James Tsismanakis; COO, SeaQuest, Dave Palinski. Back row L-R: Mayor, Stonecrest GA, Jason Lary; NBA Great Terry Cummings; Former NFL Pro John Wayman Henry; NBA Great Dale Davis; NBA Great Theo Ratliff

30

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

Which side is experiencing the most activity? Are you optimistic about what you see in both sectors?

We are actively involved on all fronts, which is what makes the collaboration between the entities effective. It creates the capacity to be responsive while the interest is high. We have


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WATCH. PLAY. SHOP. STAY. been attending various conferences this year such as the ICSC in Las Vegas and national sports teams conference in Orlando (Fla.). In every industry there is interest in both the existing and new components.

What does today's shopping mall environment look like today?

As Craig has stated (and I absolutely concur), today, malls continue to be the place for people to come together. It has always been about a true social experience whether it be to shop, learn about community programs, participate in events or to just be with friends in the moment.

Talk a little about the relationship with Atlanta Sports City, Emory Healthcare and The Mall at Stonecrest.

The Emory partnership will be an important component for this project. The development team of Atlanta Sport City is committed to building a world class facility and the inclusion of sports medicine and sports sciences was a key aspect of that pursuit. Emory will

Our efforts to incorporate social media into the fabric of the mall and sports venues will be unique. If a 14 year old hits his first home run or scores a double-double those highlights will be displayed live-action and real time throughout the facilities.

have a 10,000-square-foot sports medicine pavilion that will focus on sports medicine, rehabilitation and sports sciences inside the Atlanta Sports City Field House. During lease negotiations the Atlanta Sports City team determined Emory has a need for additional space and added a 55,000 square foot medical office component to the Stonecrest Landing. That second medical office building will be anchored by Emory, include a full service drug store and have Emory physicians on a multitude of disciplines.

How does this development set a trend for future opportunities? We are taking what malls are known for – bringing people together – to a whole new level. We see this as the mall-of-the-future where retail, entertainment and sports come together as one. If other developers follow in our footsteps (we can't say or predict), but the more experiences you can create for your customer, the stronger your mall will be.

Irons and General Manager, The Mall at Stonecrest, Patricia Edge discuss plans.

32

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 21

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Columbia Square • Architect: House & Robertson • Designer: Scott Morris Architects LTD • General Contractor: Hathaway Dinwiddie Construction & Driver SPG Owner: Kilroy Realty Corp & Columbia Square Hospitality Group • Photographer: David Laudadio


WATCH. PLAY. SHOP. STAY. Furthermore, this development will set a trend in partnerships, showcasing the synergy that two different industries can have on one another. The Mall at Stonecrest and Atlanta Sports City will be an incredible boost to the entire local economy, not just the mall. Both entities working together, coordinating events, planning new programs and establishing the mall and the City of Stonecrest as a tourist destination will create more jobs, more businesses will want to relocate and re-invest in the City of Stonecrest, and most of all, will bring millions of out-of-state visitors looking for places to eat, places to shop, places to stay and places to have fun.

What trends are you seeing out there today? What is today's consumer looking for?

Customers want to interact with malls. They want to be a part of the mall. No longer do they want to just come and shop.

From L-R: CEO, Atlanta Sports Connection, Patrick Henderson; General Manager, The Mall at Stonecrest, Patricia Edge; Director, Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, Scott D. Boden, MD; Master Developer, Atlanta Sports City & Stonecrest Landing, Vaughn Irons; CEO, Urban Retail, Craig Delasin

We are taking what malls are known for – bringing people together – to a whole new level. They want to be a part of the action. They want to have a true experience and make some memories. Our efforts to incorporate social media into the fabric of the mall and sports venues will be unique. If a 14 year old hits his first home run or scores a double-double those highlights will be displayed live-action and real time throughout the facilities. Families will be able to download those moments almost immediately and post them for friends and family to see. We think consumers are looking for experience, the ability to share those moments and to savor the memories. The Urban Retail and Atlanta Sports City are designed to provide that, and much more.

34

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 22


WATCH. PLAY. SHOP. STAY. Tell us what will make this project when finished so unique? This will be the future of shopping centers and sports entertainment destinations – bringing two different industries together and creating a unique experience and environment for the entire family. By visiting atlantasportscity.com, you’ll clearly see, even more so, that the Atlanta Sports City at Stonecrest and its partnership with Urban Retail is one of the most exciting places to be right now and in the future.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Finding the new, innovative tenant mix for Stonecrest Landing and responding to the overwhelming list of sporting event organizers who want to book Atlanta Sports City for multi-year engagements.

Describe a typical day on the ground developing this project.

Each day is different which is what makes this such a remarkable journey. We start each Monday morning with an all-hands team meeting and each Tuesday there is a development/construction meeting. Everything for the week is dictated from those meetings and required follow up with prospective tenants, vendors and outside inquiries.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving forward?

Creating new partnerships and bringing in new retail concepts that the community really embraces. Being the first of its kind and a road map to the mega mall and multi-use sports entertainment destinations of the future where you can find and do it all – watch. play. shop. stay. CCR

One-on-one with... Vaughn D. Irons, Master Developer Atlanta Sports City & Stonecrest Landing

What was the best advice you ever received?

To get something you’ve never had you might have to do something you’ve never done. That advice inspired me to embrace innovation in every project we endeavor.

What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

The most rewarding part is the ability to shape the future of this community and our industry. What we’re able to do for the local economy and individual families with this investment and the 1,800 new jobs we are facilitating by our development work is very important to me.

36

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you?

“You are one of the most dependable people I’ve ever worked with.”

Name the three strongest traits a leader should have and why.

In addition to integrity and commitment, the three strongest traits any leader should have is sincere caring for his team, a passion for the work and the vision to see the future that can be.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

What is the true key to success for any manager?

The keys to success for any manager are having the skills/ knowledge, the experience and the relationships to get the job done.

What book are you reading now?

“The Color of Law” by Richard Rothstein.

How do you like to spend your down time?

I believe the price of success is service to others. I spend a lot of my downtime working in various volunteer capacities with local nonprofits and advocacy groups in my community.


SAVE THE DATE JANUARY 10-12, 2018 • DAYTONA BEACH, FL. HILTON DAYTONA BEACH OCEANFRONT RESORT

WANT TO ATTEND AS AN END-USER OR SPONSOR... Contact David Corson 678.765.6550 or e-mail davidc@ccr-mag.com End-Users (retailers, hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc.) will receive complimentary hotel, airfare, transportation

www.ccr-summit.com CIRCLE NO. 23

Sponsored by:


JANUARY 10-12, 2018

DAYTONA BEACH, FL. HILTON DAYTONA BEACH OCEANFRONT RESORT

REGISTER TODAY AT WWW.CCR-SUMMIT.COM 1 and 2- Seminars 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM • January 11th Grace Daly President, ShopTalk360.com

The Direct Impact of the Built Environment on the Brand Experience; How Industry Leaders are Claiming their Seat at the Table. Join us for this retail & restaurant in depth panel sharing their candid POVs and strategies on the everchanging landscape of our brick and mortar spaces. We’ll cover the infusion of technology into brick and mortar; the continued growth of online purchases and how we are adapting as an evolving Industry.

Steve Olson President, CESO, Inc.

Managing change in today’s fast-paced Commercial Retail / Restaurant world. Perspectives on juggling multiple stakeholders, limited budgets, and an increasing expectation to roll out or remodel innovative concepts quickly.

Tom Kowalski

Executive Creative Director

Jennifer P Striepling

Vice President of Design at Bloomin’ Brands Inc.

3 and 4 - Seminars 10:45 AM - Noon • January 11th Moderator: Jamey Chinnock, Project Management, GPD Group

Becky McAdams

Brandon Collier

VP of Operations, GPD Group

Director of Design, RaceTrac

Leveraging BIM throughout the design process and beyond The program focuses on design and development process for Racetrac’s new prototype in BIM. This panel discussion will include topics on challenges, lessons learned, and future goals for BIM implementation.

Brad Bogart President, Bogart Construction, Inc.

How to Mobilize in the Wake of Disaster With the high activity of hurricanes this year, we want to review how to prepare, mobilize, locate materials and manpower to cleanup after a major disaster. Please select one in each time slot: Seminar 1

Seminar 2

Breakfast Speaker:

Gary Roberts

Gary Roberts is a Motivational Speaker, Corporate Entertainer, and Comedian Magician, and one of the most versatile public speakers/entertainers in the industry today. He will be presenting his program “Be Amazing” which is an audience interactive program that’s pure fun Lunch Speaker:

Nick Scott

As a professional speaker, author, professional bodybuilder, wheelchair ballroom dancer, and personal trainer, Nick Scott uses his enthusiasm, vision, convictions, abilities, and life experience to reach out, to inspire and give hope to others, especially those All seminars are AIA accredited 1.15 AIA CEUs

Seminar 3

Seminar 4

and entertainment, with a serious thought- provoking message about the many people we cross paths with in life, and why certain people are more amazing than others. Gary teaches that we all have unique talents that make us different, and when we accept our uniqueness, then we, too, can inspire and amaze others. Gary shares the secrets how you, too, can be Amazing. unaware of the personal strength they can tap into if only they will believe and try. Nick’s sheer strength of will has helped transform thousands of individuals - from professional athletes to senior executives - as well as organizations and corporations across the country. Nick inspires others to break through to new levels of peak performance and success.

Return your Seminar selection to David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com or fax your selections to 678-765-6551


2018 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit End-User Complimentary Registration www.ccr-summit.com

END-USER ATTENDEE INFORMATION ______________________________________________________________

Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort January 10th-12th, 2018

Name

Application Instructions

______________________________________________________________

• Please type or print clearly.

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• Incomplete applications and contracts will not be processed.

Title

______________________________________________________________ Company Name

______________________________________________________________ Street Address

E-mail Address (required)

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• A counter-signed copy will be returned to you within 10 business days.

I would like to receive Commercial Construction & Renovation. YES

Mail completed applications as follows: Attention: David Corson F&J Publications, LLC P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024

CCRS 2018 Complimentary Registration includes air fare and transportation to and from Daytona Beach, Hotel Room for two nights, Activities, Dinner Table Top Exhibit, Breakfast Round Table, Two AIA seminars, Luncheon with Speaker, One-On-One Appointments, Group Activities. Any incidentals at hotel are responsibility of attendee.

2018 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit Schedule: Wednesday Jan 10th, 2018: • * Afternoon check-in. • 5:30-7:30 PM: Mobile Video Arcade Tournament • 7:30-9:30 PM: Welcome Reception/ Table Top Exhibit with Dinner. Thursday, January 11th, 2018: • 7:45 - 8:45 AM: Breakfast buffet with Round Tables discussions & Speaker. • 9:00 - 10:15 AM: AIA Seminars. • 10:15 - 10:45 AM: Coffee Break. • 10:45 - Noon: AIA Seminars. • 12:15 - 1:45 PM: Plated Lunch with Speaker. • 2:00 - 5:30 PM: One-On-One Appts. • 7:00 - 10:00 PM: Karaoki Reception at Sloppy Joe’s Friday, January 12th, 2018: • 8:00- 9:00 AM: End User Breakfast Only. • 9:00- 11:00 AM: Go Kart Racing • Early Afternoon Flight Home CCRS 2018 Advisory Board members: Grace Daly, ShopTalk 360 Anthony Amunategui, CDO Group Erran Zinzer, US Cellular John Stallman, Lakeview Construction Gina Noda: Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC Karen MacCannell: The McIntosh Group

No

Requirement to receive complimentary credentials: Attendee must meet and have breakfast and lunch with vendor participants of your choice. In addition must agree to meet at least six vendor participants of your choice for 15 minute meetings on January 11th, 2018 in the afternoon. Please select one Seminar in each time slot: 9:00 am - 10:15 am

Seminar 1

Seminar 2

10:45 am - noon

Seminar 3

Seminar 4

PAYMENT: Registration: Complimentary Hotel Room: Complimentary Wednesday Group Activity: Complimentary Friday Group Activity: Complimentary I hereby authorize F&J Publications, LLC to reserve the Summit spots as indicated I acknowledge that I have read the 2018 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit requirements above and agree to abide by all terms and conditions. I am an authorized representative of the company named on this Application and have full power and authority to sign this document. I understand that F&J Publications, LLC reserves the right to decline this document.

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The 2018 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit is owned, managed and produced by: F&J Publications, LLC


2018’s to-do

lists set I

Commercial construction executives eye future with positive mindsets 40

t wasn’t that long ago that the violent winds and rain spewing from Hurricane Katrina rocked the areas in and around Biloxi, Mississippi’s coastline and peninsula. The locals still share tales of how entire blocks were completely destroyed, leaving the city’s homes and casinos decimated. During this year’s Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat, attendees stayed in one of the areas that was hardest hit. These days, the White House Hotel, located down the road from casino row, played host to the event, held Sept. 28-Oct. 1. Attendees were treated to all things Biloxi during the Retreat, including a shrimp boat tour, a lunch at one of the city’s most popular local hangouts, and a dinner smack dab in the middle of the casino lights. There was even time for a group swim at the Margaritaville Resort. Included in our Weekend at Biloxi was the Retreat’s lineup of educational staples, including a roundtable discussion and the revered one-on-one meetings. Following is the first installment of our roundtable discussion, which also is available at www.ccr-mag.com.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


Colleen Biggs The Little Gym

Marilyn Brennan Egan Sign

Blake Brosa EMG

Anthony Byrd

Darrel Chaney Prime Retail Services

Grace Daly Shop Talk 360

Glenn Davis RPM Pizza/Dominos

Rick Erickson Allied Partners

George Farrelly Aaron’s Inc

Stephen Gallant Barteca Restaurant Group

Dave Garvey Grand Hinckley Casino

Steven Hackworth Steak n Shake

Tim Hill The Beam Team

Tom McBride TJM Consultants

Jeff Mobley Qualserv Solutions

Tim Olson Glab Maintenance

Steve Olson CESO, Inc.

Rebecca Suen Hilliker Corp

Bob Vacsulka National Pavement

Julia Versteegh Storefloors

Candace Wells RPM Pizza/Dominos

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

41


2018’S TO-DO LISTS SET CCR: What’s on your to-do list right now?

Jeff Mobley, Qualserv Solutions: We’re now a Middleby Colleen Biggs, The Little Gym: Right now, we are focusing our company. Middleby has 30 food service equipment compaplan for the next 18 months of growth for our brand as a company nies it has purchased over the last 25 years. On our to-do list and honing in on development growth. We’ve rolled out a smaller, right now is to consolidate our custom manufacturing with our scaled down concept of The Little Gym, as well as are conceivequipment manufacturing, where they have customers who we ing and piloting our mobile concept. Mobile licensing will be an may not have worked with. That to-do list includes transitioning individual license opportunity as well as and additional revenue to Middleby. It’s very exciting for our company. We were owned opportunity for the current licensed franchisees that own a brick by Banks for years, and now we have someone in the industry and mortar store. They would have the opportunity to apply for the off and running with us. license for the mobile opportunity within their territory. We feel this initiative will offer us the opportunity to Glenn Davis, RPM Pizza/Dominos: continue to grow as a brand. Our goal is to We’re four years into the rebranding become a household name. of 187 stores. Right now, I have three I’m also preparing to move into a new stores I’m working with. One is a major role next year. In this new position I will be remodel, and two are regular reimages overseeing the brand consistency for the and rebranding going on in the south. company – The Little Gym International. Three rebrandings are going on in the We’re based out of Scottsdale, Ariz., so I’m Midwest. I currently have four projects going to put my wings on and become a little with architects, and over the next two bit of a road warrior over the next 18 months. years, we’ll relocate 12 stores and build My goal in traveling to each store would eight new ones. Most of them are in be to not only continue to build trust and Mississippi and Louisiana, with a few in relationships with the franchisees, but also to the Midwest. uncover what best practices are being utilized within the businesses, as well as what’s CCR: Are you affiliated with working that has already been established as those TV commercials where a proven process for many years. We are only all of those guys are knocking as strong as our weakest “process” right? Endown their old stores? suring that we have solid “Best Practices” in RPM Pizza/Dominos’ Davis: No, we don’t place as well as testing “Proven “processes” do that ourselves. Those stores have to open offers us a strong brand continuity across the the next morning. You pull it out and throw community prior to the growth we anticipate it in the dumpster. My contractors hate that – Blake Brosa, EMG between 2018 and 2025. commercial. Customers say, “Is that really what you do?” “No, that’s not what we do.” It’s like the first commercial blowing the sign up off the building. That’s not how you take down the sign. It’s great PR, because everybody asks about it and everybody loves the commercials, but it’s not reality. That would be a whole different building permit.

“Probably the No. 1 thing on our to-do list is to go deeper with our existing clients. If they’re expanding throughout the U.S., how do we not only help them with project management, but also get up front to provide real estate due diligence services and partner downstream on capital planning?”

Bob Vacsulka, National Pavement: We’re focused on wrapping up the season. We have a couple hundred remaining jobs to do. We’re running a little behind given the different hurricanes and storms. As far as additional to-do items on our list, we have a lot of business planning to do for 2018, as we look to grow the existing customer base. We plan to meet with customers face-toface to see what needs and opportunities may exist in 2018 and how we can be a partner for them on that.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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CIRCLE NO. 24


2018’S TO-DO LISTS SET Blake Brosa, EMG: Probably the No. 1 thing on our to-do list is to go deeper with our existing clients. We already work with a lot of the major Fortune 500 retail, banking, hospitality, c-store, and restaurant brands, so where we have an existing relationship in our project management Candace Wells, RPM Pizza/Dominos: I’m ordering equipment for division, we’re looking at partnering with them, or vice versa. six and seven different stores at one time that we are either relocating If they’re expanding throughout the U.S., how do we not only or building from the ground up. I’m also training contractors in Indiana help them with project management, but also get up front to provide who will be taking over our warehouse in 2018. One of my biggest real estate due diligence services (Phase I environmental assessprojects for 2017/18 will be taking on all oven and hood installs for ments, PCAs, ALTA surveys, etc.) and partner downstream on capital RPM’s stores in the South and Indiana. Looking forward to 2018. planning? Using that existing base is not a new concept, but we’re a fairly recently merged company, so we’re continuing to build on those Tim Olson, Glab Maintenance: At Glab Maintenance, we are existing relationships. always looking to grow our company by client acquisition. We are The second biggest piece, for me, is to just follow the retail also focusing on preventative maintenance plans because we find industry. I don’t think any of us can look in a crystal ball today and our customers are continually trying to do more with less. If you can say what it’s going to be in the next two to five years. So, I want to anticipate and catch problems ahead of time, we can come up with keep pace and keep track. What’s Amazon doing? What’s Whole more cost effective solutions. Foods doing? Where is Target going? Walmart? What are all of the different initiatives, like the buy-online/ pick-up-in-stores. I think for our part of the business – construction project management – a lot of folks are downsizing boxes. Also, more money’s being reinvested in technology, so how do we position ourselves to be a technology implementation provider? We don’t want to walk away from project management services, but we want to look at what those traditional teams are doing. A lot of that’s being changed. The third piece is just being that consultant around the life cycle of real estate. When – Julia Versteegh, Storefloors we talk about buying, building, and maintaining properties, EMG wants to be a partner throughout that entire life cycle. One of the things we’ve developed is OverviewFacility.com, a web-based software that allows our clients to track and manage their Steven Hackworth, Steak ‘n Shake: The biggest on my to-do building assets. Take for instance, water heaters or any other mechanilist is to figure out how to get policies and procedures in place to cal system. How old are they? Where are they located? Who and when grow our company to more than 1,000 units within a reasonable was the last time it was serviced? What is the life expectancy? timeframe of five to six year. Right now, we’re just under 600 units. This is a great opportunity for our clients to be in control of As you can see, to get to that 1,000-unit mark, we need to open 100 their budget eliminating unnecessary repairs, emergency calls, and stores a year. That can be very difficult. Right now, the best we’ve expensive trip charges. Our software is customizable allowing our been able to do is 37 stores a year. customers to manage their unique needs unlike other software that Most of that is due to the fact that we use franchisees for our is available. growth, so there is lots of problems trying to get the franchisees, get the correct architect on board, make sure they understand our branding Stephen Gallant, Barteca Restaurant Group: Barteca’s made and what needs to go into those drawings. We provide a prototypical set up of two different divisions – Barcelona and Bartaco. In 20 years, of drawings for them to base their stores off of, but it seems like each we have opened 20 locations and we are looking to develop into architectural firm wants to put a little spin on it. So my job is to review all new markets. We have opened nine locations over the past year and of that to make sure that they don’t spin it the wrong direction. a half. My role is to add structure and process to what they didn’t To accomplish that, we’ve also went into the nontraditional have. Barteca is a small company who has been run by two brilliant market. We’re opening more restaurants inside of universities. I think partners. We have made some changes to grow from a privately held we’re at three airport locations and looking for more airports. The company to position ourselves to open more than 8-10 locations per airport is a great captive audience as is a university. You can have a year. We are also developing a formal maintenance division to handle restaurant in a university and a mile down the road still have another the escalated store growth. restaurant that does great. That’s my biggest challenge. Also, we’re looking into different verticals such as REIT’s, where we don’t have such a heavy presence, but we’re looking to expand in 2018.

“As a company, one of our major initiatives is continuing to grow our supplier partners internationally and across the U.S. This gives us the opportunity to offer a wider variety of products at a lower cost to our customers.”

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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CIRCLE NO. 25


2018’S TO-DO LISTS SET Steve Olson, CESO, Inc.: The first thing on my to-do list always involves a focus on our staff. We spend a large amount of time hiring the next strong leader, and then pouring into their training and development. We do that because we think that well-equipped and empowered people can go out and build the business without a tremendous amount of handholding. Next is to find more commercial business partners. We’re really looking at each of our clients for what their business needs are and how we can partner with them. We want to either assist them with their new store/restaurant programs, remodel programs, or help them to put a new creative twist on their brand evolution with our own branding group. So, in addition to reminding people about our architecture, civil and survey core business, our to-do- list includes getting the word out a little bit more about our design and branding business, and to try to increase work within that service line. Anthony Byrd: My to-do list includes putting into place contracts to help manage the vacant properties we have. On the way to developing those sites that are vacant, it’s my job to maintain them and make sure they’re within city compliance. So I need some vendors to help bring that about. Another item is a major redevelopment of one of our high-rise properties. This is utilizing a program from the federal government using HUD funds, called RAD. That’s pretty major. Finally, I would say is to complete the capital improvements I have for the properties I manage. Marilyn Brennan, Egan Sign: My to-do list is to attend more trade shows and industry events, maintain our existing clients and offer expanded services to our clients in different areas of signage that they have not previously utilized. With that, we’re also onboarding new clients and making sure that the transition is really strong. Our clients are always the focus and building a very tight relationship in the beginning of the onboarding process is critical. We do a lot of handholding in the first couple of months with our clients.

complete makeover with a more open and vibrant layout that will allow our Guests an opportunity to pick and choose food lines they’d like to visit. This is different from classic buffet lines. Our Snack Bar was remodeled and we’ve also moved Sweet Spot (our coffee shop) to the center of the casino to allow Guests to grab a latte or espresso while playing their favorite games. Our casual restaurant – the Grand Grill Americana – has been closed for remodel and work is happening to transform that space into a new and exciting eatery. Our popular Winds Steakhouse also received some love – we updated all wall coverings, carpet, tables and added new comfortable chairs. The second project involves the discussion of minimum wage, which is a front-and-center topic in the state of Minnesota. I currently sit on the Minnesota Restaurant Association’s Board of Directors. One of the things that the hospitality industry is facing at this time is the minimum wage increase to $15 an hour. We continue to look at different programs within our organization that will reward Associates once they start in a Food & Beverage position. The Associate does receive a merit increase on an annual basis, but we have also implemented a Pay for Performance program, which allows Associates to actively participate in the goals of our department and qualify for an additional payout at the end of the fiscal year. This has created a lot of excitement with our Associates. I am also proud to work with a national organization called ProStart, which is a great opportunity for our local high school students. We bring them into our business and show them the operations of our food venues, which gives them a look into the hospitality industry and hopefully sparks some interest.

Dave Garvey, Grand Hinckley Casino: There are two major projects underway that are almost near their completion. The first project is our property is undergoing a major remodel and we are in various stages of this project. In December 2016, we opened Stories Diner, which is a classic American diner with a twist. Our Grand Buffet received a

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

CCR: On the buffets, do you still have any type of all-you-can-eat offers?

Grand Hinckley Casino’s Garvey: We offer lunch 7 days a week; Monday through Thursday evenings we offer a Classic Dinner Buffet; Friday evenings we offer a Seafood Buffet; Saturday evenings a Prime Rib Buffet is served and Sunday evenings we round off the week with a Shrimp Lovers Buffet.

CCR: What was the reason for going away from the buffets?

Grand Hinckley Casino’s Garvey: It was a little of everything, including the cost savings. The focus groups told us, “If we can go in there and get all we want, we’re okay with it.” We did a study that showed things were slower in the winter. So we weighed


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CIRCLE NO. 26

OLSON@CESOINC.COM


2018’S TO-DO LISTS SET and counted everything. We did month-end inventory in seven hours. When we reopened, we knew exactly what we had. At the end of that night, we’d served 465 guests. We weighed and counted everything again in a 24-hour inventory. We threw away more food than we thought. We threw away more food than the 465 guests ate. So, you start putting common sense behind the decision. Julia Versteegh, Storefloors: As a company, one of our major initiatives is continuing to grow our supplier partnerships internationally and across the U.S. This gives us the opportunity to offer a wider variety of products at a lower cost to our customers. That’s an ongoing initiative that’s picked up some momentum. We’re excited about that. We’re also focusing more on a couple of different segments, such as restaurants and cannabis retail. So I’ve been learning about the marijuana retail industry.

Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services: The No. 1 thing on our to-do list is to make sure that we have the right people. We have three divisions in our company – fixture installing, construction, and inside our construction division we have an electrical division. Our workload continues to grow, so we need to have the right people for the right jobs, whether they be in the lower end of the scale as a laborer, or a project manager or superintendent. We are really trying to grow our electrical division. Once we opened that division, we saw it was really advantageous for us, as well as our clients.

Rick Erickson, Allied Partners: II have been charged to find vendors who can handle hotel remodels, from Architect’s to flooring to boilers, and things in-between. I am excited to bring the next wave of hotel design. The reason I got into the business 20 years ago is because hotels generate cash by changing their rates overnight and can reinvent themselves periodically through ROI (return on investment) projects. In hotels today, we’re trying to promote the idea that hotels are becoming your third space. Nobody’s sitting in an office building all day, all year long. You’ve got to get out, meet and mingle, no one wants to get stuck in a conference room anymore. You’re going to go downstairs in the hotel to meet clients, share coffee or – Steve Olson, CESO, Inc. cocktails in a ‘happenin’ environment. So we’re going to turn hotels into that third space, creating buzz and an environGeorge Farrelly, Aaron’s Inc.: Our to-do list has kind of changed ment where everyone can thrive. In order to do this, we want to since the hurricanes have hit our stores. We have a lot of stores in create strategic partnerships. Why can’t there be a Steak ‘n’ Shake Florida and Texas, so we’ve been focused on getting some of them inside the lobby of a hotel? For years, hoteliers have tried to run up and running again. We had five stores completely shut down that restaurants and they lose money. If we have a huge fitness facility were in the process of rebuilding the inside. We have another 30 that sitting idle, why not expand it to include CrossFit, Ninja training, have damage inside the stores. We’re removing carpet, drywall and indoor pool activities, etc. We’ll offer swimming lessons for kids, fixtures. Those are our main priorities right now. why not add gymnastics or something? We really want to create Another on that list is the 150 remodeled stores we had an environment beyond just a lobby on your way to your room … planned to do this year. We still have about 20 to do, and 15 are creating synergy breeds creativity in the workplace. my projects. In the future, our to-do list will bet to do 150 stores over the next four or five years, and to catch up our 1,800 stores to Tim Hill, The Beam Team: We have a couple of things on our the new look. To-Do list. Right now, we are preparing ourselves as we start to In addition, we’re working with a design group – The Big Red wrap up 2017 so that we can further our success in 2018. In Rooster – to design a store of the future. This will help give Aaron’s retail, there is a usually a down period between mid-November a more modern look. Our look is kind of old. We haven’t changed it to February as we wait for capital spending to start up again. As in a very long time, so Big Red Rooster is giving us some ideas for a result, we are looking to avoid these periods of delay. Fortuthe inside of the store. We’re doing something called the endless nately for the Beam Team, we have experienced a lot of growth tile, instead of just having product inside the store. We’re looking at this year, so our biggest focus right now is ensuring that we have a kiosk where you can pick any product you want from any furniture some of the best qualified sub-contractors as well as enough company and Aaron’s can provide it to you. superintendents and tradespeople to match our growth potential We’re also working on the signs on the front of the building. It’s for 2018. more of a new retro look. I’m also onboarding 10 GCs. I need to get them up and running so that they can help us with these 150 stores Aaron’s Inc.’s Farrelly: Our slowdown is in November and Decemwe’re doing over the next four to five years. ber slowdown. We’re slow the first two weeks of November, and then

“The first thing on my to-do list always involves a focus on our staff. We spend a large amount of time hiring the next strong leader, and then pouring into their training and development.”

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 27


2018’S TO-DO LISTS SET the busy season starts. But after talking with vendors recently, the hurricanes have required a lot of roofs to be built. Some of those stores where there is damage have to wait for the landlord to fix the buildings. I talked with some contractors that told me off record that they were glad the hurricanes hit. It doubled sales for the year. It’s horrible to say, but they’re right. It gave them sales for the year they were not going to normally have. Half the people aren’t going to be redoing stores, but we kind of have to now because of the path of the hurricanes. RPM Pizza/Dominos’ Davis: The problem you have after a storm – after going through Katrina – roofs are the first to get fixed. Right now FEMA has hired every roofer there is available to go blue tarp roofs. They do all the residential structures first, which is why it is hard to get a roofer. The only way you’re going to one is to bring them in from somewhere else. Most of your roofers from around this area have all headed to Texas and Florida because FEMA is paying the money. After Katrina, I had to have my house blue tarped. That’s what it is. The next stage is going to be famers. After that is going to be electricians and plumbers and HVAC, and then sheet rockers. It just follows the path all the way until everything’s done. Aaron’s Inc.’s Farrelly: We also have to keep in mind the fixture packages that we have. We order some of the fixtures, but with the hurricane in Texas and Florida, we had to unplan fixtures that weren’t there. There are 25 stores where we didn’t plan on needing any fixtures for. Now, we do. There is a four- to six-week lead time on the fixtures. I can place an order two weeks ago and still be four weeks out for them to be ready. We have that delay of trying to get all of the fixtures and carpet. Big hits like that all snowball down. Fixtures now take longer. The carpet takes longer. Trying to get the subcontractors to get to a location – it’s harder to find. RPM Pizza/Dominos’ Davis: After going through Katrina here, our disaster recovery at RPM Pizza is done. We’re just completely through it. We have a complete system for disaster recovery. We sent people to Texas and Florida after it was over with to help out Dominos franchises. We’ve been through it, so we have a system that works. All of my new stores are built plug and play for generators. Every one of them. It’s a $2,000 increase in the costs, but I’ll tell you what, all of our stores after a storm are the first ones to open on generators. So right now, during your recoveries, you turn into a saint. No carpet on the floor. No paint on the wall. You have all of the fixtures there and you sell them and then plant it. You’ve got to plan around the trades. You’re not going to get any trades. With the size of that and then two states – the trades are going to be all tied up. Residential is where the money’s going to be, so that’s where they’re going to go.

50

Rebecca Suen, Hilliker Corp.: One of the largest projects I’m working on right now is helping a national self-storage retailer find a location in St. Louis. Self-storage business is booming right now. They’re popping up everywhere. A lot of people are using this type of storage. I’m helping this company find a big, empty box that’s in a middle- to higher-income area for its new location in St. Louis. I’m also helping them find a location that’s on a national basis. That ties into one of our company’s biggest goals for this upcoming year, which is to increase our partnership with our sister company, Westwood Net Lease Advisors. Hilliker is licensed in Missouri and Illinois, but we have clients who are looking to purchase properties outside of these two states. With Westwood, we have the ability to work with commercial properties all over the country. Its sole focus is on triple net properties. They work with Steak ‘n Shake, Buffalo Wild Wings, Chik-fil-A, Family Dollar – those types of businesses. I’m building my client base and working with more business investors beyond the St. Louis area.

CCR: For the brands, what are your top three requirements for qualifying new contractors, suppliers and vendor partners?

Aaron’s Inc.’s Farrelly: No. 1 is background checks. There is a pamphlet we send out to all of the contractors. If you’re a general contractor, we want you to give us a list of five of your subs and/or people you work with and then five brands. I need to check how their payments are, if they pay on time, how their work is, would they get a recommendation? No. 2 is the financial sustainability of the company. We require three years of audited or reviewed financials. It is reviewed by two sets of people. First by me, because I have an accounting background. Next, it’s sent to our financial department, who gives it a grade of A, B or C. A is the best, B is moderate and C is no way we’re going to use you. Anything with an A is onboarded immediately. With a B, we get a little more background check. C is just not there. The reason is that we require our general contractors to pay their subs before we pay them. If the subs are paid, we don’t have to worry about lien waivers. We hold back some of the money owed to them, and once the waivers come in, we pay them. Also, it’s a 30- to 45-day process from the time we get them to when they get paid. They have to have the flexibility to be able to handle the job. It could be five remodels going on at the same time that The Beam Team is running, so it’s a $60,000 job times five. It’s a lot of money out there, so we have to make sure they are capable of doing it. The final thing is that I always tell the builders that I’m not looking for a general contractor. I’m not looking for a vendor – I’m looking for a family. I don’t want this to be just a business relationship, it’s a partnership.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


» CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 28


2018’S TO-DO LISTS SET Grand Hinckley Casino’s Garvey: As a company, one of our major initiatives is to support our Native owned contractors and supplier partnerships. We also utilize an RFP process. If we’re going to entertain a restaurant remodel, I’m involved. I then work with our property’s Project Manager who will meet with the architects and the building group. Anthony Byrd: We put a tremendous amount of emphasis on minority businesses and women businesses. It’s not a requirement, but the agency looks at all of the vendors that we use and where all of the dollars are going. We want to show a very high percentage of this is being done with minority-owned businesses and women-owned businesses. In addition, we want to work with businesses that in turn will hire what is called Section 3 workers. Section 3 is a special federal

items at the proper time, know how to work with vendors for owner furnished items and make sure that it comes in at the same time. I find that a lot of contractors that are used to buying everything out their selves, when it comes to coordinating owner furnished items, they don’t know how to do that. They forget to call, and then they come back and say, “Oh, I couldn’t get the lighting package here in time.” “Well, did you order it?” I ask. “Not in time,” they reply. So those are the things we’re looking for, to make sure that they’re on top of that.

CCR: What about architects?

designation for a lot of people who qualify for public housing. We want to encourage those businesses to reach out to the community, provide opportunities for people to work. So we make that a requirement; it’s not a set quota. The federal government doesn’t have a set quota, but it wants to at least see a plan. In addition, we have a standard RFP process, where we want to see you submit all the current documents. Pricing is going to be one of the things reviewed, but you’re going to go through a pretty involved evaluation criteria.

Steak n Shake’s Hackworth: When it comes to architects, we look for architectural firms that have restaurant experience. Basically, we’re looking for production houses for drawings – not somebody that does design. We have our own in-house design team. Our CEO goes through everything, looks at it, and approves all of the renderings before we go out for a new look for a restaurant. So we want to make sure that all of the branding items are in those drawings and we take it off our prototypical set. For vendors, we’re looking more for partnerships. We have in-house purchasing agents and people that work with vendors to get our pricing. We work national accounts with the manufacturers. Again, in restaurants, you get consistency in the food. If you want the same burger to taste the same that you buy in Michigan or Florida, then you have to have the right equipment, the right training in place. You can’t have different brands of equipment in a restaurant because they have different fry times and things. If somebody goes in there and orders your French fries, you want them to be exactly the same every time. But not every deep fryer fries it the same way. So our training is based on certain pieces of equipment that produce our product the way we want it so we make sure that – that’s why we establish national accounts and we’re looking for vendors that want to partner up with us on that.

Steak n Shake’s Hackworth: It’s different between the way we qualify GCs versus the way we qualify architects and our vendors. I’ll start with the GCs. We send in the typical AIA request for information form. They provide us with their financials, their experience in the restaurant building business and a list of references. We go through all of those and check them. The main thing I’m looking for on that one is to make sure they have restaurant experience, they have superintendents that know how to schedule the kitchen equipment in at the right time, the FF&E

Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant: We want to make sure the vendors we deal with have experience in doing high end restaurant or retail business. We look for that on their qualifications – whether it’s an architect, vendor or a GC…i.e. how long have they been in business?... doing business under the same name during the entire time they have been in business, . and we evaluate their annual volume. We do not want an error on our project or another project they may be completing bankrupting them while completing our work.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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CIRCLE NO. 29


2018’S TO-DO LISTS SET We get contractors through industry contacts, some cold calls and my past experience. I ask for an AIA A305 form, their financials and related references. I evaluate the information provided and either approve or disapprove them based on their answers. If they get to bid and are one of the low bidders I will obtain a Dunn & Bradstreet report to verify their payment history, industry rating and if they have any claims against them. It is inexpensive for a Dunn & Bradstreet report which will often show more information than contractors are willing to give during the prequalifying stage. I qualify the contractor very carefully and insure they are providing us an experienced team and superintendent that has done high end restaurant work.. If they’ve changed their name a lot or in the last two or three years I don’t want to deal with them. I want to deal with a company that has been in business at least 10 years under the same name doing a volume of $20 million or more at least.

It’s hard for me to acquire vendors that want to stay. One of the requirements we look for in a vendor is helping maintain brand consistency across the community. The investment of vendor partners is to assist the franchisee, so they are able to focus on their business and not vetting vendors. Our business is really about the experience family has. We are also very integrated in every community. The franchisees that buy a The Little Gym aren’t investing into this business to become millionaires. They’re doing it because they have a passion for children, for their community, and are wanting to be part of changing lives for these little ones. At the end of the day, it’s about providing a safe place for the children, at an early age, to understand how valuable they are. Looking at it from that angle, we choose for the Franchisee to be focusing on the operations of the business. The operations of the business include staffing, marketing, budgeting, Aaron’s Inc.’s Farrelly: We look for retail training, etc. My current responsibility is to experience, not just construction experimake it as easy for them as possible to get ence. Hotels, casinos and building hotels a facility built. We strive to have vendors in spaces are completely different. You place that are “valued” vendors. We are the have, especially with open remodels also, ones partnering with them for the benefit of because we do ours during the day. That’s the Franchise community. When you become one thing I forgot to add. part of our family, you’re not just a vendor to us. You’re a valued preferred partner. RPM Pizza/Dominos’ Davis: I get a lot The most important attribute of a solid of architects and general contractors that valued preferred partner is customer service. want to do the work. The biggest thing I In our business, this is crucial. We have a check is if they are licensed in that particular very unique business that serves the “tiniest” state. A lot of them will say they’re licensed of the population, in reference to age that is. all across the United States. But it’s a little When your goal daily as a Franchisee is to unique in Louisiana and Mississippi. build the best relationships possible and earn I send architects a sample set of the trust of the parent, you do not take that our plans and ask them to price it out. If responsibility lightly. We want to partner with they’re in the ballpark, I’ll check background a vendor company that has those values and references, etc. I have a lot of repeat GCs, shares that integrity. We’re not interested in because building a Domino’s Pizza store is a vendors that just want to make a quick buck. little bit unique. We have a lot of standards Another attribute that we seek is lonthat are required, so things have to be done gevity. It is the most difficult and is extremely in different ways. These things have to be time consuming to onboard a new vendor done to get the stores certified. partner. Replacing current valued preferred With vendors, Domino’s has its own partners is grueling, every time. If we find equipment and supply company, so a lot of the someone that has the integrity, work ethic, stuff I buy comes through them. For example, and customer service we desire to work with there only two types of ovens that we use, so work with, I’m committed. We remain loyal. we have to buy from them. We prefer to partner with them for 10-15 – Rick Erickson, Allied Partners As for signs, the companies have to be years if I can. Some of my tenured valued approved by Domino’s Corporate before they can be a supplier. There preferred partners have been with us for over 13 years. Longevity are a lot of different rules when it comes to certification. strengthens trust!, for us longevity is key. Finally, we negotiate and focus on cost. Quality work will bring the The Little Gym’s Biggs: We’re pretty unique because we’re not a consistency we need, however, I’m not interested in paying top dollar restaurant. We fall into the category of retail, but as the franchisor, for the products out there. I’m certainly not looking for the cheapest we don’t have any corporate-owned stores. Every single one of our product either, even if it does save the franchisee a couple of dollars. I stores is operated by a franchisee. That means every single person want to be in the “sweet spot”, so somewhere in the middle. We strive you work with is going to be quite different. for material that is accompanied by a solid quality at a fair price. CCR

“In hotels today, we’re trying to promote the idea that hotels are becoming your third space. Nobody’s sitting in an office building all day, all year long.

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2018’S TO-DO LISTS SET

Meet me on the water Mention The Blind Tiger on the Beach and what's the first thing you think of? The beach, right. And not just any beach, but the beaches from another time and place. The architecture recalls the look of the seafood factories that once stood along the beach in east Biloxi. Wrap-around decks give 360-degree views of Deer Island, boats and dolphins in the channel and sunsets over the coastline. That's where attendees of the Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat convened for dinner on Day 1, which featured dinner, drinks and a soothing ocean breeze.

Shrimp it up What better way to spend an afternoon networking than trolling for shrimp. Compliments of the the Biloxi Shrimping Trip, Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat attendees set out on a real shrimping expedition, finding the answer to that age old question, “How many legs does a shrimp have?” The 70-minute peek into the shrimping world also enable attendees to sift through the nets, which operators drug around the bottom of the Mississippi Sound. The day's catch-and-release included blue crabs, flounder and oysterfish.

Shrimp anyone? If you're going to spend some time in the Mississippi Sound trolling for catch-andrelease shrimp, the least you can do at the end of the adventure is to get some actual seafood. That's where McElroy’s Harbor House Seafood Restaurant comes in. The family owned and operated seafood haunt – a Biloxi favorite – played host to lunch in the Biloxi Small Craft Harbor. With a little bit of something for everyone, it was the perfect ending to a day on the water.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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2018’S TO-DO LISTS SET

Dinner – Casino style Located inside the Hard Rock Casino, just off the gaming floor, The Half Shell Oyster House offers something for everyone spending an evening in a casino town. Featuring a 48-foot long mural of The French Quarter, antique fixtures and lighting from the French Quarter, The Half Shell was the ideal setting to help wind down a day of networking and educational pursuits. As for the post-dinner casino trekk, what happens in Biloxi, well, you know the rest.

Poolside follies

Just beyond Biloxi

When in Biloxi, do what the local do. That includes hanging out at the rooftop water playground at Margaritaville Resort Biloxi. With a 450-foot Lazy River, winding water slides and poolside lounge, Saturdays were made for relaxation.

After tooling around the quaint streets of Ocean Springs, Miss., just outside of Biloxi, looking for the perfect spot to have one last group dinner, the folks at the Charred Steak and Oyster Bar opened up the patio. Food. Dessert. Drinks. Stories. There may not have been a better way for Biloxi to say good bye.

In the shadow of history With their significant others knee deep in one-on-one meetings, it was time to see the sights. The all-in-one spot is the Biloxi Visitors Center, which opened in July 2011 in the shadow of the Biloxi Lighthouse on U.S. 90. The Center fuses the city’s architectural heritage with state-of-the-art technology and multi-media exhibits to give visitors and residents alike a feel for the Biloxi of yesterday and today. Among the attractions is the 67-seat movie theater that offers continuous showings of the 10-minute film “We are Biloxi” – an introspective look at life after Hurricane Katrina.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 32


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Turning the corner

Attendees discuss the continued advancement of women in the workplace

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“I

f there is no struggle there is no progress.” The words of Frederick Douglass continue to ring true wherever there are still hills to climb and roads to travel. While many of today’s leading commercial construction companies across all sectors have women in leadership positions, there is still work to be done. That was the overlying theme of the second half of the roundtable discussion during the 2017 Commercial Construction & Renovation Women’s Retreat. The women in attendance, leaders in their own right, discussed their journeys and how the road to gain a seat at the leadership table continues to be a work in progress. The discussion was one of the many snapshots of the Retreat, held at The Andaz Hotel in Savannah, Ga., Aug. 3-6. Along with several key networking events, dinners, cocktail parties and haunted tours, attendees spent a morning participating in the always anticipated one-on-one meetings. Following is the conclusion of our roundtable discussion coverage, which you can also see online at www.ccr-mag.com.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


Sarah Appleton

Lori Armstrong

Michol Brandon

Wallace Engineering

Beam Team

Crestpoint Companies

Marilyn Brennan

Kelli Buhay

Kelly Burnette

Egan Sign

Retail Maint Spec

F&D Commercial

Isyol Cabrera

Caroline Carithers

TJ Cartier

IHG

Woodforest National Bank

Lee Health

Grace Daly Shop Talk 360

Julie Fox ShopCore Properties

Melissa Gallant Spence Diamonds

Jennifer Grieser Tuesday Morning

Laura Gross Value City/American Signature Furniture

Amnada Hinson Rogers Electrical

Cynthia Hirsch Sargenti Architects

Faith Hoople Fulcrum Construction

Debbie Kozar Ulta

Karen MacCannell The McIntosh Group

Susan Marsh Continental Realty

Adrienne Natale Topco

Gina Noda Connect Source

Demetria Peterson Bridgestone Retail Operations

Malinda Redman Genesis Lighting Solutions

Roz Strapko Automated Cutting Technologies

Jackie Tomlinson Woodforest National Bank

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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TURNING THE CORNER CCR: Talk about what it is like being a woman in a maledominated industry.

Grace Daly, ShopTalk 360: I’ve been in the industry for a very long time, probably combined, well over 25 years, and it has been really interesting. I used to build for brands back in the day. Today, it’s great because there are so many more women in leadership roles. Michol Brandon, Crestpoint Companies: I have a different outlook on it because I am looking at it from the hospitality industry. We develop hotels, so I don’t see as many women-owned and operated hotel developers. I recently attended the National Association for Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers conference and it was very empowering and inspiring to see so many women in the room, especially women of color. So, for me, I’d like to say that it is promising enough that they have opened the playing field for us to come in and begin to cut our teeth in the industry. There are some of the brands that are actually going after

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“An ongoing focus for Fulcrum is to develop relationships with industry partners and clients. Specifically in 2018, we want to be the goto partner who tackles challenges creatively and brings ideas and solutions to the table.” – Faith Hoople, Fulcrum Construction

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

more diversity inclusion. It was encouraging to see African-American women who are hotel owners now, whether it’s new developments or acquisitions. We are finally getting into leadership positions within hotels. And that’s so important. We are helping impact the bottom lines in revenue management, GMs, hoteliers, investors. My takeaway is that I can do this. It was such a big confirmation and a legacy I can leave for my son. So, yes, we are making a breakthrough and it’s empowering. Kelli Buhay, Retail Maintenance Specialists: I believe that we have turned a corner, but I think it depends on who you’re dealing with. You still have the good old boy clubs that don’t always respect what women in this industry do. It’s a mentality. There are more women in the workforce today, especially women in leadership positions. So, I think the corner has been turned, and we will continue to do that. But we need to get past the oldworld thinking, too.


CIRCLE NO. 34


TURNING THE CORNER

“I’ve been in the industry for a very long time, probably combined, well over 25 years, and it has been really interesting. Today, it’s great because there are so many more women in leadership roles.” – Grace Daly, ShopTalk 360

CCR: Is that good or bad?

Malinda Redman, Genesis Lighting: I’ve been in many forums in my Lighting career where I was the only women. Setting on the executive boards of many companies, trade meetings, sales meetings. I do bidding, proposals and meet with foundations representing the company. Most attendees, already know me, my capabilities and knowledge which empowers me and earns me their respect.They know I can do the job. Not all women have this opportunity. I have been in the industry many years, networking and developing a long standing respected corporate relationships. But there are regions of the country where although women are turning that corner, that corner still has a long way to go. There’s that good old boy’s club. I see it a lot. I know a lot of them. But once they get to know me and find that I am the real deal, it opens up the doors. But until you can have that conversation or open a dialogue with them, you’re just a face. And that face can be ignored. It is rewarding to see that after having a conversation that they think, “She might actually know what she’s talking about.”

“As women, we’re very empathetic. We multitask well. We have some skill sets that men don’t have. So it’s about showing your knowledge base without overstepping your boundaries.” – Gina Noda, Connect Source Consulting Group

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

CCR: And that makes all the difference.

Genesis Lighting’s Redman: I’m so fortunate to have the industry respect for me to sit before most male dominated organizations. More times than not being the only women at the table. I am always able to hold my end of the conversation, just like any of us here can. I have a long standing relationship with a big box retailer, who’s women buyers are always so happy to see me for meetings. They tell me they welcome meeting with another women, since most of the vendors are men. It’s really important that we get out there and work with them, show them that we are just as capable as they are, maybe even more so in some cases. Genesis Lighting’s Redman: I’m so fortunate to have the industry respect for me to sit before most male dominated organizations. Most times as the only woman at the table. And hold my own end of the conversation, just like any of us here can. That’s why we have to keep moving forward. We cannot take any steps back,


CIRCLE NO. 35


TURNING THE CORNER

just keep moving forward. It’s important to have women running our businesses, being on the forefront for our companies. Debbie Kozar, Ulta: I agree that we have turned the corner, but think that we have a long way to go. There are still male managers where we have opportunities to make connections with. But I think slowly but surely things are changing. They begin to see that we know what we are talking about. Demetria Peterson, Bridgestone: I think we’re beginning to turn the corner. When I first entered this industry, working for a general contractor, I was just one of the guys. I think this is because I was at a very junior level with no authority over anything. Once I reached the manager level, I immediately noticed a change in how I was treated. Some of it due to intimidation. So there’s a fine line we have to walk to achieve results without alienating our teammates and managers.

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“We have all these big universities that are offering construction manager and architectural design programs. Right now, if you go into a classroom, it’s filled with minorities and females. So that’s progress.” – Isyol Cabrera, IHG

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

Gina Noda, Connect Source Consulting Group: I’ve encountered that a couple times in the past. I was working with a company where I felt a little lack of respect. And when I stepped up to show my knowledge, their egos kicked in. There has to be a balance. As women, we’re very empathetic. We multitask well. We have some skill sets that men don’t have. But it’s still hard in a construction world dominated by men. So it’s about showing your knowledge base without overstepping your boundaries.

CCR: You don’t want to seem threatening, right?

Connect Source’s Noda: No. They can get intimidated by that. So I still want to try to be a woman – I still want to have that balance. Roz Strapko, ACT: On the fixture side of things, women have turned the corner to some extent, but we still have those pockets of good old boys. This is especially true in certain parts of the South. It’s not as bad as it was 30 years ago, where there were so few women.


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CIRCLE NO. 36


TURNING THE CORNER When I look at the women in this group, I see a strength of character. I hear stories and know that we have experienced the same things. I also see change. And I know that more change is coming. That’s part of the evolution that must continue to happen. Jennifer Grieser, Tuesday Morning: We have not yet turned the corner but we are able to say there is a big spotlight on the subject. From the time I was hired by Tuesday morning, I was treated like management in charge of my department, not like an administrative position. What it boils down to is that change is not really going to happen until leadership – male or female – is stronger.

CCR: And that starts at the top.

Tuesday Morning’s Grieser: Yes. The next level up needs to be more robust. There has to be mentoring and coaching in the field, regardless of gender. I think women are 50 percent culpable of this problem, because we need to participate more

“In property management I feel like most of the managers are female. So I’m still in that female dominated world. But most of the executives and directors are male.” – Susan Marsh, Continental Realty

in our own outcome. We need to show up and be active in our own growth. We can’t sit down and be that mousy administrative person waiting for our place in line. We have to ask for it. Men get it offered to them; we have to ask for it. And I am okay with that. There’s nothing wrong with standing up and saying, “It’s my turn. I want my shot at the big project. We tend to wait for it and hope that they’ll notice us one day. They’ll see how awesome we are. That’s not their job. It’s our job to speak up for ourselves. We must help bring the leadership team forward in their thinking and actions. Grace Daly, Shop Talk 360: I think that’s so important. We can pick and choose who we work with. So you know what, if the good old boys club is not welcoming, we don’t have to work with them. That’s the way we can make our voices heard. Caroline Carithers, Woodforest: That’s exactly right. I travel to forums a lot with our facilities department manager and people always look to him for the answer. And he has to say I am his boss.

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CIRCLE NO. 37


TURNING THE CORNER Isyol Cabrera, IHG: We have all these big universities that are offering construction manager and architectural design programs. I remember taking classes at Poly Southern just to get familiar with the architectural laws. I was the only female in the construction manager classes. I was ignored. Right now, if you go into a classroom, it’s filled with minorities and females. So that’s progress. TJ Cartier, Lee Health: I think it is terrific that we are teaching young girls going into post-high school education that they can be engineers and architects and CEOs or that they can work in the construction field or facilities management. They have that option. We need to promote that women can get the education they need to be successful in those fields. This is critical to build that bench strength and build future women leaders in those industries. Marilyn Brennan, Egan: I’ve been in project management for most of my career. I have a manufacturing background and have been on construction sites. I’ve also been told by men that I can be too aggressive when standing my ground. This is something that is acceptable and usually applauded if you are a male. It really is amazing that this behavior and thinking still exists. Hopefully the next generation will get rid of some of those stereotypes and assumptions. We’re not here

“I am looking to develop more creative ways of partnering with suppliers, but still add value for our membership. We're rolling out better messaging programs.” – Adrienne Natale, Topco Indirect

“The rest of this year is really getting ready for next year when the expansion starts.” – Melissa Gallant, Spence Diamonds:

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just to be another pretty face. I think we’ve turned a corner. I think we are getting women in key positions. I think some of those old sentiments are going away.

CCR: Do you think these issues are still more generational and that Millennials may be able to make more progress?

Egan’s Marilyn Brennan: I think these issues are more generational. There is a lot of good happening in the younger generation with a focus on equality. There are still some old behaviors and thoughts that are being passed down. Kelly Burnette, F&D Commercial: I see more of a collaborative effort and camaraderie among women in business and particularly,

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


» CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 38


TURNING THE CORNER

women in construction. It’s important for us to work together in this capacity and to continually learn from one another and lift each other up. I think that is incumbent upon us, for women to support each other and to impress this upon millennials and younger generations. ACT’s Strapko: I agree. But to get to Marilyn’s point, a lot of these are generational jobs. There are families who are passing their companies down to their children. In some ways, that’s the biggest good old boy’s club. Tuesday Morning’s Grieser: Yes the younger generation of leaders will help close the gap with and for women in this industry. Connect Source’s Noda: You are right. There are some brands that do not waiver

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I believe that we have turned a corner, but I think it depends on who you’re dealing with. It’s a mentality. There are more women in the workforce today, especially women in leadership positions. – Kelli Buhay, Retail Maintenance Specialists

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

from their beliefs. Their culture is their culture, through and through. And their vendors know this. Their employees know this. Their customers know this. Michol Brandon, Crestpoint: Interestingly enough, the president and CEO of my company is an Indian American, so for me to be sitting at the table was very interesting. I love the comments that Jennifer and Julie made. I read the most phenomenal book, “Lean In,” by Sheryl Sandberg. Every one of us need to get up every morning and empower ourselves. Regardless of if we turned the corner, it will always be a conversation that will be debated. You have to start the conversation. You have to be self-empowered. If no one else does, it starts with you. At the beginning of the day, sometimes we don’t feel like we want to get up and do this. But on my worst day, I get up and come to the table. It’s a great book.


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CIRCLE NO. 39


TURNING THE CORNER If you’ve not read it, it will empower you to want to sit at the table. It’s all in our minds. Corners are just that – they’re corners. You go around it or you go to the next one. Sarah Appleton, Wallace Engineering: I think all of us in this room are pretty strong females and have probably turned the corners we needed to turn. The fact that we hold leadership positions today means our firms have turned that corner as well. I think that as an industry, though, we still have a long way to go before we can say the corner has been turned. I’ve had multiple conversations with other engineers who can’t figure out how to move up in their companies. They’re the only woman at that level and they think they get pushed

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“We’re not here just to be another pretty face. I think we’ve turned a corner. I think we are getting women in key positions. I think some of those old sentiments are going away.” – Marilyn Brennan, Egan

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

down. I am very fortunate that I don’t have that at my company. All in all, we’ve made progress, but I believe our industry still has a long way to go before we can say we have completely turned that corner. Susan Marsh, Continental Realty: I agree with that. In property management I feel like most of the managers are female. So I’m still in that female dominated world. But most of the executives and directors are male. Wallace Engineering’s Appleton: As we continue to move up in our careers, I believe our next challenge is to help others advance in their careers. It’s all about empowering the next generation by example.


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CIRCLE NO. 40


TURNING THE CORNER Cynthia Hirsch, Sargenti Architects: I think it’s important that we have women in leadership roles. We need to take a stand and become more active in the industry. Attend conferences and speak about these types of things. That’s how we will continue to empower women in the younger generations. We can get there. It’s not impossible.

“I see more of a collaborative effort and camaraderie among women in business and particularly, women in construction. It’s important for us to work together in this capacity and to continually learn from one another and lift each other up.

ShopTalk 360’s Daly: Having worked in the industry as long as I have, I do see a distinct difference in leadership and what women bring to the table. When I do the interviews for my podcasts with women in leadership roles, I am also always trying to learn from them.

– Kelly Burnette, F&D Commercial

Karen MacCannell, The McIntosh Group: In the architecture industry, we’re graduating 50 percent or more women from architecture school. Three and four years down the road, there’s still less than 24 percent women in the field, either because they took another path, or they chose to stay home after having children. As a firm, we are actively combatting this by creating a more welcoming environment for women and working moms. Some of the ways we do that have to do with flexible hours, a generous maternity policy, and a clear path to leadership within the firm that is accessible to anyone willing to put in the effort. We also worked with our local AIA chapter to create a Women in Design

“Once I reached the manager level, I immediately noticed a change in how I was treated. Some of it due to intimidation.” – Demetria Peterson, Bridgestone

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subgroup where we tackle issues facing us in this industry. A big part of it is mentoring. We want to support and bring everybody up along with us.

CCR: This is our lightning round. Give us a quick snapshot on what you’re working on through the end of this year and into 2018. Ulta’s Kozar: My plans for the end of 2017 into 2018 is if any new design that we have coming in for our stores. I’m going to look for new opportunities to create an RFP with on additional vendors. Wallace Engineering’s Appleton: My main focus for 2018 is training and growth. I want to continue to train my staff to not only become stronger and more efficient

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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CIRCLE NO. 41


TURNING THE CORNER

engineers, but also to teach them the importance of relationships & business development – offering them the encouragement and opportunities to grow in their careers. Crestpoint Companies’ Brandon: It’s about training and growth, really connecting with our staff at the guest level so that we don’t feel the tremendous impact from some of our competitors out there. We want to continue to deliver exceptional service.

“I think all of us in this room are pretty strong females and have probably turned the corners we needed to turn. The fact that we hold leadership positions today means our firms have turned that corner as well.”

Fulcrum Construction’s Hoople: An ongoing focus for Fulcrum is to develop relationships with industry partners and clients. Specifically in 2018, we want to be the go-to partner who tackles challenges creatively and brings ideas and solutions to the table. ACT’s Strapko: The new year is about growth and marketing. Spence Diamonds’ Gallant: The rest of this year is really getting ready for next year when the expansion starts. Beam Team’s Armstrong: We have experienced a lot of growth this year, so we are

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

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CIRCLE NO. 42


TURNING THE CORNER working on optimizing efficiency through bettering our overall quality in the work we produce as well as the products we use on and off job sites. Connect Source’s Noda: I am putting together my strategic business plan with the goal of becoming a very successful consulting firm. Bridgestone’s Peterson: I am continuing to learn about the automotive industry focusing on Finance and Operations. F&D Commercial’s Burnette: Our key goals for this next year are: to continue to be innovative in our business approach to the hard surface industry and to expand our footprint in the commercial construction world. We are focused on growth, both internally, through expansion of our team and externally, through continued relationship building with both new and existing customers.

“When I look at the women in this group, I see a strength of character. I hear stories and know that we have experienced the same things. I also see change. And I know that more change is coming. That’s part of the evolution that must continue to happen.” – Roz Strapko, ACT

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CIRCLE NO. 43


TURNING THE CORNER Continental Realty’s Marsh: I am continuing to work on the redevelopment of a retail strip center that we just took over – getting my budgets done, etc. Rogers Electric’s Hinson: We are looking to expand our business. That means asking more questions and really listening to our clients, so that we can come up with the solutions that can help. Sargenti Architects’ Hirsch: I want to continue to market and grow our client base. Tuesday Morning’s Grieser: We’re looking at bringing faster, better, more cost effective service to our store managers and field team. Retail Maintenance Specialists’ Buhay: We’re always looking to continue with our

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“I think it is terrific that we are teaching young girls going into post-high school education that they can be engineers and architects and CEOs, or that they can work in the construction field or facilities management. They have that option.” – TJ Cartier, Lee Health

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

controlled growth. We want to be able to service that clients who have been with us for 10 years and our new clients without any difference. That’s about improving on our internal team. Lee Health’s Cartier: We have several major expansion and new facility projects in flight that will take a great deal of coordination over the next three years. Coming from a retail background I am expanding by design expertise through further education in the area of health care design, optimal healing environments, lean flows of healthcare and the ever-changing healthcare landscape in southwest Florida. Egan Signs’ Brennan: We are always looking for great client partners, ones that bring quality to our brand.


CIRCLE NO. 44


TURNING THE CORNER So it’s about onboarding new clients and keeping our existing clients. On a personal level, I want to be more involved in advisory boards and different levels within organizations as a whole. I think it’s important for women to be involved in key organizations in this industry. Woodforest National Bank’s Carithers: We continue to make sure we have all the pieces in place. We want to get more efficient at building our branches, build out our offices and support the growth in our people and departments.

“From the time I was hired by Tuesday morning, I was treated like management in charge of my department, not like an administrative position. What it boils down to is that change is not really going to happen until leadership – male or female – is stronger.” – Jennifer Grieser, Tuesday Morning

Genesis Lighting’s Redman: In addition to continuing to work hard with my existing customers, I will proceed to develop new relationships and tap into new markets and avenues of business.

“As a firm, we are actively combatting this by creating a more welcoming environment for women and working moms. A big part of it is mentoring. We want to support and bring everybody up along with us.” – Karen MacCannell, The McIntosh Group

Topco’s Natale: I am looking to develop more creative ways of partnering with suppliers, but still add value for our membership. We’re rolling out better messaging programs.

good relationships, and we’re looking for the next big clients out there. We continue to develop our staff internally to prepare them for leadership roles within the company.

The McIntosh Group’s Karen MacCannell: We are continuing to work hard with our existing clients to maintain

ShopTalk 360’s Daly: I will continue to do by podcasts and expand into video interviews or vlogging. I’m also looking to wrap up my book, which is a fictional piece based on the commercial construction industry. CCR

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IHG’s Cabrera: My main focus frame is to keep learning about the hospitality business and keep growing.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 45


Five-star squared New Vegas steakhouse steps up its game with sizzling floor design By Ron Treister

ecently, a five-star restaurant insisted on having a five-star wood floor in both its entryway and its entire dining room. Welcome to Bavette’s Steakhouse, the world-class dining attraction and newest hotel on Las Vegas’ world famous Strip: Park MGM. From Day One, Bavette’s Steakhouse began offering the best wood flooring in Las Vegas. Some background. A decision was made that Monte Carlo Resort & Casino required a total architectural and design transformation to capitalize on its outstanding Las Vegas Strip location. Under the combined leadership of MGM Resorts International and Sydell Group, the 3,000-room Monte Carlo is undergoing a two-year, $500 million “re-imagine” makeover. The new look will help create a new luxury brand for MGM Resorts International and, concurrently, bring The NoMad hotel concept to The Strip from the Big Apple. The strategic Park MGM design builds on the property’s history, incorporating European influences, while retaining a branding connection to The Park, an adjacent outdoor dining and entertainment venue, which MGM introduced in April of last year. The NoMad Las Vegas, an independently operated, upscale boutique hotel with 292 rooms and suites, will be located on the building’s top floors.

Photos reflect the venue during non-operating hours.

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R

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


“This was very precise, intricate work. But we knew the grand opening was coming. The final installation was the result of a true team effort.”

"I created my 'Array' design to complement, as well as enhance, the herringbone featured floors throughout the main restaurant space," she says. Oshkosh Designs was selected to custom fabricate the winning design because of its world-class production facilities, vast knowledge of hardwood materials and Sparking creativity superior service. The Winneconne, Wis.-based This past June, Bostik's Signature Spaces firm has built a national reputation for Series of Design Competitions –“The Art Of Hardwood Flooring Design Contest” – invited fashioning exquisite hardwood medallions, architects, designers and other wood flooring wood floor borders and designer parquet trade members to share their wares. flooring. It completely transformed Sheet's – Garrett Ulfig, MasterCraft Floors After a panel of esteemed judges selected winning design into a "ready-for-installation, the work of Jennifer Sheets, an interior de550-square-foot reality." signer at Studio R Interiors, her winning design was installed in Bavette’s "The final installation is a visual masterpiece that is in sync with lobby. The winning design also landed her a trip for two to Paris. the overall theme of the restaurant," says president and CEO Brenda "I've been fortunate to be in this industry for 10 years, with Kubasta. "We are so proud to be featuring our premium craftsmana wide range of various commercial and hospitality projects that I ship for this ultra-high visibility hospitality space." Joyen Vakil, senior VP of design and development at MGM Resorts designed and/or managed from concept to completion," says Sheets, International, says the winning design is just remarkable. "It makes a whose Lafayetter, Colo-based firm specializes in hospitality design and powerful statement to our guests that no detail has been overlooked at the procurement. "This is by far one of my most exciting achievements at a steakhouse – and that their experience will be nothing short of wonderful.” soon-to-be globally recognized, upscale hospitality venue." Eagle Bay Hardwood Flooring, the exclusive brand produced by When asked about her vision for the winning design entry, Sheets Delta Hardwood Flooring of Boonville, N.Y., was selected to provide said she was inspired by the Art Noir movement; interlocking geometwood flooring material from its soon-to-be-launched Frank Lloyd Wright ric shapes and stylized symmetry that were specified in the contest Collection for the remainder of the restaurant, specified to complement guidelines as a prerequisite of the project. The pattern depicts an array of the lobby work of Oshkosh Designs. interchanging shapes that harmoniously fit within a symmetrical medallion. Chicago restaurant group Hogsalt Hospitality created the original Bavette’s, which under the direction of restaurant impresario Brendan Sodikoff, has earned the status of “delivering the best steak in Chicago.” The new edition of his upscale eatery opened at Monte Carlo in October.

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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FIVE-STAR SQUARED

“It makes a powerful statement to our guests that no detail has been overlooked at the steakhouse – and that their experience will be nothing short of wonderful.”

The commercial-grade product chosen met intricate specifications set forth by the venue's design firm, MBDS (Martin Brudnizki Design Studios) of London and New York. "After reaching a licensing agreement with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation to produce a FLW Collection of high-end hardwood flooring, this project provided the perfect opportunity to launch this collection," says Randy Bowers, founder and president of Delta/Eagle Bay. "It's a great opportunity to introduce a company that's been around for over 10 years with a highly focal project such as Bavette’s at Park MGM.” Bowers says that in Q2 of 2018, this same FLW Collection would be available to consumers in select stores at the nation's largest specialty retailer of hardwood floor– Joyen Vakil, MGM Resorts International ing, Lumber Liquidators. MasterCraft Floors, the commercial flooring firm, which has built a strong reputation for delivering complex and visually stimulating projects throughout Las Vegas, managed all phases regarding the restaurant's intricate wood floor installation. All the restaurant's wood flooring space has been installed with a complete installation system consisting of Bostik materials.

CIRCLE NO. 46

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

"We're excited about working on this high profile project from Day 1," says Garrett Ulfig, West Coast operations manager of MasterCraft Floors. "We work successfully with MGM Resorts. We're grateful they acknowledge the quality of our craftsmanship.” Clearly, MasterCraft had some challenges to address to ensure a worldclass installation. Initially, the project included repairing and flattening the existing concrete slab before installation of the Oshkosh and Eagle Bay materials. And, the clock was continually ticking, as deadlines were fast approaching. The beautifully fabricated entryway floor (after being custom-fabricated by Oshkosh) was shipped in modular sections, which contributed greatly to reducing installation time. MasterCraft installed Eagle Bay’s Frank Lloyd Wright Collection of highend wood flooring, within the 5,000 square foot dining area in an exquisite, herringbone pattern conceived by MBDS. “This was very precise, intricate work,” Ulfig says. “But we knew the grand opening was coming. The final installation was the result of a true team effort.” Sheets, also a finalist in the "2016 Design 'N Gather Mosaic Design Award Competition, co-sponsored by Bostik and Artaic Innovative Mosaic, was honored to be selected as a winner of the contest. "Winning this high profile design competition for a client such as MGM Resorts, the largest hospitality and entertainment corporation in the world, is one my proudest moments of my career," she says. And, Bavette’s is destined to excite guests with its beautiful design and outstanding menu. Guests will see/experience/ appreciate a dining area with beautiful wood flooring that is visually stimulating. CCR Ron Treister is President/ Founder of Communicators International, Inc., a marketing communications firm headquartered in Jupiter, Fla. For three decades, his firm has worked with major accounts focusing on the commercial construction sector. He may be reached at: rlt@communicatorsintl.com


CIRCLE NO. 47


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING

Survey highlights leading security firms

S

ome of the commercial construction industry’s leading security firms are highlighted in our annual listing of the companies leading the charge in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. Our exclusive report provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If your company was not on the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. 3XLogic Suzi Abell, Marketing Manager 10385 Westmoor Dr., Suite 210 Westminster, CO 80021 (317) 445-2937 www.3xlogic.com suzi.abell@3xlogic.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Alarm Control Panels/Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Digital Video Recorders, Business Intelligence Software Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Adams Rite, an ASSA ABLOY Group Brand Stacie Browder, Marketing Planner 10027 S. 51st St. , Suite 102 Phoenix, AZ 85044 (800) 872-3267 www.adamsrite.com customerservice.adamsrite@assaabloy.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Agent Video Intelligence (Agent VI) Roni Kresner, Marketing Manager 405 Lexington Ave., 26th Floor New York, NY 10174 (855) 243-6884 Fax: (303) 648-4264 www.agentvi.com sales@agentvi.com Security Product Type: Video Analytics Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Critical Infrastructure (Government Buildings, Jails, Electricity Stations) City Surveillance (Cities, Municipalities)

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Alarm Controls, an ASSA ABLOY Group Lissette Tuminello, Marketing Planner 10027 S. 51st St. , Suite 102 Phoenix, AZ 85044 (800) 645-5538 www.alarmcontrols.com customerservice.alarmcontrols@assaabloy.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Allegion Elle Walls 11819 Pennsylvania St. Carmel, IN 46032 (317) 810-3144 www.us.allegion.com elle.walls@allegion.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Integrated Security Systems/BMS, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Arecont Vision Morgan Zerries, Manager of Marketing Operations 425 E. Colorado St. , Suite 700 Glendale, CA 91205 (818) 937-0700 (818) 937-0464 www.arecontvision.com mzerries@arecontvision.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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CIRCLE NO. 48


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Arteco Steve Birkmeier, Vice President of Sales and Business Developement 14515 North Outer, Suite 150 Chesterfield, MO 63017 314-434-5331 Fax: 866-462-1323 www.arteco-global.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Retail, Corporate, Education, Commercial

ASSA ABLOY

Susan Grohs, Mar Com SpecialistArchitectural Door Accessories 110 Sargent Dr. New Haven, CT 06511 (203) 492-4220 www.markar.com, www.pemko.com, www.rockwoodmfg.com, www.mckinneyhinge.com • ahssmarketing@assabloy.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Electrified Hinges Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

ASSA ABLOY Electronic Security Ann Glaser, Marketing Planner 10027 S. 51st St. , Suite 102 Phoenix, AZ 85044 (800) 626-7590 www.assaabloyesh.com • customerservice.esh@assaabloy.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

The Bilco Company Steve Weyel, Advertising Manager P.O. Box 1203 New Haven, CT 06505 203-934-6363 Fax: 203-535-1582 www.bilco.com • stevew@bilco.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Fire Safety Equipment, Natural ventilation Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Boon Edam Greg Schreiber, Senior VP of Sales 402 McKinney Pkwy. Lillington, NC 27546 (800) 334-5552 Fax: (910) 814-3899 www.boonedam.us • sales@boonedam.us Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Turnstiles Markets Served: Corporate, Education, Commercial

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Bosch Security Systems, Inc.

130 Perinton Pkwy. Fairport, NY 14450 (800) 289-0096 www.boschsecurity.com • onlinehelp@us.bosch.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Alarm Control Panels/Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Communication Equipment, Digital Video Recorders, Integrated Security Systems/BMS Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

C.R. Laurence

Andrew Haring, V.P. Marketing 2503 E. Vernon Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90058 (800) 421-6144 www.crlaurence.com • askus@crlaurence.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Bollards/Protective Barriers, Bullet Resistant Systems, Communication Equipment, Digital Video Recorders, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Glass Protection, Locks/Key Controls, Windows, Security Screens Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Calpipe Security Bollards

Dylan Markus, Marketing Communications Manager 19440 S. Dominguez Hills Dr. Rancho Dominguez, CA 90220 (877) 283-8518 (310) 885-1899 www.calpipebollards.com • info@calpipebollards.com Security Product Type: Bollards/Protective Barriers Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Parking Lots, Storefronts, Pedestrian Plazas

Camden Door Controls

David Price, Marketing Manager 6-5151 Everest Dr. Mississauga, ON Canada L4W-2Z3 (877) 226-3369 Fax: (905) 366-3378 www.camdencontrols.com • info@camdencontrols.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Bollards/ Protective Barriers, Communication Equipment, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Corbin Russwin

Amy Esposito, Marketing Communications 225 Episcopal Rd. Berlin, CT 06037 (860) 225-7411 www.corbinrusswin.com Security Product Type: Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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CIRCLE NO. 49


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Cornell Storefront Systems Christopher Slocum, Founder & Chief Customer Officer 140 Maffet St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705 (800) 882-6773 Fax: (800) 882-6772 www.cornellstorefronts.com • cslocum@cornellstorefronts.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Bullet Resistant Systems, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Fire Safety Equipment, Glass Protection, Locks/Key Controls, Safes/Vaults/Lockers, Windows Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Covertech Flexible Pkg. John Starr, VP/Partner 279 Humberline Dr. Etobicoke, ON Canada M9W 5T6 (416) 798-1340 Fax: (416) 798-1342 www.rfoil.com • johnstarr@covertechfab.com Security Product Type: RF Shielding Markets Served: Corporate, Commercial

Dahua Technology Gail Miller, Marketing Operations Manager 23 Hubble Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 673-7777 Fax: (949) 679-5760 www.dahuasecurity.com • sales.usa@global.dahuatech.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, CCTV Cameras/ Systems, Digital Video Recorders Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

DeltrexUSA Elias Wexler, President 415 Concord Ave. Bronx, NY 10455 (718) 401-4006 www.deltrexusa.com • contact@deltrexusa.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Bollards/Protective Barriers, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Commercial

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Eye Trax, Inc. Jerry McSorley, Owner 4200 Performance Rd. Charlotte, NC 28214 (800) 594-4157 Fax: (800) 594-4157 www.eyetrax.com • jerry@eyetrax.net Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Commercial, Residential Construction & Oil/Gas Industry

Gatekeeper Systems, Inc. Shane Walsh, Digital Marketing Manager 8 Studebaker Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 233-6594 Fax: (949) 453-8148 www.gatekeepersystems.com • swalsh@gatekeepersystems.com Security Product Type: Loss Prevention, Shopping Cart and Pushout Theft Prevention Markets Served: Retail, Shopping Malls, Supermarkets

Hager Companies Ginny Powell, Product Marketing Specialist 139 Victor St. St. Louis, MO 63104 (314) 633-2837 www.hagerco.com • gipowell@hagerco.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Bollards/Protective Barriers, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Horton Automatics Giovanna Hewitt, Regional Manager 4242 Baldwin Blvd. Corpus Christi, TX 78405 (800) 531-3111 www.hortondoors.com • giovanna-hewitt@overheaddoor.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Airports

i3 International Jeremy Gulley, Regional Sales Manager 780 Birchmount Rd., Unit 16 Toronto, ON Canada M1K5H4 (866) 840-0004 www.i3international.com • info@i3international.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


iDentytech Solutions America LLC Rodrigo Perez, Sales Manager 8725 N.W. 18th Terrace, Suite 105 Cooper City, FL 33024 (888) 703-7150 www.identytech.com • rodrigo@identytech.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Alarm Control Panels/Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Digital Video Recorders, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Integrated Security Systems/BMS, Full Identity Management C41 Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Government, Residential

ImmerVision Jay Murray, Vice President, Video Surveillance Applications 2020 Robert-Bourassa Blvd., Suite 2320 Montreal, Quebec Canada H3A 2A5 (514) 985-4007 Fax: (514) 282-8612 www.immervisionenables.com • jay.murray@immervision.com Security Product Type: 360º Panomorph Lens Design Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Virtual Reality, Broadcast, Action Cameras, Wearables, Drones

InstaKey Security Systems Chris Kenady, Business Development Manager 7456 W. 5th Ave. Lakewood, CO 80226 (303) 761-9999 ext. 126 Fax: (303) 761-6359 www.instakey.com • ckenady@instakey.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Government G5A Vendor

Johnson Controls Denise Bruley, Director, Promotional Marketing 3301 Langstaff Road Concord, Ontario Canada 905-760-3000 ext. 2414 www.tycosecurityproducts.com • dbruley@tycoint.com Security Product Type: Access Control/ Biometrics, Alarm Control Panels/ Monitoring Equipment, CCTV Cameras/Systems, Communication Equipment, Digital Video Recorders, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Integrated Security Systems/BMS Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Aviation, Banking/Finance, Gaming, Sports and Leisure, Government

Luxul Mike Grubb, VP of Sales & Marketing 12884 Frontrunner Blvd., Suite 201 Draper, UT 84020-5490 (801) 822-5450 www.luxul.com • sales@luxul.com Security Product Type: IP Networking Devices (Routers, Controllers, WAPs, Switches) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial, Residential

Morse Watchmans Joe Granitto, Chief Operating Officer 2 Morse Rd. Oxford, CT 06478 (203) 264-4949 Fax: (203) 264-8367 www.morsewatchmans.com • josephg1@morsewatchman.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Locks/Key Controls, Safes/Vaults/Lockers Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Norton Door Controls Beth Welch, Director, Marketing Communications 3000 Hwy. 74 E. Monroe, NC 28112 (800) 438-1951ext. 6030 Fax: (704) 233-5576 www.nortondoorcontrols.com • support.aadcg@assaabloy.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Ocam Jumbi Edulbehram, Regional President, Americas 900 Middlesex Turnpike, Building 5, Suite 2E Billerica, MA 01821 978-735-4860 ext. 106 www.oncamgrandeye.com • sales@oncamgrandeye.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Oval Fire Products Corporation

Protos Security

Kevin Kozlowski, President 115 W. Lake Dr. , Suite 300 Glendale Heights, IL 60139 (630) 635-5000 Fax: (630) 303-9801 www.ovalfireproducts.com • kkozlowski@ovalfireproducts.com Security Product Type: Fire Safety Equipment Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, All Commercial Properties

Kris Vece, Director of Client Relations 90 Town Center Street , Suite 201 Daleville, VA 24083 (540) 798-7958 www.protossecurity.com • krisvece@protossecurity.com Security Product Type: Security Guards Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

OxBlue Corporation

Beth Welch, Director, Marketing Communications 3000 Hwy. 74 E. Monroe, NC 28112 (800) 457-5670 Fax: (800) 221-0489 www.rixson.com • support.aadcg@assaabloy.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

1777 Ellsworth Industrial Blvd. NW Atlanta, GA 30318 Kelsey Collins/Marketing Manager 888-849-2583 Fax: 404-917-0201 kcollins@oxblue.com • www.oxblue.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems, Ultra High-Res Images Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, HealthCare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

RIXSON

Robotic Assistance Devices Pivot3 Brandon Reich, Surveillance Practice Leader 221 W. Sixth Street, Suite 750 Austin, TX 78701 512-807-2666 Fax: 512-807-2669 www.pivot3.com • sales@pivot3.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems Markets Served: Retail, HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

PROTECH ( Protection Technologies) Jeffrey Morris, National Sales Manager 529 Vista Blvd., A-3 Sparks, NV 89434 (800) 428-9662 Fax: (775) 856-7658 www.protechusa.com • jeffrey@protechusa.com Security Product Type: Integrated Security Systems/BMS, Perimeter Intrusion Detection Systems, Fence-Mounted, Infrared Beams, Bi-Static Microwaves, Video Analytics Markets Served: Corporate, Commercial, Corrections, Utilities, Airports, Government/Military

98

Steve Reinharz, President and CEO 23121 La Cadena, Suite B/C Laguna Hills, CA 92653 1-877-78-ROBOT http://roboticassistancedevices.com info@roboticassistancedevices.com Security Product Type: Guarding, security guard robots Markets Served: HealthCare, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Critical Infrastructure

Ross Technology Steve Luscian, Vice President, Sales & Marketing 104 N. Maple Ave., P.O. Box 646 Leola, PA 17540 (717) 339-8895 Fax: (717) 656-3281 www.rosstechnology.com • sales@rosstechnology.com Security Product Type: Bollards/Protective Barriers, Bullet Resistant Systems, Security Doors/Door Control Hardware, Fencing, Windows, Anti-ram Vehicle Barriers and Fencing/FE/BR and Blast Windows, Doors, Louvers and Escape Hatches Markets Served: Government/Military, Oil/Gas, Pharmaceutical, Power Generation, Mass Transit, Data Centers, Custom Residential

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


National Contact: Ian Bannister, Director of Business Development 404-660-1003 (M) • 866-933-3456 • Ian@windowfilmdepot.com

GOT A STICKY SITUATION? Window Film Depot Is Your Nationwide Solution for Anything “Sticky” Applied to Windows or Walls SOLAR - SECURITY - GRAPHICS •Turn-key 3m window and wall film sales & installation services •In-house custom design & printing services •Custom vinyl murals and wall graphics solutions •Specialty films: anti-graffiti, one-way mirror, black-out films •Defenselite – retro-fit anti-intrusion glazing system •Bulletshield – retro-fit anti-ballistic protection

Visit our booth at: Authorized Retailer Window Film Products

Window Protection and Security CIRCLE NO. 50


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Salsbury Industries-Lockers.com Mark Eu, Director of Marketing 1010 E. 62nd St. Los Angeles, CA 90274 (800) LOCKERS Fax: (800) 562-5399 www.lockers.com • salsbury@lockers.com Security Product Type: Locks/Key Controls, Lockers & Storage Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

SALTO Systems Michael Mahon, Sr. VP Commercial Sales 1780 Corporate Dr., #400 Norcross, GA 30093 (866) GO-SALTO Fax: (770) 452-6098 www.salto.us • info@salto.us Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

SARGENT Manufacturing Amy Esposito, Marketing Communications 100 Sargent Dr. New Haven, CT 06511 (800) 727-5477 www.sargentlock.com

Paul Sowacke, VP of Sales & Marketing 3714 Runge St. Franklin Park, IL 60131 (800) 322-2435 Fax: (847) 288-9999 www.se-kure.com • psowacke@se-kure.com Security Product Type: Mirrors, Alarms for Displayed Products Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

STANLEY Access Technologies Ashley Harmon, Marketing Specialist 65 Scott Swamp Rd. Farmington, CT 06032 (860) 507-2505 www.stanleyaccess.com • ashley.harmon@sbdinc.com Security Product Type: Security Doors/Door Control Hardware Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

UniKey Technologies, Inc. Lee Odess, Chief Operating Officer 111 W. jefferson St., Suite 100 Orlando, FL 32801 (202) 999-8180 www.unikey.com • lee@unikey.com

Security Product Type: Locks/Key Controls

Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Security Doors/Door

Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate,

Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls, Safes/Vaults/Lockers, Windows

Education, Commercial

Security Door Controls Olga Iakomi, Marketing and Events Coordinator 801 Avenida Acaso Camerillo, CA 93012 800-413-8783 www.sdcsecurity.com • olga@sdcsecurity.com Security Product Type: Access Control/ Biometrics, Security Doors/ Door Control Hardware, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

100

Se-Kure Controls, Inc.

Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multifamily

Vanderbilt Industries Mitchell Kane, President 2 Cranberry Rd. Parsippany, NJ 07054 (973) 316-3900 www.vanderbiltindustries.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics Markets Served: Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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» CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 51


SPECIAL REPORT

SECURITY MANUFACTURING Verint Kevin Wine, Vice President of Marketing 175 Broadhollow Rd., Suite 100 Melville, NY 11747 631-962-9600 Fax: 631-962-9300 www.verint.com Security Product Type: Actionable Intelligence Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Corporate, Commercial

Vidsys Roberto Mandanas, Vice President of Strategic Marketing and Alliances 8219 Leesburg Pike, #250 Vienna, VA 22182 (703) 883-3730 www.vidsys.com • rmandanas@vidsys.com Security Product Type: Physical Security Information Management (PSIM) and Converged Security and Information Management (CSIM) Technology Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Viking Electronics Mike Busby, Marketing and Sales Manager 1531 Industrial St. Hudson, WI 54016 (715) 386-8861 Fax: (715) 386-4344 www.vikingelectronics.com • info@vikingelectronics.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Communication Equipment, Emergency Communication Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

VuTeur Jana Rankin, CEO 2028 E. Ben White Blvd, Suite 240-2048 Austin, TX 78741 800-217-1204 www.vuteur.com • info@vuteur.com Security Product Type: Digital Video Recorders, Emergency Management Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education

102

Wanco, Inc. Tim Paulino, Business Development Manager 5870 Tennyson St. Arvada, CO 80003 (800) 972-0755 Fax: (303) 427-5725 www.wanco.com • tim.paulino@wanco.com Security Product Type: CCTV Cameras/Systems, Digital Video Recorders, Integrated Security Systems/BMS, Security Lighting, Portable Video Surveillance, Trailers Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Window Film Depot Jeff Franson, President/CEO 4939 Lower Roswell Rd., Suite 100 Marietta, GA 30068 (866) 933-3456 Fax: (678) 547-3138 www.windowfilmdepot.com • jeff@windowfilmdepot.com Security Product Type: Bullet Resistant Systems, Glass Protection, Windows, Other Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Light Industry

Yale Locks & Hardware 225 Episcopal Rd. Berlin, CT 06037 (800) 438-1951 Fax: (800) 338-0965 www.yalecommercial.com yalemarketing@assaabloy.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Alarm Control Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

ZK Access, LLC Larry Reed, CEO 6 Kingsbridge Rd., Suite 8 Fairfield, NJ 07004 (862) 505-2101 www.zkaccess.com • sales@zkaccess.com Security Product Type: Access Control/Biometrics, Locks/Key Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 52


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS

Signage firms take spotlight in annual listing

I

f you’re looking for the industry’s leading facility maintenance providers, our annual signage listing has you covered. The report highlights some of the industry’s leading brands. To help you find what you need, the listing provides the contact information and contact person at each of the reporting firms in the areas of retail, restaurant and hospitality. If you want to be a part of next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

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Philadelphia Sign............................. $57,000,000 Jones Sign....................................... $44,000,000 Icon................................................. $30,800,000 Anchor Sign, Inc............................... $26,000,000 Persona, Inc..................................... $22,600,000 Prioritysign...................................... $19,500,000 Yunker Industries............................. $17,500,000 Kieffer/Starlite................................. $17,000,000

Persona, Inc...................................... $36,700,000 Federal Heath Visual Communications............................... $17,000,000 Prioritysign....................................... $12,500,000 Anchor Sign, Inc................................ $11,000,000 SignResource................................... $8,000,000 Jones Sign........................................ $6,000,000 Kieffer/Starlite.................................. $6,000,000 South Water Signs............................ $6,000,000 United Sign Systems......................... $6,000,000 Barlo Signs International, Inc............. $5,000,000

RESTAURANT

Federal Heath Visual Communications.................... $145,000,000 SignResource.................................. $81,000,000

Persona, Inc.......................................$29,300,000 Kieffer/Starlite...................................$6,500,000 SignResource....................................$5,000,000 Federal Heath Visual Communications......................$4,500,000 Anchor Sign, Inc.................................$4,000,000 United Sign Systems..........................$3,000,000 Philadelphia Sign...............................$2,500,000 South Water Signs.............................$2,500,000 Barlo Signs International, Inc..............$2,000,000 Blair Companies................................$2,000,000

TOTAL BILLINGS

HOSPITALITY

RETAIL

Top Ten Totals

Federal Heath Visual Communications.................................... $178,000,000 SignResource....................................... $102,000,000 Persona, Inc.......................................... $89,500,000 Philadelphia Sign.................................. $80,400,000 Jones Sign............................................ $75,000,000 Blair Companies................................... $60,000,000 Icon...................................................... $60,000,000 Prioritysign........................................... $50,500,000 Kieffer/Starlite...................................... $50,000,000 Anchor Sign, Inc.................................... $43,000,000

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 53


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS ADART Corey Perez, SVP 700 Parker Sq. Flower Mound, TX 75028 (469) 322-1909 www.adart.com corey@adart.com Year Established: 1958, No. Of Employees: 22 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 128, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Retrofits, Rebates Leading Clients: N/A

Advance Sign Group Andy Wasserstrom, VP, Sales & Marketing 5150 Walcutt Ct. Columbus, OH 43228 (614) 429-2079 www.advancesigngroup.com andyw@advancesigngroup.com Year Established: 1994, No. Of Employees: 151 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 49, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: N/A

American/Interstate Signcrafters Brendan Stanton, Dir. Mktg. 171 Freeman Ave. Islip, NY 11751 (631) 273-4800 www.americansigncrafters.com bstanton@americansigncrafters.com Year Established: 1979, No. Of Employees: 152 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 302, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $32,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Wells Fargo, Citibank, Northwell Health

106

Anchor Sign, Inc. Cade Thompson, VP Operations 2200 Discher Ave. Charleston, SC 29405 (800) 213-3331 Fax: (843) 747-5907 www.anchorsign.com info@anchorsign.com Year Established: 1991, No. Of Employees: 185 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 74, Retail Billings: $26,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $4,000,000 , Restaurant Billings: $11,000,000 Other Billings: $2,000,000 , Total Billings: $43,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: N/A

Barlo Signs International, Inc. Raymond Brayton, Chief Operations Officer 158 Greeley Street Hudson, NH 03051 603-882-2638 Fax: 603-882-7680 www.barlosigns.com your_image@barlosigns.com Year Established: 1969, No. Of Employees: 65 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 674, Retail Billings: $3,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $2,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $5,000,000 Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $10,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Engineering Leading Clients: Ninety Nine Restaurants, NH State Liquor Commission, Market Basket

Blair Companies Scott Rizzo, Vice President 5107 Kissell Ave. Altoona, PA 16601 (610) 368-5037 www.blaircompanies.com srizzo@blaircompanies.com Year Established: 1974, No. Of Employees: 367 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 37, Retail Billings: $14,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $2,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $3,000,000 Other Billings: $41,000,000, Total Billings: $60,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: FedEx, UPS, Bank of America, BP, Sheetz, Wawa, Hertz, Aseena, GNC, Party City

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 54


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS Egan Sign Flash Right Displays Marilyn Brennan, Business Development/ National Accounts Manager 1100 Berkshire Blvd., #200 Wyomissing, PA 19610 (844) 460-6631 Fax: (610) 478-1332 www.egansign.com sales@egansign.com Year Established: 1988, No. Of Employees: N/A Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 30, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Rebranding, Digital Value Engineering, Design Control Documentation Leading Clients: Orschen Farm & Home, Value City Furniture, Red Wing Shoe Co., Famous Footwear, Med Express, Med Post, People Ready, The Medicine Shoppe

Elro Sign Co Frank Rhodes, VP 400 W. Walnut St. Gardena, CA 90248 (800) 927-4555 Fax: (310) 380-7451 www.elrosigns.com frankrhodes@elrosigns.com Year Established: 1947, No. Of Employees: 75 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 50, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, EMC’s Leading Clients: Verizon, UPS, Delta

Federal Heath Visual Communications Daniel Belling, VP Sales & Marketing 2300 State Hwy. 121 Euless, TX 76039 (817) 685-9075 Fax: (817) 685-9103 www.federalheath.com dbelling@federalheath.com Year Established: 1981, No. Of Employees: 600 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 55, Retail Billings: $145,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $4,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $17,000,000 Other Billings: $12,000,000, Total Billings: $178,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: N/A

108

6210 Browns Bridge Road Cumming, GA 30041 Pete Monti/ President 678-455-9121 pete@flashrightdisplays.com • www.flashrightdisplays.com Year Established: 2009, No. Of Employees: 4 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 200, Retail Billings: $ N/A Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $300,000 Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $300,000 Types of Signage: Manufacturing, Leading Clients: Various QSR

Georgia PrintCo., LLC 90 South Oak St. Lakeland, GA 31635 Drew Barry/Director of Marketing 866-572-0146 • FAX:: 866-245-0867 drew@georgiaprintco.com • www.georgiaprintco.com Year Established: 2002, No. Of Employees: 40 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $N/A Hospitality Billings: $N/A, Restaurant Billings: $N/A Other Billings: $5,000,000, Total Billings: $5,000,000 Types of Signage: Printer for all POP, POI and Advertising materials Leading Clients: Innerworkings, Webb Mason, Proforma

Howard Industries

Jeffrey Stewart, Vice President 6400 Howard Dr. Fairview, PA 16415 (800) 458-0591 Fax: (814) 838-0011 www.howardindustries.com • sales@howardindustries.com Year Established: 1928, No. Of Employees: 48 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing Leading Clients: Penn State University, Cleveland Clinic, Geisinger Health Plan, First National Bank

Icon

Kevin Hughes, SVP Bus. Dev. & Mktg. 1701 Golf Rd., 1-900 Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 (847) 364-2250 Fax: (847) 364-1517 www.iconid.com • info@iconid.com Year Established: 1931, No. Of Employees: 400 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 116, Retail Billings: $30,800,000 Hospitality Billings: $1,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $700,000 Other Billings: $28,500,000, Total Billings: $60,000,000 Types of Signage: Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Leading National Clients Under Non-Disclosure Agreements

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 55


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS Identicom Sign Solutions Kroy Sign Systems

John DiNunzio, President 24657 Halsted Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (248) 344-9590 Fax: (248) 946-4198 www.identicomsigns.com • info@identicomsigns.com Year Established: 2009, No. Of Employees: 20 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 30, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Domino’s, Harley-Davidson, Pilot Centers, Love Centers, Nothing Bundt Cakes, Red Lion Hotels, Big Boy, PetValu, Rainbow Child Care, Ashley Stewart, Mr. Alan’s

iSIGNS Inc. (Wholesale Sign Dist.) Bill Burrows, Sales and Operations Manager 7625 Birkmire Drive Fairview, PA 16415 866-437-3040 Fax: 814-835-7057 www.isignsled.com ª sales@isignsled.com Year Established: 2007, No. Of Employees: N/A Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: N/A, Leading Clients: N/A

Steve Hatcliff, Marketing Director 8221 E. Gelding Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85260 (800) 916-3212 Fax: (480) 483-0235 www.kroysignsystems.com • signs@kroysignsystems.com Year Established: 1983, No. Of Employees: 18 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Manufacturing, Leading Clients: N/A

Laminators Incorporated Shawn Crouthamel, National Sales Manager 3255 Penn St. Hatfield, PA 19440 (800) 523-2347 Fax: (215) 721-4669 www.laminatorsinc.com • info@laminatorsinc.com Year Established: 1963, No. Of Employees: 75-100 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Manufacturing, Other Leading Clients: Sign Distributors

Loren Industries Jones Sign Christopher Reiff, National Sales Director

John Mortensen, President 1711 Scheuring Rd. DePere, WI 54115 (800) 536-7446 www.jonessign.com • jmortensen@jonessign.com Year Established: 1910, No. Of Employees: 435 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 41, Retail Billings: $44,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $2,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $6,000,000 Other Billings: $23,000,000, Total Billings: $85,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: AutoZone, T-Mobile, Dollar Tree

Kieffer/Starlite Ed Davies, Multi-Media Marketing Manager 585 Bond St. Lincolnshine, Il 60069 847-415-5756 www.kieffersigns.com • edavies@kieffersigns.com Year Established: 1959, No. Of Employees: 200+ Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 125, Retail Billings: $17,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $6,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $6,000,000 Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $50,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Walgreens, Hilton

110

12226 Coast Drive Whittier, CA 90601 562-946-7545 Fax: 562-949-5707 www.lorensigns.com • chris.r@lorensigns.com Year Established: 1993, No. Of Employees: 41 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 20, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Popeye, Pep Boys, Chipotle, Big 5, American Eagle, CKE

May Group

Dalana Morse, Marketing Manager 1200 Forum Way S. Fort Worth, TX 76140 (817) 336-5671 www.maygroupusa.com • dmorse@maygroupusa.com Year Established: 1946, No. Of Employees: 70 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 2200, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Program Management, Other Leading Clients: Madden, Miller Coors, North American, ADM, Guess, New Belgium Brewing, Boelter

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 56


SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS MC Sign Company Persona, Inc. Bob Patton, VP Sales 8959 Tyler Blvd. Mentor, OH 44060 (440) 209-6200 Fax: (440) 209-6277 www.mcsign.com • bob.patton@mcsign.com Year Established: 1953, No. Of Employees: 203 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: N/A, Leading Clients: N/A

Mungsube

Jonatthan Glanz, Senior Vice President 19 Spielman Rd. Fairfield, NJ 07004 862-702-3661 Fax: 862-702-3682 www.mungsube.com • jonglanz@mugsube.com Year Established: 2003, No. Of Employees: 10 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Manufacturing Leading Clients: Panasonic, AMI, Atlanta Braves

Nesper Sign Inc.

Phil Garland, President 4620 J St. S.W. Cedar Rapids, IA 52404 (800) 332-8403 Fax: (315) 366-6493 www.nespersign.com • pgarland@nespersign.com Year Established: 1925, No. Of Employees: 28 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: $4,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $200,000, Restaurant Billings: $200,000 Other Billings: $1,000,000, Total Billings: $5,400,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Full Color LED Electronic Message Displays Leading Clients: HY-VEE Foods, Von Maur, Alliant Energy Corp.

North American Signs, Inc.

Randy Davis, New Business Development 3601 W. Lathrop Street South Bend, IN 46628 574-234-5252 Fax: 574-237-6167 www.northamericansigns.com gma1@northamericansigns.com Year Established: 1934, No. Of Employees: 105 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: N/A

112

Mike Peterson, VP/Business Development 700 21st St. S.W. Watertown, SD 57201 (605) 882-2244 Fax: (605) 882-3521 www.personasigns.com • mpeterson@personasigns.com Year Established: 1980, No. Of Employees: 401 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 178, Retail Billings: $22,600,000 Hospitality Billings: $29,300,000, Restaurant Billings: $36,700,000 Other Billings: $900,000, Total Billings: $89,500,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Persona offers value-engineering services to make the most of customers’ signage dollars Leading Clients: Best Western, McDonald’s, Choice Hotels, Holiday Station Stores

Philadelphia Sign

Nate Doney, National Sales Executive 707 W. Spring Garden St. Palmyra, NJ 08065 503-830-3841 Fax: 856-829-8549 www.philadelphiasign.com • ndoney@philadelphiasign.com Year Established: 1911, No. Of Employees: 408 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 58, Retail Billings: $57,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $2,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $3,500,000 Other Billings: $17,400,000, Total Billings: $80,400,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Other Leading Clients: N/A

PixelFLEX LED

David Venus Director of Marketing 700 Cowan St. Nashville, TN 37297 1-800-930-7954 pixelflexled.com • sales@pixel-flex.com Year Established: 2009, No. Of Employees: 40 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 100, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Custom LED Display manufacturer for indoor/outdoor Leading Clients: Nike, Coach.Kate Spade, Target, Google, Major League Baseball, Ford, Nashville Predators, AECOM

Priority Sign, Inc.

837 Riverfront Dr. Sheboygan, WI 53081 Andy Dykstra/President 920-280-0876 inquiries@prioritysign.com • www.prioritysign.com Year Established: 1997, No. Of Employees: 96 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 83, Retail Billings: $19,500,000 Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $12,500,000 Other Billings: $18,500,000, Total Billings: $50,500,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Mgmt., Site Survey/Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: AT&T, Red Robin, Sprint, United Health

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SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS SignResource South Water Signs Scott Van Ness, President & CEO 6135 District Blvd. Maywood, CA 90270 323-771-2098 www.signresource.com • srmarketing@signresource.com Year Established: 1969, No. Of Employees: 525 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 23, Retail Billings: $81,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $5,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $8,000,000 Other Billings: $8,000,000, Total Billings: $102,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Shell, BP, Citgo, Exxon/Mobil, Phillips 66, Domino’s, Circle K, 7-Eleven, Sinclair, Dollar General, Enterprise, Rite Aid, FedEx, Best Western, Burger King, ARCO, Dunkin Brands

Noah Pettit, VP of Sales 934 N. Church Rd. Elmhurst, IL 60126 (630) 607-6297 Fax: (630) 333-4915 www.southwatersigns.com npettit@southwatersigns.com Year Established: 1999, No. Of Employees: 120 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 500, Retail Billings: $13,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $2,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $6,000,000 Other Billings: $11,500,000, Total Billings: $33,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Edward Jones, United Airlines, HR Block

Signage Solutions Sullaway Engineering, Inc. Chris De Ruyter, President 2231 S. Dupont Dr. Anaheim, CA 92806 (714) 491-0299 Fax: (714) 491-0439 www.signage-solutions.com chrisd@signage-solutions.com Year Established: 1990, No. Of Employees: 46 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 50, Retail Billings: $1,500,000 Hospitality Billings: $150,000, Restaurant Billings: $3,500,000 Other Billings: $850,000, Total Billings: $6,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Digital Graphics Leading Clients: Nordstrom, Saks Fifth Ave., Skechers, Habit Burger, Del Frisco’s, Rock and Brews, ICON Theatres, Planet Hollywood

Michael F. Sullaway, P.E., President 10815 Rancho Bernardo Rd. Suite 260 San Diego, CA 92127 858-312-5150 Fax: 858-777-3534 www.sullawayeng.com projectmanager@sullawayeng.com Year Established: 2009, No. Of Employees: 18 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 582, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Provide stamped structural engineering drawings & calculations for projects throughout the United States and Canada. Licensed nationwide. Engineering design, prototype engineering, shop drawings/drafting & preliminary engineering. Leading Clients: N/A

SMI Sign Systems, Inc. Thomas Sign and Tom Stacey, Vice President Awning Company, Inc. 3903 Cornell Pl. Frederick, MD 21703 (301) 468-1132 Fax: (301) 230-9048 www.smisigns.com tom@smisigns.com Year Established: 1989, No. Of Employees: 55 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 128, Retail Billings: $1,200,000 Hospitality Billings: $1,600,000, Restaurant Billings: $800,000 Other Billings: $3,200,000, Total Billings: $6,800,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Clarke Construction, Hitt Contracting, Buch Construction

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Patti Canady, Marketing Director 4590 118th Ave. N. Clearwater, FL 33762 (800) 526-3325 Fax: (727) 573-0328 www.thomassign.com info@thomassign.com Year Established: 1969, No. Of Employees: 180 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $25,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: N/A

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SPECIAL REPORT

SIGNAGE FIRMS United Sign Systems Vixxo Signage and Lighting Mike Noordewier, Owner 5201 Pentecost Dr. Modesto, CA 95356 (204) 543-1320 Fax: (204) 543-1326 www.unitedsign.net miken@unitedsign.net Year Established: 1967, No. Of Employees: 80 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 30, Retail Billings: $11,000,000 Hospitality Billings: $3,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $6,000,000 Other Billings: $2,000,000, Total Billings: $22,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Zoning and Entitlements, Leading Clients: Dollar Tree, Grocery Outlet

United Visual Branding, LLC Anne-Marie Thomas, Sales Manager 206 Tower Dr. Oldsmar, FL 34677 (813) 488-2993 www.uvbrand.com amt@usigns.com Year Established: 1994, No. Of Employees: 95 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 250, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $12,000,000 Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting, Design/ Construction Consulting Leading Clients: Automotive and Restaurant

Sign, Lighting & Graphics Company

Urban NeonSign Lighting & Graphics

Jim Malin, Sales Associate 500 Pine St., Suite 3B Holmes, PA 19043 (610) 804-0437 Fax: (610) 461-5566 www.urbanneon.com jmalin@urbanneon.com Year Established: 1993, No. Of Employees: 25 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: N/A, Leading Clients: N/A

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Julie Lapacka, Director of Business Development 4801 Woodway Dr., Suite 160W Houston, TX 77056 (281) 822-1704 www.vixxo.com • julie.lapacka@vixxo.com Year Established: 1980, No. Of Employees: 50 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 33, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Design, Maintenance, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation, Permitting Leading Clients: Extra Space Storage, Sally Beauty Supply, TBC Corp

Warner Bros. Design Studio 4000 Warner Blvd., Bldg. 44 Burbank, CA 91522 Craig McNabb/Director 818-954-1815 • FAX: 818-954-2806 Year Established: 1920, No. of Employees: N/A Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $ N/A, Types of Signage: Design, Manufacturing, Installation, Leading Clients: N/A

Your Signage Source.com Chuck Freels, Vice President 10086 Woolwine Hwy. Woolwine, VA 24185 (276) 930-1500 Fax: (276) 229-3059 www.yoursignagesource.com chuckfreels@yoursignagesource.com Year Established: 2004, No. Of Employees: 6 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: N/A, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Types of Signage: Manufacturing, Leading Clients: N/A

Yunker Industries

Nadine Seitz, Marketing Manager 310 O’Connor Dr. Elkhorn, WI 53121 (877) 798-6537 Fax: (262) 723-3340 www.yunker.com • nseitz@yunker.com Year Established: 1948, No. Of Employees: 105 Signage Clients as of 11/2016: 48, Retail Billings: $17,500,000 Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: $275,000 Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $17,775,000 Types of Signage: Design, Program Management, Site Survey/ Analysis, Manufacturing, Installation Leading Clients: Ross Dress For Less, JoAnn, TSC, Oportun, Cycle Gear, Ralph Lauren

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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Doing

Business IRL C Adapting convention centers for the digital era

hat with any of your colleagues who have recently returned from an industry gathering or conference, and, in addition to the business debriefing, you’ll likely hear anecdotes, restaurant recommendations and, of course, the latest insider gossip. In my experience, there’s no substitute for this kind of personal interaction. Face-to-face networking in such a concentrated way with people who have common interests remains an incredibly effective, efficient way of communication. Judging by a report in the June 2017 issue of Trade Show Executive, an increasing number of people share this view. Year-over-year, April 2017 exhibited 2.9 percent growth in nation-wide trade show attendance, and capped a run of four consecutive months of growth. Especially in the age of digital meeting technologies, this positive trend is encouraging. As people are communicating more electronically – video-conferencing is de rigueur in large organizations, with approximately 450,000 systems installed in the United States. Skype alone logs eight billion hours of calls each year. It’s obvious that quality, in-person time is viewed as valuable and that the convention industry, especially host cities and facility owners, should appreciate this by keeping their properties in top condition. A convention center can generate a significant amount of revenue for a municipality. The income isn’t attributable to just the facility rentals, but also the expense-account dollars spent by visitors for dining, entertainment and shopping. In 2016, the San Diego Convention Center welcomed 824,000 attendees, who directly spent $658 million in the city; the regional fiscal impact totaled $1.1 billion. Chicago’s 2.6 million-square-foot McCormick Place generates $1.7 billion each year. The Orange County Convention Center brought $2.28 billion to the Orlando community in 2015, while drawing one million visitors to town.

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By Julian Anderson

Disrupt or be disrupted

In light of these facts, it’s clear that the meetings industry must make some significant changes if it is to continue to remain relevant. At the big-picture level, a new perspective on the economic relationship between the community and the convention business is emerging. Cities are promoting not just their facilities and cultural attractions to conference organizers, but also their resources for innovation, often in the tech, research and education sectors. This far-sighted, inclusive strategy stresses long-term growth for cities and regions, rather than short-term returns. Austin’s South by Southwest (SXSW) is a notable example of this approach. With minimal expense, the city leveraged its homegrown media and Cities are music industries to attract attendpromoting not ees as well as outside sponsors just their facilities to the conference; the local economic impact of the 2016 event and cultural was $325.3 billion. Attendance attractions to at SXSW has increased eightfold conference since its establishment in 2011. organizers, Redefining the destination-city in this way greatly but also their enhances the draw to convention resources for visitors. If they’ve made the finaninnovation, cial and scheduling commitment often in the to traveling, conference attendees want to go somewhere interesttech, research ing. To remain competitive, it’s and education incumbent upon cities to deliver a sectors. holistic experience to visitors.

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Drilling down on building up

To keep up with these changes, the physical nature of convention centers has also evolved. In the 20th Century, convention centers were all about scale. Except in cases where a facility regularly hosts heavy-equipment trade shows, the demand for cavernous exhibition spaces is waning. Replacing the bigger-is-better mandate is a focus on customizable meeting spaces that can be tailored to diverse specifications. Many communities are faced with a choice between constructing a new convention center, or renovating existing facilities. Typically, building a new hall is easier than rehabbing an old one. But, finding a suitable site – one that is sufficiently large, centrally located and within walking distance of urban attractions– is not always feasible. Opting to build from the ground up also eliminates the need to interrupt scheduled conventions, as they can be held in the outdated facility while the new one is being constructed. For convention centers located on a landlocked, built-out site, there’s typically one way to go when adding meeting space to the hall: Up. The old model for facilities situated everything at ground level for easy access; now, with land at a premium, most buildings are stacking spaces vertically. This presents its own set of challenges, including incorporating parking into the structure and planning the ground-level programming and content – but it provides an opportunity to make a design statement. When modernizing the envelope of an existing building, owners are seeking design solutions that go beyond merely dressing up a box. They are aware that an attractive exterior can help to compensate for the decline in performance that occurs once the building starts showing its age, between five and 10 years after completion. In addition, convention centers that have an architecturally iconic identity reflect positively on their home city and, by extension, on the attendees and the conference.

Intelligently planned and executed, investments in convention centers will yield not only great financial returns, but also ensure a returning customer.

and meeting spaces with a high level of quality detailing and finishes (think wood veneer, clear-span design, and glass partitions instead of drywall, concrete columns and popcorn ceilings). Architecture that capitalizes on its setting, with a lobby or ballroom oriented towards a view of a river or park, is another enticement that appeals to meeting planners. To maximize resources (both in area and revenue), it’s possible to simultaneously increase meeting capacity and reduce exhibit space through creating a physically flexible design. Moscone West in San Francisco is an example of this tactic. The building features more than a mile of movable interior walls that permits a high degree of freedom to reconfigure the 200,000 square feet of function space on the second and third floors. Anaheim’s new expansion also adopts this approach. Of course, the technological features that are intrinsic to the impetus for upgrading a convention facility must be state-of-the-art. Digital resources, seamless connectivity and security programs are central to every successful meeting. Intelligently planned and executed, investments in convention centers will yield not only great financial returns, but also ensure a returning customer. CCR Julian Anderson is a member of Rider Levett Bucknall’s global board and chairman of its Central Consulting Services (CCS) group of companies. He is a founding shareholder and president of the company’s North American practice, where he is responsible for overall management. Rider Levett Bucknall is an award-winning international firm known for providing project management, construction cost consulting, and related property and construction advisory services – at all stages of the design and construction process.

Interior amenities

Inside the convention center, user expectations are a combination of the pragmatic and the aesthetic. Conference organizers are attracted to environments that make a good first impression. Great-looking public areas CIRCLE NO. 60

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Does your project have what it takes? Being the best takes a team effort.

In today's commercial construction industry, the successful new builds and renovated projects are the ones with every part of the team working in unison to deliver on time, under or on budget and in sync. From design, to engineering, to building and management, the best projects feature the best teams.

That's why Commercial Construction & Renovation is looking for your team. Our first “CCR Project Profile Awards ” will recognize the best-of-the-best construction projects from the top down with awards for New Construction Project and Renovation Project. To help select these special projects, we're building a special committee from our Editorial Advisory Board to pour through the nominations. After they select the projects, we'll identify winners (14 in all) in the following sectors:

• • • •

Retail Restaurant Hospitality Federal

• Healthcare • Shopping Center • Multi-housing

So, how do you get your project nominated? Here’s what you need to give us:

Project title: _________________________________________________ Location: ___________________________________________________ Designer: ___________________________________________________ Contractor: __________________________________________________

Deadline to submit form: Jan 15, 2018

Subcontractors: ______________________________________________ Number of square feet: _______________________________________ Year started: _________________________________________________ New or Renovation:___________________________________________ Completion date: _____________________________________________

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Why this project should be nominated?__________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

Send your nominations forms to David Corson, publisher, at davidc@ccr-mag.com.


WINTER 2017

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Executive Chef Steve Sturm

Director of Construction Alvin Hood

Serve. Enrich. Exceed.

Why the Firebirds Wood Fired Grill brand is not your father’s steakhouse

A special supplement to:

Also Inside: Striking lighting helps illuminates iconic brew house


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Serve. Enrich. Exceed. Why the Firebirds Wood Fired Grill brand is not your father’s steakhouse By Michael J. Pallerino

T

he original premise was simple – set the expectations

Dennis Thompson and Doug Glendenning knew the drill. Thompson was cofounder of Lone Star high with the belief that no detail is too small. Steakhouse & Saloon and an original owner of Fox and Hound Bar & Grill, That’s the Firebirds Wood Fired Grill way. while Glendenning was the former president of Lone Star. They opened the first Firebirds in 2000 in Charlotte, NC. In 2011, they partnered with Angelo Gordon to continue its recent expansion plans. That plan was to provide a full-spectrum dining experience enhanced with local flavor. And that’s just what Firebirds does. The contemporary-polished restaurant, which operates 44 restaurants in 18 states and has another four under construction for 2018, is an energetic twist on the traditional grill – boldly flavored, classic American menu in an inviting, fire-centric atmosphere.

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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Its newest location in Jacksonville, Fla. is putting an even bigger energetic twist on the traditional grill. The location features design elements inspired by warm fires and smoking wood, for a lively, open and light-infused concept that stands apart from the darker, old-fashioned look of many steakhouses. And in keeping with its mission – “To Serve, Enrich and Exceed” – Firebirds supports ever-growing sustainability efforts throughout its restaurants and partners with Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, and has raised more than $1 million for childhood cancer research through the sale of freshsqueezed lemonade. Commercial Kitchens sat down with Alvin Hood, director of construction, to get his take on where the Firebirds Wood Fired Grill brand is heading.

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Our goal is to create a warm, inviting, energetic environment that will create memorable experiences for our guests.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017

Give us a snapshot of Firebird’s brand.

We’re a contemporary-polished restaurant, an energetic twist on the traditional grill featuring a boldly flavored, classic American menu in an inviting, fire-centric atmosphere. Our signature menu items include hand-cut, aged steaks and fresh seafood hand-filleted in-house and seared over locally sourced hickory, oak or pecan wood in our scratch kitchen and exposed wood-fired grill. Our open, stylish, enticing décor incorporates wood-fired themes and entertaining spaces, such as our outdoor patio with seasonal comforts and our award-winning FIREBAR®.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

Guests who would appreciate our class-leading food quality cooked over a wood-fired


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» CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

grill, refined service offered at moderate prices in a polished environment. Our new prototype in Jacksonville, Fla. further enhances key elements that appeal to a variety of generational segments.

How does the design of Firebirds cater to what today’s consumers are looking for?

We believe consumers are looking for open, bright, lively restaurants with welcoming staff and, of course, great food. Our new design by starrdesign pairs an open-concept floorplan, floor-to-ceiling windows and contemporary design with our signature warm hospitality, making it the perfect spot for any occasion.

Walk us through how and why it is designed the way it is?

Many painstaking details have contributed to the design of our new prototype to further evolve our high-quality but casual environment – simplified, streamlined interior. Open, inviting fenestration and patio communicate energy and activity. Varied building massing and volume enable multiple dining experiences. Color, materials and texture express the wood-fired theme. Environmentally responsible, energy-efficient designs feature low-E tinted glass, LED lighting and deep twofoot roof overhangs at most fenestrations.

We believe today’s consumers look for companies and organizations that share their own values.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

Our goal is to create a warm, inviting, energetic environment that will create memorable experiences for our guests. On the exterior, the building consists of various materials that catch one’s eyes especially the warm glow created after night fall. On the interior, various wood elements direct the focus to the open kitchen with the woodfired grill and the FIREBAR®.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

Controlling construction costs in a manner that matches our fiscal responsibilities and desire for growth. As the construction market gains momentum, the labor costs are increasing, continuing the trend of higher overall costs.

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Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

As a conscious company, we have a responsibility to our local communities, from eco-friendly cooking practices to the recycling of wine corks and crayons, we recognize that our business can only thrive in a healthy environment. We continually strive to minimize our environmental footprint and maximize the impact of our sustainability efforts.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

The economy continues to strengthen and the population continues to become even more sophisticated in their food choices.

Continuing to make Firebirds more accessible, whether that be new locations, expanded reservation offerings or enhanced online ordering.

Are you optimistic about what you see today in the marketplace?

Yes, the economy continues to strengthen and the population continues to become even more sophisticated in their food choices.

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What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

Currently, we operate 44 restaurants in 18 states with another four under construction with plans to open in 2018. With the exception of a few markets, we are focused on expanding within our current footprint.

What trends are you seeing?

Our primary focus is to continue offering bold flavors, authentic hospitality, real value and a fine dining experience at a moderate price, but we are seeing our guests wanting more access to Firebirds via technology, so we’ve recently introduced Online Ordering and a partnership with OpenTable.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” shopping environment in today’s competitive landscape?

Value – which for us means providing a tremendous portion of the freshest ingredients prepared in our scratch kitchen,


Light is like a brick...

just as steel and stone give shape, light reveals form, scale and evokes an emotional response.

from concept through construction call us to ensure your lighting works for you www.darkhorselightworks.com 818-370-6411 info@darkhorselightworks.com

Exceptional Performance in Light Architectural Lighting Design Lighting Control Systems Design CIRCLE NO. 64


SERVE. ENRICH. EXCEED.

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS personalized service offered in a polished casual environment and upscale amenities at a moderate price

What is today’s consumer looking for?

We believe today’s consumers look for companies and organizations that share their own values. At Firebirds, we believe in giving back to our local communities. Every Firebirds location supports Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation by donating $1.25 from the sale of every Alex’s Fresh Squeezed Lemonade to fund the fight against childhood cancer “one cup at a time.” To date, we have donated more than one million dollars!

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Achieve construction costs while rolling out a new prototype design and meeting overall company goals in growth and Proforma.

Describe a typical day.

Mornings are most productive, so I try to reach the office or at least my computer by 6 a.m. most days. By 9 a.m., the phone activity picks up as well as the scheduled conference calls and meetings. With all of the available technology, there is seldom time when one is unreachable for those needing assistance. Each day is filled with new challenging opportunities creating much self-fulfillment.

Tell us what makes you so unique?

Grilling over a true wood fire in our scratch kitchen, offering personalized service with unexpected delights in a polished environment for real value. CK

One-on-One with... » Alvin Hood

Director of Construction, Firebirds Wood Fired Grill

What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

Taking pride in our team’s efforts in completing a project for any given community and then watching the guests enjoy what we have created.

is to try and always listen and analyze a situation completely before responding. No. 3 is to lead by example. I never ask anyone to do anything that I would not do myself.

What was the best advice you ever received?

What is the true key to success for any manager?

Try to respect others and put yourself in their shoes when evaluating a situation.

Diligence and perseverance.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why.

Recently finished “Conscious Capitalism” by John Mackey.

No. 1 is that “honesty is the best policy.” Provide feedback to team members so that they know the expectations and how they are performing. No. 2

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What book are you reading now?

How do you like to spend your down time? Any activity with my family – just spending quality time together.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


SEARCH without the “noise”

The clear choice for finding the companies & products you need.

Search today! CCR.SearchTheBlueBook.info

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Shine it on

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Striking lighting helps illuminates iconic brew house

F

irestone Walker Brewing Company is a craft brewery based in Paso

Robles, Calif. The brewery has experienced significant success, gaining recognition with a number of international awards for its beers. And it now operates three facilities – the others located in Buellton and Venice.

In fact, the brewery’s growth has required the addition of a new 10,000-squarefoot brew house at its Paso Robles headquarters in order to meet the steep increase in demand for its products. Harris Architecture was mandated to design the new space with the goal of increasing production capacity. As well as being a fully functional brewery, the Paso Robles location also offers tours to visitors, and after an eight-month construction period, the new addition was opened to the public in May 2017. “The whole space has a turn of the century iron works style,” says Kyle Harris, who led the project for Harris Architecture. “There is a lot of galvanized metal and exposed bolts combined with tiling and concrete floors. It’s retro with a tech edge.” The team from Harris worked closely with the Firestone Walker founders to ensure that every element of the new space was on point from a design and usability perspective. Everyone involved in the project was very conscious of choosing the right pieces to present the facility as the iconic, signature location in the Firestone Walker family of facilities. Lighting the space was an important piece of the design. The lighting had to be functional as well as fitting aesthetically with the design intent of the space.

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SHINE IT ON

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

In collaboration with Prudential Lighting Products, the Harris team identified Luminis products as the perfect solution. Luminis’ Torx and Aramis products were chosen. Twelve Torx TR2450 pendants were selected to illuminate the brew deck. The products are decorative and functional ceiling pendants with a frosted acrylic refractor and an LED light source. Delivering more than 12,000 lumens per product, the pendants are ideal for areas where efficiency, reliability and aesthetics are important. To carry the aesthetic throughout the facility, two more were included in the visitor center.

“The whole space has a turn of the century iron works style. There is a lot of galvanized metal and exposed bolts combined with tiling and concrete floors. It’s retro with a tech edge.” – Kyle Harris, Harris Architecture

Four Aramis AR148 pendants were used for additional illumination, while 13 wall-mounted Aramis AR148 luminaires are positioned around the perimeter of the room. Most of the Aramis AR148 wall mounted sconces are in pairs – one as an uplight, and one as a downlight in each pair – providing a striking accent. The 6-inch cylindrical luminaires have an LED light source and deliver 2,050 lumens. “Functionality and performance were key requirements,” Harris says. “The lighting not only delivered on those requirements but also perfectly fit the industrial aesthetic in the rest of the building.”

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Outside of the building, Harris chose Luminis’ Syrios SY602 products, complete with LED light source and unique integral tilting mechanism for precise directional aiming. Used primarily to illuminate the Firestone Walker signage and accent the curved roof, the products really catch the eye. Finally, Eclipse Mini EC612 products illuminate the exterior of the main entrance providing the complete lighting experience from outside to inside – a testament to the wide array of interior and exterior products offered by Luminis. The durable lights, designed to withstand extreme weather conditions, are mounted to the wall either side of the front door and on the columns supporting the covered entry. All of the interior lighting is on a dimming channel, enabling adjustment depending on

“The lighting is industrial, beautiful and functional; not an easy combination to achieve when lighting a modern brew house.” – Firestone Walker co-founder David Walker

the time of day. During the night, brew house lighting is turned up to deliver 100 foot candles of light at floor level to assist with nightly cleaning. In the daytime, the lighting is scaled back to deliver 45-55 foot candles at floor level for standard use. “We did extensive calculations and modelling to make sure the lighting would be at the right level, and that we got the light in the places it was needed,” Harris says. “Inside the brew house the lighting hits the metal and the stainless steel brew tanks, and the results are striking.” The reaction of the client has been well received. “The lighting is industrial, beautiful and functional; not an easy combination to achieve when lighting a modern brew house," says Firestone Walker co-founder David Walker. "It is elegantly done.” CK

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Consistently Bringing Brands to Life Since 1911

E

very year, companies spend millions of dollars on branding. Whether the industry is retail, restaurant or hospitality, a brand communi-

cates the promise of what customers expect from their interaction with a company. From end-users to leasing companies to franchise owners, decisions and investments are made based on the strength of a company’s brand. What makes a brand memorable? Consistency. Logos should be instantly recognizable and messaging should be clearly expressed from literature to digital media to the point of sale.

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BRANDING SUPPLEMENT

Signage is the most high profile visual representation of an organization’s brand story. Each sign should express the brand message with clarity, quality, accuracy and consistency. A reputation for consistency and quality are also important when selecting a sign company. As one of the nation’s top sign companies, Philadelphia Sign has been bringing brands to life for over 100 years. This sign industry leader was launched in 1911 when 18-year old Andrew Paxson Trucksess purchased a sign business for $500. The original signs were hand-painted placards delivered by pushcart. The company’s timeline mirrors the growth of the United States and at

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No Boundaries

times, has reflected the history of the world – from the heyday of neon through war time efforts to the rise of retail chains and multi-site conversions – Philadelphia Sign has been at the forefront over the decades. The changes in the commercial landscape have dictated the need for constant improvements and advances in the sign industry. Corporations with hundreds of nation-wide locations required sign companies that could handle branding programs on a large scale. Philadelphia Sign began production work for multisite gasoline stations in the 1930’s. The company’s proprietary project management system was and remains at the core of its ability to manage the demands of branding for national retail, fast food chains and the banking industry’s multi-site conversion programs. Philadelphia Sign consistently ranks as the number one sign company for large-scale branding and conversions.

Don’t be misled by the company name. Philadelphia Sign is a national company with a geographical reach that extends from coast to coast and around the globe. Our partnership in The International Sign Alliance (TISA – www.tisaglobal.com) expands our borders beyond the US allowing us to serve our clients internationally.

An Industry First: Using Solar Power To Manufacture Signs

The push for greener technology in both materials and production have inspired signage manufacturers to devise better, cleaner, more energy efficient methodologies. Philadelphia Sign began using VOC compliant lead-free paints & coatings and

PHILADELPHIA SIGN HAS LICENSED CREWS ON STAND-BY ACROSS THE COUNTRY TO REPAIR OR REPLACE DAMAGED SIGNS, AND REFRESH WORN OR UNLIT SIGNS. energy saving LED lighting technology in the 1990’s. In 2010, Philadelphia Sign completed a major installation of solar panels on the roof of its main plant, becoming the first and only sign company in the United States to manufacture signs using solar power. The company is committed to consistently making improvements in greener production, recycling, material improvements and technology. Every sign we make is fabricated using renewable solar energy. The 910 kilowatt solar installation is capable of generating 1.1 million kilowatt hours of electricity annually, enough energy to power 900 homes. And, each year the solar panels will offset enough carbon pollution equivalent to 4,700 acres of trees.

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Maintenance and Lighting

A sign company should be just as consistent in its responsiveness to maintenance issues that may arise. Over the past 10 years alone several major weather events have impacted the US, resulting in damage and destruction of property. Facility operators, property management companies and building supervisors are usually some of the first on the scene and are responsible for handling the concerns from building occupants and clients. It’s a fact that damaged or worn signs can have a negative effect on both the brand and the building. That makes quick remediation an imperative. When shopping for a sign company, select one with a department devoted to maintenance and lighting, on a national scale. Philadelphia Sign has licensed crews on stand-by across the country to repair or replace damaged signs, and refresh worn or unlit signs.

High Rise Installations

High-rise signage requires additional considerations; installations at higher elevations have more rigorous material and structural requirements than those on the ground; lighting and illumination must be on point for maximum visibility at greater distances. In 1977, PSCO took to the sky with its first helicopter installation. More recently, we have worked with Chase Bank, Huntington Bank, PSFS, Beneficial, and FMC to name a few. Signs serve as the on-site representation of a brand story. Companies expect that their brand image will be consistently executed with every sign. They rely on commercial construction and renovation firms, and facility managers to protect their brand, and ensure signs are properly displayed and carefully maintained. Choose a nationally respected company like Philadelphia Sign (www.philadelphiasign.com) that will deliver a quality, product, provide responsive service when and where needed: seek out new, greener technologies, and utilize the most efficient methods possible to bring your brand to life.

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Photos courtesy of John Mini Distinctive Landscapes, Congers, NY, Member of the National Association of Landscape Professionals.

5 tips to implement and improve green spaces By Missy Henriksen

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here’s no denying that sustainable, green practices are on the rise within the commercial building space. Let’s face it – technological advances and demographic shifts, including the country’s growing urbanization and the varied lifestyle patterns of Millennials – continue to impact the success of commercial properties in recent years. Forward-thinking concepts like consumer lifestyle centers, sustainable practices, low-impact design and environmentally friendly, green living spaces continue to breathe new life into the evolving commercial industry. To help you find ways to integrate green spaces into your commercial space’s landscape, here are five tips to gain a competitive advantage for your building:

No. 1 – Simplify Your Landscape

Well-designed, manicured landscapes with high quality turf are considered the hallmark of green infrastructures and can add anywhere from 15 to 20 percent to a property’s overall value and boost rental rates in multifamily units.

No. 2 – Treat Your Trees

Although it might seem obvious, a simple way to enhance your building’s existing green spaces is to properly maintain and prune well-established trees throughout each season to ensure their longterm health. Trees lend value to a property – both for beauty and functions – by reducing noise and giving off oxygen. They also add monetary value. Depending on size, species and condition, trees can increase the value of a commercial property, save money in annual energy costs, and reduce building energy demands for heating and cooling by providing shade in the summer and protecting buildings from harsh winds in the winter.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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GREEN THUMB No. 3 – Water Wisely

In an effort to go green and reduce water consumption, many contractors and developers are taking appropriate steps to install irrigation systems and harness storm water volume to design and install bioswales. These shallow trenches filled with vegetation help retain water runoff and reintroduce it back into the soil. Oftentimes, bioswales and rain gardens can be installed to work with a properties’ existing plants. If you are looking for a quick fix, keep in mind there are many low-cost projects that can significantly lessen the environmental impact of a commercial property’s green spaces. Simple changes can enhance your property’s sustainability, all the while reducing costs and increasing bottom lines.

No. 4 – Reinvent Your Roof

When designing renovations in an existing landscape, the most important factor is functionality. Before the detailed work begins, it is crucial to have a strong understanding of how the space is currently being used and how it can be improved. If your commercial building is limited in outdoor space, consider integrating interactive green roofs or walls – vegetative layers lining a building’s roof or walls – that can provide many benefits to commercial spaces, including the production of oxygen, cooling for the building and reduction of storm water runoff.

No. 5 – Get Serious

Once your green infrastructure’s landscape, sustainability practices and green spaces are up to par, consider obtaining eco-certifications that will take your property to the next level. The most widely used green building rating system is having a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. It has been shown to increase occupancy rates in office buildings and rental rates in residential buildings alike. CCR

Missy Henriksen is VP of public affairs for the National Association of Landscape Professionals. To learn more, visit LoveYourLandscape.org.

Photo credits: (Top photo) Photos courtesy of The Davey Tree Expert Company, Greenville, DE, Member of the National Association of Landscape Professionals. (First left photo) Photos courtesy of John Mini Distinctive Landscapes, Congers, NY, Member of the National Association of Landscape Professionals. (Bottom left photo) Photo courtesy of Heritage Landscape Services, LLC, Sterling, VA, Member of the National Association of Landscape Professionals. (Top right photo) Photo courtesy of Town and Gardens Ltd., Long Island, NY, Member of the National Association of Landscape Professionals. (Bottom right photo) Photos courtesy of John Mini Distinctive Landscapes, Congers, NY, Member of the National Association of Landscape Professionals

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WINTER 2017

ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

SUPPLEMENT

Shields up Army Corps builds foundation for resiliency

A special supplement to:

ALSO:

Design, products and expertise collide to help McCarran Airport International gate expansion project land on time


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Shields up Army Corps builds foundation for resiliency

N

By JoAnne Castagna

estled in the Sandy Hook Bay, the community of Port Monmouth, N.J. has experienced flooding, blizzards and major storms that have swept through the area throughout the

years. It’s Atlantic hurricane season once again, and lifelong Port Monmouth resident Charles Rogers reminisces about storms that have battered the area and his experiences. “My father placed me on his shoulders and walked through 4 feet of water to take me to my grandmother’s house during the hurricane of 1944,” Rogers says. The “1944 Great Atlantic Hurricane” was a destructive and powerful tropical cyclone that swept across a large portion of the East Coast in September of that year. During Hurricane Donna in 1960, the area was evacuated, and Rogers and his entire family were transported by the U.S. Coast Guard via an amphibious vehicle to the firehouse to safety. “In 2012, Hurricane Sandy placed almost 4 feet of water in my house and 6 feet in my cellar, and we lost our heating, electric, food and personal items,” he says. The outlook on future storms is much brighter for Rogers due to the Port Monmouth Flood Risk Management Project being performed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. Rogers says it’s an important project to protect Port Monmouth residents. The Corps, in partnership with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Bureau of Coastal Engineering, is working on this project to make the community more resilient during future storm flooding and surge.

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • SHIELDS UP

To help with this resiliency, the Corps decided to include an environmentally friendly soil stabilization process that has never been used by the Corps before on a flood risk management project. The process makes the project stronger, improves the community’s quality of life and saves tax-dollars. The project area is made up of low lying salt and freshwater marsh, and there are many residential and commercial structures sitting right on or near this marshland. Erosion over the years has removed much of the natural beachfront and dune complexes that provided coastal protection to the community from storm surge. Hurricane Sandy further exacerbated the problem by causing millions of dollars in damages, destroying 750 homes and businesses in Port Monmouth alone. The project includes two phases

of work that together will reduce the risk of flooding throughout the entire community. The first phase was completed in 2015 and provides storm risk reduction from the Sandy Hook Bay. This work included building up and widening the shoreline, constructing a 15-foot high protective dune – spanning a mile and half long, and constructing a new stone groin perpendicular to the shoreline. A groin structure extends out from the shore into the water, interrupting water flow and limiting the movement of sand, to prevent beach erosion and increase resiliency. In addition, a fishing pier was extended 195 feet and walking paths were built to provide the public access to the beach area. The second phase is in progress and will provide a line of defense surrounding Port Monmouth. The work includes constructing a concrete floodwall – the length of almost 22 football fields – to reduce flooding from the Pews Creek to the west and the Compton Creek to the east. A floodwall is a vertical barrier designed to temporarily contain the waters of a river or other waterway that may rise to unusual levels during seasonal or extreme weather events. Additionally, pump stations, road closure gates and a tide gate at Pews Creek will be constructed. A pump station pumps or drains water from low lying land, and tide gates allow water to flow freely under normal conditions

The outlook on future storms is much brighter due to the Port Monmouth Flood Risk Management Project being performed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District.

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • SHIELDS UP

“I personally believe this project is a big plus for the residents of Port Monmouth. This project should cut those losses by at least 95 percent and our residents can sleep better at night.”

There are numerous benefits to this and close automatically to prevent flood process, but the biggest benefactor is the waters from flooding a community. surrounding community that sits just a few In addition, a system of levees will be hundred feet from the project area. constructed. A levee is an embankment This process eliminates the need for designed to prevent flooding. The ones being over 1,750 tri-axle trucks trips, carrying constructed need a strong foundation. The land wet, mucky and odorous material, through is made up of low lying salt and freshwater residential streets. marsh that is not strong and very saturated, “When this process was put on the so this soil needs to be removed and replaced table it sounded good then,” says Rogers, an with better soil to construct upon. active member of the Port Monmouth com“Typically, it’s cost effective to remove munity. “Anytime you can use what is there and replace the unsuitable soil, but in the and not have large truck loads of materials New York and New Jersey region it’s a running up and down the roads you save different story,” says David Gentile, project money. It’s a big plus for the project, the manager, New York District, U.S. Army Corps residents and the environment.” of Engineers. Ken Johnson, engineer with the Corps’ “In urban areas it’s hard to find disposNew York District, says that less trucks al sites, so the soil would have to be picked – Port Monmouth resident Charles Rogers means the local roads and bridges are up by trucks and transported to a location spared from possible damage. “There is less that can accept it and new more suitable air pollution, noise complaints are greatly reduced and there is an soil trucked in, which is expensive, especially since we are moving a overall savings of landfill space along with financial savings.” mountain of material,” Gentile says. Gentile says the public is very supportive of the project and Gentile decided to move forward with a cost effective solution tax-payers will save an estimated $700 thousand. The project is for the soil that has never been accomplished before by the Corps on expected to be completed by 2020 and designed to provide flood a flood risk management project. protection that can withstand another Hurricane Sandy. “I personally believe this project is a big plus for the resiThe 'Situ Soil Stabilization' Solution dents of Port Monmouth,” Rogers says. “Over the years this area This solution is a process called “In Situ Soil Stabilization.” Instead of has suffered large dollar losses in property, homes and vehicles removing and replacing the marsh soil, this process allows engineers due to floods from hurricanes and storms. This project should cut to leave the soil where it is. A material, such as common Portland those losses by at least 95 percent and our residents can sleep cement and water is mixed with the existing soil to strengthen the better at night.” FC porous marsh soil, creating an impermeable foundation for a levee. Dr. JoAnne Castagna is a Public Affairs Specialist and writer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. She can be reached at joanne.castagna@usace.army.mil.

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION

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Design, products and expertise collide to help McCarran Airport International gate expansion project land on time

cCarran International Airport in Las Vegas has been taking off for decades. Opened in 1948, the airport has experienced enormous growth and has undergone numerous significant expansions. In fact, McCarran is known for its continuous expansions and upgrades, tripling in size between 1981 and 2005. “We like to stay ahead of pace,” says McCarran International Airport Project ManagBy Greg er Todd Cooklin. “There was a clear growth opportunity to expand international tourism for Las Vegas. Direct international flights lead to global visitors choosing Las Vegas as the launching pad for their U.S. visit. The challenge was our city has grown around the airport so we had to be creative in how we designed the International Gate Expansion Project, and do it efficiently to minimize interruptions for the airlines.” In February 2016, the $51 million International Gate Expansion project kicked off with an aggressive timeline of 14 months. The design included improvements to the airport’s $2.4 billion Terminal 3, expanding international gates from seven to 14, and building an underground tunnel connecting McCarran’s D gates directly to the U.S. Customs and

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Border Protection passenger arrival facility. The tunnel is under one of the main taxi lanes and features moving walkways, escalators and elevators. “When constructing a tunnel, it’s one thing when it is a transit tunnel for vehicles," says Martin-Harris Construction superintendent Dennis Maestas. "A tunnel to transport people presents many challenging details. First and foremost there is zero tolerance for Austin water in the structure.” To ensure the high level of required water tightness, McCarran’s team selected GCP Applied Technologies to be a one-stop shop for waterproofing the tunnel. “With our tight timeline we had no room for delays," Cooklin says. "We needed partners and providers that would be with us every step of the way.”

Design advantage

The GCP team worked directly with the McCarran management team, architecture firm Gensler & Associates, waterproofing consultant CDC Inc., and general contractor Martin-Harris Construction to walk through details and drawings.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • BOARDING CALL

There were pre-construction meetings to go over specifications and details, minimize unforeseen challenges with the drawings and prep the project to be managed efficiently in the field. “From blueprint to build, there was an excellent process of working from the design phase to completion of the project,” says Martin-Harris Construction superintendent Dennis Maestas. In addition to meeting all aspects of the project’s design, the International Gate Expansion also required working with McCarran’s owner, the Clark County Department of Aviation, to meet its requirements. Specifically, the Department had requirements on the specifications of the concrete being used to construct the tunnel.

Unlike some conventional membranes that are vulnerable to water penetration at junctions and penetrations, the membrane creates a seal with the concrete to prevent any entry or migration of moisture around the structure. The vertical walls of the tunnel were constructed using a high performance, flexible, preformed waterproof membrane. After the walls were installed, a GCP's Bituthene Deck System was used on the lid of the tunnel. It was first installed as a fluid-applied leveling course, followed by a layer of a waterproofing membrane. In addition to being high performing, the membranes are able to be electronically tested to verify water tightness and they are well suited for the extreme variations in the Las Vegas climate,” says CDC Inc. manager Michael Lee. “During the day it can be 102 degrees and then drop to 40 degrees at night. GCP’s products have a high tolerance for the dramatic swing in temperatures.”

Intelligence in the field

CalPortland, the concrete provider for the tunnel project, used GCP admixtures to meet the Department’s delivery time limitations and low shrinkage requirements. Mark Bliss, CalPortland director of quality control Mark Bliss, says as with any government project, additional inspections and requirements come into play. During one inspection, the Department of Aviation even commented on how it liked the concrete mix and how well it was working.

Proven product performance

For the International Gate Expansion Project, a pre-applied waterproofing system was again selected to deliver the extreme water tightness required for the tunnel transporting international passengers. The product was used on the underslab of the entire concrete floor of the underground tunnel. The unique multi-layered composite waterproofing sheets, made from a chemically resistant HDPE film, provide a weather resistant protective coating that allows the membrane to fully adhere to freshly poured concrete and prevent water tracking.

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Once construction began, GCP was on the tarmac to provide complete site support. Field technicians collaborated with all teams overseeing installation, answering questions, sharing insight and providing recommendations. “We had a representative here at least once a week guiding us and ensuring everything was installed properly,” Cooklin says. “When they were not onsite, we would simply text them a photo with a question and would usually have an answer back within an hour. This kind of partnership was vital in maintaining our timeline.” “As the waterproofing consultant on the project, we always consider the manufacturer’s ability to be able to provide technical support when selecting a waterproofing system,” Lee says. “The quality of GCP’s support, both from their technical office staff and their field staff was a major factor in our decision to utilize a GCP waterproofing system on this difficult project.”

Ready for the world

In June 2017 McCarran welcomed its first direct international flights to the International Gate Expansion. McCarran now has double the number of gates available to international air carriers, serving additional visitors from around the world. The seven reconfigured gates are able to handle wide-body jetliners typically used by international carriers, including the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. One of the gates is fitted with a dual-level bridge to handle the double-decked Airbus A380. With more than 50 airport projects completed, GCP continues to innovate and be the choice for airport construction and structures across the globe. FC

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

For the Craft Brewing Professional

Co-Founder Michael Oxton at the Taproom

Made in Boston How Night Shift Brewing became one of Beantown’s favorite craft breweries

PLUS: Let’s face it – sometimes new product fail. But when they hit, the rewards are worth the ride. CBAM looks at which came first – and why it matters


insights

79 The percent of customers who want brands to “understand and care about” them, according to “How to Know Your Customers Better Than They Know Themselves” by Semarchy. Interestingly, 56 percent are loyal to brands that deeply understand their priorities and preferences, the study found.

The way of the Millennial Millennials, right? Is it any wonder that every brand works overtime to try and figure out what makes them tick? And here’s the thing – while they’re shopping and engaging more, they’re doing it differently ways than past generations. For example, 39 percent post reviews of products or brands, according to data compiled by MergeIn. In addition, 48 percent say they try to use brands of companies that are active in supporting social causes, with 45 percent saying environmental stewardship is more important now than what it was two years ago, the data found.

“We look to the employees and give them recognition. We are giving them the opportunity to put their imprint on the program, which makes it more compelling.” – Bart Casabona, director of social media at Pitney Bowes, on why more companies are enlisting employees to create an army of branding ambassadors

Book Rec Building a StoryBrand: Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen By Donald Miller

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Donald Miller’s StoryBrand process is pretty straightforward. When it comes to providing a solution for companies discussing their brands, his method works. Miller’s revolutionary process for connecting with customers provides readers with the ultimate competitive advantage, revealing the secret for helping their customers understand the compelling benefits of using their products, ideas or services. How does he do it? Building a StoryBrand teaching readers universal story points all humans respond to – the real reason customers make purchases; how to simplify a brand message so people understand it; and how to create the most effective messaging for websites, brochures and social media. Whether you’re the marketing director of a multibillion dollar company, the owner of a craft brew brand or the lead singer of a rock band, Building a StoryBrand will forever transform the way you talk about who you are, what you do and the unique value you bring to your customers. It’s the story every craft brewer should read.

CRAFT BRAND AND MARKETING

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017

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Night Shift Taproom

Photography by: Tim Oxton / Night Shift Brewing

Made in Boston How the Night Shift Brewing brand became one of Beantown’s favorite craft breweries

On the streets where everyone The Night Shift Brewing knows the Night Shift Brewing founders eventually moved their brand, the story of its auspicious operations out of that Somerville beginnings is well known. A trio of kitchen. Today, with more than friends in a kitchen in Somerville, 60 team members, including Mass., took a 5-gallon boil kettle, bartenders, brewers, salespeople a Gatorade cooler mash tun and and microbiologists, the beer is some basic starter recipes, and one of the New England area’s By Michael J. Pallerino started dabbling in a little homegrandest obsessions. brewing. In 2007, before the craft brewing phenomOperating from a 30,000-square-foot facility in Evenon became a worldwide obsession, they slowly erett, Mass, the Night Shift Brewing story continues started to refine their process, tweak the recipes and to enhance it legendary status. With its wide array upgrade their equipment. of unique, complex flavors, the Night Shift name Before long, they found themselves up past midnight remains at the center of the craft brewing explosion. brewing two to three times a week. Office workers by Craft Brewing and Marketing sat down with day, they became homebrewers by night. That initial Night Shift Brewing co-founder Michael Oxton to dabbling of recipes is now one of the Boston areas get his thoughts on why his brand is helping lead favorite craft brews. the craft brewing charge and what the future holds.

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CBAM-MAG.COM


Give us a snapshot of today's craft brew market from your perspective. The craft beer industry has been growing and developing so quickly that change is really the biggest constant. Every day there are new businesses on the scene, new trends developing and more opportunities to engage with the larger community. It’s an exciting and challenging task to consistently stand out from the crowd.

What trends are defining the space?

cans multiple times. Our production team stays on top of what’s new in the brewing world, and that beer is a great example of how we got in on the New England IPA craze early.

What is the Night Shift story from a brand perspective? Night Shift Brewing is a company born from experimentation and curiosity, and we’ve never been shy about sharing the real stories behind the beer we’re producing. Our new projects, our personal interests, our mistakes – none of it is meant to be kept a mystery. You can see this in our dedication to quality – our willingness to dump beer that isn’t up to our standards and our fierce advocacy for freshness. As we’ve grown, that ethos has stayed, but we’re talking about bigger things nowadays. Topics

Telling a coherent story and cultivating a cohesive image is where a lot of breweries are focusing their energy. Since most of us are operating across so many mediums – taprooms, social media, product packaging – there are a lot of opportunities to showcase who you are. When it comes to branding and graphic design, that often means building a consistent tone and a set of visuals rather than just taking each project independently. We’re hoping that a craft beer drinker can see our work from afar and immediately recognize it as Night Shift Brewing. On the production side, we always aim for a balance of quality and innovation. We’re fine-tuning new recipes all the time – from mixed fermentation sours brewed with lactose sugar, to fruited double IPAs, to traditional German styles like zwickelbier and schwarzbier. More often than not, Brewer Brett Kennison at work breweries are barrel-aging, using wild yeast strains and producing hoppy beer all at the same time. In response, conlike sustainable growth, quality control decisions sumers are showing up to taprooms to try an array around different packaging formats, and the Masof styles instead of just their go-to. sachusetts distribution system are all on our minds. We don’t focus on chasing trends, but we do The sense of excitement and transparency try to adopt new processes and drive industry upon which we were founded hasn’t left. More innovation. When it comes to small-batch reresources simply means more innovative opporleases, we’re able to express a specific idea or tunities, so we’re continuing to push forward with inspiration through our products. A great examrecipe development and new brewing processes. ple is Fluffy – a New England IPA. The recipe Those initiatives are born from that continual sense was originally created by one of our production of curiosity, but we’ve improved our capacity and managers, Anna Jobe, to highlight a soft and capability to tackle them. pillowy mouthfeel. We released it on draft at our Over time, we’ve added incredible people to our taproom and it resonated with our fans in a big team while keeping our core values intact, ensuring way – so much so that we’ve brought it back in a consistent, strong brand identity and culture.

The craft beer industry has been growing and developing so quickly that change is really the biggest constant.

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(Top left) Small-batch IPAs from Night Shift, (Far left bottom) NSB beer about to go out for distribution, (Inside bottom left) Two mixed fermentation sours from Night Shift’s Weisse series, (Above) Brewer Craig Kennison at work

Walk us through your branding strategy. The strategy starts with high-quality beer. Without that, we’re not telling a story worth standing behind. The passions and expertise of our production crew are a big part of who the company is, and their work is the basis for the vision we’re sharing with the world. From there, we share that vision in our Taproom by empowering our staff to educate the customers about our products, while enhancing their experience through exceptional hospitality. On the partnerships front, we put a lot of effort into making sure that our distribution partners are strong advocates for our work. The more effectively we can communicate the story and vision to them, the easier it is to ensure that the end-consumer is impacted by it. Our visual branding is all about storytelling. A lot of our visual identity is centered around our hop owl logo, which began as a quick sketch of mine back in 2009 for our homebrew labels, and we keep that front and center as often as possible. It’s a reminder of our nocturnal homebrewing roots and a great way to share our company’s history. Outside of that, we try to experiment as much as possible, while still creating recognizable themes like our Weisse series and our small-batch IPAs (Fluffy, Timber!, Craigerator, etc). At the end of the day, we use our branding to highlight our values and the stories we see at Night Shift on a daily basis. If a label, poster or design can help showcase the inspiration happening behind the scenes, then it’s a job well done.

Talk about your distribution strategy. We self-distributed right out of the gate in 2012, and that independence has always been a huge part

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of the Night Shift identity. It started with us driving around with bottles and plastic kegs in the back of a Subaru Outback, and eventually grew to the point where we had multiple box trucks delivering cans and (non-plastic) kegs of Night Shift around the city. Night Shift Distributing was started with the goal of disrupting the distribution scene in Massachusetts. Our team was frustrated by archaic franchise laws that lock in brewers for eternity, and we knew that others shared our frustration. So, we started the distribution company to offer fellow craft breweries a like-minded distribution partner with a strong focus on beer quality and freshness, brand control, and customer service. NSD is for brewers, by brewers and now operates as its own separate company – striving to create a better craft distribution landscape here in our home state of MA

What's the biggest issue today related to the marketing/sales side of the craft beer business today? Standing out. Everyone is trying to share their message and break new ideas first without just adding to the noise. It’s inspirational and motivating, but it’s also a challenge that every marketing and sales person in the industry is constantly aware of. Having an identity that customers understand, and branding that they recognize makes all the difference when there are 15 different local IPAs on the shelf. Our job is to maintain connections with our loyal fan base while creating new connections with an audience of potential fans. A customer purchasing their first four-pack of Night Shift today should feel like they're joining an exciting chapter in the Night Shift story just as some of our very first

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customers did back in 2012. That’s really hard to maintain, but it's so important.

What is the secret to creating a branding story that consumers can buy in to? Jury’s still out on whether it’s a secret, but we’ve always relied on honesty and keeping an open dialogue. No one is interested in seeing another ad that is forced upon them or digesting another insincere marketing campaign. Be yourself, share your passions, and don’t be afraid to eat some humble pie when things go wrong. If your product is great and your dedication is earnest, the community will respond to your work. When they respond, listen. Listen to the people who come into your taproom or write to you on social media, and take what they say seriously. Branding is absolutely a dialogue, not a monologue, with your consumers.

What is the one thing that every craft beer brand should be doing in the way of marketing? It’s hard to say that there’s one cover-all strategy, but making sure your employees are a part of the

message can’t be understated. Everyone needs to buy-in and really believe in the brand, otherwise, it’ll be just another job versus a passion and your fans will feel that. Whether you’re sourcing information from taproom staff, featuring different employees on social media or just posting quick, easy Instagram stories about your staff’s day-to-day, it’s always smart to keep your marketing people-centric. At the end of the day, a personal touch is often what builds the relationship with a lifelong supporter.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead? Right now, it’s growing the Night Shift brand in our Massachusetts wholesale market. This means a huge focus on consumer education and awareness, strong partnerships and cohesive branding.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Nailing down our 2018 release calendar. Got some exciting beer on the horizon.

Drinks with Night Shift Brewing co-founder Michael Oxton What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Growing our company with the amazingly talented team of people that we’ve built around us. And drinking our delicious beer with them at the end of the day.

What was the best advice you ever received? From my dad: “If you wake up to find yourself in a gray jacket and gray pants, carrying a gray briefcase, heading out to your gray car, on your way to your gray office, make a change. Don’t live a gray life.”

When I was a kid, my dad had this realization one morning on the way to work. He promptly quit his office job to start what eventually became a successful photography business with my mom. Gotta follow the passion. I did the same right before founding NSB. I left my cubicle job to build a brewery with Mike and Rob on a shoestring budget, a crazy dream, and plenty of passion. Haven't looked back. Don't live a gray life. From Allagash’s Rob Todd: “Be relentless about improving. When you see trash, pick it up. The little things matter. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Smile. Listen.”

What's the best thing a customer ever said to you? “Can we volunteer to help around the brewery?” – three customers at our first tasting in 2012. All brothers. They now all work for us as full-time brewers.

What is your favorite brand story? The first batch of our flagship New England pale ale, Whirlpool, was a total experiment. We brewed it into a non-jacketed, room temperature brite tank and just let it free rise ferment. We ended up with a few sixtels and zero idea how it would taste. It was ridiculously good, and customers loved it. We sold out almost immediately, brewed it again in a bigger batch, and Whirlpool took off from there. It tastes a lot better today than that first batch, but those bright citrus flavors and soft, sessionable qualities were there from the beginning.

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branding

By Eric Balinski

Odds: 3,000 to 1 Let's face it –sometimes new product fail. But when they hit, the rewards are worth the ride.

Many times people, as well meaning as they may be, just can’t tell you what to make, but they will assure you they are right if you listen to them.

“Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza.” – Humorist and writer Dave Barry

A fitting quote to start this article on new product innovation, as my last article used pizza as a metaphor to discuss how to grow the craft beer market. Odds are as a craft brewer, you go to bed at night dreaming of creating a brew that will start a new trend or push you to the front of a current craft beer trend. At this year's "Great American Beer Festival" in Boulder, Colo., some brewer’s dreams played out, with awards in 98 categories of beer, covering 161 different beer styles. Let’s face it though – creating new products is a tough game. In general, most new products fail. Studies suggest greater than 80 percent fail. One study on new product development found, for every one idea that turns into a commercial success (it makes money and pays for the investment), it takes at least 3,000 ideas being vetted before the one that finally succeeds. That’s a lot of thinking, sweat, frustration and failure along the way to success. Product innovators tend to fall into one of two broad categories: The Inventor – typically one

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person whose own ingenuity guiding force behind experimenting until he hits upon something people like or need. Thomas Edison is a great example of a genius. The other type is the Plotters – this tends to start with a team that methodically follows a plan, charts each step, analyzes results and adjusts until they achieve the desired end result. Most large companies follow a regimented process like this because they have more faith in a process than creative genius. They also claim more success than they actually achieve, which is why many of them will buy a smaller more creative competitor, as is occurring in the craft beer industry. Both approaches have merit, so it’s not uncommon to see some blending of the two, though one will dominate within a company more than the other because of a company’s culture, leadership and talent. Whatever your approach, it all starts with generating an idea. Typically, there are several common areas that spark product ideas and innovation. They include Trends, People and Vision. Here is a brief overview on each:

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Trends Innovators often study and follow trends. Craft beer is a trend in itself, with trends within the craft beer trend. Forecasted trends for 2018 suggest brewers will make and consumers will drink more: botanicals beers, wild and sour beers, barrel aged beers and hazy IPAs. This is terrific up to the point that you realize every craft brewer is aware of these trends. Following trends does not mean you are guaranteed to succeed, as most of your peers are following them, too. Let’s not forget either that following trends brought us beverage failures such as New Coke, Coors Rocky Mountain Sparkling Water, and Zima. Trends often do provide an initial hint of a new product, and for that reason alone are worth your attention.

People Innovators often follow their customers, employees or thought leaders ideas as the source of news ideas and products. The voice of the customer/employee/thought leader can have wonderful insights. Yet, many times, people can only articulate what

they like or don’t like, giving little useable insights to effectively shape a new product’s direction. Many times, people, as well meaning as they may be, just can’t tell you what to make, but they will assure you they are right if you listen to them.

Vision People wake up with a dream and a new idea. Or maybe while mowing the yard or walking the dog, the big idea hits them. Often and unexpectedly, something triggers an inspiring vision of possibilities. Perhaps the most renowned inventor who possessed the gift of vision was Leonardo da Vinci, though even he would be shocked that a painting of his sold this month for $450 million. Most likely this is also how many craft brewers started and built their business. Based upon an insightful vision backed by passion for a style or flavor, they thought they could do better, and thus launched their brewery. Bravo and many more sweet brew dreams. While these three sources of new ideas are worth tapping, it has been my experience many new products

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are also seeded by unlikely sources. Unfortunately, one’s own beliefs can blind one to recognizing and using these sources to create new products. Allow me to give an example: A former client made ingredients that imparted unique characteristics into their customer’s end products. They were a well-established pioneer in the field with current revenue, making them a large mid-sized company. But they were frustrated that all their new ingredients innovations fell flat with their customers. In other words, after years of spending considerable money on new products, none of their customers bought any of their latest stuff. A conversation with the team revealed they had segmented their customers into five distinctive buyer groups, each with different needs for ingredients. For logical reasons, the team only introduced new ingredients to their important, biggest or most lucrative customers, because the team thought they would best appreciate the new ingredients. They didn’t. Ever. The team also had one odd-ball customer group considered to be low value. As we discussed what made them odd, the light bulb went off that their least favored customer group might have the most potential use for the new product ingredients. With nothing to lose, they dusted off 10 years’ worth of new products and introduced them to the odd-balls, who themselves had customers eager for new products. The odd balls had terrific success with the new ingredients and launched new product after new product based upon the old developments. Not surprising, once low value oddball customers succeeded, they created a trend with the important, biggest and most lucrative customers buying the ingredients, too. The result for the company was an amazing amount of increased sales, doubling its size in only five years, all based upon old new products.

Innovators often follow their customers, employees or thought leaders ideas as the source of news ideas and products.

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These product successes resulted only after people in the company, considered customers outside their traditional sweet spots. This dynamic is not exclusive to this company or industry. Why? People creating new products tend to talk with people they know, people who currently buy the most, people they like, and people that are liked minded. As Leonardo da Vinci said, “The greatest deception men suffer is from their own opinions.” While there is great value in an aligned team, like-mindedness can and does affect new products successes, not always for the better. Continue watching trends, talking with current customers and employees, hoping for a vision to hit, but don’t settle there. Here’s what you should also do to find insightful inspiration that could create new products for your brewery: • Talk to and hang around people you don’t sell to or sell very little to. • Study people who are not like you, don’t think like you do and people you may not agree with. • Go to places that aren’t centered on craft beer, like a winery, a martini bar or places where people gather to have a good time, but where craft beer may not be the featured attraction, or even sold. • Don’t be afraid to take some of your old new products that “failed” with your customers and introduce them to completely different customer groups. • When all else fails, look way outside your industry. “I do condition my hair with honey and beer. I smell like the bottom of a beer barrel for for days afterward, but it's very good for the hair." – Catherine Zeta-Jones My hunch is there are plenty of idea sources for new products that brewers are not tapping into. The counter-culture, edgy look and feel of brewers’ websites and social media pages suggests an industry norm, all the more reason to step outside these norms to find new ideas. As Peter Drucker said, “If you want something new, you have to stop doing something old.” Eric Balinski is the owner of Synection, LLC, which is a strategy and growth consultancy firm. For more information, visit: synection.com.

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By Eric Johnson

marketing

Your marketing toolbox Making choices with variety packs Revolution Brewing is a winner. Combining more than one beer style in a 12- or 15-pack format isn’t revolutionary. It has been done for decades by both big beer and craft brewers. Variety packs can be advantageous in grabbing more shelf space. They offer potential for expanding the palates of customers already familiar with your flagship brand. In today’s ultra-competitive marketplace, how would you get your variety pack to stand out – if you make the decision to even launch one. Time for some serious brand strategy considerations. In Craft Beer & Marketing issue No. 3, we featured Revolution Brewing in Chicago. We shared its unique story as well as its insights on contemporary market conditions. The trend toward bigger packaging received a mention from Doug Veliky, CFO/CMO of Revolution, as did its “League of Heroes Series (LoH)” of rotating IPAs. Recently, we had the pleasure of a follow-up visit with Doug and Revolution, which led to taking home the latest edition in the “League of Heroes.” Net result, a remarkable experience. Equally impressive were the brews themselves, as well as the multiple branding choices surrounding them. All are worthy of review. Let’s look at how this variety pack became the No. 1 seller in the Chicago market (per IRI stats). As Veliky mentioned, “League of Heroes” offered many opportunities for expression. For Rev’s brewers, LoH is a platform for them to work with newer hops. For Rev’s branding team, the series cuts loose the inner comic and superhero geek within. There were multiple inspirations all coming together in “League of Heroes.”.

The Beer Rev fans are knowledgeable and discriminating consumers. They have high expectations of Revolution, especially with regards to freshness. The “League of Heroes” series brews are all single-hop varieties (for example: Galaxy, Mosaic, Amarillo, etc.). All are

canned within a couple days of each other. Twelve packs are hand-packed and issued in short runs every two weeks. The date of the oldest can is stamped on the carton. That’s a serious commitment to freshness.

The Brand Concept “League of Heroes” is a concept extension of Revolution’s earlier “Heroes” series of specialty IPAs. “Heroes” issues have been one brew per six-pack format. They have been marketed as seasonal with rotation every two to three months. The “League of Heroes” concept was created with the comparative experience in mind. Each 12-pack contains four different IPAs. Always included is the Anti-Hero flagship brand. The past November was the third release of the League 12-pack. Each features a different mix than earlier issues. Over the year, the “League of Heroes” issues stand as an educational experience in hopped styles.

The Imagery Revolution’s visual expression of brand identity has been rich in comic book style characters from the beginning. Just look at The General featured on Anti-Hero IPA. The Heroes series of characters started when Revolution was asked to do a brew for C2E2, the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo. Galaxy Hero came first. The other characters in The League just rolled on from there. And by the way, Rev’s Anti-Hero can made the Top 10 in Russ Phillips 2014 book, titled “Canned! Artwork of the Modern American Beer Can.”

The Finish “League of Heroes” is a verified success story for Revolution Brewing. Innovation in brewing and branding. What’s your variety pack story? What might it be?

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Leadership

By Eric Johnson

Music and Beer CBAM looks at which came first – and why it matters

Photo by: Tim McLaughlin of Hapless Guitar Photography

Which came first, the music or the beer? It depends on who you are. The answer may differ by circumstances of the moment. We asked that question to our Chicagoland friends, a group of craft brew aficionados that includes brewery founders, musical artists and retail establishments known for supporting both. Separately interviewed, it was as if we were in the same room hoisting brews. Not so coincidentally, same

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shared community. The collective answers were resounding. Beer and music are exceedingly intertwined, almost inseparable. Together, they enrich our lives. For Alan Cromwell, co-founder of Blue Island Beer Co., beer and music are life threads. Same for John Condron, a Chicago-based singer/songwriter/ producer and former co-owner of a pub renown for support of craft brewers. Likewise, Jeff Julian, co-founder of the indie rock band, The Vaudevileins.

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place with industrial, mercantile roots back to the 1830s. The Cal Sag Channel of the old Illinois Michigan Canal still runs barge traffic through it today. Before Prohibition, there were seven breweries here. Blue Island Beer, founded 2 1/2 years ago is the first one since. For Al Cromwell, the roots of inspiration for Blue Island Beer came from coffee. Not the beverage actually, but the local coffeehouse scene of some decades back. As an artistically-inclined young person, Cromwell gravitated to those places. “I was a punk-edged rock ‘n’ roller," Cromwell says. "Way back, we had a band called The Seventies. It was a double-entendre of our birth years and musical style. At that time, Al Cromwell, Blue Island Beer Co. coffeehouses were where it was at. They were places for art, music, and conversation to happen. I had some older friends touring California and they came back sharing great experiences. Places like that are rare now. Coffee got corporate. We lost something when it did. In founding Blue Island Beer, one of our goals has been to create that type of cultural epicenter that didn’t exist anymore.” For John Condron, his early life was all about the music. Condron is a city boy. Raised in one of northeast

He also is an occasional home brewer and full-time communications director for a non-profit organization. Throughout our interviews, as well as ones with other artists, we heard the same phrases describing their inspirations and endeavors. Authentic. Personal. Experiential. Expressive. Localized. Intentional. Hard-working. Blue Island is a small city 16 miles south of the Chicago loop, population 25,000. It’s a working-class

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Philadelphia’s many working-class neighborhoods, ChicagoLand and Craft Brew came much later. “I’ve been traveling in some capacity or another for over 30 years," Condron says. "My earliest exposure to what’s now considered craft was at out of town gigs. Beerwise, we’d always ask for something local. It was all about the experience. Stuff we couldn’t get back home. Like finding local food fare. When out of town friends played in town, it was the same. We insisted they have Philly Cheese Steaks.”

Blue Island Beer is unique in ChicagoLand for its consistent support of musical artists, especially being a smaller, stand-alone brewery. Condron and Julian have each performed at Blue Island. Word is spreading among circles of regionally-touring artist friends that Blue Island can be a great gig. It can also be source of well-crafted brews and multi-sensory evening for both local patrons as well as performers.

Not surprising for a “communications” professional, Jeff Julian is articulate and multi-talented. To that, he demurs, in amusement. “I’m a believer that one should fail in many things in life," Julian says. "I’ve failed well in a variety of arts over the years, including creative writing, music, brewing, and the spoken word. Beer is much easier to drink than make. Like Al, I’m a fan of the coffeehouse scene. A few good ones are still out there. Like John, I’ve always hungered for the richness of local experience.”

•C  romwell: Our goal is to make great beer. But as a local small business, it’s more than that. We promote product and experience. We attract people willing to pay for quality and be part of something more than a beer. It’s synergistic. Here, you can share an evening with friends. You can be part of a fund-raiser for a local Bluegrass festival. Stretch your musical awareness. We host artists doing everything from Irish to avant-garde, to spoken word, to hip hop from Nashville. It’s become an organic evolution. • Condron: Blue Island is special. They are so intentional in what they do. Much greater attention to lights, sound, stage placement, etc. Beer, too, of course. What they do gives musicians the best shot at their performance art. Brewers tend to be supportive of musicians, especially original ones. We’re kindred craft with deep connections. • Julian: Music and beer are risky propositions. We both have such competition. Is there a need for another IPA? Another rock ‘n’ roll band? Every chord progression has been done. Every beer style made. We’re spoiled for choice for both in Chicago, really. But, there’s still room for expression, for peak experience. Brew and music are the same in this. They take dedication and hard work. Lots of thought and care, practice over and over. Consistency is the elusive objective. Tougher with greater volumes. Through it all, a sense of authentic personality is created. • Cromwell: Blue Island is a reflection of who we are and what we love. Artists pick up on that. They have a welcoming place here. We’re a community place in many ways. And our clientele in one night ranges from age 21 to 70. The craft-drinking public gets it, too. They can smell it when a place is not authentic. First-timers come here, see art on the wall, gig posters in the window. And, top-quality interesting brews to enjoy. What more is there? I’ve often said, “Living well is the best revenge.” • Julian: Reminiscing is a trip. A very long time ago, as a music reviewer, I interviewed Alan and his old band, The Blue Meanies. Does he remember that? It’s interesting circling back, seeing what he’s doing here. As an artist, I’m actually inspired by craft brewers. Love the ideas, the creativity, especially packaging. I’ve learned about promoting and branding from them.

Photo by: Kevin Errek

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These interviews prompted John Condron to look back as well, including his years as a partner in Chicago Street Pub in Joliet, Ill. John and Mike Trizna went in together 15 years ago. Today, Mike and his wife, Kathy, carry on. Chi Street has become the place for live music, great craft brew and homemade-style pub food in Will County. The Triznas are supreme supporters of these related

“Brewers tend to be supportive of musicians, especially original ones. We’re kindred craft with deep connections.” – Chicago-based singer/songwriter/ producer John Condron

arts, including having organized and managed “Hopstring Fest” for five years. Hopstring’s tag line is, “a Celebration of Craft Beer and Original Music.” Condron, Julian and Cromwell are all veterans of Hopstring and Chicago Street. "Craft beer wasn’t an epiphany moment at Chicago Street," Condron says. "People started to request things out of the ordinary. Brewery reps and distributors were instrumental in us all trying new things, especially 10 years ago – even today. They spent time with us. Supported musical events. Over time, you get really educated on what

portfolios are available. There’s such a great level of awareness now. People like us, we gravitate to it. Every night now, Chicago Street is filled with people who love both craft brew and original music. In ChicagoLand, there are other Craft Brewing establishments that regularly support musical artists. Quickly coming to mind are: Two Brothers, Haymarket, Tribes, 350 Brewing and Lagunitas. Many others sponsor and/or host music festivals, Lagunitas being prominent. They were the largest sponsor of the “Hopstring Fest,” for example. All said, Blue Island is unique for now. It's the only brewery, not also operating a restaurant/ Blue Island Beer Company bar, to be such firm supporters http://blueislandbeerco.com/ of musical artists. Hopefully, more will follow. Change is John Condron inevitable. And with it all is the www.johncondron.com potential for inspiration. Jeff Julian “The only thing that rehttp://vaudevileins.com mains constant is the absolute base-level connection between Chicago Street Pub music and craft," Condron says. http://chicagost.com/ "It’s the same people.”

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MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS www.communicatorsintl.com | info@communicatorsintl.com CIRCLE NO. 74


From Pursuit to Purpose W

e live in a culture that promotes constant growth. You know that old saying, “If you’re not growing, you’re dying.” As an executive coach and entrepreneur, I agree with the need to grow. There are two different kinds of growth that I have experienced: Pursuit and Purpose. Both have their place and serves a purpose. In Pursuit, the focus is more so on quantity over quality. How much we can get done and checked off the list? How much more can we do? How much more can we accomplish? At work, it’s the size of our budgets, the number of new openings or remodel projects, the deals we close, our titles and the endless list of responsibilities. On the home front, we’re saving for our kids’ futures: colleges and weddings. We do so to provide them better opportunities. We want them to have a better life than we did and, in doing so, we’re focused on Pursuit. In Pursuit, we accumulate stuff, stuff upon stuff; purging the old stuff just to get new stuff. We accumulate from a physical point as well as from an emotional point. The accepted norm is the recognition we seek via social media, as an individual or as an organization. How many likes? How many views? How many followers? It is a never ending cycle – the pursuit to collect and accumulate. I’m sure many of you may have done that at one point or another in you life. Some of you are still in Pursuit, and there’s nothing wrong with that. I lived my 20 years in Corporate America as one long endless Pursuit. There’s no doubt that you’re having fun while you’re pursuing, and there is an unbeatable feeling of what you define at the moment as success. But like anything else, success comes with a price, too. We allow a tremendous amount of stress into our lives. It’s easy to lose track of why we do what we do. What we believe will make our families happy, will make our parents proud and will give us that financial security we’re all seeking is lost in this constant pursuit cycle. We actually think we’re in our top game.

The truth is we’ve just started playing. The top game comes when the shift happens – when Pursuit evolves to Purpose. Something clicks, and what we truly believed was personal power when we operated in Pursuit is simply a shadow to the power of Purpose. You see, the power of Purpose goes beyond our own needs. It goes beyond the busy day-to-day transactional details. It goes beyond accumulating. It’s addressing a longing; a benevolent calling that grows beyond our physical view and even our physical space. It reaches out much further than we can imagine and impacts the masses for a greater good. When we are on Purpose, we are finally still. And in this stillness we finally feel and hear our own breathe. We are in the moment and that is true power. Our industry once had us traveling the country, building new locations and remodeling at the speed

Grace Daly is the founding host of ShopTalk360.com, the industry podcast show. With more than 20 years directing design, construction and facilities for national retail brands, Daly’s current role as interviewer, author and business coach celebrates the leaders in our industry she fondly refers to as her family. Please feel free to reach out to her at Grace@GraceDaly.com

When we are on Purpose, we are finally still. And in this stillness we finally feel and hear our own breathe. We are in the moment and that is true power. of light. Those days are few and far between now. It doesn’t mean it’s over – it just means there’s a different game; a deeper conversation on our brick and mortar world. The savvy players in our industry come prepared with new and open mindsets, and they grant themselves the time to listen, learn and transition into this new game. For your brand New Year – what will you do differently? What will you do for yourself? What will you do for your Purpose? CCR

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LEADERSHIP

LEADERSHIP


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Nation's Giant Hamburgers Development

Sacramento, CA

$5,000,000.00

12,700

New Construction

Q2 2018

MOD Pizza

Auburn, WA

$500,000.00

3,050

Remodel

Q1 2018

Habit Burger #256

Dixon, CA

$400,000.00

2,703

Remodel

Q1 2018

Dollar General

Klamath Falls, OR

$2,400,000.00

9,100

New Construction

Q1 2018

AutoZone #5208

Pearl City, HI

$1,500,000.00

5,000

New Construction

Q2 2018

Bath & Body Works

Ontario, CA

$250,000.00

6,194

Remodel

Q1 2018

625IVE

Santa Ana, CA

$1,000,000,000.00

2,300,000

New Construction

Q4 2018

Magnitude LAX

Hawthorne, CA

$500,000,000.00

1,000,000

New Construction and Remodel

Q2 2018

Views on Fifth

Olympia, WA

$20,000,000.00

130,000

New Construction

Q2 2018

Fig + Pico Hotel

Los Angeles, CA

$450,000,000.00

506,682

New Construction

Q2 2018

Spokane Street Hotel

Walla Walla, WA

$18,000,000.00

92,175

Addition and Renovation

Q1 2018

Fairfield Inn and Suites by Marriott

North Bend, WA

$15,000,000.00

54,000

New Construction

Q1 2018

Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact University of Oregon

Eugene, OR

$1,000,000,000.00

225,000

New Construction

Q2 2018

Shiloh Hills Elementary School Renovation

Spokane, WA

$16,700,000.00

65,373

Addition and Renovation

Q1 2018

Castle High School - Cafeteria Expansion

Kaneohe, HI

$2,578,000.00

23,806

Addition and Renovation

Q2 2018

Nevada City Courthouse

Nevada City, CA

$102,827,000.00

83,782

New Construction

Q4 2018

Jamestown Sklallam Public Safety and Justice Center

Sequim, WA

$1,300,000.00

6,500

New Construction

Q1 2018

City Hall and City Council Chambers Renovation

Rolling Estates, CA

$750,000.00

5,465

Renovation

Q1 2018

New Hospital

Chelan, WA

$25,500,000.00

75,000

New Construction

Q2 2018

Huntington Memorial Hospital - Pediatric and PICU Renovation

Pasadena, CA

$18,000,000.00

42,400

Renovation

Q3 2018

South Sound Clinic Expansion Evergreen Treatment Services

Olympia, WA

$230,000.00

9,010

Addition and Renovation

Q1 2018

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE:

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Ad Art/Genesis Light Solutions............................. 71, 109................37, 55

International Roofing Expo................................... 149......................68

Arecont Vision...................................................... 103......................52

ISA International Sign Expo.................................. 151......................69

Assa Abloy........................................................... 101......................51

InstaKey Security Systems.................................... 95.......................49

Automated Cutting Technologies................................ 67.......................35

Jones Sign........................................................... 107......................54

Beam Team Construction................................... 51, 69.................28, 36

Lakeview Construction, Inc.................................... 9.........................8

The Blue Book..................................................... 131......................65

Loren Industries................................................... 113......................57

Bostik................................................................... 31.......................20

Mapes Architectural Canopies............................... 11........................9

Calpipe Security Bollards..................................... 147......................67

May Group........................................................... 163......................73

Cawley................................................................. 14.......................12

The McIntosh Group.............................................. 64.......................34

Ceso..................................................................... 47.......................26

NAC Products....................................................... 21.......................17

Clock Shark.......................................................... 23.......................18

National Flooring................................................... 27.......................19

Commerical Construction & Renovation Project Awards.................................. 120......................61

National Pavement................................................ 45.......................25

Commerical Construction & Renovation Retreats.............................................. 59.......................32 Commerical Construction & Renovation Summit 2018...................................37-39....................23

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association............................................... 33.......................21 Newton............................................................... CVR2......................1 Persona...................................................................... 117........................59

Connect Source.................................................... 75.......................39

Prime Retail Services.................................................. 53.........................29

Construction Data Co. (CDC)................................ 173......................75

Prioity Sign................................................................. 115........................58

Commicators International Inc................................ 170......................74

Protos Security............................................................ 93.........................48

CONSTRUCT-ED................................................... 154......................71

Retail Maintenance Specialists................................ 87.......................45

Construction One................................................... 1.........................2

Rockerz Inc............................................................ 7.........................5

Controlled Power.................................................. 16.......................14

Rogers Electric..................................................... 83.......................43

Coverings................................................................153...................... 70

Salsbury................................................................ 8.........................6

Dark Horse..............................................................129...................... 64

Sargenti Architects............................................... 73.......................38

Dynamic Air Quality Solutions.................................. 3.........................3

Schimenti......................................................... 8, CVR4.................7, 77

Egan Sign.......................................................... 43, 81.................24, 42

ShopTalk 360º...................................................... 13.......................10

Elro Signs............................................................. 91.......................47

Signage Solutions................................................ 111......................56

EMG..................................................................... 57.......................31

SignResource Indentiy Group................................. 5.........................4

Energex Wall Systems.........................................60-61....................33

SMI Sign Systems, Inc......................................... 127......................63

F&D Commercial................................................... 79.......................41

Storefloors............................................................ 55.......................30

Fast Signs............................................................. 19.......................16

SuperBright LEDS ................................................ 90.......................46

FPL....................................................................... 35.......................22

Wagner................................................................. 13.......................13

Fulcrum Construction............................................ 85.......................44

Wallace................................................................. 77.......................40

Georgia Printco.................................................... 157......................72

Warner Bros........................................................ CVR3.....................76

GGS Partners....................................................... 119......................60

Window Film Depot............................................... 99.......................50

Glab Maintenance Services................................... 49.......................27

Wolverine Building Group..................................... 125......................62

GlobalShop.......................................................... 141......................66

Yunker................................................................. 105......................53

Honeywell............................................................. 17.......................15

ZipWall................................................................. 15.......................13

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


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NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Thank you for your service W hen returning home from our CCRP Scottsdale, Ariz, in early December, it was my one of my memorable flights ever taken. As usual, I booked my seat in the exit row for more leg room and, most importantly, to be there in case of an emergency. As passengers filled their seats for a full to capacity flight back to the ATL, an 18-year E2 Seaman apprentice sat in the middle seat of my row. He was looking dapper in his military attire and sailor's cap, navy blue Seaman jacket and uniform underneath. From Tucson, he was making his way back to Norfolk, Va., where he was stationed. On my way down the aisle, I saw the past two-term Governor of Georgia Sonny Perdue and now Secretary of Agriculture in the Trump Administration sitting on the aisle in coach class. I acknowledged that I knew who he was and shook his hand.

Seaman’s hand with a big smile on his face. The picture on phone, priceless. If you would have seen this young E2 Seaman Apprentice, you would have been proud to be an American. Fact is our military is made up of many of these young, brave souls who volunteer and are willing to sacrifice it all for our country to remain free and safe from the evil in the world. With the Holiday season ahead, I want say “Thank You” to all of military personnel for their service and to be safe while on duty. Let’s not forget about our first responders who help keep us safe 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Just so happens that my nephew just graduated from fireman training school and now will be on call in Hilton Head Island, S.C. Way to go Jordan. And then there are our yearly shout outs: • First, to my family for being there regardless of the mood of the day this entrepreneur is in. Also, thanks to our dogs for being man’s best friends. • “Thank You” to all of our valued subscribers, attendees, advertisers and sponsors. You're the best.

When the E2 Seaman sat down in his seat, we started a conversation. I asked him if Secretary Purdue shook his hand and thanked him for his service when he passed by his seat. He said no. So I told him, “We're going to fix that.” So after the plane took off and reached cruising altitude, I went up to the Secretary Purdue's row and asked him if he saw the young E2 Seaman when he passed by his row. He said no. I asked if he would come back and shake his hand and thank him for his service. He said yes. A few minutes later, he came back and said hello, and shook the young E2

With the Holiday season ahead, I want say “Thank You” to all of military personnel for their service and to be safe while on duty.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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• Next, "Thank You" to our magazine staff for once again doing an awesome job in producing our first-class trade publication and events. • “Thank You” to all of the vendors who help us do our business daily with topnotch professionalism and class. As we close the book for 2017 and say hello to 2018, we want to wish all of you a Happy Holiday Season with your family and friends. We also wish you good health, prosperity and safe travels. And, as always, keep the faith.

Subscription: 1 year, $50 in U.S., Canada and Mexico; single copies, $10. 1 year, $190 International surface; $290 International air mail; International single copies $25. Printed in U.S.A. Known office of publication: 358 Aviemore Lane, Suwanee, GA. 30024. Periodicals postage paid at Suwanee, GA. 30024, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Commercial Construction & Renovation, P.O. Box 3908, Suwanee, GA 30024.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — NOVEMBER : DECEMBER 2017


CIRCLE NO. 76


CIRCLE NO. 77

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