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IS INTEGRATED PROJECT DELIVERY (IPD) RIGHT FOR YOU, SEE HOW

Family affair

How Plamondon Hospitality Partners’ second generation is leading the charge

Exclusive Inside: 3D Virtual Reality and today’s sign companies Check out our GC & Lighitng surveys

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May/June 2018 • www.ccr-mag.com

Pete Plamondon, Jr., co-president, Plamondon Hospitality Partners

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BUILDING WRAPS / SCAFFOLDING WRAPS / BARRICADE GRAPHICS

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May/June • 2018 Vol. 17, No.3

96

26

164

FEATURES

164  Achieving a Contemporary 26 Family affair Aesthetic with Masonry  How Plamondon Hospitality Partners’  Brick and manufactured stone solutions second generation is leading for modern commercial designs the charge 96 On call  Communication infrastructure assumes critical priority in construction process

170  Virtually speaking  How the technology is transforming today’s sign companies 184  Time to collaborate  Is Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) right for you?

Cover and feature photos by: Wertman Photography

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May/June • 2018 Vol. 17, No.3

SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  CCRP – Minneapolis, MN 22  CCRP – Charlotte, NC

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

38  Leading General Contractors 70  Leading Lighting Suppliers

DEPARTMENTS

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 181 Perspective 189 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 190 Ad Index 192 Publisher’s Note

143

22 SPECIAL SECTION

Commercial Kitchens 101 American made  Why the LandShark Bar & Grill may be coming to a beach town near you 112 Tankless  How a rooftop water heater solution saved a trendy Santa Ana Culinary Center Multi-Housing 120 Opening the door  Inside the viability of a PTAC retrofit alternative Federal Construction 125 Code changers  Affordable housing project changes legislation in the Northwest 132 How the Army is updating its barracks to appeal to recruits  How the Army is updating its barracks to appeal to recruits

101

Healthcare 138 Fearsome Foursome  See how four New York agencies and companies nailed down the $5.3 million renovation of the Irish Hunger Memorial in Manhattan Craft Brand and Marketing 143 Meet me at Cherry Street  How Nick Tanner’s Colorado-born beer became the toast of Georgia 152 Swear by the oath  Inside Honor Beer’s mission – its customers 156 Say what now?  Why it’s not could to skunk your customers Women in Construction 160 #ME TOO and the construction industry

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 3


EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

What would you do (now)?

O

kay, hear me out. Work with me here. I’m giving the opportunity for a redo—a mulligan, as they say. Yes, I know, I don’t have that kind of authority. But what if I did? What if you did?

I'm not talking Disney plot lines here. I'm talking the greatest gift each of us have—learning from our mistakes. I don't think it's something we take seriously enough. Sure, we think we do, but when it comes right down to it, we still tend to swing and miss when the opportunity to "make right," as they say, presents itself. As Winston Churchill once said, "Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Think about it. Failing, losing, coming in second, whichever term you want to use doesn't mean you've lost. What it really means is that you have been afforded the opportunity to see the whole picture. And yes, I know that it doesn't really apply to each and every situation, but let's not get too picky here. Let's try to apply the thinking to your work. Project specifics. Deadlines. Hiring practices. Interwork relations. Partner choices. And the list goes on and on and on. So, as you sit down to sketch out your to-do list—daily, weekly, monthly, it doesn't matter—sketch out the whole picture. As you approach the topic at hand, ask yourself if you have been there before. Chances are, you have. What did you do? What could you have done differently? The most important question is, "What would you do now? CCR

As you approach the topic at hand, ask yourself if you have been there before. Chances are, you have. What did you do? What could you have done differently?

What if you could turn back time and change something— anything—that you did. Something that you know when you did it just wasn't your best move. Think about it, really think about it. There are so many choices, right? Personal. Professional. It's mind-boggling if you think about it. I had that chance recently. The ins and outs of why aren't as important as the opportunity. Here's the thing, the proverbial redo doesn't have to be wishing on a star or haggling back and forth with a genie.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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EDITORIAL EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 772.232.6614

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CIRCLE NO. 7


EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target

RESTAURANTS

GREGG LOLLIS Sr. Director, Design Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp. DAVID SHOTWELL Construction Manager, Flynn Restaurant Group ISYOL E. CABRERA Director Design and Construction Carvel

JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development

JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury

JOHN LAPINS Partner, Geolo Capital

JENNIFER GRIESER Sr. Store and Corporate Facilities Manager Tuesday Morning

GARY RALL Vice President of Design and Development, Holiday Inn Club Vacations

LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture

ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

HEALTHCARE BROOKS HERMAN Senior Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield STEVE JONES

International Director JLL MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President EMG

CONSULTANT GINA NODA President Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality

TOMMY LINSTROTH

PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations and Project Management Interserv Hospitality

10

MATT SCHIMENTI

HOSPITALITY

JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company

ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

RON BIDINOST Vice President of Operations Bubbakoo’s Burritos Corporation

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Onyx Creative STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA

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ACADEMIA DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail

Walmart Walmart will invest $277 million to renovate 45 Texas stores this year, including 18 locations in the Dallas-Fort Worth market. The retailer is focused on revamping existing locations around the country and plans to open fewer than 25 new U.S. stores in 2018. Target Target has identified spots for three more small-format stores in the New York City boroughs of Manhattan, Staten Island and Queens. The retailer, which expects to have 130 of the urban stores operating by the end of next year, has also announced plans for a location in Chicago’s Logan Square neighborhood. Best Buy Best Buy will open a 36,000-square-foot store in a Salt Lake City suburb this fall, its first since 2011. The retailer has been experimenting with in-store shops showcasing high-profile brands include Sony and Samsung. Gander Outdoors Gander Outdoors will open in more than 70 former Gander Mountain stores around the country, including one Minnesota location and six in Pennsylvania. Camping World Holdings acquired the retailer and changed its name last year. Duluth Trading Co. Duluth Trading Co. will grow by 15 more locations each year through 2023. The 2018 plan calls for new stores in eight U.S. states, including Alaska, Colorado, Maine and Texas. Five Below Five Below will roll out in the San Diego market this summer with the first of two planned stores. The low-priced retailer sells an eclectic, ever-changing mix of merchandise aimed at appealing to teens and tweens.

Old Navy Gap will open 60 new Old Navy stores in the United States this year and remodel 150 existing locations, while it continues to trim the number of slower-performing Gap and Banana Republic locations. At Home At Home will open three new stores in the Dallas-Fort Worth area this year. Nationally, the home furnishing retailer is adding 20 to 25 new locations annually, with a model that includes purchasing land, operating a store for about a year to determine the appropriate rent for the location, and then doing a sale and leaseback deal. Primark UK-based fast-fashion retailer Primark is set to open its ninth U.S. store in Brooklyn, New York this summer. Plans also call for a Florida store in 2019 – the first U.S. location that will be outside the Northeast. Express Express has revamped a New York City store to test a concept that groups fashions together based on different work styles, including office work and creative careers. The store also boasts a space with Wi-Fi and charging stations designed to encourage shoppers to stay and get some work done. Comcast Cable provider Comcast has moved into retail with new stores in five cities that feature spaces where customers can try out products, including video players and smart home gadgets. It expects to launch at least 50 more this year. ALDI ALDI has completed remodels on 17 of its 54 stores in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, and it soon expects to have half of them done as part of a plan to invest $66 million in makeovers in the market. The German discount grocer is in the midst of plans to remodel 1,300 US stores.

Hospitality Hilton/Hampton Inn Hilton announced that it will give Hampton Inns a new design for the first time in 10 years. The design updates include an enhanced, contemporary exterior design, smaller rooms and custom front desks.

Microhotel Hotels Modus Hotels has begun construction of Philadelphia’s first microhotel. The 11-story Pod Philly will house 252 rooms roughly the size of a single bedroom, with some including bunk beds.

Wyndham/Novum Hospitality Wyndham and Novum Hospitality are planning the joint development of new hotels in the UK, Ireland, Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands and Austria.

Choice Hotels/Sercotel Choice Hotels has partnered with Spain’s Sercotel Hotels as Choice seeks growth across Europe. Under the partnership, Choice plans to offer hotel owners “a comprehensive solution and strong value proposition in international markets.”

Graduate Hotels Graduate Hotels is looking beyond just the presence of a college when it selects where it will establish properties. The chain is opening three properties this year in Iowa City, Iowa; Bloomington, Indiana; and Seattle. In 2019, it will open five hotels, including properties in Columbus, Ohio; New Haven, Connecticut; and New York City as part of the Cornell Tech campus. Radisson Hotels Radisson plans to have in excess of 200 properties open in its South Asia pipeline by 2022.

12

Marriott International Marriott plans to grow its footprint in the Middle East and Africa to 370 properties by 2023. Over the past year, Marriott has signed 30plus deals in the region. Raffles Hotels & Resorts Raffles Hotels & Resorts is partnering with developers Jordan Warshaw, and Gary and Jeffrey Saunders to put its first North American property in a $375 million tower at the corner of Stuart Street and Trinity Place. The 33-story building will be roughly half hotel, half condominiums.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


AroundtheIndustry Restaurants

(continued)

Curry Up Now Curry Up Now, a fast-casual Indian concept that started in 2009 as a food truck, will expand to new markets through franchising with Fransmart. The California chain, which operates six restaurants and four food trucks, has signed franchisees to open units in San Diego and is searching for operators in 40 U.S. markets.

Kona Grill Kona Grill will begin franchising in the United States and in China with the Chinese Plateno Hotel Group. Kona Grill operates 46 U.S. restaurants and has three international franchise locations. Famous Dave’s Famous Dave’s has introduced a remodeled look and revamped menu at its Coon Rapids, Minnesota, restaurant, with features designed to raise the energy level. The restaurant’s central bar is surrounded by 15 televisions and a marquee that proclaims “America’s Best Ribs.” Dave & Buster’s Dave & Buster’s plans to start testing a fast-casual concept at a few locations later this year in response to customer requests for quicker options. Crackin’ Kitchen Japan-based restaurant operator Toridoll Holdings is expanding its U.S. chain, Crackin’ Kitchen, from Hawaii to the U.S. mainland with the first California location. The concept, which melds traditional Hawaiian and Cajun cuisines, is part of Toridoll’s plan to gain a bigger U.S. presence. Tommy Bahama Men’s fashion retailer Tommy Bahama will open the first California location of its fast-casual restaurant concept in Palm Springs, California next month. The restaurant, which has locations in New York and Florida, will include a full bar and outdoor seating for 180.

Wetzel’s Pretzels Wetzel’s Pretzels plans to roll out a sleek new store design to as many as 40 existing and new locations before year’s end. The new look, which debuted last year at a New Jersey mall location, has been introduced at 16 stores and features an exhibition counter for observing the chain’s handmade pretzel-making process, wood accents and contemporary graphics. Fazoli’s Fazoli’s has launched a turnaround effort that includes restaurant remodels, menu improvements and mobile ordering. It plans to open six new locations in 2018. The Meatball Shop The Meatball Shop will open its first location outside New York City in Washington, D.C., this summer. The quirky six-unit concept has made some changes since launching in 2010, including stressing its local sourcing practices and streamlining the menu to make ordering easier.

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MAY : JUNE 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

T

Shakeout

Competition taking its toll on smaller grocers

here are BOGOs everywhere. Specials in myriad categories – meat, deli, beer, etc. As larger companies such as Walmart and Amazon bolster their efforts to lure grocery shoppers, the battlefield is heating up. The pressure is taking a toll on smaller chains. In too many instances, bankruptcy protection and closures are happening at alarming rates. It started with Amazon’s $13 billion acquisition of Whole Foods, which pumped up the game to get in front of today's shoppers. The trend picked up with Wal-Mart's decision to start offering an online grocery delivery service in 100 cities. Amid the intense competition, while the number of supermarkets around the country increased from 2010 to 2015, the amount of supermarket operators declined slightly. Industry experts say the pace of consolidation is expected to accelerate. The solution will depend on a brand's ability to weather pricing pressure over an extended period of time—a move some experts say the weaker ones cannot do.

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By the numbers 3,000

The number of new Starbucks stores expected to open in China by 2022, the brand says. If you do the math, that adds up to a new location opening every 15 hours. China is home to 3,300 Starbucks locations, including the chain’s largest store in Shanghai.

115.8

The amount, in billions, that the luxury hotel segment is expected to hit in size by 2025, according to an analysis by Grand View Research. The growth forecast is attributed to increasing purchasing power of consumers and rising number of international as well as domestic tourists on business or leisure trips, the report cited.

26

The number of Wahlburgers locations that Hy-Vee plans to open in the eight states where it does business. The grocer decided to join the burger business after receiving a number of social media requests when it featured Mark Wahlberg’s sports nutrition products.

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Small hotels of 10 rooms or less placed in smaller neighborhoods are now a new industry trend, according to Condé Nast Traveler’s “Hot List 2018: The Best New Hotels in the World.” These independent hotels, which enable guests to enjoy a local experience while still receiving full hotel amenities, are giving less obvious destinations a chance to shine—and providing hoteliers with a new kind of traveler to impress. In the 22nd edition of the Hot List, Condé editors crisscrossed six continents to review hundreds of new properties firsthand, eventually citing 102 winners.

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MAY : JUNE 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

More room at the mall F

irst-quarter vacancy rates at major U.S. malls rose to 8.4 percent, a level last reached in the fourth quarter of 2012, according to Reis. Smaller shopping centers in 41 of 77 regional areas studied reported occupancy declines in the 12-month period that ended March 31.

Trending updward Study shows more construction spending predicted in 2018 While highway, hotel, manufacturing, multifamily and power spending should remain steady, office construction is projected to increase by 9 percent in 2018, according to investment consultants FMI Corp. In addition, overall construction and engineering spending is expected to increase 7 percent, the research shows. To note, water supply and sewage, and waste disposal construction are likely to decline.

Pop goes the retail The uberization of retail is on. Pop-up stores, once a stunt venue used by some retailers—are now enabling retailers to go where the demand is. The tricky part is that it isn’t even necessarily about selling something, as it is getting key marketing and some brand love. This makes these events something that retailers and brands must monitor. As many industry experts and analysts say, the pop-up concept isn't going anywhere. While it's not going to completely transform retail into a whole new business model, it most likely will become a regular, sustained effort by retailers—another form of customer engagement. That means more strategy, processes, people and technology to support the channel.

16

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

“It’s a really interesting insight because it means in our retail space we can’t necessarily have a place that’s like 'let’s roll out the mats and do the work-out on the shop floor. Our intention is to create an inclusive brand that offers elements of exclusivity.” – Lucas Hugh founder and CEO Anjhe Mules on the brand's first retail store


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Hop to it Minneapolis table tennis bar plays host to CCRP Nation

W

hen in Minneapolis, do what the natives do – or some of them, at least. The popular Twin Cities’ bar, Hop21, played host to Commercial Construction & Renovation (CCRP) Nation, offering seven ping-pong courts, a full bar, great food and all the networking they could handle. If you’re looking for this type of diverse networking, add the CCRP event to your to-do list. For more information, connect with Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

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CIRCLE NO. 14

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1.

3.

4.

6.

9.

2.

5.

7.

10.

8.

11.

1. Winner of Ping Pong Tourney, Perry Loukusa, FCP Services 2. B enjamin Meyer, Immervision Data; Mike Loukusa, Immervision Data 3. B rian Perkkio, Elder-Jones, Inc.; Steve Bachman, Retail Construction Services; Justin Elder, Elder-Jones Inc. 4. K aren MacCannell, McIntosh Transforms; Barry Greive, Target; Brad Gaskins, The McIntosh Group 5. S teve Behling, FCP Services; Jerry Fisher & Carolyn Fisher, ANP Lighting

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

12. 6. Vaun Podlogar, State Permits; John Stallman, Lakeview Construction; Bob Sobczak, Entouch Controls 7. Perry Loukusa, FCP Services; Tim Hill, The Beam Team 8. Leslie Burton, UHC Corp; David Corson, CCR 9. Gordon Elkins, Mannington Commercial; Jeff Anderson, EMG Corp 10. Steve & Sharon Bachman, Retail Construction Services 11. Jennifer Johnson, Koch Logistics; Jamie Dery, Target; Michele Adams, Target 12. Ross Stecklein, Retail Construction Services; Tony Johnson, Davis & Associates


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CCRP Charlotte goes all Lumberjaxe Make plans to join us at CCRP May 17th, 2018 in Minneapolis, MN

Attendees take aim in the Queen City

W

ho needs darts when you can throw axes? Yes, you read that right. The Commercial Construction & Renovation (CCRP) group headed to Charlotte for some good old-fashioned ax throwing. Again, you read that right. Attendees of one of the industry’s best networking events converged on Lumberjaxe to network, eat, drink and throw some axes. If you want to test your aim and add the power of networking to your to-do list this year, connect with Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

Thank You to Our CCRP Charlotte, NC Sponsors:

INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Thank You to Our CCRP Charlotte, NC Sponsors:

REGISTERED COMPANIES:

Belk Chain Store Maintenance Cornell Storefront Systems CT Addison Consulting, LLC Flynn Restaurant Group

Fortney & Weygandt Illuminating Technologies Interior Architects JLL L2M

Little Primax Properties Rack Room Shoes United Visual Branding Weekes Construction

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

Little Diversified Architectural Consultancy Jeff Roark - Principal - Partner 5815 Westpark Drive Charlotte, NC 28217-3554 (704) 525-6350 jroark@littleonline.com

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Mitch Lapin, VP 31269 Bradley Road North Olmsted, OH 44070 Ph: 440-716-4000 mlapin@fortneyweygandt.com www.fortneyweygandt.com

Retail Contractors Association Carol Montoya, CAE Executive Director 2800 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 210 Alexandria, VA 22314 Ph: 703-683-5637 carol@retailcontractors.org www.retailconstractors.org

Make plans to join us at CCRP May 17th, 2018 in Minneapolis, MN

22

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


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CIRCLE NO. 16


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

3.

9.

11.

10.

12.

4.

5. 1.

6. 13.

7.

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1. M  att Frank, Fortney & Weygandt 2. Winner of Axe Tourney, Jason Loucks, Little 3. B ob Jensen, JLL; Kirk Light, Rack Room Shoes; Ken Gonnerman, Rack Room Shoes 4. H  unter Weekes, Weekes Construction; Scott Rigsby, Interior Architects; Doug Gigi, Interior Architects 5. Angela Saladino, Illuminating Concepts; Bittany Hampton, Primax Properties; Ann-Marie Brooks, United Visual Branding 6. J amie Witherspoon, Belk; Tom Kay, Entouch Controls; Clay Addison, CT Addison Consulting 7. M  ike DiPaola, United Visual Branding; Emily Roofe, Little; Ron Hunter, United Visual Branding

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14.

8.

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8. D  avid Shotwell, Flynn Restaurant Group; Bob Howell, JLL; Chris Slocum, Cornell Storefront Systems 9. Cynthia Hirsch, Interior Architects; David O’Brien, Primax Properties 10. Matt Frank, Fortney & Weygandt; David Corson, CCR 11. John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; Jeff Mahler, L2M Architects 12. Jeff Roark, Little; Andy Hoffman, Belk 13. Bob Jenson from JLL, lining up target. 14. Hunter Weekes, Weekes Construction 15. Tom Kay, Entouch Controls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 17


Family affair How Plamondon Hospitality Partners’ second generation is leading the charge By Michael J. Pallerino

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


P

ete Plamondon, Jr.’s love of the hospitality industry came directly from his father. In fact, his first paycheck still hangs in his office. He worked as a busboy in a Hot Shoppes Restaurant, a chain opened by the Marriott

family before they entered the hotel business.

As a second-generation owner of The Plamondon Companies, Peter Plamondon lives for the hospitality business. Upon graduation, he spent several years working in Marriott’s sales and marketing department, eventually leaving the hospitality industry to work in commercial real estate. There, he climbed the ladder. But when the family business called, he answered. In 1993, Pete joined his father’s business, Plamondon Enterprises, helping extend the company’s reach. By virtue of his experience and time at Marriott, he expanded into the lodging business by opening hotels throughout Frederick and Hagerstown, Maryland, and started Plamondon Hospitality Partners with his brother, Jim, in 2004. Today, Pete is helping push the family business forward. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with the co-president at Plamondon Hospitality Partners to get his take on the company’s vision moving forward.

Give us a snapshot of the Plamondon brand?

The one thing that makes us unique is we’re a franchisor and a franchisee. That’s a unique perspective. I don’t know of any other company that does both in the hospitality space. This is our 38th year in business. We started off in the restaurant space and now have been in lodging for the

past 22 years, but it’s all hospitality-related. We want to always align ourselves with top brands, whether it’s one we own or those like Marriott and Hilton. We always want to be perceived as dealing with upper-tier brands.

What type of consumer/guests are your hotels targeting?

That’s always a matter of market and demand, so it depends on what market we’re developing in. We assess the inventory of hotel brands that currently exist there, their relative age, and where the opportunity exists. In Altoona, our most recent project, we developed a dual branded Fairfield Inn and TownePlace Suites in one building. There’s a lot of older product in the market and there was not a purpose-built extended-stay brand in that market. That’s why we felt that TownePlace Suites would be an important component. The thinking there was we would build a 125-room Fairfield Inn and then, if there was extended-stay demand coming to that hotel, build a TownePlace because the property was large enough to hold both. But Marriott suggested to us that if we felt the demand was there today, we should redo our feasibility plan. Obviously, that’s very different from the restaurant side of our business with Roy Rogers, where we have a single brand that has to work well in whatever market we enter.

MAY : JUNE 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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FAMILY AFFAIR Our portfolio with Marriott and Hilton gives us more latitude in terms of brands and how many rooms to introduce to the market. Altoona has 197 rooms. That’s the largest we’ve ever built. The thinking there was we would build a 125-room Fairfield Inn and then, if there was extended-stay demand coming to that hotel, build a TownePlace because the property was large enough to hold both. But Marriott suggested to us that if we felt the demand was there today, we should redo our feasibility plan. So, instead of two hotels we basically did two smaller hotels in a single building envelope, which makes it theoretically quicker to fill.

Walk us through your management partnership strategy?

Interesting strategy. When we develop a hotel, we have an equity raise, friends and families and a group of investors who have been with us on previous projects and know they can depend on us to deliver results, a return on their investment. That’s how I see a partnership. We source out the deal, we put the deal together, raise the equity, borrow the money and build it. The partners are all limited partners. Going back to the brands thing again, we only identify with brands we feel are best in class. That’s Marriott and Hilton at this point. Brands we believe in. Just like Roy Rogers on the restaurant side. When we first got into the hotel business with Marriott, they sent a couple of guys to vet us as prospective franchisees. One of their questions was, if they didn’t approve us would we go out and build a site with another brand. We said, “No, we only want to work with top brands.” My dad and I came out of Marriott and we knew them culturally. We want to be partners with brands that are leaders.

Tell us about how you work with Marriott to test new initiatives and pilot programs.

How does the design of the hotels cater to what today's guest are looking for?

Altoona was a perfect example where we as the franchisee had to come up with our own thoughts and ideas toward what that blended concept should look like. There was no prototype for this. The rooms are rooms, pretty typical, but we came up with our own design for the common/public space. It all had to be approved by Marriott but they allowed us to design and build what we thought made sense by combining two brands. We look to our franchisor’s corporate team for guidance and support. That’s part of the benefit of being a franchisee of a great system. We talked about our design concept with them and had access to their resources and expertise to help us perfect the concept. Each town is unique and we want the public space in each hotel to reflect that.

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We look to our franchisor’s corporate team for guidance and support. That’s part of the benefit of being a franchisee of a great system.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

We’ve done quite a lot of that over the years. We’re always interested in new ideas coming from Marriott, how they’re being implemented and beta tested. We’ve been recognized at owners conferences for our collaboration with Marriott, because we have four of their brands and we’re essentially right up the street from their headquarters in Bethesda. So when Marriott wants to test something, they can test it in more than one brand with us. They can get back and forth to and from our Frederick offices easily to talk to our operations people and see how things are going. That’s been a wonderful partnership. That makes us better because we’re talking to the brands directly, not waiting for things to get rolled out after the decisions have been made. We’re part of their due diligence to assess if something will fly or not. That makes it fun. They also respect our opinion. Mike Henningsen heads up the lodging side of our company. He came from Marriott and has been with us 19 years. He’s our EVP.


CIRCLE NO. 18


FAMILY AFFAIR What's the biggest issue today related to the hotel business?

Probably something not terribly unique to the hotel business – I also see it with the restaurant business as well – is finding good people. The prevailing wages these days are $15 minimum wage. That hurts those in the service industry such as hotels and restaurants. That, combined with the fact that the pipeline for service personnel has been restricted, puts a stress on our ability to sufficiently staff our properties. We need people to fill these jobs. It’s not easy work and at the same time there are a lot of new hotels being built and we’re going after the same pool of talent. If you ask me five years from now what the biggest issue is I’ll have the same answer. If you asked me five years ago, I would as well. The brands are always looking at ways to use technology to help offset some of the pressure on labor. But you have to be aware of the pros and cons. The front desk is a good example because of self check-in and it is being made easier all the time. Mobile check-in might make it more seamless, but we still want people in the lobby interacting with guests, even if they’re not processing them. Service and the personal, human touch are what differentiate us. We are in the hospitality business. If you don’t want that, that’s where Airbnb comes in. A lot of people ask me if I’m scared or concerned about Airbnb. The fact is the metrics show the national occupancy rates for hotels are at an all-time high and yet there are millions of room nights being absorbed by Airbnb. We provide hospitality and service. Airbnb is just a place to spend a night and not everyone wants that. There’s always going to be the need for brands and lodging because of that differentiation we provide. The Airbnb phenomenon has more people traveling, which is good for all lodging businesses.

Talk about sustainability. What are your brands doing?

We’re building with that in mind. That comes down from the brands, Hilton and Marriott. They’re forcing that, which is not a bad thing. It used to be we’d spend a lot more money to put energy-efficient materials into a building. That’s no longer the case. It basically costs no more today to install fixtures that use less water or energy than to install older standards, especially if you’re building that in from day one vs.

30

renovating. Pricing now is basically cost-neutral, so it makes sense if you can use less water, electricity, etc. I remember going to a Marriott conference years ago and it had an author speak who had written a book called “Good to Green,” who said no matter your opinion about global warming, just being a business person you want to do the sustainable thing because you’ll save money in the long run. A lightbulb went off. It does make sense and we save money and we have less of an impact on the environment and as operators and owners we’re saving money. So it’s being built into the brand standards now so we’re following what Hilton and Marriott are doing. That’s where everything is headed. The other part is building with materials that don’t have to be replaced or renovated as often, like carpeting. If they’re specifying certain materials that will last longer, if we can get an extra year or two from

Service and the personal, human touch are what differentiate us. We are in the hospitality business.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

the carpeting, for example, that’s where we’re being more sustainable because we’re not replacing things as frequently as we used to.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

I guess it is to continue to expand our footprint. We already have done that by opening in Augusta, Georgia, and Altoona, Pennsylvania, farther from our home base of Maryland, and the challenge for our company is managing from a distance Our first six hotels were located within half an hour of each other in Maryland. Now that’s not the case. We’re starting to branch out. That’s not unique but for us it is. So we have to consider how we can maintain our culture and standards across a longer distance. How do you effectively manage a business five states away or two hours away? It’s incumbent on my brother and me as owners to be in these properties, but we can’t be there as readily as we are accustomed to. But that doesn’t mean we can’t be successful. It just means we have to be shrewd managers and keep our personality alive and well in every property no matter how far and wide we expand.

Are you optimistic about what you see in the hotel sector?

I am. People are traveling more and it’s become apparent to me that each type of lodging option has its place because of different


CIRCLE NO. 19


FAMILY AFFAIR kinds of travel. Marriott and Hilton have more brands than I can name, different “swim lanes” to offer depending on your travel needs. A hotel is not a hotel is not a hotel like back in the day, and many are trying to incorporate an independent look. It’s not Courtyard, not Homewood not Residence Inn; it’s the Smith Inn in South Beach. The point is that it has the Marriott engine behind it so you get the best of both worlds. Brands get more expansion that way and the hotel gets the value of being with a top brand. Everyone wins. We haven’t done that ourselves yet, so being less regional and incorporating different brands are some of our aspirations.

What is your growth plan?

We’re under construction with our 10th hotel right now. It should open by the end of the year. In the next five years, we should have another three to four open.

As we get larger the biggest task is to continue to challenge ourselves on how to manage better and more efficiently.

What is the secret to creating a "must visit" hotel in today's competitive landscape?

Try to make it distinguishable from the guy next door or across the street. How do you personalize it to the specific location and how do you create the experience, too, with the service you’re providing? I think what it comes down to is guests are looking for service and we have to be able to “out hospitality” the guy next door. The walls in a hotel space can look pretty and can yield nice pros initially, but the look of your facility can very quickly become dirty, dated, not well maintained and start to lose favor with the guests. It comes back to the human perspective. We have to do better than our competitors in terms of sales and operations efforts. It sounds trite but we’re in the hospitality space, not the making furniture or widgets space or whatever. It comes down to a human element.

32

We also have to provide constant training to all of our associates so that people will be constantly learning and cross-trained so they’re always prepared to step in where needed. So, you may start out working at the front desk but we want you to be trained in housekeeping, food and beverage management, etc. We want to hire people who see the hospitality space as a career and make them more valuable to themselves and to us. And as we grow with different brands, we have the ability to do that, too, because we have a portfolio that lets us choose the best brand option.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

I guess as we get larger the biggest task is to continue to challenge ourselves on how to manage better and more efficiently. As I said before, now we’re not just in this tight cluster of Frederick or Hagerstown. As we expand the back office, we have to consider how to use technology, for instance, to analyze our business and do projections because we’re not only managing for ourselves but for investors as well and they expect to get a return on their investments. So we have to think about how we can do more, whether it’s with accounting, marketing, purchasing or whatever, so that as we get larger and are doing it at greater distances we can see our results and be able to plan more adeptly. As we’re spread thinner, we have to be able to manage 10 properties the way we did with two and be as good or better. So we have to constantly challenge ourselves to find ways to do that.

Describe a typical day.

I don’t think there is one. It’s not only meeting with operations and talking about how we’re doing but also planning our growth so we’ve got a couple of irons in the fire. And meeting with our guests. I love doing that. They give me the best and most direct feedback on our people and our hotels.

Don’t you also have a segment of your business in which you would manage a property for another investor?

Marriott would allow us to do that, and Hilton would, too, to be a third-party operator. We’re on a list. That’s not for every management company out there. We could do it in the future. Not as much a focus right now but it’s there if we want to do it. CCR

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


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CIRCLE NO. 20

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FAMILY AFFAIR

Pete with his brother and father

One-on-one with... Pete Plamondon, Jr.

Co-president, Plamondon Hospitality Partners What’s the most rewarding part of your job? For me, it’s rewarding to know that I’m running a business that provides a livelihood for more than 1,200 people and their families. That’s an awesome responsibility and it gives me the greatest sense of fulfillment. In collaboration with my brother and the Roy Rogers Restaurants side of our business, it’s a pretty cool thing that the decisions we make can have a positive impact on our associates’ lives and the well being of their families. It means we’d better be doing a good job and making good decisions.

What was the best advice you ever received? “Use your MBA: Manage by Being Around.” That’s what my dad taught us. He used that phrase throughout his career and we heard it all the time. I just heard him use it yesterday.

34

is always being positive in your communications and interactions with others. People feed off what mood I’m in or how I say things. I have to remain very cognizant of that. And No. 3 is maintaining constant communication with your team to the extent you can engage their ideas. Asking others for their ideas makes them think on behalf of the business and they own the decision because it came from their idea.

What is the true key to success for any manager?

That’s why it’s so relevant to me today. It’s not about running this business by remote control. We love being at our hotels and restaurants. We really enjoy it. It’s not just a desk job, looking at statistics every day. The energy in our business comes from our interaction with our guests and associates.

The ability to hire quality people. We really need to hire the right attitude. Everything else can be taught. This is a public-facing industry so it’s key for managers to hire not just for technological prowess but also for the personality or attitude. We can teach everything else, but you either have “it” or you don’t.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you?

What’s your favorite vacation spot and why?

It hasn’t been any one person, but the best thing I’ve heard is when people compliment us on our people. They’ll say, “Oh, yeah, the hotel or restaurant was a great experience,” but they lead off saying something about the hospitality at our business. When they do that in that order, I love that.

Vero Beach, Florida is a special place for our family. I’ve been going there since I was born. My grandfather moved there from Chicago in 1945 and bought a hotel. That’s what got my dad into the hospitality business in the first place. That’s why he – and then I – went to Cornell’s School of Hotel Administration. That’s where the Plamandon Hospitality philosophy was born. I also just love being in my backyard at home, sitting by the pool; my home vacation.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why. No. 1 is not coming across as being the smartest guy in the room. No. 2

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 21


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SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING

Leading GC firms highlighted in annual survey

I

f you’re looking for the commercial construction industry’s leading general contractor firms in the retail, restaurant, hospitality, healthcare, mulit-family, federal and other commercial sectors. Our exclusive annual report provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If your company was not on the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

Whiting-Turner.............................................$6,172,000,000.00 Gilbane Building Company...........................$4,712,982,000.00 Lendlease....................................................$3,933,464,798.00 Ryan Companies US, Inc..............................$1,364,279,670.00 Pepper Construction Group..........................$1,119,600,000.00 Gray............................................................$1,097,687,844.00 Digney York Associates................................$1,000,000,000.00 EMJ Corporation..........................................$952,672,544.00 Clune Construction Company.......................$921,902,359.00 Hoar Construction........................................$862,744,000.00

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RESTAURANT

MULTI-HOUSING

Lendlease.................................................... $2,897,567,141.00 Gilbane Building Company........................... $683,523,000.00 Whiting-Turner............................................. $601,000,000.00 Hoar Construction........................................ $261,796,000.00 Kinsley Construction, Inc.............................. $95,386,202.00 Broadway Construction Group...................... $90,706,401.00 Winter Construction..................................... $83,200,000.00 O’Neil Industries, Inc.................................... $82,000,000.00 EMJ Corporation.......................................... $59,683,533.00 Rockford Construction................................. $47,773,481.00

HEALTHCARE

HOSPITALITY

Digney York Associates..................................... $1,000,000,000.00 Whiting-Turner.................................................. $238,000,000.00 Gilbane Building Company................................ $181,440,000.00 Lendlease......................................................... $143,874,884.00 EMJ Corporation............................................... $94,515,016.00 First Finish, Inc.................................................. $89,000,000.00 EBCO General Contractor, LTD.......................... $82,811,286.00 Winter Construction.......................................... $81,000,000.00 IDC Construction, LLC....................................... $70,000,000.00 McGuire Builders, Inc........................................ $59,800,000.00

Lendlease....................................................... Whiting-Turner................................................ Gray............................................................... Prairie Contractors, Inc.................................... Wolverine....................................................... S.L. Hayden Construction Inc.......................... Marco Contractors.......................................... JG Construction.............................................. Schimenti Construction Company................... Lakeview Construction....................................

Whiting-Turner.............................................$721,000,000.00 Gilbane Building Company...........................$266,922,000.00 Lendlease....................................................$232,270,762.00 Pepper Construction Group..........................$134,600,000.00 O’Neil Industries, Inc....................................$130,000,000.00 Hoar Construction........................................$113,973,000.00 Ryan Companies US, Inc..............................$90,632,559.00 S. M. Wilson & Co........................................$70,316,503.00 Rockford Construction.................................$39,547,247.00 EMJ Corporation..........................................$29,191,499.00

FEDERAL

RETAIL

Whiting-Turner............................................. $382,000,000.00 EMJ Corporation.......................................... $344,071,122.00 Schimenti Construction Company................ $244,000,000.00 Hoar Construction........................................ $221,249,000.00 Mycon......................................................... $203,680,000.00 Pepper Construction Group.......................... $155,600,000.00 Ryan Companies US, Inc.............................. $141,762,748.00 We Oneil...................................................... $117,000,000.00 Rockford Construction................................. $110,494,864.00 Fulcrum Construction................................... $108,000,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

Top Ten Totals

Whiting-Turner............................................. $258,000,000.00 Gilbane Building Company........................... $192,542,000.00 Lendlease.................................................... $6,662,270.00 Hoar Construction........................................ $4,031,000.00 S. M. Wilson & Co........................................ $2,562,582.00 LCS Facility Group........................................ $2,000,000.00 Taylor Bros. Construction Co., Inc................. $1,500,000.00 Anderson & Rodgers Commercial Construction... $500,000.00 Prime Retail Services Inc............................. $450,000.00 Rockford Construction................................. $168,947.00

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

$114,205,540.00 $50,000,000.00 $31,600,000.00 $24,368,000.00 $23,000,000.00 $21,500,000.00 $21,000,000.00 $18,209,000.00 $16,000,000.00 $12,000,000.00


• Construction Manager • General Contractor • Thirty eight years of professional and quality construction management services makes us...

“The Customer’s Builder” SPECIALIZING IN:

Tenant Fit-Outs Remodels

Ground Up Renovation

Retail Hospitality

Big Box Fitness

www.constructionone.com

CIRCLE NO. 23

Licensed Contractor in all 50 States 101 East Town Street - Suite 401 - Columbus, OH 43215 • 614.235.0057


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Anderson & Rodgers Commercial Construction James Spataro, General Manager Operations 137 MacArthur Ct. Nicholasville, KY 40356 (859) 885-8531 Fax: (859) 885-0154 www.andersonandrodgers.com info@andersonandrodgers.com Year Established: 2013 No. of Employees: 18 Retail: $2,000,000.00 Restaurants: $1,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A $6,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $2,000,000.00 Federal: $500,000.00 Other: N/A Total: $11,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 15 Square Footage: Retail: 6,000 Hospitality: 3,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: 5,000 Healthcare: 5,000 Multi-Family: 2,000 Other: N/A Total: 25,000 Specialize In: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Multi-Family

Beam Team Construction, Inc. Tim Hill, Executive Vice President, Business Development 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Blvd. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 www.thebeamteam.com • timhill@thebeamteam.com Retail: $60,000,000, Hospitality: $5,000,000 Restaurants: $5,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $5,000,000, Total: $75,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 3000+ Square Footage: Retail Square: 120,000, Hospitality: 10,000, Restaurants: 10,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 10,000 Total: 150,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

Bogart Construction Danny Stone, Director of Business Development 9980 Irvine Center Dr., Suite 200 Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 453-1400 (949) 453-1414 www.bogartconstruction.com dstone@bogartconstruction.com Retail: $58,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $58,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 65, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 550,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Store, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

40

Broadway Construction Group Joe Aiello, COO 140 Broadway, 41st Floor New York, NY 10005 (212) 837-4614 www.broadwwaycg.com jaiello@broadwaycg.com Year Established: 2013 No. of Employees: 41 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $22,545,148.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $90,706,401.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $113,251,549.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 14 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 175,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: 1,472,000 Other: N/A Total: 1,647,000 Specialize In: Hotels, Multi-Family

Buildrite Construction Corp. Bryan Alexander, President 4112 Clubview Ter. Marietta, GA 30068 (770) 971-0787 www.buildriteconstruction.com bryan@buildriteconstruction.com Year Established: 1982 No. of Employees: 28 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $21,508,321.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 300+ Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Retail

Capacity Builders WayneRausch, President 5563 S Prince St. Littleton, CO 80120 (303) 627-1248 Fax: (303) 627-1249 www.capacitybuilders.com wayne@capacitybuilders.com Retail: $2,500,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $2,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 850, Square Footage: Retail: 64,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 64,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


adaptive reuse | government | higher education historic preservation & restoration | hospitality | interiors k-12 education | mixed-use | multifamily | office | recreation religious | restaurant | retail | senior living | special projects

good experience builders

SolĂ­s Hotel Two Porsche Drive

191 Peachtree Street NE, Suite 2100, Atlanta, GA 30303 | 404-588-3300 | www.winter-construction.com CIRCLE NO. 24


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING C.B.. Summer Construction Co., Inc.

JohnnyWilkins, Senior Product Manager 595 Colonial Park Dr., Suite 200 Roswell, GA 30075 (770) 772-9018 Fax: (770) 318-4974 www.cbsummer.com johnny@cbsummer.net Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $10,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/18: N/A, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

CKP Construction

Todd Barbour, President 1616 S. Kentucky, Suite C325 Amarillo, TX 79102 (806) 420-0696 www.ckpconstruction.com tbarbour@ckpconstruction.com Year Established: 2011 No. of Employees: 18 Retail: $662,000.00 Restaurants: $11,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,050,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $11,100,000.00 Total: $24,812,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 153 Square Footage: Retail: 790,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 24,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 11,700 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 326,000 Total: 1,137,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Office Building

Clune Construction Company

Jack Follman, Communications Manager 10 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 2200 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 726-6103 www.clunegc.com jfollman@clunegc.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: $921,902,359, Total: $921,902,359, Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Office Interiors

Command Center, Inc.

Dwight Enget, National Accounts 3609 S. Wadsworth Blvd., Suite 250 Lakewood, CO 80235 (866) 464-5844 www.commandonline.com dwight.enget@commandonline.com Year Established: 2006 No. of Employees: 220 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Multi-Family

42

Commonwealth Building, Inc. Chris Fontaine, President 265 Willard St. Quincy, MA 02169 (617) 770-0050 Fax: (617) 472-4734 www.combuild.com cfontaine@combuild.com Year Established: 1979 No. of Employees: 35 Retail: $25,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $3,000,000.00 Total: $28,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 50 Square Footage: Retail: 722,450 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 27,550 Total: 750,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Special Projects and Maintenance Division

Construction Advantage, Inc. Mike Rothholtz, President 1112 Hibbard Rd. Wilmette, IL 60091 (847) 853-9300 constructadvantage@sbcglobal.net Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: Varies Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: Varies Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

Construction One Don Skorupski, Business Development Manager 101 E. Town St., Suite 401 Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 235-0057 www.constructionone.com dskorupski@constructionone.com Year Established: 1980 No. of Employees: 55 Retail: $19,000,000.00 Restaurants: $4,000,000.00 Hospitality: $12,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $13,000,000.00 Total: $48,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 106 Square Footage: Retail: 350,000 Hospitality: 150,000 Restaurants: 60,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 200,000 Total: 760,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Daycare, Banks, Light/Large Commercial, Hospitality

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 25


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING DAVACO Paul Hamer, EVP 4050 Valley View Ln., Suite 150 Irving, TX 75038 (877) 7DAVACO www.davacoinc.com info@davacoinc.com Year Established: 1990 No. of Employees: 1,300 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

De Jager Construction Inc. Dan De Jager, President 75 60th St. S.W. Wyoming, MI 49548 (616) 530-0060 Fax: (616) 530-8619 www.dejagerconstruction.com dj1@dejagerci.com Year Established: 1970 No. of Employees: 40 Retail: $23,430,000.00 Restaurants: $870,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $24,300,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 83 Square Footage: Retail: 365,393 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 5,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 370,393 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

DeWees Construction Inc. Allen C. Galloway, Sr. VP 35 N. Baldwin Bargersville, IN 46106 (317) 709-5135 Fax: (317) 422-5142 www.deweesconstruction.com allen@deweesconstruction.com Year Established: 1991 No. of Employees: 17 Retail: $8,184,272.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $1,015,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $1,332,000.00 Total: $10,531,272.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 22 Square Footage: Retail: 40,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 12,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 16,500 Total: 68,500 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

44

Digney York Associates Deanne Kuzmic, Dir. Business Development 1919 Gallows Rd. Vienna, VA 22182 (703) 790-5281 www.digneyyork.com dkuzmic@digneyyork.com Year Established: 1985 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $1,000,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: $1,000,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 700 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 1,000,000,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,000,000,000 Specialize In: Hotels (Renovation Only)

DLP Construction Co. Inc. Lynn Kaden, Dir. Business Development 5935 Shiloh Rd. E., Suite 100 Alpharetta, GA 30005 (770) 887-3573 Fax: (770) 887-2357 www.dlpconstruction.com lkaden@dlpconstruction.com Year Established: 1996 No. of Employees: 35 Retail: $30,000,000.00 Restaurants: $6,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $36,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 408 Square Footage: Retail: 1,600,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 30,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,630,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc. Bryan Hodnett, Dir. Business Development 3030 E. Causeway Approach Mandeville, LA 70448 (800) 626-4431 Fax: (985) 626-3572 www.donahuefavret.com dfcinfo@donahuefavret.com Year Established: 1979 No. of Employees: 52 Retail: $7,067,700.00 Restaurants: $364,913.00 Hospitality: $5,131,626.00 Healthcare: $12,287,156.00 Multi-Family: $18,717,273.00 Federal: N/A Other: $43,900,799.00 Total: $87,469,467.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 13 Square Footage: Retail: 33,000 Hospitality: 50,000 Restaurants: 2,278 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 27,094 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 130,300 Total: 242,672 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 26


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Donnelly Construction Doug Berry, Senior Product Manager 557 Route 23 S. Wayne, NJ 07470 (973) 672-1800 Ext. 100 Fax: (973) 677-1824 www.donnellyind.com dberry@donnellyind.com Year Established: 1977 No. of Employees: 100 Retail: $4,500,000.00 Restaurants: $6,500,000.00 Hospitality: $14,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $10,000,000.00 Total: $35,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 75 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

DWM Comprehensive Facility Solutions Bennett Van Wert, National Sales Manager 2 Northway Ln. Latham, NY 12110 (888) 396-9111 Ext. 225 www.dwminc.com bvanwert@dwminc.com Year Established: 1997 No. of Employees: 75 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A MultiFamily: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $29,200,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 8,340 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education

E.C. Provini Co., Inc. Joseph Lembo, President 1 Bethany Rd., Bldg. 2 Suite 24 Hazlet, NJ 07730 (732) 739-8884 Fax: (732) 739-8886 jlembo@ecprovini.com Year Established: 1986 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: $33,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $33,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 72 Square Footage: Retail: 402,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 402,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Phased Open Renovations/Expansions/Downsizing

46

EBCO General Contractor, LTD. William A. Egger, VP, Strategy & Technology 804 E. 1st St. Cameron, TX 76520 (254) 697-8516 Fax: (254) 697-8656 www.ebcogc.com william.egger@ebcogc.com Year Established: 1986 No. of Employees: 84 Retail: $11,726,241.00 Restaurants: $10,401,114.00 Hospitality: $82,811,286.00 Healthcare: $24,784,853.00 MultiFamily: $365,266.00 Federal: N/A Other: 3,967,635.00 Total: $134,056,395.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 25 Square Footage: Retail: 90,560 Hospitality: 626,551 Restaurants: 16,419 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 14,376 Multi-Family: 36,573 Other: 16,612 Total: 801,091 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants

ELAN General Contracting, Inc. AdrianJohnson, President 3111 Camino Del Rio N., Suite 400 San Diego, CA92108 (619) 284-4174 Ext. 7001 Fax: (619) 284-4175 www.elangc.com ajohnson@elangc.com Year Established: 1981 No. of Employees: 15 Retail: $18,000,000, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Billings: $18,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: N/A

EMJ Corporation Burt Odom, CEO & President 2034 Hamilton Place Blvd., Suite 400 Chattanooga, TN 37421 (423) 855-1550 www.emjcorp.com news@emjcorp.com Year Established: 1968 No. of Employees: 441 Retail: $344,071,122.00 Restaurants: $4,686,347.00 Hospitality: $94,515,016.00 Healthcare: $29,191,499.00 Multi-Family: $59,683,533.00 Federal: N/A Other: $420,525,027.00 Total: $952,672,544.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 95 Square Footage: Retail: 5,536,252 Hospitality: 2,538,261 Restaurants: 14,242 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 298,275 Multi-Family: 575,648 Other: 4,236,488 Total: 13,199,166 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Renewable Energy, Industrial, Distribution, Warehouse, Sports Venues, Entertainment, Mixed-Use, Public Work, Office Buildings

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 27


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING FCP Services James Loukusa, CEO 3185 Terminal Dr. Eagan, MN 55121 (651) 789-0790 www.fcpservices.com jloukusa@fcpservices.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 5,000+ Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

First Finish, Inc. Jason Stock, VP of Business Development 8300 Guilford Rd., Suite F Columbia, MD 21046 (410) 290-6450 Fax: (410) 290-6451 www.firstfinish.net jstock@firstfinish.net Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 80 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $89,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $89,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 18 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 3,378,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 3,378,000 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Greg Freeh, President 31269 Bradley Rd. North Olmsted, OH 44070 (440) 716-4000 Fax: (440) 716-4010 www.fortneyweygandt.com gfreeh@fortneyweygandt.com Year Established: 1978 No. of Employees: 109 Retail: $25,511,959.00 Restaurants: $8,705,518.00 Hospitality: $35,436,133.00 Healthcare: $2,675,513.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $408,300.00 Total: $72,737,423.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 104 Square Footage: Retail: 184,538 Hospitality: 341,945 Restaurants: 66,198 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 15,070 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 29,968 Total: 637,719 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Senior Living

48

Fulcrum Construction Faith Hoople, Vice President 1945 The Exchange, #400 Atlanta, GA 30339 (770) 612-8005 Fax: (770) 612-8115 www.fulcrumconstruction.com fhoople@fulcrumconstruction.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 95 Retail: $108,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $108,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 125 Square Footage: Retail: 1,250,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,250,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

N-STORE Services & Granger Contracting Kevin Zigrang, Dir. Business Development 160 Chesterfield Industrial Blvd. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 728-0448 Fax: (636) 728-0449 www.gnhservices.com kevin@gnhservices.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 75 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Gilbane Building Company DennisCornick, Executive Vice President 7 Jackson Walkway Providence, RI 02903 (401) 456-5800 www.gilbaneco.com media@gilbaneco.com Year Established: 1873 No. of Employees: 2,813 Retail: $17,309,000.00 Restaurants: $2,098,000.00 Hospitality: $181,440,000.00 Healthcare: $266,922,000.00 Multi-Family: $683,523,000.00 Federal: $192,542,000.00 Other: $3,369,148,000.00 Total: $4,712,982,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 354 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 26,309,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Hotels, Education, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 28


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Gray Eric Berg, Senior Vice President 421 E. Cerritos Ave. Anaheim, CA 92805 (714) 491-1317 Fax: (714) 333-9700 www.gray.com eberg@gray.com Year Established: 1960 No. of Employees: 893 Retail: $90,200,000.00 Restaurants; $31,600,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $975,887,844.00 Total: $1,097,687,844.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 564 Square Footage: Retail: 2,100,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 187,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 3,200,000 Total: 5,487,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Distribution Centers, Entertainment, Film/TV Studios, Theme Parks

Harmon Construction, Inc. Ardell Mitchell, Vice President 621 S State St. North Vernon, IN 47265 (812) 346-2048 Fax: (812) 346-2054 www.harmonconstruction.com ardell.mitchell@harmonconstruction.com Year Established: 1955 No. of Employees: 80 Retail: N/A Restaurants: $3,500,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $3,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 80 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 50,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 50,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Sports Stadium, Airports

Healy Construction Services, Inc. Jim Healy, Director of Construction 14000 S. Keeler Ave. Crestwood, IL 60418 (708) 396-0440 Fax: (708) 396-0412 www.healyconstructionservices.com jth@healyconstructionservices.com Year Established: 1989 No. of Employees: 30 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $16,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 1191 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 2,800,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family

50

Hirsch Construction Corp. Adam Hirsch, President 100 Conifer Hill Dr., Suite 306 Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 762-8744 Fax: (978) 762-8455 www.hirschcorp.com ahirsch@hirschcorp.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 30 Retail: $20,000,000.00 Restaurants: $5,000,000.00 Hospitality: $5,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $30,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 60 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 200,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Airport Work

Hoar Construction Sandra Cox, Corporate Marketing Director Two Metroplex Dr., Suite 400 Birmingham, AL 35209 (205) 803-2121 Fax: (205) 423-2323 www.hoar.com info@hoar.com Year Established: 1940 No. of Employees: 650 Retail: $221,249,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $34,465,000.00 Healthcare: $113,973,000.00 Multi-Family: $261,796,000.00 Federal: $4,031,000.00 Other: $227,230,000.00 Total: $862,744,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 60 Square Footage: Retail: 520,287 Hospitality: 254,065 Restaurants: N/A Federal: 361,400 Healthcare: 410,620 Multi-Family: 2,673,176 Other: 1,502,900 Total: 5,704,448 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

Horizon Retail Construction, Inc. Stefanie Andersen, Marketing Manager 1500 Horizon Dr. Sturtevant, WI 53177 (262) 638-6000 Fax: (262) 638-6015 www.horizonretail.com sales@horizonretail.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 298 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $220,000,000.00+ Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 1,461 Square Footage: Retail: 90,405,049 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 1,913,930 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 5,629,206 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 14,635,936 Total: 112,584,121 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Financial Institutions, Airport Concessions, Entertainment

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


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800.955.4731 www.gpdgroup.com CIRCLE NO. 29


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Hueber-Breuer Construction J. Andrew Breuer, President P.O. Box 515 Syracuse, NY 13205-0515 (315) 476-7917 Fax: (315) 476-7990 www.hueber-breuer.com hb@hueber-breuer.com Year Established: 1880 No. of Employees: Retail: $1,500,000.00 Restaurants: $1,500,000.00 Hospitality: $37,000,000.00 Healthcare: $11,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $92,000,000.00 Total: $143,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 8 Square Footage: Retail: 40,000 Hospitality: 182,000 Restaurants: 5,500 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 50,800 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 887,500 Total: 1,165,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Education, Mixed-Use, Student Housing, Athletic, Manufacturing, Parking, Historic Renovation, Non-Profit

Hunter Building Corp. Peter Ferri, President & CEO 14609 Kimberley Ln. Houston, TX 77079 (281) 877-6550 Fax: (281) 752-8600 www.hunterbuilding.com jriedel@hunterbuilding.com Year Established: 2006 No. of Employees: 10 Retail: $473,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $473,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 15 Square Footage: Retail: 50,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 50,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers

Icon Kevin Hughes, SVP Sales & Marketing 1701 Golf Rd., I-900 Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-4246 (847) 631-3210 Fax: (847) 364-1517 www.iconic.com khughes@iconid.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $19,200,000.00 Restaurants: $600,000.00 Hospitality: $500,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $700,000.00 Total: $21,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 1,827 Square Footage: Retail: 6,400,000 Hospitality: 217,000 Restaurants: 521,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A MultiFamily: N/A Other: 280,000 Total: 7,418,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/ Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

52

IDC Construction, LLC ValerieHan, Contracts Admin. 1000 Churchill Ct. Woodstock, GA 30188 (678) 213-1110 Fax: (678) 213-1109 www.idcconstruction.com valeriehan@idcconstruction.com Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 30 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $70,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $70,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 20 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 68,000,000 Specialize In: Hotels

Integrated Construction, LLC Justin Beebe, VP-Hospitality 14827 Mandarin Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223 (904) 356-6715 Fax: (904) 356-6714 www.integratedfl.com jbeebe@inteconst.com Year Established: 2007 No. of Employees: 49 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $26,969,096.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $81,977,889.00 Total: $108,946,985.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 54 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 608,771 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 2,556,049 Total: 3,164,820 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Senior Living Communities, IL/AL & Memory Care Facilities

JG Construction Wally Clark, VP 15632 El Prado Chino, CA 91710 (809) 993-9393 www.jgconstruction.com wallyc@jgconstruction.com Year Established: 1986 No. of Employees: 67 Retail: $14,100,000.00 Restaurants: $18,209,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $9,100,000.00 Total: $41,409,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 64 Square Footage: Retail: 95,077 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 160,780 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 255,857 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 30


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Kadean Construction Matt Breeze, VP Operations 1558 Fenpark Dr. Fenton, MO 63026 (636) 305-0099 Fax: (636) 305-7232 www.kadean.com mbreeze@kadean.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: $62,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 22, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 2,765,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Office Buildings, Industrial

Kinsley Construction, Inc. Sarah McCauley, Marketing Content Coordinator 2700 Water St. York, PA 17403 (717) 741-3841 www.kinsleyconstruction.com info@kinsleyconstruction.com Year Established: 1963 No. of Employees: 1,327 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $5,643,917.00 Healthcare: $14,419,878.00 Multi-Family: $95,386,202.00 Federal: N/A Other: $437,150,608.00 Total: $552,600,605.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 400 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Education, MultiFamily, Distribution, Hospitality, Manufacturing, Office, retail/ Commercial, Senior Care

Knoebel Construction Matthew Mabie, President 18333 Wings Corporate Dr. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 326-4100 Fax: (636) 326-4101 www.knoebelconstruction.com mmabie@knoebelcon.com Year Established: 1981 No. of Employees: 57 Retail: $45,994,040.00 Restaurants: $3,847,425.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,404,181.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $15,667,181.00 Total: $67,912,827.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 55 Square Footage: Retail: 582,300 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 28,460 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 13,980 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 140,900 Total: 765,640 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

54

L & L Retail Construction, LLC Nathan Howard, Managing Member 5601 Huettner Dr. Norman, OK 73069 (405) 360-2775 Fax: (405) 360-8897 www.llretail.com nathan@llretail.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 2545 Retail: $9,000,000.00 Restaurants: $150,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $150,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $9,300,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 120 Square Footage: Retail: 260,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 1,500 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 2,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 263,500 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, RollOuts, Cap-X

Lakeview Construction John Stallman, Marketing Director 10505 Corporate Dr. Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (262) 857-3336 Ext. 241 www.lvconstruction.com john@lvconstruction.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 110 Retail: $82,500,000.00 Restaurants: $12,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $900,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $95,400,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 810 Square Footage: Retail: 2,200,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 100,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 25,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 2,325,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

LCS Facility Group Joe Fairley, Vice President 36 Cottage St. Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 (845) 485-7000 Fax: (845) 485-7052 www.lcsfacilitygroup.com joseph.fairley@lcsfacilitygroup.com Year Established: 2001 No. of Employees: 440 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $4,000,000.00 Healthcare: $4,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $2,000,000.00 Federal: $2,000,000.00 Other: $2,500,000.00 Total: $14,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: Over 200 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 1,000,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: 500,000 Healthcare: 2,000,000 Multi-Family: 500,000 Other: 500,000 Total: 4,500,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Education, Multi-Family, Commercial Including High-Tech, DC’s, Logistics, Warehouse, Manufacturing

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 31


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Lendlease

Robert Bassler, General Manager, Strategic Business Unit 200 Park Ave. New York, NY 10166 (212) 592-6800 Fax: (212) 592-6988 www.lendlease.com americas@lendlease.com Year Established: 1917 No. of Employees: 1800 Retail: $31,727,165.00 Restaurants: $114,205,540.00 Hospitality: $143,874,884.00 Healthcare: $232,270,762.00 Multi-Family: $2,897,567,141.00 Federal: $6,662,270.00 Other: $507,157,036.00 Total: $3,933,464,798.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 609 Square Footage: Retail: 140,800 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 1,310,000 Federal: 198,000 Healthcare: 405,100 Multi-Family: 6,424,090 Other: 2,562,726 Total: 11,040,716 Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

Marco Contractors

Samra Savioz, Director of Dev. National Accounts 100 Commonwealth Dr. Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 816-4547 www.marcocontractors.com ssavioz@marcocontractors.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $58,000,000.00 Restaurants: $21,000,000.00 Hospitality: $9,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $88,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 11,218 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Multi-Family, Other

MC Construction Management

Connie Mollet, Director of Development 38012 N. Linda Dr. Cave Creek, AZ 85331 (480) 367-8600 Ext. 107 Fax: (480) 367-8625 www.mcbuilders.net cmollet@mcbuilders.net Year Established: 2001 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: $24,500,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $26,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 50 Square Footage: Retail: 581,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 8,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 589,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Entertainment, Medical, Office

56

McGuire Builders, Inc. Michael S Tande, Co-President & COO. 2850 Walnut Ave. Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 424-3636 www.mcguirebuilders.net michelle@mcguirebuilders.net Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $59,800,000 Restaurants: $10,200,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $70,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 10 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: 1,012,000 Restaurants: 29,142, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A Total: 1,041,142, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Boutique Hotels, Adaptive Reuse

MCX Interior R. Shane McNamara, Co-Founder and Managing Principal 11 Broadway, Suite 615 New York, NY 10004 (310) 928-3988 www.mcxinterior.com contact@mcxinterior.com Year Established: 2005 No. of Employees: 50-100 Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $13,000,000.00 Total: $13,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 25 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Corporate Interiors and Luxury Showrooms

Mowery Dave Cross, Owner and President 1000 Bent Creek Blvd. Mechanicsburg, PA 17050 (717) 506-1000 Fax: (717) 506-1010 www.rsmowery.com dcross@rsmowery.com Year Established: 1925 No. of Employees: 70 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: 115,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 64 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 2,312,712 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Education

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


FORTNEY & WEYGANDT, INC. GENERAL CONTRACTORS

RETAIL

LODGING

RESTAURANT

ROLLOUT

Fortney & Weygandt specializes in retail, rollout, restaurant, commercial and lodging segments across the country and has completed over 24,000 projects in the past 40 years. 31269 Bradley Rd. • North Olmsted, OH 44070 • www.fortneyweygandt.com • 440.716.4000 CIRCLE NO. 32


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Mycon Dana Walters, Vice President of BD 17311 Dallas Pkwy. Dallas, TX 75248 (972) 529-2444 www.mycon.com dwalters@mycon.com Year Established: 1987 No. of Employees: 135 Retail: $203,680,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $100,320,000.00 Total: $304,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 63 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 468,500 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education

O’Neil Industries, Inc. Dean Arnold, Retired Vice President-Consultant 1245 W. Washington Blvd. Chicago, IL 60607 (773) 755-1611 Fax: (773) 442-0297 www.weoneil.com darnold@weoneil.com Year Established: 1925 No. of Employees: 424 Retail: $105,000,000.00 Restaurants: $3,000,000.00 Hospitality: $40,000,000.00 Healthcare: $130,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $82,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $289,000,000.00 Total: $649,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 221 Square Footage: Retail:1,350,000 Hospitality: 157,000 Restaurants: 3,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 401,000 Multi-Family: 397,000 Other: 2,088,000 Total: 4,396,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Office, Residential-Multi-Family, Manufacturing, Transportation, Power

P&C Construction, Inc. Nic Cornelison, Vice President 2500 East 18th Street Chattanooga, TN 37404 (423) 493-0051 Fax: (423) 493-0058 www.pc-const.com nic@pc-const.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 57 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 333 Square Footage: Retail: 687,400 Hospitality: 0 Restaurants: 57,800 Federal: 0 Healthcare: 47,688 Multi-Family: 0 Other: 378,000 Total: 1,170,888 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education

58

Pepper Construction Group J. Scot Pepper, Executive Vice President 643 N. Orleans St. Chicago, IL 60654 (312) 266-4700 www.pepperconstruction.com info@pepperconstruction.com Year Established: 1927 No. of Employees: 1,149 Retail: $155,600,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $38,400,000.00 Healthcare: $134,600,000.00 Multi-Family: $8,100,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $782,900,000.00 Total: $1,119,600,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 441 Square Footage: Retail: 1,660,000 Hospitality: 429,050 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 571,700 Multi-Family: 84,800 Other: 8,197,900 Total: 10,943,450 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Commercial Office, Data Centers, Industrial/Manufacturing, Institutional, Entertainment

Prairie Contractors, Inc. Peter Hegarty, President 9318 Gulfstream Rd., Unit C Frankfort, IL 60423 (815) 469-1904 Fax: (815) 469-5436 www.prairiecontractors.com notifications@prairie-us.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: $2,784,000.00 Restaurants: $24,368,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $27,152,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 65 Square Footage: Retail: 30,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 115,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 145,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants

Prime Retail Services Inc. Jeff Terry, Business Development Officer 3617 Southland Dr. Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511 Fax: (866) 584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com jterry@primeretailservices.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 300(+) Retail: $20,000,000.00 Restaurants: $5,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $450,000.00 Other: N/A Total: $25,450,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 1000(+) Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING PTS Contracting Alan Briskman, Principal 75 Virginia Rd., Suite 400 White Plains, NY 10603 (914) 290-4166 www.ptscontracting.com alan@ptscontracting.com Retail: $2,000,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: $1,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $5,000,000, Total: $8,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 22 Square Footage: Retail: 100,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: 200,000 Total: 300,000, Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Office Fit-Outs

R.E. Crawford Construction, LLC Susan Courter, Dir. Business Development 6650 Professional Pkwy. W., #100 Sarasota, FL 34240 (941) 907-0010 Fax: (941) 907-0030 www.recrawford.com scourter@recrawford.com Year Established: 2005 No. of Employees: 44 Retail: $25,155,000.00 Restaurants: $4,134,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,226,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $285,000.00 Total: $31,800,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 81 Square Footage: Retail: 291,965 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 48,312 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 25,047 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 3,223 Total: 368,547 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Retail Construction Services, Inc. Ross Stecklein, Dir. Business Development 11343 39th St. N. Lake Elmo, MN 55042 (651) 704-9000 Fax: (651) 704-9100 www.retailconstruction.com rstecklein@retailconstruction.com Year Established: 1984 No of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Other

60

Rockerz Inc. Robert Smith, Director of Business/National Accounts 100 Commonwealth Dr. Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 612-6520 www.rockerzinc.com rsmith@rockerzinc.com Year Established: 2004 No. of Employees: 68 Retail: $6,400,000.00 Restaurants: $1,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $7,400,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 270 Square Footage: Retail: 3,000,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 100,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 3,200,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

Rockford Construction Jennifer Boezwinkle, Executive Vice President 601 First St. NW Grand Rapids, MI 49504 (616) 285-6933 Fax: (616) 285-4472 www.rockfordconstruction.com jboezwinkle@rockfordconstruction.com Year Established: 1987 No. of Employees: 316 Retail: $110,494,864.00 Restaurants: $3,198,382.00 Hospitality: $24,213,098.00 Healthcare: $39,547,247.00 Multi-Family: $47,773,481.00 Federal: $168,947.00 Other: $85,614,474.00 Total: $311,010,493.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 356 Square Footage: Retail: 5,778,829 Hospitality: 165,241 Restaurants: 194,861 Federal: 346,500 Healthcare: 560,712 Multi-Family: 539,930 Other: 1,322,756 Total: 8,908,829 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

RT Stevens Construction Inc. Troy Stevens, President & CEO 420 McKinley, #111513 Corona, CA 92879 (951) 280-9361 Fax: (951) 549-9560 www.rtstevens.com tstevens@rtstevens.com Year Established: 1988 No. of Employees: Retail: $6,000,000.00 Restaurants: $50,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $100,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $6,150,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 45 Square Footage: Retail: 172,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 2,500 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 8,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 182,500 Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 34


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Ryan Companies US, Inc. Jessica Wing, Digital Coordinator 533 S. Third Street, Suite 100 Minneapolis, MN 55415 (612) 492-4000 www.ryancompanies.com jessica.wing@ryancompanies.com Year Established: 1938 No. of Employees: 1,200+ Retail: $$141,762,748.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $32,582,965 Healthcare: $90,632,559 Multi-Family: $252,336,240 Federal: N/A Other: $1,099,049,062 Total: $1,364,279,670 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 100 Square Footage: N/A Retail: 1,574,502 Hospitality: 611,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 483,936 Multi-Family: 1895,304 Other: 8,366,237 Total: 12,930,979 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Multi-Family, Hospitality, Industrial, Mixed-Use, Office, Retail, Senior Living

S.L. Hayden Construction Inc. Steve Hayden, President 3015 S. IH 35 W. Burleson, TX 76028 (817) 783-7900 Fax: (817) 783-7902 www.slhaydenconstruction.com shayden@hcichicago.com Year Established: 1992 No. of Employees: 20 Retail: $6,000,000.00 Restaurants: $21,500,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $27,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 472 Square Footage: Retail: 150,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 90,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 240,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Catastrophic Services

S. M. Wilson & Co. ColeenOlson, Executive Assistant 2185 Hampton Ave. St. Louis, MO 63139 (314) 645-9595 Fax: (314) 645-1700 www.smwilson.com coleen.olson@smwilson.com Year Established: 1921 No. of Employees: 130 Retail: $43,594,062.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $70,316,503.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $2,562,582.00 Other: $113,976,205.00 Total: $230,449,352.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 26 Square Footage: Retail: 2,969,425 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 828,741 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 2,010,445 Total: 5,808,611 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Multi-Family

62

Sachse Construction Miha Pusta, Business Development 1528 Woodward Ave., Suite 600 Detroit, MI 48226 (313) 481-8263 Fax: (313) 481-8250 www.sachseconstruction.com mpusta@sachse.net Year Established: 1991 No. of Employees: 165 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 185 Square Footage: Retail: 16,000 Hospitality: 95,000 Restaurants: 48,600 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 26,000 Multi-Family: 219,000 Other: 178,000 Total: 1,056,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

SAJO Inc. Rocco Raco, Director of Marketing & Business Development 1320 Graham Mont-Royal, QC H3P 3CB Canada (877) 901-7256 www.sajo.com rocco@sajo.com Year Established: 1977 No. of Employees: 160 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Retail

Schimenti Construction Company Joseph Rotondo, Executive Vice President 650 Danbury Rd. Ridgefield, CT 06877 (914) 244-9100 Fax: (914) 244-9103 www.schimenti.com jrotondo@schimenti.com Year Established: 1994 No. of Employees: 175 Retail: $244,000,000.00 Restaurants: $16,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $15,000,000.00 Total: $275,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 150 Square Footage: Retail: 1,000,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 120,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 200,000 Total: 1,320,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


Taylor Bros. would like to

CONGRATULATE all the winners of the

Commercial Construction & Renovation Project Profile Awards

National Contractor

Construction Manager Self-Performing General Contractor Fixture Installation

MBE - Minority Business Enterprise

COLUMBUS, INDIANA 812.379.9547 | WWW.TBCCI.COM CIRCLE NO. 35


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Shames Construction Carolyn Shames, President & CEO 5826 Brisa St. Livermore, CA 94550 (925) 606-3000 Fax: (925) 606-3003 www.shames.com cshames@shames.com Year Established: 1987 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: $78,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $78,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 13 Square Footage: Retail: 1,200,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,200,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Singleton Construction, LLC Jennifer Danquist Kilgore, Director of Business Development & Marketing P.O. Box 309 Canal Winchester, OH 43110 (740) 756-7331 Ext. 106 Fax: (740) 756-7441 www.singletonconstruction.net jkilgore@singletonconstruction.net Year Established: 1995 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: 33,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 1,100 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Site Roll Outs

Solex Contracting Inc. Jerry Allen, President 42146 Remington Ave. Temecula, CA 92590 (951) 308-1706 Fax: (951) 308-1856 www.solexcontracting.com jerry@solexcontracting.com Year Established: 2004 No. of Employees: 100 Retail: $16,000,000, Hospitality: $ N/A, Restaurant: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $32,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 150 Square Footage: Retail: 350,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: N/A, Federal: 150,000, Other: N/A, Total: 500,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Telecommunications/Tower Erection

64

SOS - Retail Services Eli Lessing, Dir. Business Development 201 Rosa Helm Way Franklin, TN 37067 (615) 550-4343 www.sos-retailservices.com elessing@sos-retailservices.net Year Established: 2009 No. of Employees: 75 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 439 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Convenience Stores

Spiegelglass Construction Company Tim Spiegelglass, Owner 18 Worthington Access Dr. Maryland Heights, MO 63043 (314) 569-2300 Fax: (314) 569-0788 www.spiegelglass.com tim@spiegelglass.gc.com Year Established: 1904 No. of Employees: 15 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Restaurants, Tenant Improvement, Retail

StoreCrafters, Inc. Laurie Schindler, Account Manager 100 Boxart St. Rochester, NY 14612 (585) 865-5350 Fax: (585) 865-5461 www.storecrafters.com laurie.schindler@storecrafters.com Year Established: 2001 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: $22,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 45 Square Footage: Retail: 700,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Groceries, Specialty Stores, Retail

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 36


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Taylor Bros. Construction Co., Inc. Jeff Chandler, Vice President 4555 Middle Rd. Columbus, IN 47203 (812) 379-9547 Fax: (812) 372-4759 www.tbcci.com jeff.chandler@tbcci.com Year Established: 1933 No. of Employees: 200 Retail: $43,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,500,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $1,500,000.00 Other: $10,000,000.00 Total: $57,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 475 Square Footage: Retail: 5,000,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 20,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 100,000 Total: 5,120,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores

Timberwolff Construction, Inc. Mike Wolff, President 1659 W. Arrow Rte. Upland, CA 91786 (909) 949-0380 Fax: (909) 949-8500 www.timberwolff.com mike@timberwolff.com Year Established: 1989 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 176 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Offices-Commercial

Triad Retail Construction Brian Holroyd, VP 2206 O’Day Rd. Pearland, TX 77581 (281) 485-4700 Fax: (281) 485-7722 www.triadrc.com bryan@triadrc.com Year Established: 2008 No. of Employees: 64 Retail: $16,000,000.00 Restaurants: $4,000,000.00 Hospitality: $5,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $20,000,000.00 Total: $45,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 413 Square Footage: Retail: 95,000 Hospitality: 28,000 Restaurants: 20,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 400,000 Total: 543,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Self-Storage

66

TRICON Construction

Rich Carlucci, Vice President 3433 Marshall Ln. Bensalem, PA 19020 (267) 223-1060 Fax: (215) 633-8363 www.tricon-construction.com r.carlucci@trion-construction.com Retail: $7,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $7,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 50 Square Footage: Retail: 555,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 555,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Casinos, Specialty Stores

UHC Construction Services

Leslie Burton, Dir. Business Development 154 E. Aurora Rd., #155 Northfield, OH 44067 (216) 544-7588 www.uhccorp.com lburton@uhccorp.com Year Established: 2006 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $15,220,728.00 Restaurants: $6,973,626.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $963,646.00 Total: $23,158,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 2,319,500 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 1,150,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A MultiFamily: N/A Other: 624,500 Total: 4,094,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Financial/Banking

VENATOR Contracting Group, LLC

Suzette Novak, Dir. Business Development 44930 Vic Wertz Dr. Clinton Township, MI 48036 (586) 298-8679 Fax: (586) 229-2430 www.venatorcontracting.com suzette@venatorcontracting.com Year Established: 2010 No. of Employees: 12 Retail: $6,600,000.00 Restaurants: $1,100,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $315,000.00 Total: $8,015,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 39 Square Footage: Retail: 128,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 15,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A MultiFamily: N/A Other: 3,300 Total: 146,300 Specialize In: Big-Box/ Department, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Offices, Salons

Vintage Construction Management

Tyler Arney, Owner 217 E. Stone Ave., Suite 20 Greenville, SC 29609 (864) 252-5099 • (888) 387-7126 tyler@vintagecm.com Retail: $2,900,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $2,900,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 18 Square Footage: Retail: 40,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 40,000, Specialize In: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


Looking, Planning a project in Puerto Rico

Construction Administration • Project Management • Inspection

CIRCLE NO. 37

Manuel Ray, P.E. PO BOX 9023772 • San Juan, PR 00902-3772 787.723.4442 / 375.5770 Fax: 787.723.4447 mray@3mg-pr.com


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Warner Bros. Design Studio

Craig McNabb, VP Design 4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, CA 91522 (818) 954-4430 www.warnerbrosdesignstudio.com • wbds@warnerbros.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Entertainment-Custom Specialty Fabrication

Warwick Construction, Inc.

Walt Watzinger, Vice President 365 FM 1959 Houston, TX 77034 832-448-7000 • FAX 832-448-3000 www.warwickconstruction.com walt@warwickconstruction.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 70 Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $84,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 182 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant Square Footage: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: 910,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Off Airport Parking Facilities, Gas Station/Convenience/Car Wash

Weekes Construction, Inc.

Hunter Weekes, Vice President 237 Rhett St. Greenville, SC29601 (864) 233-0061 Fax: (864) 235-9971 www.weekesconstruction.com hweekes@weekesconstruction.com Year Established: 1975 No. of Employees: 32 Retail: $36,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $36,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 44, Square Footage: Retail: 599,212, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: 599,212, Specialize In: N/A

Whiting-Turner

Bob Minutoli, Division Vice President 135 W. Central Blvd., Suite 840 Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 370-4500 www.whiting-turner.com bob.minutoli@whiting-turner.com Year Established: 1909 No. of Employees: 3396 Retail: $382,000,000.00 Restaurants: $50,000,000.00 Hospitality: $238,000,000.00 Healthcare: $721,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $601,000,000.00 Federal: $258,000,000.00 Other: $3,922,000,000.00 Total: $6,172,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 350+ Square Footage: Retail: 6,187,058 Hospitality: 3,046,167 Restaurants: 191,086 Federal: 1,486,459 Healthcare: 21,185,992 Multi-Family: 20,500,000 Other: N/A Total: 52,596,762 Specialize In: Big-Box/ Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, E-Commerce, Data Center, Warehouse & Distribution, Theme Parks, Sports Facilities

68

Winter Construction Sacha Turpin, Director of Marketing 191 Peachtree St. N.E., Suite 2100 Atlanta, GA 30303 (404) 588-3300 www.winter-construction.com sturpin@winter-construction.com Year Established: 1962 No. of Employees: 310 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $81,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $83,200,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $164,200,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 18 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 328,900 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 1,110,000 Total: 1,438,900 Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Aviation, Interiors, Multi-Family, Office, Parking Decks, Religious, Student Housing, Senior Living

Wolverine Mike Houseman, President North America Division 4046 Leonard N.W. Grand Rapids, MI 49512 (616) 949-3360 www.wolvgroup.com mhouseman@wolvgroup.com Year Established: 1939 No. of Employees: 140 Retail: $17,000,000 Restaurants: $23,000,000 Hospitality: $22,000,000 Healthcare: $10,000,000 Multi-Family: $116,000,000 Federal: N/A Other: $45,000,000 Total: $233,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 89 Square Footage: Retail: 183,000 Hospitality: 133,000 Restaurants: 93,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 37,000 MultiFamily: 816,000 Other: 1,750,000 Total: 3,012,000 Specialize In: Big-box/department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family, Industrial

Zerr Enterprises, Inc. Mike Zerr, President 1545 S. Acoma St. Denver, CO 80223 (303) 758-7776 Fax: (303) 758-7770 www.zerrenterprises.com mike.zerr@zerrenterprises.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: 16 Retail: N/A Restaurants: $2,000,000.00 Hospitality: $24,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $26,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: 34 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 980,000 Restaurants: 100,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,980,000 Specialize In: Hotels

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


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MEDICAL, FINANCIAL & AUTOMOTIVE TURNKEY SOLUTIONS

uhccorp.com 866-931-0118 • info@uhccorp.com

CIRCLE NO. 38


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING

Annual survey shines spotlight on lighting firms

L

ighting. There are scores of companies out there offering the latest and greatest technology and services related to the category. To help you keep up with who’s who, our annual listing shines a spotlight on some of the industry’s leading companies. Our report provides the contact information and contact person at each of the reporting firms in the areas of retail, restaurant, hospitality, healthcare, mulit-family, federal and other commercial sectors. If you want to be a part of next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. Acclaim Lighting Eric Loader, Vice President 6122 S Eastern Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90040 (323) 213-4626 Fax: (323) 582-3108 www.acclaimlighting.com blaine@acclaimlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

ACS Cable Systems Lindsay Lyons, Marketing Communications Manager 960 Flaherty Dr. New Bedford, MA 02745 (508) 985-1240 www.acsunifab.com llyons@atkore.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Modular Lighting, PreFabricated Assemblies, Raised Floor Systems, and Underfloor Systems Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Multi-Family, Telecommunications, Office Space, Casino, and Hotels

AFC Cable Systems Lindsay Lyons, Marketing Communications Manager 960 Flaherty Dr. New Bedford, MA 02745 (508) 985-1240 www.afcweb.com llyons@atkore.com Lighting Product Type: Armored Cable, Metal Clad Cable, Flexible and Liquidtight Conduit Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

70

Altman Lighting

Julie Smith, General Manager 57 Alexander St. Yonkers, NY 10701 (914) 476-7987 www.altmanlighting.com marketing@altmanlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Museum, Art Gallery, Performance Arts Venues, House of Worship

American Illumination, Inc.

Gina Lee, Director of Marketing & Sales 2421 W 205th St., Suite D103 Torrance, CA 90501 (310) 212-6550 Fax: (310) 212-6551 www.american-illumination.com info@american-illumination.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Custom Lighting, LED Engines Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

American PERMALIGHT, Inc.

Marina Batzke, General Manager 2531 W 237th St., Unit 101 Torrance, CA 90505-5245 (310) 891-0924 Fax: (310) 891-0996 www.americanpermalight.com info@americanpermalight.com Lighting Product Type: Photoluminescent EXIT Signs, Photoluminescent Egress Path Markings Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Hotel/Motel, Hospital, Office/Administration

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


Amerlux, LLC

Jeff Zaro, Marketing Specialist 178 Bauer Dr. Passion. Power. Performance. Oakland, NJ 07436 (973) 882-5010 Fax: (973) 882-2605 www.amerlux.com jzaro@amerlux.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Anolis Lighting

David Chesal, Business Development Manager 12349 SW 53rd St., #202 Cooper City, FL 33330 (844) 4ANOLIS Fax: (954) 680-1910 www.anolislighting.com david.chesal@robelighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Media Solutions Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

ANP Lighting

Jerry Fisher, National Sales Manager 9044 Del Mar Montclair, CA 91763 (800) 548-3227 www.anplighting.com jfisher@anplighting.com Lighting Product Type: Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Indoor Pendants Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Arani

Wei Wong, Marketing Strategist 5579 Pare St. Mont-Royal , QC Canada H4P 1P7 (888) 992-7264 Ext. 502 Fax: (514) 903-2297 www.arani.ca w.wong@arani.ca Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Auroralight, Inc. Jason McCulloch, Director of Sales & Marketing 2742 Loker Ave. W Carlsbad, CA 92010 (877) 942-1179 Fax: (760) 931-2916 www.auroralight.com sales@auroralight.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Underwater Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Residential

Autec Power Systems Billy Bautista, Marketing Director 31328 Via Colinas, Suite 102 Westlake Village, CA 91362 (818) 338-7788 www.autec.com marketing@autec.com Lighting Product Type:, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, LED Drivers Markets Served: Healthcare, Commercial, Agfri/Horticulture, Custom

Avenue Lighting Chris Titizian, CEO 9000 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth, CA 91331 (800) 798-0409 Fax: (888) 870-0105 www.avenuelighting.com info@avenuelighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Custom Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Baero North America David Horowitz, Key Account Manager 10432 Baur Blvd. St. Louis , MO 63132 (314) 308-1963 Fax: (314) 991-2640 www.baerousa.com daid.horowitz@baerousa.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Supermarkets

MAY : JUNE 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

71


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Bartco Lighting

Becca Mendez, Marketing Director 5761 Research Dr. Huntington Beach, CA 90710 (714) 230-3200 Fax: (714) 230-3222 www.bartcolighting.com mktg@bartcolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

B.E.G. Controls

MJ Johnson, V.P. Sales & Operations 277 Hwy 74 N, Suite 319 Peachtree City, GA 30269 (770) 349-6341 www.begcontrols.com info@begcontrols.com Lighting Product Type: Intelligent Lighting Controls & Fixture Integrated Sensors Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Bellacor.com

Sara Saferstein, Director of Business Development 251 N 1st Ave, #600 Minneapolis, MN 55401 651-294-2500 www.bellacor.com ssaferstein@bellacor.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Bitro Group Fritz Meyne Jr., Vice President Sales 300 Lodi St. Hackensack, NY 07601 (201) 641-1004 www.bitrogroup.com fritzm@bitrogroup.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Point of Purchase, RGB, Plastics Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Marine

72

Buster + Punch David Schlocker 10844 Burbank Blvd. North Hollywood, CA 91601 (818) 392-3827 www.busterandpunch.us david@drsandassociates.com Lighting Product Type:, Light Bulbs, Wall Sconces Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial

C3 Lighting, Inc. Rick Farrell, President 2907 S Croddy Way Santa Ana, CA 92704 (714) 545-5985 www.c3lighting.com sales@c3lighting.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Corporate, Education

CDS Lighting Studio Inc. Michael Baker, Vice President 4513 Central Ave. NE Albuquerque, NM 87108 (505) 256-9479 www.cdslightingstudio.com cdslighting@gmail.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Multi-Family

CED David Van Laeys 1920 Westridge Dr. Irving, TX 75038 (951) 551-5611 www.cednationalaccounts.com vanlaeys@cednationalaccounts.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Solar Panel Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


SOPHISTICATED LIGHTING & CONTROL

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SOLID STATE SOLID PERFORMANCE acclaimlighting . com SALES@ACCLAIMLIGHTING.COM

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CIRCLE NO. 39


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING ConTech Lighting 725 Landwehr Rd. Northbrook, IL 60062 (847) 559-5500 www.contechlighting.com info@contechlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

ControlBright, Inc. Chad Behling, CEO 5019 Airport Rd. Hermantown, MN 55811 (888) 929-9936 www.controlbright.com info@controlbright.com Lighting Product Type: Cloud-Based Architectural Lighting Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Controlled Power Company Suzanne Hooley, Marketing Director 1955 Stephenson Hwy. Troy, MI 48083 (800) 521-4792 www.controlledpwr.com shooley@controlledpwr.com Lighting Product Type: Emergency Lighting Inverters, Egress Lighting Solutions Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Cope Lindsay Lyons, Marketing Communications Manager 960 Flaherty Dr. New Bedford, MA 02745 (508) 985-1240 www.copecabletray.com llyons@atkore.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Cable Trays and Cable Management Solutions Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Education, Commercial

74

Cortet by CEL (California Eastern Labs)

David Parrett, Director, Product Marketing 520 Courtney Way, Suite A Lafayette, CO 80026 (408) 919-2668 www.cortet.com david.parrett@cortet.com Lighting Product Type: Lighting Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Cree, Inc.

Claire Simmons, PR Manager 4600 Silicon Dr. Durham, NC 27703 (919) 313-5300 www.cree.com media@cree.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, , Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

EarthTronics

Kevin Youngquist, Vice President 380 W Western Ave. Muskegon, MI 49440 (231) 332-1188 Fax: (231) 726-5029 www.earthtronics.com keviny@earthtronics.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Multi-Family

Eaton

Kyra Mitchell Lewis 1121 Highway 74 S Peachtree City, GA 30269 770-486-4800 eaton.com/lighting PTCmarcom@eaton.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highway Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


M+D

Simplistic ideology. Alluring illumination. The M+D Collection combines a seamlessly flowing aluminum housing with energy-efficient LED to provide fully dimmable glare-free illumination.

5

12 to 30 Inch – Modern Design Pendant Luminaires

STYLES

4 SIZES

For detailed specifications visit us at ANPlighting.com Unlimited finishes and combinations. Made in U.S.A.

Š 2018 ANP Lighting, Inc. All rights reserved.

CIRCLE NO. 40


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Ecoglo Inc. Michael Turow, Director, US Sales & Marketing 3000 International Pkwy. Williamsville, NY 14221 (716) 818-6646 michaelt@ecoglo.us Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, GSA, HIGHRISE Buildings 75 ft +

Enlighted Theresa Wallenhorst, Account Executive 930 Benecia Ave. Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (650) 964-1094 www.enlightedinc.com theresa@sweeneypr.com Lighting Product Type: Lighting/IoT Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial

Espen Technology ELCO Lighting Brandon Cohen, Operations 2042 E Vernon Ave. Vernon, CA 90058 www.elcolighting.com brandon@elcolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family

Elemental LED Inc. J.B. Lowe, Associate Director, Marketing 855 Trademark Dr., Suite 200 Reno, NV 89521 (510) 679-1506 www.diodeled.com jb.lowe@elementalled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

eLumigen Bob Kirschner, National Sales Manager 21557 Telegraph Rd., Bldg. #100 Southfield, MI 48033 (855) 912-0477 www.elumigen.com info@elumigen.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Commercial Lighting, Rough Service & Harsh Environments Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Industrial

76

John Clancy, SVP, Sales & Marketing 12257 Florence Ave. Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670 (562) 529-2938 Fax: (562) 529-2978 www.espentech.com jclancy@espentech.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

EverLast Lighting Andrew Stella, Marketing Coordinator 2021 Wellworth Ave. Jackson, MI 49203 (888) 383-7578 Fax: (866) 366-4029 www.everlastlight.com drew@everlastlight.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, High Ambient Temperature (149 F) High Bay Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Industrial

FC Lighting Joe Freehill, Marketing Manager 3609 Swenson Ave. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 889-8100 Fax: (630) 889-8106 www.fclighting.com jfreehill@fclighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 41


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Flex Lighting Solutions

Luis Acena, Marketing Manager 6201 America Center Dr. San Jose, CA 95002 (408) 576-3710 www.flexlightingsolutions.com luis.acena@flex.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Food Processing Lighting Markets Served: Corporate, Education, Commercial, Industrial, Indoor Sports, Indoor Parking

Focal Point

John Dellorto, Vice President- Sales 4141 S Pulaski Rd. Chicago, IL 60632 (773) 247-9494 Fax: (773) 247-8484 www.focalpointlights.com john.dellorto@focalpointlights.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Forest Lighting

Doug Baillie, VP Marketing 2252 N West Pky. SE Marietta, GA 30069 (800) 994-2143 www.forestlighting.com info@forestlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs LED, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Fulham Co., Inc.

Andy Firchau, Marketing Manager 12705 S Van Ness Ave. Hawthorne, CA 90250 (323) 779-2980 Fax: (323) 754-9060 www.fulham.com afirchau@fulham.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Emergency Lighting, LED Components, LED Retrofit Kits Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, OEMs, Distributors, Installers

78

Garden Light LED

Jason Swilley, Marketing Manager 6112 Benjamin Rd. Tampa, FL 33634 (800) 511-2099 www.gardenlightled.com sales@gardenlightled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Architectural Lighting & Color Branding Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Residential Outdoor Lighting

Genesis Lighting Solutions

Doug Head, Executive Vice President 700 Parker Square, Suite 205 Flower Mound, TX 75028 (469) 322-1900 www.making-light.comdoug@adart.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Parking Lot Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Global Lux

Carlos Vilanova, CEO 1350 Volta, Suite 102 Boucherville, QC Canada J4B 6G6 (450) 449-0949 www.global-lux.com info@global-lux.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Signage Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Graybar

Scott Moseman, Strategic Account Manager 11885 Lackland Rd. St. Louis , MO 63146 (612) 810-0916 www.graybar.com scott.moseman@graybar.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 42


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Green LED Lighting Solutions, LLC Derek Breneol, Director 6320 Desert Inn Rd. Las Vegas, NV 89146 (888) 580-6366 www.glls.com www.glls.com/contact-us Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Architecture

Gripock Systems Bryan Shamblin, Sales Director 1132 Mark Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013 (805) 566-0064 www.griplocksystems.com bryans@griplocksystems.com Lighting Product Type: Components, Cable Suspension Systems for Architectural and Industrial Lighting Fixtures Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Lighting OEMs

HanleyLED Michael Kerber, Director of Product Development 1585 Fencorp Dr. Fenton, MO 63026 (800) 512-9941 www.hanleyledsolutions.com information@hanleyledsolutions.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, We Specialize in Cabinet & Channel Letter Solutions Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Hera Lighting Jad Kiswani, Marketing Manager 3025 Business Park Dr. Norcross, GA 30071 (770) 409-8558 (770) 409-8531 www.heralighting.com jk@heralighting.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, FlexSheet, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Display, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

80

Hermitage Lighting National accounts

J.D. Ryan, Account Manager 3640 Trousdale Dr. Nashville, TN 37204 (615) 843-3394 Fax: (615) 943-3351 www.nationalaccounts.hermitagelighting.com jdr@hlg.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Hi-Lite Manufacturing

David McAdam, Sales 13450 Monte Vista Ave. Chino, CA 91710 (909) 465-1999 Fax: (909) 465-0907 www.hilitemfg.com sales@hilitemfg.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, RLM Fixtures Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Hubbell Lighting and Hubbell Control Solutions

Customer Service 701 Millennium Blvd. Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 678-1000 www.hubbelllighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighitng, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

HyLite LED, LLC

Shahil Amin, Director 3705 Centre Cir. Fort Mill, SC 29715 (803) 336-2230 Fax: (803) 336-2231 www.hyliteledlighting.com info@hylite.us Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Industrial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 43


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING IdentiCom Sign Solutions

John DiNunzio, President 24657 Halsted Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (248) 344-9590 Fax: (248) 946-4198 www.identicomsigns.com info@identicomsigns.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Illuminating Technologies

Angela Saladino, Specification Sales P.O. Box 18463 Greensboro, NC 27409 (800) 278-5483 www.illuminatingtechnolgies.com angela@illuminatingtechnologies.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Freezer Case Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Grocery Stores/Supermarkets

Inlight International Inc.

Christine Gee, Director of Business Development 1744 W 166th St. Gardena, CA 90247 (310) 896-8782 Fax: (310) 496-1993 www.inlightii.com christineg@inlightii.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Custom Decorative Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family

Innovations in Lighting

Rob Bruck, President 3115 Foothill Blvd., Suite M213 La Crescenta, CA 91214 (818) 732-9238 Fax: (818) 796-4724 www.innovationsinlighting.com info@innovationsinlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Decorative Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Multi-Family

82

JESCO Lighting Group

Richard Kurtz, President & CEO 15 Harbor Park Dr. Port Washington, NY 11050 (800) 527-7796 Fax: (855) 265-5768 www.jescolighting.com info@jescolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

KLIK USA LLC

Betsy Ketter, Marketing Manager 2840 N Brookfield Rd., Suite 3 Brookfield, WI 53045 (262) 505-5124 www.klikusa.com sales@klikusa.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Illuminated Handrail Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

LaMar Lighting Co., Inc.

Nicole Calise, Director of Marketing 485 Smith St. Farmingdale, NY 11735 (631) 777-7700 Fax: (631) 777-7705 www.lamarled.com/ www.occusmart.com nicole@lamarlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Other

LEDCONN Corp.

Charlene Ro, Marketing Manager 301 Thor Pl. Brea, CA 92821 (714) 256-2111 Fax: (714) 256-2118 www.ledconn.com marketing@ledconn.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, , Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential, Signage

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


AlphaTECH

An Elemental LED Lighting Solution

IF YOU’RE NOT USING

AlphaTECH™

YOU’RE USING YESTERDAY’S TECHNOLOGY

AlphaTECH shown in a snowy environnment

BUILT TO BE TOUGH & ELEGANT • Designed, developed, and manufactured in the USA • Built for extreme and demanding conditions • Striking elegance with innovative technology • IP68 submersible up to 3 meters • Flexible ruggedness for an easy install • Slim and compact design • High performance Diode LED light engine • Impact resistant and UV protected • Sustains compressive load up to 1000 PSI • UL Listed for USA and Canada

COLOR TEMPERATURE OPTIONS 2400K 2700K 2850K 3000K 3300K 3500K 3800K

MADE IN USA

W I T H

F O R E I G N

P A R T S

4200K 4400K 5000K 6300K Blue Green Red

elemental led

To learn more, visit our website at www.ElementalLED.com

Technology | Engineering | Innovation

CIRCLE NO. 44


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING LEDVANCE

Glen Gracia, Head of Media Relations 200 Ballardvale St. Wilmington, MA 01887 (978) 395-7902 www.sylvania.com glen.gracia@ledvance.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Smart Lighting, Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

LIDO Lighting

Bill Pierro Jr., LC, President 966 Grand Blvd. Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 595-2000 Fax: (631) 595-7010 www.lidolighting.com billpierro@lidolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Controls, Lighting Design, Bluetooth Lighting, iPhone Controlled Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Grocery

Lightheaded Lighting Ltd.

Steve Dewar, VP Business Development 1150-572 Nicola Pl. Port Coquitlam, BC Canada V3B OK4 (604) 464-5644 Fax: (604) 464-0888 www.lightheadedlighting.com info@lightheadedlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Lighting Services Inc.

Kerri Galgano, Marketing Specialist 2 Holt Dr. Stony Point, NY 10980 (845) 942-2800 Fax: (845) 942-2177 www.lightingservicesinc.com sales@maillsi.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

84

LSI Industries Inc. Jay Matsueda, Senior Marketing Director 10000 Alliance Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45242 (513) 793-3200 www.lsi-industries.com updates@lsi-industries.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Sports Court Lighting Markets Served: N/A

LumenOptix Inc. Gabrielle Santulli, VP Customer Success 203 Progress Dr. Montgomeryville, PA 18936 (267) 613-6110 Fax: (267) 613-6111 www.lumenoptix.com gsantulli@lumenoptix.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Industrial Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Industrial

Lutron Electronics Robert Dekker, Director Commercial Campaign Strategy 7200 Suter Rd. Coopersburg, PA 18036 (484) 547-7120 www.lutron.com rdekker@lutron.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Multi-Family

LUX Dynamics John McCarty, President 1350 Capital Blvd. Reno, NV 89502 (775) 200-0707 www.luxdynamics.com customersupport@luxdynamics.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Task Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Industrial, Natatorium, Gymnasium, Correctional

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


Flex Lighting Solutions

American Manufacturer of High-Performance LED Fixtures

Essentials Series 4.0

Linear Series 2.0

Hosedown Series 2.0

HT1 Series

SAVE ENERGY AND REDUCE YOUR TOTAL COST OF OWNERSHIP Not all LED High Bays are created equal. Contact us to learn why.

Indoor Parking & Garages

Warehouses & Logistics

Industrial & Manufacturing

Convention Centers

Food/Beverage Processing

CIRCLE NO. 45

5 YEAR

LUMEN MAINTENANCE

WARRANTY

Contact us: www.flexlightingsolutions.com lighting.tech@flex.com · (913) 851-3000

Aviation Facilities


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING LUXX Light Technology Maggie Janssen, Marketing Manager 4830 S 10th St. Milwaukee, WI 53221 (414) 763-3141 www.luxx.com m.janssen@luxx.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Other Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Architecture

MaxLite Amy Silver, Senior Marketing Manager 12 York Ave. West Caldwell, NJ 07006 (973) 244-7300 www.maxlite.com asilver@maxlite.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Metro Light & Power Daniel Deutsch, Co-Founder 98 Copley Ave. Teaneck, NJ 07666 (201) 692-0702 Fax: (208) 979-4613 www.metrolightandpower.com info@metrolightandpower.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

My LED Lighting Guide Neil Peterson, VP LED Technology One Chestnut St., Suite 4M Nashua, NH 03060 (888) 423-3191 www.myledlightingguide.com sales@myledlightingguide.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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Nora Lighting

Kevin Solano, Marketing Supervisor 6505 Gayhart St. Commerce, CA 90040 (800) 686-6672 Fax: (800) 500-9955 www.noralighting.com marketing@noralighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

OSRAM

Ellen Miller, Head of Media Relations, Americas Region 200 Ballardvale St. Wilmington, MA 01887 (978) 570-3755 www.osram.us e.miller@osram.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Management Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Pemco Lighting Products LLC

John Bowers, Managing Director 150 Pemco Way Wilmington, DE 19804 (302)892-9000 Fax: (302) 892-9005 www.pemcolighting.com pemco@ix.netcom.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Retro Fit Kits Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Colleges, Universities

Philips Lighting

Heather Milcarek, Managing Director 200 Franklin Square Dr. Somerset, NJ 08873 (732) 563-3468 www.usa.lighting.philips.com heather.milcarek@philips.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Government, Grocery, Petrol, Public Spaces

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


Conductor’s Choice. New Color Tuning LED Flat Panel. Free smart phone app controls the widest tuning range in the industry: 2700K-5000K Forest Lighting introduces its new LED Flat Panel featuring infinitely variable white color tuning from 2700K to 5000K, the widest range available. End-users and facility managers, using a free smart-phone app, can control both the color temperature and bright-to-off dimming. The app can also pre-schedule daily or weekly lighting systems changes. The sleek architectural design will suit any office, school, store, hospitality or healthcare application. The LED Flat Panel delivers >100 lumens per watt, 70,000 hours of life, and has a 7 year warranty. UL and DLC certified. Contact us or your local distributor today for more information. Forest Lighting, 2252 Northwest Pkwy SE, Suite D, Marietta, GA 30067 CIRCLE NO. 46

800-994-2143 www.forestlighting.com


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING PixelFLEX LED David Venus, Director of Marketing Nashville, TN 37207 www.pixelflexled.com sales@pixel-flex.com Lighting Product Type: LED Video Displays Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

PLC Lighting Robert Gilardi, Vice President 9667 Owensmouth Ave., Suite 201 Chatsworth, CA 91311 (818) 349-1600 Fax: (818) 407-0100 www.plclighting.com plclighting@plclighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Track Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Plumen Will Latter 105 Sumner St. London, United Kingdom SE1 9HZ 44 020 7650 7882 www.plumen.com will.latter@plumen.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Commercial Lighting, Decorative Lighting, Interior Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Project Light Inc. Jenni Collier, Director of Projects 4976 Hudson Dr. Stow, OH 44224 (330) 688-9000 Fax: (330) 688-9026 www.projectlightinc.com jenni@projectlightinc.com Lighting Product Type: N/A Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Commercial

How many people does it take to change a lamp? Lighting is one of the largest energy and money drains in your facility. Replacing it with LED lighting will have the quickest impact on your bottom line and will put money in your pocket.

With Genesis, the answer is nada, diddly-squat, zilch, zip,

Zero. 469.322.1906

www.making-light.com CIRCLE NO. 47

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 48


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Quattrobi Inc. Marina Bondarenko, Managing Director 311 W 43rd St. New York, NY 10036 (929) 422-2361 www.quattrobi.net info@quattrobi.net Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Rayon Lighting Isaac Fereydouny, Vice President 1303 Mirasol St. Los Angeles, CA 90023 (323) 446-2626 www.rayonlighting.com isaac@rayonlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Regency Lighting Mark Heerema, Sr. Director National Accounts 195 Chastain Meadows Ct., Suite 100 Kennesaw, GA 30144 (800) 284-2024 www.regencylighting.com mark.heerema@regencylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Royal Contract Lighting, Inc. Kyle Jackson, Inside Sales Manager 645 Myles Standish Blvd. Taunton, MA 02780 (508) 824-8880 Fax: (508) 824-8877 www.royalcontract.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Decorative Lighting, Large Custom Public Space Fixtures Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Multi-Family, Casinos

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Samsung Semiconductor, Inc. Sunghoon Jung, Sales & Marketing Manager 11800 Amberpark Dr., #225 Alpharetta, GA 30004 www.samsung.com/led sunghoon.j@samsung.com Lighting Product Type: LED Component Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Schreder Lighting Maegan Lee, Marketing Coordinator 2105 W. Corporate Dr. Addison, IL 60101 (219) 241-5905 www.schreder.com mlee@schreder.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Integrated/loT Lighting and Controls Markets Served: Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Stadiums/Arenas. Roadways, Industrial

Sengled Megan Johnson, Marketing Communications Manager 155 Bluegrass Valley Pkwy., Suite 200 Alpharetta, GA 30005 www.us.sengled.com mjohnson@sengled.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Programmable Smart Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Sentry Electric LLC Michael Shatzkin, Director of Marketing & Bus. Development 185 Buffalo Ave. Freeport, NY 11520 (516) 379-4660 Fax: (516) 378-0624 www.sentrylighting.com michael@sentrylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Municipalities

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


IT’S NOT JUST WHERE YOU START IT'S ALSO WHERE YOU FINISH DL-FLEX2’s PROPRIETARY ON-BOARD IC CHIPS MAKE CERTAIN THAT THE BEGINNING OF EACH RUN LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE THE END

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Compare that to most other strips in the market that lose 30-40% light output from beginning to end

Matching our 24V strip offering with our patented 120V INFINA© LED strip, which allows runs of 150 feet and is sold in lengths in precise 4" increments, means JESCO can meet any of your design needs.

As the original company to introduce FLEXIBLE LED strip, JESCO Lighting is the go-to choice for designers who realize that not all LED strips are the same

• Extensive collection of high-lumen outputs at 90 CRI and above • At least 30% brighter than any strip in the market • Very high efficacy • Easy installation with in-line clips or snap-on connectors • Field-cuttable as little as every ⅜" • Indoor/Outdoor Static White, Static Colors, RGB, RGBW, RGBWW, Color Tunable, Full Spectrum, Neon and more 800.527.7796 www.jescolighting.com

CIRCLE NO. 49


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING SloanLED Jeremy Baker, Digital Marketing Manager 5725 Olivas Park Dr. Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 676-3200 Fax: (805) 676-3206 www.sloanled.com info@sloanled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Signage Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Petroleum, C-Store, Grocery

Solar Electric Power Company Stephanie Holloran, National Sales Manager 1521 SE Palm Ct. Stuart, FL 34994 (772) 220-6615 Fax: (772) 220-8616 www.sepco-solarlighting.com info@sepconet.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Solar Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Sonneman- A Way of Light Christian Rizzo, PR Rep 20 North Ave. Larchmont, NY 10538 (914) 833-0128 www.sonnemanawayoflight.com christian@upspringer.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Soraa 6500 Kaiser Fremont, CA 94555 (510) 456-2200 www.soraa.com info@soraa.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Downlights and Adjustable Directional Fixtures, Lamps, Direction Fixtures, Ambient Fixtures, Light Engines, Snaps and Fixture Accessories Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Museum

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Specialty Lighting

Teresa Carpenter, Marketing 4203 Fallston Rd., P.O. Box 780 Fallston, NC 28042 (704) 538-6522 Ext. 207 Fax: (704) 538-0909 www.specialtylighting.com tcarpenter@specialtylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Custom Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Furnishings

Times Square Lighting

Lee Crisman, Creative Media Specialist 5 Holt Dr. Stony Point, NY 10980 (845) 947-3034 Ext. 213 Fax: (845) 947-3047 www.tslight.com lee@tslight.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Markets Served: N/A

Tresco Lighting

Shari McPeek, PR-Advertising Mgr. 12400 Earl Jones Way Louisville, KY 40299 (800) 227-1171 Fax: (502) 491-2215 www.trescolighting.com cservice@trescolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Residential

Tridonic

Paul Montesino, Director of Product Marketing, USA 3300 Route 9W Highland, NY 12528 (617) 943-7040 www.tridonic.us sales.us@tridonic.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Internet of Light Applications Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Outdoor and Industry

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 50


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Ultralights Lighting

Teri Avalos, Office Manager, Customer Service 1936 E 18th St. Tucson, AZ 85719 (520) 623-9829 Fax: (520) 623-0081 www.ultralightslighting.com info@ultralightslighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Task Lighting (Decorative Task) , Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Ecclesiastical, High End Residential

Urban Solar Corp.

Rowan Plaxton, Business Development Manager- Eastern USA 1880 SW Merlo Dr. Beaverton, OR 97003 (503) 356-5516 Fax: (778) 430-5517 www.urbansolarcorp.com rowan@urbansolarcorp.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

Universal Lighting Technologies, Inc.

Susan Phillips, Vice President, Marketing 51 Century Blvd., Suite 230 Nashville, TN 37214 (800) 225-5278 www.unvlt.com customerservice@unvlt.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Commercial, Industrial, and Warehouse

Vantage Lighting

Jason Korbelik, VP- Sales, Marketing & Service 181 Narragansett Park Dr. East Providence, RI 02916 (860) 564-4512 www.vantageltg.com sales@vantageltg.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

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Vista Professional Outdoor Lighting

Cruz Perez, Vice President of Sales & Marketing 1625 Surveyor Ave. Simi Valley, CA 93063 (805) 527-0987 Fax: (800) 766-8478 www.vistapro.com cperez@vistapro.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

WAGO

N120W19129 Freistadt Rd., P.O. Box 1015 Germantown, WI 53022 (800) 346-7245 www.wago.com/us press.us@wago.com Lighting Product Type: PCB Terminal Blocks, Splicing Connectors, Wiring, Power Supplies Used in All Forms of Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, All

Waldmann Lighting

Brook Tunac, Regional Manager 9 W Century Dr. Wheeling , IL 60090 (847) 848-7379 Fax: (847) 520-1730 www.waldmannlighting.com btunac@waldmannlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Task Lighting, Industrial, Medical Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Industrial

Wattstopper- Legrand, North & Central America

2700 Zanker Rd., Suite 168 San Jose, CA 95134 (408) 988-5331 Fax: (408) 986-9300 www.legrand.us/wattstopper Lighting Product Type: Lighting Controls Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Xeleum Lighting

Jon Cooper, President 3430 Quantum Blvd. Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (954) 617-8170 Fax: (561) 557-3925 www.xeleum.com sales@xeleum.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Built In Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


— — —

CIRCLE NO. 51


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


On call

C

ommon consequences of communication dead zones in buildings range from mere inconvenience to serious

tenant dissatisfaction. While these ramifications are certainly cause for concern, the stakes just grew exponentially higher.

Today, dead zones in new construction and renovation projects have the potential to result in occupancy permit denials that severely impact a building owner’s bottom line. In a real sense, dead zones may mean dead space until the situation is remedied. What is driving the change? Since 9/11, the nation’s public safety community advocated for their own wireless broadband network to enhance communications during emergencies and other events. Congress green-lighted the network in 2012, and work began to develop customized implementation plans in each state and territory.

Communication infrastructure assumes critical priority in construction process

In December 2017, FirstNet, a wireless broadband network dedicated solely to emergency communications to save lives and protect communities, became a reality. Governors from every state, as well as officials from Washington D.C. and two U.S. territories, accepted the FirstNet deployment plan. The FirstNet network provides first responders with immediate access to mission-critical capabilities during emergencies, large events or other situations in which commercial networks could become congested.

Connectivity compliance picks up steam

Having a dedicated public safety network is one thing. Utilizing it and making sure it is accessible is something entirely different — and may not be optional in the future. While there isn’t yet a broad industry code that requires guaranteed network connectivity compliance in buildings, individual counties are taking the lead.

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ON CALL

More than 30 counties have adopted public safety network connectivity thresholds for new construction and renovation projects. In these counties, failure to meet public safety network connectivity thresholds may result in occupancy permit denials. Geoffrey Hammer, senior engineering solutions manager at WIN, a company that leads the industry in providing in-building cellular connectivity solutions, expects the trend of implementing public safety network connectivity codes to continue. Hammer believes the industry is proactively moving toward measures to ensure public safety connectivity, whether it is required or not. “Not only is it the right thing to do, but developers and contractors see the value of public safety connectivity as a desirable building feature,” Hammer says. “Whether required by code or not, embracing and implementing public safety connectivity standards makes sense in terms of tenant marketability now and eliminates the potential for costly retrofits later.”

Being in the right place at the right time during the new construction or renovation process is critical to the success of a communication infrastructure installation.

Understanding the obstacles

The fact that a public safety network exists does not mean achieving maximum connectivity with it is without challenges. Like other factors that affect connectivity in buildings, construction materials, complex layout interiors and the actual installation process can create public safety signal roadblocks. Green building materials often present a yin-yang dilemma in construction and renovation projects. While great for the environment, LEED-certified windows can be unfriendly to wireless

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connections. Innovative layouts and interiors may be appealing aesthetically, but when work needs to get done or tenants’ safety is on the line, a creative interior will not trump strong connectivity. Even traditional construction and renovation materials can present significant connection interference. John Wyskiel, senior project manager at WIN, says anything metallic is a potential culprit for creating a communication barrier. “The very nature of the construction process tends to run counter to connectivity. As the construction of the building progresses, the pathways to connectivity diminish. It’s much easier to plan connectivity prior to building construction rather than trying to retrofit it into an existing situation, especially when you consider the potential metallic interferences that can be introduced from sources like HVAC duct work, conduit or fire alarm piping.”

Keys to connectivity success

Despite the challenges, installing a communication infrastructure that meets the connectivity demands of the public safety network is possible—and feasible—with an experienced in-building cellular connectivity provider. Both Hammer and Wyskiel cite key attributes to look for in providers to ensure connectivity success with new construction and renovation projects.

A proactive approach

The Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) is the last stop before an occupancy permit is issued. Connectivity providers who initiate

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


A commitment to excellence

and build a strong working relationship with the project AHJ are armed with the ins and outs of the code requirements for their connectivity installations. “With advanced knowledge of code nuances and localized variances, the AHJ’s perspective offers unique insight,” Hammer says. “Providers who actively reach out to the AHJ close the gap more efficiently between potential issues and cost-effective solutions.”

The goal is to create a communication infrastructure that supports connectivity and hits or exceeds public safety network benchmarks. And in most instances, meticulous planning and project integration ensure success. But an occasional glitch may still occur, and the selected provider’s commitment to excellence is what determines the final impact. “Quality in-building cellular connectivity providers ensure that stated benchmarks are achieved, and they transparently employ solutions if any signals fall short,” Hammer says. “When an occupancy permit is on the line, anything less than excellence is unacceptable.”

Intuitive involvement

Being in the right place at the right time during the new construction or renovation process is critical to the success of a communication infrastructure installation. Industry experts agree that early communication and collaboration with the general contractor is mandatory. “Experienced inbuilding RF engineers know the time to get involved is when the RCPs become available,” Wyskiel says. A good provider can also help account for other infrastructure systems that will coexist with the communication components, and recommend the optimal sequence of system installations. “If you skip the work of integrating system installations, a code-compliant communication infrastructure may be rendered useless by an HVAC or electrical system that blocks wireless pathways,” Wyskiel says.

Connecting to the future

Whether or not a new construction project or renovation currently requires specific public safety network connectivity, the future is within sight. Proper preparation and planning with a knowledgeable provider can help push the industry connectivity standard higher and avoid cost knowledgeable provider can help push the industry connectivity standard higher and avoid costly retrofits in the future.CCR

For more information, visit https://www.firstnet.gov/news/first-responder-network-goes-nationwide.

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Brilliance is Our Business

CIRCLE NO. 52

MAY : JUNE 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SAVE THE DATE JANUARY 15-17, 2019 GOLDEN NUGGET BILOXI HOTEL & CASINO IN BILOXI, MS.

WANT TO ATTEND AS AN END-USER OR SPONSOR... Tuesday Jan 15th, 2019:

• * Afternoon check-in. • 5:30-7:30 PM: Welcome Reception • 7:30-9:30 PM: Table Top Exhibit, Dinner and Scavenger Hunt

Wednesday, January 16th, 2019:

• 7:45 - 8:45 AM: Breakfast buffet with Round Tables discussions & Speaker. • 9:00 - 10:15 AM: AIA Seminars. • 10:15 - 10:45 AM: Coffee Break. • 10:45 - Noon: AIA Seminars. • 12:15 - 1:45 PM: Plated Lunch with Speaker. • 2:00 - 5:30 PM: One-On-One Appts. • 7:00 - 10:00 PM: Gala Reception, Casino Night at The Maritime Museum

Sponsored by:

Contact David Corson 678.765.6550 or e-mail davidc@ccr-mag.com

Thursday, January 17th, 2019:

End-Users (retailers, hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc.) will receive complimentary hotel, airfare, transportation

www.ccr-summit.com

CIRCLE NO. 53

• 8:00- 9:00 AM: End User Breakfast Only. • 9:00- 11:00 AM: Local Boat Tour • Early Afternoon Flight Home


SUMMER 2018

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens American made Why the LandShark Bar & Grill may be coming to a beach town near you

David Crabtree, President & CEO, IMCMV Holdings, Inc.

Also Inside:

A special supplement to:

How a rooftop water heater solution saved a trendy Santa Ana Culinary Center Cover story photography by Michael Rollins


American made Why the LandShark Bar & Grill may be coming to a beach town near you

By Michael J. Pallerino

C

onjure up those images of some of the great beach joints that once blanketed the Atlantic coast. Got that vision? Now imagine LandShark Bar & Grill. With multiple locations throughout the United States – and beyond – LandShark takes you back to a time when all was right with the beach scene.

Here’s the LandShark Bar & Grill set up – located in the center of waterfront action, the meeting spot is the perfect blend of a beach escape, great food, generous drinks and outstanding music. With a menu geared toward classic American beach flavors and a fresh coastal twist, visitors can sip on a cold draft or one of its many frozen concoctions.

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AMERICAN MADE After the first LandShark Bar & Grill opened in 2011 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, the brand now can be found in Atlantic City, New Jersey, Biloxi, Mississippi., Gatlinburg, Tennessee, Hollywood Beach, Florida, Harvest Caye, Placenia (Belize), Daytona Beach, Florida, and it newest location at Lake Lanier in Buford, Georgia. Commercial Kitchens sat down with the operator of the majority of the LandShark Bar & Grill locations, IMCMV Holdings, Inc.’s President & CEO David Crabtree to get his thoughts on where the brand is heading in 2018 and beyond.

Give us a snapshot of LandShark brand.

Dine in paradise and enjoy a one-of-a-kind tropical experience with live or video entertainment, great food and drink in a relaxing atmosphere at the LandShark Bar & Grill Restaurant. It’s a place to put your feet in the sand and a drink in your hand.

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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

There is an opportunity to find iconic locations with eager developers. We have created a unique concept where consumers escape their daily lives to enjoy our “feet-in-the-sandwith-a-drinkin-your-hand” atmosphere.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

What type of consumer are you targeting?

We’re looking for consumers who want to escape their everyday life while enjoying great music, food, drink in a relaxing atmosphere.

How does the design of LandShark cater to what today’s consumers are looking for? When consumers dine out today they expect an outstanding memorable experience. That’s what LandShark strives to deliver.

Walk us through how and why it is designed the way it is?

We look to include a feature water component that’s visible from the restaurant and patio. We look to build the restaurants on a body of water whether salt, fresh or manmade.

Take us through your construction and design strategy. The brand performs best located at an iconic


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location within a tourist destination. The size of our units are approximately 5,500 to 6,500 square feet, including a 1,500- to 2,000-square foot outside patio facing a water feature. Seating of approximately 300 seats between the dining room and the bar(s).

Give us a rundown of the market’s layout.

The markets we are in are tourist destinations with 5-plus million visitors, have less seasonality, water features available and an iconic location that attracts the tourist visitors.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business? We’re ramping up our growth and have been fortunate thus far. But finding availability of quality subcontractors is starting to become worrisome.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

We are on pace of growing three to four per year. We will continue to stay relevant

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There is a need to create a unique memorable dining experience with a differentiation element. Our differentiator is our tropical experience, which includes great food, drink, music and vibe.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

through menu evolution for both food and drink options, site selection and content of music (both live and video) within the restaurant. We always ensure we include local craved and produced offerings on our menus.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

There is an opportunity to find iconic locations with eager developers. We have created a unique concept where consumers escape their daily lives to enjoy our “feet-in-the-sand-with-a-drink-in-yourhand” atmosphere.

Are you optimistic about what you see today in the marketplace?

We are extremely excited about the opportunities for expansion we currently have in front of us. We are creating careers, not just jobs for our team members. It is my job to continue to create opportunities for my team to achieve their goals.


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What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

We want to open three to four units/year. We look for tourist destinations with 5-plus million visitors, prefer less seasonality, water feature available, iconic location that attracts the tourist visitors.

What trends are you seeing?

On a very positive note, consumer spending is increasing. They are looking for great dining experiences. We are positioning our company (IMCMV) to capitalize on this. We’re starting to see a tightening of the labor market – need to differentiate to potential employees why IMCMV is best for them.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” shopping environment in today’s competitive landscape?

There is a need to create a unique memorable dining experience with a differentiation element. Our differentiator is our tropical experience, which includes great food, drink, music and vibe.

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On a very positive note, consumer spending is increasing. They are looking for great dining experiences.

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What is today’s consumer looking for? Experiences that are unique, memorable and fun.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Creating opportunities for my company and team members to grow and achieve all of their career dreams

Describe a typical day.

Tough question: I wake at 4:45 a.m., play hoops or workout and then shower. I have breakfast with my wife (if I’m in town), respond and send emails and call my executives, call our restaurants that are doing well and ones with opportunities to improve. I get out to the office at 10 a.m., where I work on my to do list and attend meetings.

Once a week I have lunch with two or three team members. I ask about them and what they’re working on and discuss anything they want to talk about. I finish at the office around 7 p.m., where I head to dinner with my wife. I like to read current events (The Wall Street Journal) and watch something with my wife. Then it’s off to bed by 11:30 p.m.

Tell us what makes your restaurant concept so unique?

Dine in paradise and enjoy a one-of-a-kind tropical experience with live or video entertainment, great food and drink in a relaxing atmosphere at the LandShark Bar & Grill Restaurant. A place to put your feet in the sand with a drink in your hand. Trying to always be located on water. CK

One-on-One » David Crabtree with...

President & CEO of IMCMV Holdings, Inc.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you?

Even during tough situations – I am always fair and reasonable.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why. Set a goal and create action steps to get there. Without a map of where you want to go – how will you know how to get there. Communication – the only way to ensure expectations are achieved you have to communicate clearly and consistently to the organization. Recognition and acknowledgement – treat everyone as a valuable part of the team, and recognize great work and acknowledge commitment.

What is the true key to success for any manager?

Focus, drive, willingness to learn, train and lead by example and toward the goal.

What’s your favorite vacation spot and why? What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

Creating opportunities for my team members to achieve their personal career goals through us expanding the company successfully.

What was the best advice you ever received?

Know what you don’t know. Find the answer and don’t fake it.

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Minocqua, Wisconsin. It is my true paradise. From May through October there is nowhere in the country more beautiful. Activities available swimming, fishing, water skiing, biking, hiking, golfing, or just relaxing in paradise on a wine and cheese sunset cruise.

What are you doing now?

Just trying to stay caught up on current events in the world and the industry. My everyday read is The Wall Street Journal.

How do you like to spend your down time?

Staying connected to my wife and two sons, who are both in college at Miami University in Ohio. My other escape is working out. I’m trying to outrun father time.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


Need more boots on the ground in all of the places you can’t be? EMG is the go-to resource for construction and facility managers. Partner with EMG to assess the condition of your facilities and manage construction projects, roll-outs, and capital programs nationwide. ASSET MANAGEMENT

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www.EMGcorp.com


Tankless How a rooftop water heater solution saved a trendy Santa Ana Culinary Center By John O’Reilly

P

lumber Sam Crandall remembers the job at the 4th Street Market in Santa Ana, California “as kind of a beast of a project.” Not that this 32-year-old con-

tractor hesitated one bit in taking on the job when it was first offered to him—even after learning that other contractors had chosen not to get involved.

The 4th Street Market is a new-wave food hall and culinary center that opened in February 2015 in Downtown Santa Ana. Combining more than 20 food venues into a single, 44-foot x 31-foot space on one level – and the special, mechanical requirements that resulted – are what spurred the plumbing design and installation innovations by Crandall’s Plumbing.

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“We tend to get calls for jobs others don’t want,” says Crandall, with funky names like Electric City Butcher, Radical Botanicals, Chunkwho with his spouse, Erica, started Crandall’s Plumbing in nearby N-Chip and Noodle Tramp. The largest player in the space—and the Huntington Beach in 2009. “We’re used to handling all kinds of prime expression of Chase’s vision—is East End Incubator Kitchens, installation challenges.” offering 10 commercial rental kitchens, including three for gluten-free But the challenges at 4th Street involved techniques that Crancooking and one for confectionary items. All are intended exclusively dall and his technicians had not encountered previously, “and don’t for young masters-in-the-making to hone their culinary skills and build come along everyday,” he admits. local followings without draining their slender resources. “We were turning the first level of a 30-year-old, two-story Combining all of these food venues into a single, building into something totally modern and different, making it 17,000-square-foot space on one level—and the special, mechaniimpossible to anticipate every little thing. Plans changed daily. All we cal requirements that resulted—are what drove the plumbing design could do was rely on our knowledge of the local codes and deand installation challenges for the Crandall’s Plumbing crew. This sign-engineer the thing as we went along. “Their vision of the final structure got a little tricky,” continues Crandall, speaking of the building’s highly creative ownership. “But I believed in what they were doing, and that made it fun. There was always light at the end of the tunnel.” The “they” above refers to S&A Management (Costa Mesa, California). The “vision” Crandall credits belongs to entrepreneur and chief strategist Ryan Chase, S&A principal and owner of the 4th Street Market, a new-wave food hall and culinary center that opened in February 2015 in downtown Santa Ana (DTSA). The Chase family traces its ongoing involvement in DTSA back nearly a century, to 1919, when Ryan’s great grandfather opened a shoe store there. In recent years, Santa Ana’s East End District—once known as Fiesta Marketplace—has undergone a dramatic, multi-million-dollar revitalization Five of the 22 Noritz tankless water heaters installed atop the roof at the 4th Street into “an urban oasis for up-and-coming Market in Santa Ana, Calif. Providing hot water for the building’s 22 tenants with a restaurants, retailers and entertainment conventional water heating system would have required at least two, 600-gallon venues,” Ryan says. storage tanks, estimates Jeff Beddow, construction manager for building owner S&A The newest addition to this trending Management. “Not only was there no room on the first level for such a system, but scene is the Fourth Street Market: an innovaits sheer weight would’ve been way too much for the roof.” tive, street-level emporium, designed to attract a young clientele seeking groundbreaking cuisine from talented young chefs lacking the wherewithal to go solo. Inwas especially true for the building’s domestic hot-water system, spired by well-known food markets like Pike’s Place in Seattle and Grand an obviously critical need for all 22 food-service tenants in the 4th Central Market in Los Angeles, 4th Street Market is 100-percent-devoted Street Market. to food and the people who make it – and make it special – as Chase Up on the roof told Orange County’s Coast Magazine in May 2014: No different than any other commercial developer, Chase sought to “Food was always the driving force. But part of the challenge maximize the rentable space in renovating the first-floor venue that with the cutting-edge food business is that these chefs are very cool would ultimately house the 4th Street Market. The year-round warm and very hip, but they don’t know how to run a business and they climate of Southern California offers the luxury of locating building have no capital. So we created an incubator-type concept to help mechanical systems outdoors—in this case, on the roof—and S&A defer a lot of the startup costs and overhead these chefs face when Management happily capitalized on that advantage. they want to open a restaurant. The idea is to make it as simple and Given that space is so precious, “No building owner or tenant clean as possible.” wants to see an exposed mechanical room,” Crandall says, “especially Now fully operational, Fourth Street consists of 15 different in a trendy space like 4th Street Market that caters to consumers.” “artisan” food vendors occupying roughly 300 square feet apiece and

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But while a rooftop location for the water heating equipment was seen as the best option from the outset, S&A Management had initially envisioned a boiler and storage-tank system until coming to grips with the daunting logistics of such an installation. “Providing enough water for 22 tenants, plus the facility’s own needs, is a huge requirement,” says S&A construction manager Jeff Beddow. In fact, the finished building had 49 outlets for hot water: 20 kitchen sinks, 19 prep sinks, seven lavatories and three mop sinks. If all were running simultaneously, they would require a flow rate of nearly 43 gallons per minute (gpm). The system was sized for approximately 75 percent of that maximum, or 32 gpm.

Inspired by wellknown food markets like Pike’s Place in Seattle and Grand Central Market in Los Angeles, 4th Street Market is 100-percent-devoted to food and the people who make it.

“At a minimum, we would have needed two, 600-gallon storage tanks to do the job,” Beddow says. “Not only was there no room on the first level for such a system, but its sheer weight would’ve been way too much for the roof.” Plus, there was one other complication: As much as possible, S&A wanted to offset its operating costs by metering the hot-water consumption of each tenant separately. That way, each could pay its own monthly gas bill, rather than S&A assuming this financial burden and then wrestling with the thankless task of splitting the cost equitably. All of which is why Chase and Beddow opted for a rooftop installation of 22, commercial-grade tankless water heaters. No question, the up-front cost of a boiler system, even with two large storage tanks would have been lower, compared with the extra gas and water lines, plus all those water meters, of the tankless setup. But the idea of individual gas bills for all those kitchen operations outweighed the cost and complexities of the tankless option. Meanwhile, S&A encountered no objection to going tankless from local building inspectors: “Because tankless technology has improved, our local Health Department is more accepting of their use,” Beddow says.

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Meanwhile, Crandall liked the idea as well, having done so much work with tankless on the residential side of his business. (He currently is averaging 10 tankless installs per month.)

The tankless advantage

Manufactured by Noritz America, the 22 units at 4th Street are all Model No. NC1991-OD-NG. with a thermal efficiency of 84 percent; a maximum flow rate of 11.1 gallons per minute; and gas consumption, from 16,000 to 199,900 BTU/hour. Measuring only 23.6 inches high x 13.8 inches wide x 9.4 inches deep, up to 24 of these heaters can be “quick-connected” into a “multi-system.” At the 4th Street Market, those operations large enough to require multiple units had them linked together. The remainder are unlinked. Beyond their diminutive size and weight (54 pounds apiece for the NC1991’s) versus a boiler and storage tank system, tankless also offers the key advantage of delivering hot water only when needed, that is, “on demand,” thus saving on storage fuel costs. This redundancy also offers a critical maintenance advantage for multi-user applications: If one unit needs servicing, it can be isolated and even removed, while the other 21 continue delivering as much hot water as needed, so that the whole building does not suffer. Hoisting the equipment from street level with ropes – ”I hadn’t figured on renting a crane in my job quote to S&A,” Crandall says – his four-person crew clustered the 22 water heaters into five small groups atop the roof of the 4th Street Market building. The Incubator kitchens were assigned four, each with its own meter, while Electric City Butcher employs another two. The remaining 16 are divvied up among the other tenants, with a few operations sharing a unit. “Because of the amount of piping required, it wasn’t practical for each vendor to have a dedicated, metered tankless unit,” Crandall says. “S&A really did this system right.” Crandall’s team found its greatest design/installation challenges in two areas: developing a way to mount the 22 units on the rooftop and building the pipe runs from those units through the building’s top level, where a small college had been located (the space is now vacant), to the kitchens and shops at ground level. Rooftop Rack – Although seldom destructive, minor seismic activity is a routine fact of life in Southern California. That is why Crandall quickly concluded that “some rinky-dink, wooden structure to hold the tankless units would not have been a good idea.” Instead, Crandall foreman Rolondo Jimenez and his team chose to build from scratch a Unistrut rack system that “worked phenomenally,” Crandall says, although not before a certain amount

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC 45 West 34th Street, Penthouse New York, NY 10001 Frankie J. Campione, Principal (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com

Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC 45 West 34th Street, Penthouse New York, NY 10001

Frankie J. Campione, Principal (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com

Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC 45 West 34th Street, Penthouse, New York, NY 10001 Frankie J. Campione, Principal (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com

Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC 45 West 34th Street, Penthouse, New York, NY 10001 Frankie J. Campione, Principal (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com

#RETAIL IS NOT DEAD

Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC 45 West 34th Street, Penthouse New York, NY 10001 Frankie J. Campione, Principal (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com

Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC 45 West 34th Street, Penthouse, New York, NY 10001 Frankie J. Campione, Principal (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com

Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC 45 West 34th Street, Penthouse New York, NY 10001

Frankie J. Campione, Principal (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com

Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC 45 West 34th Street, Penthouse New York, NY 10001

Frankie J. Campione, Principal (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com CIRCLE NO. 58

Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC 45 West 34th Street, Penthouse New York, NY 10001

Frankie J. Campione, Principal (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com


TANKLESS

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

of trial and error. “When something did not immediately work as we envisioned it, we improvised and adjusted. That was true of our work on the rack, like everything else. We had never built a tankless rack before, so we had to figure it out – and we did.” Pipe Runs – This part of the job proved an even bigger challenge, Crandall says. On the roof, his installers used copper tubing for the water lines; galvanized steel pipe for gas. All this piping, which covers approximately 4,000 square feet of roof space, runs to one of five chases leading from the roof, through the college on the second floor, to various vendors and kitchens on the first level. Why five? Once again, because of limited space in the building, in this case between the roof and ground level. Any more than five

Predictably, the path from the roof to the first level was not a straight vertical shot. If a copper water or black-iron gas line inside the chase did not wind up precisely where it was needed on the first floor, the Crandall team adjusted, jogging the line in whatever direction was required to make the final connection. As a result, piping distances varied from the original plan, created and stamped Empire 3 Consulting Engineers (Riverside, California). In these instances, Crandall had the engineer resize the pipe to accommodate the variance. Crandall says that the tankless installation, including the rooftop lines, took his team roughly a week to complete. The five chase runs required another four weeks. “We did no prefabrication on this project, because we are not a prefab shop,” Crandall says. “Everything had to be done in the field: We’d see a problem, put our heads together, sketch something out, and then go for it. “In the end, it all came together nicely.”

Size matters—a lot

Sam Crandall, shown at right in this photo with Rolondo Jimenez, project foreman: “We did no prefabrication on this project. Everything had to be done in the field: We’d see a problem, put our heads together, sketch something out, and then go for it. In the end, it all came together nicely.” chases would have been unacceptably disruptive for the floor layout on both levels. Among the challenges with the chase-building work was observing specified clearances for head height in a building that measured only 10 feet from ground level to the bottom of the second floor joists. As in most commercial-rehab projects, fitting all the necessary infrastructure through the five chases was no easy chore, Crandall says, based on personal experience: “Coordinating the layouts of the different grease trap, HVAC, electrical lines, plumbing and gas—plus the installation schedules of their respective trades—was quite a chore. Everything was very tight.”

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As in most commercialrehab projects, fitting all the necessary infrastructure through the five chases was no easy chore.

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The 22 tankless water heaters at 4th Street Market have performed “without any problem” since the renovated facility reopened in early 2015, S&A’s Beddow says. In fact, because of the “reliable experience” the company has enjoyed at 4th Street, it has opted for a tankless solution from Noritz at two other Santa Ana properties, both restaurants. Tankless water heaters “provide a reasonable solution to the demands of the county health department and the state plumbing code,” Beddow says. “We also know that tankless units are energy-efficient for our tenants,” given their high, ongoing demand for hot water. Crandall sees the space-saving benefits of tankless as a prime attraction in his part of the country. “Tankless is ideal for point-of-use delivery of hot water and individualized monitoring of that usage, as was the case at 4th Street,” he says. “But the smaller size and the zero footprint of tankless equipment is just as important. “So often in Southern California, there’s nowhere to go but up. There’s precious little affordable space available for developers to spread out, which plays to the strengths of tankless. In this climate, high rises with multiple tankless water heaters on the roof is simply a more efficient use of the space. In the end, tankless also helps this type of building function better.” CCR


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Opening

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the

door

P

ackaged terminal air conditioners (PTAC) have long filled the need for a com-

bined heating and cooling solution that provides low upfront cost, individual control and stand-alone operation within a relatively small footprint. Once installed, PTACs also make the replacement process simple down the road.

That’s why making a case for an alternative to the PTAC on a high-rise building retrofit can be a challenge. Starting in 2014, Melling Engineering, joined several other firms to do just that during an upcoming renovation of Tabco Towers, a large HUD (Housing and Urban Development) apartment building in Towson, Maryland. The project culminated in late 2016, and so far, has exceeded every expectation. The building’s owner, Wishrock Investment Group, had been planning HVAC and building upgrades at the By Rick Melling high-rise for some time. After Wishrock consulted with New Ecology, a non-profit sustainability consulting firm with offices in Boston, Providence, Hartford and Baltimore, they decided to pursue “2011 Enterprise Green Communities (EGC)” certification. “EGC certification is based on a number of factors, including a building’s energy performance,” says Marty Davey, director of Portfolio Services at New Ecology, who has worked on other Wishrock projects in the past. “Building to this certification opens the door to significant funding in Maryland.” In addition to certification and efficiency, Wishrock was looking for a longer-term solution that would provide greater comfort, control and reduced maintenance costs. Because the wall penetrations for

Inside the viability of a PTAC retrofit alternative

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the PTAC units had caused maintenance issues in recent years, sealing up the building and controlling condensate drainage were goals as well.

Finding the right replacement

While New Ecology gathered building performance data, created an energy model of the building, and helped define the overall “greening” goals of the project, Melling Engineering was brought onboard. Based in Raleigh, North Carolina, the MEP firm specializes in apartment buildings, apartment communities and commercial space. That work often comes through collaboration with several architects across the East Coast. Once a performance baseline for the 22-story building was established, the first challenge became selecting a replacement HVAC system. More efficient PTACs were considered, but the performance levels needed just weren’t available. As a high-efficiency, long-term solution, water-source heat pumps (WSHP) would have worked well, but without the need to individually monitor energy use across all the apartments, it was hard to justify the extensive core drilling necessary to install the system. The use of mini-split heat pumps as a one-for-one replacement for the existing PTACs was also extensively discussed. Efficiency levels were on par with what we needed to achieve, but with 200 apartments in a 180-foot building, finding a place to install all the condensers was difficult.

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Further, it required too many wall penetrations, and most mini-split systems could not accommodate the line-set lengths that would’ve been needed. Eventually, we began to consider a central VRF (Variable Refrigerant Flow) system. Like the WSHPs, our initial skepticism concerning VRF at Tabco Towers was the higher upfront cost. What ultimately tipped the scales in favor of VRF was that the retrofit needed to take place while the building was completely occupied. Melling Engineering routinely designs both VRF and WSHP systems, but we’ve never used VRF to replace a PTAC system, let alone in a low-income apartment building. It was ultimately the work of Marty Davey and the team at New Ecology that made it possible. In addition to an energy audit and modelling, they secured the funding that would take the project from a 15-year payback down to a five- or six-year return.

Once a performance baseline for the 22-story building was established, the first challenge became selecting a replacement HVAC system.

Before plans were finalized, the GC, Ellisdale Construction and Development, was brought onboard. The Integrated Companies, a large mechanical contractor out of Chantilly, VA, took the bid to do equipment installation. Both firms are known for their work in hi-rise apartment buildings and had the design and engineering capacity to pull it off. Their help was invaluable. The final plan utilized 22 VRF condensers, most of which were 10-tons each. The units were paired together into 20-ton systems, with one system serving two floors. All but two systems were placed on the roof. Apartments on the first and second floor are served by a ground-mounted system, while common areas in the basement and first floors use a four-ton Fujitsu JII single phase VRF system, also located at grade.

200 tons

Earlier, when mini-split heat pumps were still part of the discussion, the design team had looked closely at Fujitsu units based on a discussion that New Ecology’s Jonah Decola had with a Fujitsu Sales Engineer at the AHR Show in Chicago. The Melling team spoke with Fujitsu again when the focus shifted to VRF, and had good factory support throughout the design. But it needed to look at other manufacturers as well, considering the many criteria the new system would need to meet. Daikin, LG and Mitsubishi were all considered for the 200 tons of capacity needed. Each had its strengths and weaknesses, but Fujitsu’s Airstage heat recovery system remained the No. 1 choice because of its overall efficiency. In addition, the Fujitsu RBUs (refrigerant branch units) fit in the small spaces allotted to us. Melling initially looked at both heat pump-only and heat-recovery systems. But the building’s shape – tall and slender – meant that most of the rooms have external walls and windows. This creates the potential for widely varying loads, and increases the likelihood of different zones simultaneously calling for heat and cooling. Being able to essentially “recycle” heat, or extracting heat from one space and rejecting into another zone on the same system was a big advantage, especially during the shoulder seasons.

Installation headwinds

Work started in February of 2016. Integrated technicians worked their way up the tower, one floor at a time. One-bedroom apartments were outfitted with an 18,000 BTU slim-duct unit that was enclosed in a new soffit with an access panel. This required that the existing sprinkler system in the area and in the adjacent bedroom closet be reworked to provide room for the unit and ductwork. The studio apartments are conditioned by a wall-mount evaporator. Depending on the size of the apartment, these range from 9,000 to 14,000 BTU. The PTAC units remained in service for the duration of the project. Without interrupting either the heating or cooling in any apartments, tenants were only displaced for several hours. “Being an occupied, existing building with limited space, we were tasked with the challenge of finding a location for the RBUs,” says Scottie Williams, CEO, Integrated. “We efficiently prepared and strategized the most effective way to use our minimal space within the units and ceiling space. We achieved a solution by utilizing the smaller electrical closets and a few apartment closets to install four RBUs per floor.”

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On each floor, there are two, fourbranch RBUs and two single-branch RBUs. Unlike a mini-split system, the use of the RBUs with heat-recovery condensing units not only allows the system to supply simultaneous heating and cooling, but also to share refrigerant between two evaporators. If one room is calling for heat, and another on the same floor is in cooling mode, the cooling unit can effectively reject heat into the room calling for heat. Line-sets from the roof were run down through an old common exhaust vent. As part of the retrofit project, Ellisdale installed bathroom exhaust fans in each restroom, abandoning the old common exhaust duct and availing it to serve as a chase for the mechanical system. In addition to line-sets, the vent was used to run new power lines to the roof. After the Airstage condensers were craned to the roof, Integrated technicians placed them on top of a custom-made framework on both sides of the elevator tower. A single, 48,000 BTU Fujitsu Halcyon unit was also used to help condition the upper portion of the elevator shaft. Despite the scope of the project and several challenges, system start-up began in late July. Work on the mechanical system culminated in October.

“EGC certification is based on a number of factors, including a building’s energy performance.” – Marty Davey, Director of Portfolio Services, New Ecology

Certification and ROI

“As planned, this project progressed efficiently with the assistance of Ellisdale Construction, the Engineer of Record, Craig Howell and Matt Cole of the Ferguson VRF Division, and Fujitsu,” Williams says. Communication between all parties involved was outstanding. But New Ecology was definitely the impetus of the project. Without their work before and during the install, providing such an efficient, comfortable solution in an older building on a tight budget simply wouldn’t have been an option. “At New Ecology, we perform comprehensive audits with payback analysis, to help owners make decisions,” Davey says. “In simple numbers, modeling showed that the VRF retrofit at Tabco Towers would yield a

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15-year payback before any subsidy or grant money is accounted for. After receiving funding based on the criteria in Enterprise Green Communities Certification, the real return on investment might be about five or six years.” The hope is that Tabco Towers can serve as a template for similar projects across the country, especially as redevelopment requirements set higher energy efficiency standards. MH

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


SUMMER 2018

ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

SUPPLEMENT

Code changers Affordable housing project changes legislation in the Northwest

A special supplement to:

ALSO:

How the Army is updating its barracks to appeal to recruits


Affordable housing project changes legislation in the Northwest

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

By Dan Vastyan


H

abitat for Humanity is a global nonprofit with a presence in nearly 1,400 communities throughout the United States. The organi-

zation works to strengthen and stabilize families and communities by providing housing for those in need. Often, these homeowners help build their own houses alongside volunteers and pay an affordable mortgage.

The Puget Sound region, or greater Seattle/Tacoma area, is home to several Habitat for Humanity (Habitat) communities. The newest of these is still under construction. The small, partially-wooded development in Midland, Washington, grows by about a half-dozen houses each year. The Woods at Golden Given—or “The Woods,” as it’s called—is comprised of single-family homes between 1,100 and 2,000 square feet, each with a small yard and centralized parking. A community building, playground and basketball court fill the middle of the rectangular subdivision. But, unknown to visitors, the quaint neighborhood was also host to an indepth energy use study that changed the Washington State Energy Code last year. While working with the local utility, Tacoma Power, Habitat managers decided to install a hybrid electric heating system; zonal electric (either baseboard or fan-forced wall heaters) and a 12,000 BTU ductless mini-split in each home. Habitat for Humanity knew upfront that the 30 houses would all be built to meet the insulation requirements of the Washington code, and would also be equipped with heat recovery ventilators (HRV).

Tacoma Power research

“We wanted to use The Woods as an opportunity to study the impact of high-efficiency ductless heat pump technology on the power consumption of an electric-resistance heated home,” says Bruce Carter, assistant conservation manager at Tacoma Power. “So we essentially designed an experiment that would span two years, in which the home would automatically switch from all resistance heat to a hybrid system that included a mini-split.” Before the project broke ground in 2013, Habitat, through a suggestion from Johnstone Supply, approached Alpine Ductless LLC, for a proposal to install mini-split units in each home as they were built over the next few years.

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • CODE CHANGERS

As the name suggests, Alpine Ductless installs and services mini-split systems only, though the applications can get very large and complex. “Because of the hydroelectric dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers, the Puget Sound area has always had cheap power,” says Cory Eckert, co-owner of Alpine Ductless. “As a result, there’s a lot of zonal-electric heating here, probably more than anywhere else in the country. So we were excited to be involved with this project from the beginning, despite the unconventional installation arrangement.” For Eckert, the job didn’t result in quite as much work for his installers as a typical project would. Alpine Ductless supplied 29, 12,000 BTUH Fujitsu RLS2 mini split systems in 2013. The mini-split units were placed in storage when construction began, and are pulled out and installed as the homes are built.

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In a home with higher infiltration rates, or with a higher heating load in general, the results would likely be even more impressive.

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Habitat employees or volunteers hang the wall-mount units and set the condensing unit. Their electrician also completes the wiring. At that point, Eckert’s crew arrives onsite to install and vacuum down line sets and commission the systems. The Tacoma Power experiment began with commissioning of the first unit, and finished the test with about 13 houses in 2016 with 20 homes complete. “We’ve installed three different ductless brands, but I think Fujitsu is the leader in innovation,” Eckert says. “We also get great support from Curt Kanemasu (who is with manufacturer’s rep firm Cascade Products).”

Gathering data

Before the first unit was installed, Tacoma Power’s Carter looked to Kanemasu for specific performance and efficiency information about the Fujitsu units. They also discussed


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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • CODE CHANGERS

how to control the two heating systems in order to gather the energy data needed. Carter also consulted with Washington State University Energy Program staff on data monitoring strategies. Ultimately, WSU-EP was brought in as a partner to do installation and monitoring of data logging equipment as well as independent evaluation of the energy data. “To facilitate switching between operation modes, each home used a two-channel time clock that switched between the electric resistance heaters in the main living area and the heat pump,” Carter says. “The resistance heaters in the rest of the house remained ‘hot’ all the time.” The time clock energized either the electric resistance heaters or the mini-split in the living room on sequential weeks. Monitoring was conducted through a series of current transducers, data loggers and temperature sensors that captured electrical consumption on each circuit, indoor and outdoor temperature, and the heat pump’s line set temperature. Data loggers also tracked temperature in the perimeter bedrooms to gauge the impact of the heat pump on tempering of these zones. The collection of data took place only during the heating season. During the summer, the mini-splits provide air conditioning for all homes, aided by the Fantech Flex 100 HRV systems. The HRV not only serves to provide efficient, healthy ventilation, but also distributes either tempered air throughout the structures. “What we found was that the houses at The Woods used between 40 and 48 percent less power in hybrid heating mode,” Carter says. “We also found that, from a comfort standpoint, homeowners preferred the heat pump over the baseboard or wall heaters.”

Changing legislation

“We took that information and integrated it into the Washington State Energy Code cycle,” Carter says. “We were successful and, as of July 1st, 2016, all new, zonal-electric heated homes in the state of Washington—not just Habitat homes—are required to have a ductless heat pump in the main living area.”

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“We wanted to use The Woods as an opportunity to study the impact of high-efficiency ductless heat pump technology on the power consumption of an electric-resistance heated home.” – Bruce Carter, Assistant Conservation Manager, Tacoma Power

In a home with higher infiltration rates, or with a higher heating load in general, the results would likely be even more impressive. “The exciting thing about being a part of this study was to realize that as a company we really are saving a lot of power versus homes that use zonal heating exclusively,” Eckert says. “We’re able to quickly install these units, offset the customer’s power consumption, and make them extremely comfortable.” Alpine Ductless has installed minisplits at more than 1,400 homes that are heated with electric power. He estimates that, if they’ve saved each of those customers an average of 47 percent of their power during heating season, that’s enough power savings to supply all the power needs of a 650-lot subdivision of 1,200 square-foot homes. “As the company owner, that makes it really easy to sleep at night,” Eckert says. “And I’m confident that I speak for the whole company when I say that.” FC Dan Vastyan is a regular contributor to Commercial Construction & Renovation magazine. Common Ground is a marketing communications brokerage that covers the commercial construction market.

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Modern day warriors

How the Army is updating its barracks to appeal to recruits By JoAnne Castagna, Ed.D.

Pershing Barracks is being renovated as part of the U.S. Military Academy, West Point Cadet Barracks Upgrade Program. Credit: Michael Embrich, Public Affairs.

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he U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District is renovating Pershing Barracks as part of the U.S. Military Academy, West Point Cadet Barracks Upgrade Program. The program is designed to modernize existing barracks to continue to attract high caliber

candidates to the academy. During ongoing renovations to the Pershing Barracks, two 3-star general officers requested tours of the building and observed extensive upgrades. "This kind of interest in a project from senior leaders demonstrates its importance," says Caitlin Slattery, project manager, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, who led the tours. It's not a surprise that distinguished military leaders have an interest in this project because the barracks was named after one of the highest ranking military leaders in the United States— General John J. Pershing. He is the only American to be promoted to the General of the Armies rank of the United States, created especially for him.

Pershing received the honor because of his expertise in military tactics and his service to his country that included commanding conflicts at home and abroad. He also was a West Point graduate— Class of 1886—who later become an instructor at the academy. It is because of this that the academy named a barracks after him. Pershing had a reputation as a strict and rigid instructor, and leader. A soldier who was once under his command said, "As a soldier, the ones then and the ones now couldn't polish his (Pershing) boots." Today, the 122-year-old Pershing Barracks is being modernized to meet the needs of the modern Cadet. "The renovation includes a complete gut and remodel of the existing structure and the floor plans will be optimized to utilize space in a more practical way," Slattery says.

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • MODERN DAY WARRIORS

A new look

When completed, the four story barracks will have 135 rooms that will sleep 270 Cadets who will have access to two laundry rooms. To assist the Cadets with their academics, each Cadet company will have Collaboration Rooms that will allow them to meet in large numbers to work on group projects or participate in team building activities. Cadets will also have such amenities as water bottle filling stations in the hallways and work stations equipped with cable connectors and power supply between computers and devices—Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports. In addition, the building will be outfitted with completely new mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems. The barracks also will get something that it didn't have before – air conditioning. Many of these new and upgraded features will be energy-efficient making the barracks Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certifiable. The inside of the structure is being modernized, but the exterior's military gothic revival architecture is being maintained in order to blend in with the rest of the historic 200-year old campus.

Superintendent of USMA, LTG Caslen (center) requested a tour of the Pershing Barracks renovation. Credit: USACE.

“The renovation includes a complete gut and remodel of the existing structure and the floor plans will be optimized to utilize space in a more practical way.” – Caitlin Slattery, Project Manager, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Chief of Engineers, LTG Semonite (center) requested a tour of the Pershing Barracks renovation to see the construction and to talk with USACE team members involved in the Cadet Barracks Upgrade Program. Standing next to Semonite is Caitlin Slattery, project manager, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Credit: USACE.

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General John J. Pershing. Photo by: Source: U.S. Library of Congress.


The renovation of Pershing Barracks includes a complete gut and remodel of the existing structure and the floor plans are being optimized to utilize space in a more practical way. Credit: USACE.

The renovation of Pershing Barracks includes a complete gut and remodel of the existing structure and the floor plans are being optimized to utilize space in a more practical way. Credit: Dan Desmet, Public Affairs.

The barracks also will get something that it didn’t have before – air conditioning. Many of these new and upgraded features will be energy-efficient making the barracks Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certifiable.

Pershing Barracks is being renovated as part of the U.S. Military Academy, West Point Cadet Barracks Upgrade Program. Credit: Dan Desmet, Public Affairs.

To maintain the building's original granite exterior, the granite stones are being repointed. "Repointing is when the joints of brick or stonework are repaired by filling in with grout or mortar," Slattery says. "The primary purpose of this is to prevent water from infiltrating into the building." In addition, the building's large parapet stones—that sit along the perimeter of the roof—are also being removed to replace the flashing. "Flashing is typically a strip of metal which is used to prevent water from penetrating the junction of a building's roof with the surrounding areas," Slattery says. The building's well known historic tower clock is also being refurbished. "The renovation will provide the Cadets a more comfortable and modern space for daily life, which will allow them to spend more time focusing on their course work and other obligations," Slattery says. The barracks is expected to be available to the Cadets this fall. Pershing was dedicated to his country and to educating future military leaders. The U.S. Military Academy shares this dedication and is demonstrating this with the modernization of the building that bears his name. FC

Dr. JoAnne Castagna is a senior contributor for Federal Construction and Commercial Construction & Renovation, and a Public Affairs Specialist and writer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. She can be reached at joanne.castagna@usace.army.mil

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THERE’S A STORY BENEATH EVERY FLOOR. Contractors cut two months from the construction schedule at Reading Hospital by using easy-to-install noraplan® eco with nora® nTx.

Read the full story. nora.com/us/reading CIRCLE NO. 62


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There’s always an emphasis on condensing the construction schedule of a project and saving cost — two very important points in any development scenario. common in new construction. Thus, there’s no need for moisture testing and remediation. Contractors building a 476,000-square-foot addition at Reading Hospital in Reading, PA, covered most of the facility with noraplan® eco, using nora nTx.

“nora nTx was very important to us from a schedule and cost standpoint because it did not require a moisture mitigation system to be installed prior to the floor going down, which represents a savings in not only dollars, but also in time,” says Jeff Hutwelker, project executive with LF Driscoll Co., LLC, the Bala Cynwyd, PA-based company that provided construction management. “We believe that the time saved with the application of the nora nTx floor covering was approximately two months in our construction schedule.” To learn more about nora nTx, visit the nora website at www.nora.com/us/ntx.

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Fearsome Foursome See how four New York agencies and companies nailed down the $5.3 million renovation of the Irish Hunger Memorial in Manhattan

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he mission was simple – to restore the Irish Hunger Memorial to its former magnificence, while rendering it significantly less susceptible to damage from weather for years to come.

So, when the Battery Park City Authority (BPCA), CTA Architects, P.C., construction manager The LiRo Group and contractor Nicholson & Galloway Inc. got together, that was the plan. The $5.3 million renovation and waterproofing project was on. The Memorial, designed by internationally renowned sculptor and public artist Brian Tolle, originally opened in 2002. The contemplative space honors the Great Irish Hunger and Migration of 1845-1852 by encouraging viewers to contemplate present-day

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hunger worldwide. Over the years, it had succumbed to water infiltration from above and subsequent water damage. The half-acre site on the corner of Vesey Street and North End Avenue, in the Battery Park City section of downtown Manhattan, overlooks the Hudson River. Visitors to the 96-foot x 170-foot Memorial wind through a rural Irish landscape, with paths carved into a hill thickly lined with native Irish plants and stones imported from each of Ireland’s 32 counties. The paths lead to a breathtaking viewing point 25 feet above street level, which boasts views of the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. Located centrally along the pathways is an authentic Irish Famine-era stone cottage that was donated to the Memorial by Tolle’s extended family, the Slacks of Attymass, County Mayo. It was

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


disassembled and brought over from Ireland and reconstructed onsite, within the green “hillside” of the Memorial. The Irish Hunger Memorial was first dedicated over 15 years ago. Today, it has re-opened to stand for coming generations as a place of reflection and remembrance. The cottage, pathways and plant-filled meadows are cantilevered over a layered base of glass and polished fossil-bed limestone from County Kilkenny, Ireland. Shadowy text that relates to both the Famine and reports of contemporary hunger form upon the frosted glass panels, wrapping around the exterior of the Memorial and into the passageway leading to the cottage. This project held vital significance for CTA. “Many of us on the project have strong ties to Ireland, making this much more than basic renovation work to us,” says principal Daniel J. Allen, AIA. “We were painstaking in our repairs in order to keep the artist’s vision intact.” Similarly, CTA’s project manager for the Memorial, Frank Scanlon, AIA, grew up in County Roscommon and in County Mayo. “We were thrilled to be able to provide a solution to keep the Memorial open yearround for years to come,” he says. The project team also included landscape consultant and architect SiteWorks; mechanical, electrical and plumbing (M/E/P) engineer Collado Engineering, P.C.; and structural engineer GACE Consulting Engineers.

and reinforcement of the concealed core walls and substrates, and then installing a waterproofing membrane, and assembling the elements of the monument back together,” Scanlon says. Work began in August 2016, with Tolle approving all finishes and technical solutions.

Meticulous Work

At the start of the renovation, the project team performed a photographic survey of every inch of every element of the Memorial. All elements, including every single stone, were numbered and then removed, catalogued and stored in containers on site during the renovation. “This ensured that the team put each piece back in its correct place and position,” says LiRo VP and senior project manager Frank S. Franco, AIA.

Deteriorating Conditions and CTA’s Solutions

Soon after the Memorial was opened to the public, BPCA noticed cracking and a leak from the cantilevered slab where the monument’s landscaping and cottage were located. Upon inspection, it was found that leaks were going into the electrical space underneath the Memorial where the glass display cases panels and lights were installed. A remediation project that waterproofed a portion of the Memorial the following year failed to stem the seepage. The leaks led to efflorescence staining of the glass display panels and discoloration of the partially cantilevered slab underneath and the skirt of the slab. Some of the limestone base cladding panels had also been stained. BPCA subsequently hired CTA, which recommended a comprehensive technical solution that would address the leaks and render the Memorial impervious to weather for many years to come. “Our team recommended carefully removing the landscaping surrounding field-stone masonry walls and portions of the cottage, removing the previously applied and ineffective waterproofing system, performing limited slab repairs and patching, reconfiguration

Similarly, the team stripped the soil from the site and saved it for reuse. Prior to the commencement of the work, to ensure the safety of passersby, construction crews built a protective fence around the perimeter of the Memorial, as it is in a busy section of Battery Park City. As the main waterproofing measure, CTA specified installing approximately 2,000 square feet of a reinforced, cold-applied, liquid Kemper 2K PUR system over all exposed core walls and substrates. At the top of monument, CTA incorporated a custom masonry anchoring system for the fieldstone-and-rubble wall, which is installed over a sturdy concrete masonry unit (CMU) core faced with fieldstone and mortar. The new masonry anchor system was installed to keep in place the irregularly shaped stones within the fieldstone wall.

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Pericle Gheorghias, CTA’s senior technical designer on the project, says that one of the new solutions employed was encapsulating the edges of the slab in the Kemper waterproofing membrane. “We extended the membrane and wrapped it around the edge of the slab for additional protection,” Gheorghias says. “The artist, Brian Tolle, expressed some concern. So we found a mineral surfacing system approved by Kemper that matched the finish of the concrete slab and we incorporated it into the membrane. It completely hides the waterproofing, maintaining visual consistency with the original slab.” The team also conducted some minor masonry restoration on the cottage. But this work is not visible to visitors. Nor is most of the waterproofing and restorative work. The crews also installed new, aesthetically sensitive exposed aggregate concrete paving of the cottage and pathways, including new concealed access hatches to the interstitial service area.

Extensive Landscaping

The main challenge of the project was making the meadow function as a live elevated field with naturally growing plants and its own living ecosystem, despite the planted area being located on top of a waterproof concrete slab. The square footage of the planted area is approximately 7,200 square feet. The original planting consisted of 90,000 plugs of native grasses and 52 different types of plants. CTA closely collaborated with SiteWorks, which performed an analysis and documentation of the existing plant material to be contract grown. It also conducted a detailed topographic survey to document the furrows, which are integral to the design intent. The inventory and subsequent restoration of the furrows proved challenging. SiteWorks’ existing conditions survey included points taken every three feet. This painstakingly produced document was instrumental in providing a base for the soil profiles and irrigation layout.

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Specifically, the team noted that the soil system was comprised of three zones that mimicked natural soil profiles, namely a sand drainage layer, a combination of existing drainage layer soil and sub-base soil, and a new engineered topsoil layer. “To ensure that the existing soils could be reused, they were trucked off site and maintained with a specific windrow length and height,” says Paul Ersboll, RLA, LiRo senior design manager. “These soils had actually become homogenous over time, so the team separated out a portion and added organic material to make up the top layer.” The contract-grown plants—all indigenous to Ireland—were grown off-site and then replanted following the completion of the renovation, once weather conditions and the plants’

allowed. “We recommended that the plants begin growing early in the construction phase, as it would take a minimum of one year for them to grow to the point that they are viable,” says James Dudley, ASLA, ISA Certified Arborist, SiteWorks senior project manager. The vegetation includes four primary categories of plants: herbaceous annuals and perennials (19 different varieties, from 242 quarts of Geranium sanguineum to 522 quarts of Ranunculus acris “Multiplex”); grasses, rushes and sedges (18 types, in-

The main challenge of the project was making the meadow function as a live elevated field with naturally growing plants and its own living ecosystem, despite the planted area being located on top of a waterproof concrete slab. cluding 529 plugs of Carex shortiana); dwarf shrubs and woody plants (eight varieties, including 1,216 quarts of Calluna vulgaris “Kinlochruel”); and vines (six Clematis vitalba at the cottage). “The Memorial’s irrigation system was designed to address both the site’s slope and the use of fast-draining soils,” Ersboll says. “It comprises a combination of rotor spray heads that irrigate the upper and middle furrow, and dripperline tubing that irrigate the slope-edge plantings. As the edge planters are on a steep slope, the team added jute netting on top of the drainage layer and wrapped it to contain the soil layers until the new plant material is established.” HC

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MAY/JUNE 2018

For the Craft Brewing Professional

Nick Tanner, founder/brewmaster, Cherry Street Brewing Cooperative

Meet me at Cherry Street

How Nick Tanner’s Colorado-born beer became the toast of Georgia

PLUS: Say what now? Swear by the oath


insights

Book Rec

Extraordinary Influence: How Great Leaders Bring Out the Best in Others By Tim Irwin How do you get the most from your team? It’s a question every leader asks today. Finding ways to help others excel and realize their potential is critical today. So, what if we could speak words that help transform those under our influence and ignite fires of intrinsic motivation? What if those you lead were able to find a greater purpose and passion in their jobs? That’s what Dr. Tim Irwin set out to do in “Extraordinary Influence: How Great Leaders Bring Out the Best in Others.” What Irwin found is that recent discoveries of brain science show that affirmation sets in motion huge positive changes in the brain. It releases certain neuro chemicals associated with well-being and higher performance. Amazingly, criticism creates just the opposite neural reaction. The most primitive part of the brain goes into hyper defense mode, compromising our performance, torpedoing our motivation and limiting access to our higher-order strengths. “Extraordinary Influence” book calls for a new approach to align workers with an organization’s mission, strategy and goals, called Alliance Feedback. It’s worth the read.

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9

The percent of all purchases by consumers that are driven by conversation, according to the “TotalSocial® Version 3.0” report by Engagement Labs and Northeastern University. To note, almost half of those conversations take place on social media, with the slight majority taking place face-to-face.

Everything personal How personalization strategies are helping compete for consumer attention Want to engage more with your audience? You'd better get personal. According to the "2018 Adobe Consumer Content Survey," 67 percent of consumers say it’s important for brands to automatically adjust content based on their current context. To make things more interesting, 42 percent admit to getting annoyed when their content isn’t personalized. It's a good lesson for craft brewers wanting to strengthen their bonds with their consumers in today's highly competitive race for attention.

“The fundamental truth–and challenge–is people buy experiences, not products. Products used to differentiate businesses, but now companies have to compete for the hearts and minds of their customers. They have to exceed their expectations and always operate with a subscription mindset. Customers can renew or go to a competitor with every click.” – Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen on why customer engagement is so critical for today’s brands

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Meet me at Cherry Street

How Nick Tanner’s Colorado-born beer became the toast of Georgia

Nick Tanner had to write a business plan for a senior project. His topic – how to open a brewpub. It wasn’t all that surprising of a choice, being Tanner was studying in what is known as “The Napa Valley of Beer” – Fort Collins, Colorado. If his paper didn’t inspire him enough, after his friend invited him to help make a batch, Nick was hooked.

By Michael J. Pallerino

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CBAM-MAG.COM


The next day he purchased his first kit – an Irish Red Ale, a style that's still on tap today at the craft brewery he calls his profession. Cherry Street Brewing Cooperative may have been born in a little garage in Fort Collins as part of a bike, food and agriculture co-op, but today, it is the pride and joy of Cumming, Georgia, a upscale community 30 miles north of Atlanta. The son of a father who owned a chain of successful restaurants in the Atlanta, Nick moved back home to begin the actual brewpub process. Today, Cherry Street Brewing Restaurant and Taproom is in a partnership with Rick Tanner’s Grille & Bar, a relationship that combines classic eats with a mix of traditional and off-the-wall brews. Cherry Street's identity is defined by applying cooperative ideals to everyday life. These ideals focus on community, education, and sustainability. “We are here for the community, just as the community is here for us,” says Nick, founder and brewmaster. Five years into the game, Cherry Street recently was recognized as the "2017 US Beer Open Grand National Champions." Thanks to cutting edge new styles and recipes, and experimenting with unusual ingredients and wild yeast, Cherry Street always has something fresh and exciting to enjoy on the 25 taps pouring daily in the Taproom at Vickery Village in Cumming. CBAM sat down with Nick to get his insights on where the brand started and where it's going.

product home from the grocery store. There has been a shift in consumer purchasing decisions to a more artisanal and local focus. Consumers want to know why they should buy that product because they know they have a decision now. People are making educated decisions in where they spend their money. This allows brewers to charge what they need to survive and grow with the use of taprooms and effective retail sales.

What trends are defining the space? While modern craft beer has always had a "fresh is better" approach, the biggest trend, which is difficult to call a trend, is consumers getting the beer

Give us a snapshot of today's craft brew market from your perspective. The number and volume of large breweries has plateaued and the number of smaller breweries has drastically increased. For a long time, the focus was to grow large and fast and get the beer out there. While some have been successful with this model, it has sacrificed core ideals like quality and ingredients. Today, smaller brewers are able to use a wider selection of ingredients to make a difference in overall taste and quality. In addition, consumers are more likely to visit a brewery taproom versus taking the

We have a strong charity focus in our daily mission. I’ve learned that beer is more than just an alcoholic beverage.

as fresh as possible, and mostly from the source. Beers are actually being designed to drink immediately, not for shelf stability. There is definitely truth to the difference between one and 30-day old cans. Many breweries will have lines to get same day canned beers on release days. It’s amazing to see the IPA beer style continuously grow and evolve. I used to say in training classes that IPAs are the style people love or hate the most, but the newer takes on IPAs with New England/Hazy styles have created an IPA for the non-IPA drinker. I experienced first-hand in our taproom people getting

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cherry street

burnt out on breweries pushing the bitterness threshold. People want the flavor without the bitter. Hazy IPAs have changed the way people look at and approach beer. It is completely contrary to popular and traditional brewing methods.

Walk us through your branding strategy. We were founded on three basic ideals: community, sustainability and education. We are here for the community, just as it is here for us. We have a strong charity focus in our daily mission. I’ve learned that beer is more than just an alcoholic

beverage. It’s humble and social, and also charitable. We let the beer do all the work bringing people together and being charitable. We are just the vessel. We are a community place where people come to gather and enjoy themselves. Our tagline is “Know Your Brewer.” This is really meaningful to us, as I was involved in CSA agriculture programs and their motto is, "Do you know your farmer?" which essentially means know where your products are coming from. We are a local’s pub in a thriving community only trying to make it better.

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We want it to go beyond just purchasing a beer. Craft and independent beer is simply about creating an honest product from honest ingredients by honest people.

MAY/JUNE 2018

Talk about your distribution strategy. Originally, we never intended to do the amount of distribution we produce out of our current facility. Our business plan called for more brewpub locations, not to have expanded twice, and start canning and distribution across the state. Our distribution strategy came out of demand and opportunity. We setup our brewpub operations more on a production brewery style, instead of a traditional brewpub serving from serving tanks. Since we keg all our product, we had an opportunity to distribute a certain number of kegs and brew another batch before it ran out in house. That changed our business model forever. In the past five years, we expanded from a 3 bbl. to a 10 bbl. brewhouse and went from 3 fermenters to 12. Our original projections were to sell about 600 bbl. s in house per year, and we will do about 1800 bbl. s this year for in house and wholesale. Since our production is more limited in quantity and we have a higher return in our pub, we can focus on using ingredients we want to use and brewing beers that are different than the next tap over. All our beers are approached to stand out and make a difference, and have balance and likability. When we distribute our product across the state, it drives more business back to our pub.

What's the biggest issue related to the marketing/sales side of the craft beer business? There is a false sense of security. The biggest issue is quality control and knowing where your purchase decision is coming from. Just because it’s in the craft beer section doesn't make it good or even a craft beer. Everyone has different taste buds, but that doesn't mean you send out any and all batches of beer without some quality control points. Also, the market has shifted to where the big guys are buying up the smaller guys, making it look

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cherry street

like nothing has changed. Even though the quality or expectations of that product probably hasn't changed much, hopefully better if anything, it has impacted the playing field and the pockets of where that purchase ultimately ends up.

What is the secret to creating a successful branding story? Our brand runs and thrives on passion. There is always another great recipe. There is always another great ingredient. There is always another great process or way to do something. We find ourselves constantly trying to make the next batch better than the current. We may tweak something, but only so next time you’ll say it was better than ever. The biggest secret is keeping up with people's palettes, because there’s always something better or different to brew and share.

What’s the one thing every craft beer brand should be doing in the way of marketing? Create an experience or spark a feeling or behavior. Our saying is, “Know Your Brewer.” This is an action statement that makes you stop and think about your surroundings. It represents the paradigm shift of enlightened decision-making. We want it to go beyond just purchasing a beer. It can impact the way any decision is made. It can even impact one's daily life and interaction with others. Craft and independent beer is simply about creating an honest product from honest ingredients by honest people.

What are your biggest opportunities moving ahead? To stay focused on what we do well, especially in our local market. The harder you work for something, the higher the reward. Exceeding your customer's expectations every time is a major opportunity. You have to set this standard high and constantly work toward it.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list? I’m trying to figure out how to brew more beer. Our demand has increased well beyond our supply point and we need to get more beer flowing for distribution. Georgia law is tricky with licensing, and since we have a brewpub license, we have certain restrictions to production and a production facility without food sales for wholesale. We’re currently under construction for a second brewpub location.

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Nick Tanner, founder/brewmaster, Cherry Street Brewing Cooperative What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Creating a community within a community. During a speech to my brewery staff at the end of last year, I remember saying, “The word ‘team’ was never in a business plan. Sure, it mentions positions and salaries, but it doesn’t talk about building a team. It’s the team that has created our success over the past five years.” Watching them grow and creating a family is the most rewarding part of my job.

What was the best advice you ever received? “That will never work.” In college I came up with what I thought was a brilliant idea, when a colleague said it would never work. So I set out to prove him wrong. Those four words changed my life.

What's the best thing a customer ever said to you? It’s not so much about what a customer said as it is about seeing and feeling his excitement. We were a restaurant long before we opened the brewery with many long-term, regular customers, many of whom we call family now. I feel their pride in me and in our brand.

What is your favorite brand story? When I was in college I began collecting beer bottles. I noticed in the corner of the old Avery Brewing labels a slogan that read, “Yeah, it is.” It wasn’t until I began brewing beer that I understood what that meant. One of the greatest rewards of brewing your own beer is sharing it. One time I shared a beer with a friend who said, “Dang, that’s good.” I replied, “Yeah, it is.”

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“Our clients appreciate our careful attention to “Our ourimmediate careful attention detailclients as weappreciate explore their needs asto detail as we explore their immediate needs as well as preparing for future expansion, wellsuccession as preparing for future expansion, or sale of the facility.” succession or sale of the facility.” Melanie Friedman & Mark Moore Melanie Friedman & Mark Moore

www.fmdarchitects.com www.fmdarchitects.com 2841 Riviera Drive • Suite 200 • Fairlawn OH 44333 2841 Riviera Drivee: • Suite 200 • Fairlawn OH 44333 p: 330.836.2343 contact@fmdarchitects.com p: 330.836.2343 e: contact@fmdarchitects.com CIRCLE NO. 66


customers

By Eric Balinski

Swear

oath by the

Inside Honor Beer's mission—its customers

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I’ll admit it up front, every time I hear someone in the craft beer industry say something like, “It’s all about the beer,” it makes me flinch. I wonder where the customers fit into the person hierarchy of priorities. Yes, this statement is intended to show pride in the brewer’s craft and its view of what will make its customers happy. But having worked with and advised numerous companies over the past 30-plus years, this is one of the toughest challenges—convincing the company leadership their business’ success is less about their product. The reason is, overtime this focus often results in a company disconnected to customers, uninspired value for customers and disappointing sales. Today, the craft beer consumer has an overwhelming number of choices, all of which are pretty darn good beers, available for any palate. That makes these good brews more of a commodity in the taste buds of customers and a growing issue to every brewer’s prosperity and survival. Recently, I was introduced to Honor Brewing in Chantilly, Virginia by the wife and agent of musician Dave Bray. Becky Bray told me great things about the people behind Honor Brewing,

what its mission was, and how it is dedicated to doing extraordinary things for its customers. Our whole conversation was such a testament to Honor’s efforts with its customers. Needless to say, I had to learn more about this mission-driven craft brewer. When I spoke with David Keuhner, co-founder of Honor Brewing, my first question was, “Please tell me about your mission, because it doesn’t sound much like the rest of the craft beer industry?” Keuhner explained that Honor Brewing started with the idea to find a way to pay tribute and recognize all the men and woman who served our country, as well as their families. He noted that there are more than 3 million American men and women who served in Iraq and Afghanistan alone. “We may not be able to help all, but we can help some.” This noble mission has propelled Honor’s expansion into 14 states in only two years. As we talked further, it was clear Keuhner was more passionate about his customers than about beer making. He talked a

Today, the craft beer consumer has an overwhelming number of choices, all of which are pretty darn good beers, available for any palate.

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customers

lot about people and their lives, not flavors, styles, The mission defined or new products. Keuhner shared story after story of Honor Brewing’s branding and marketing is comcustomers, their families and what Honor Brewing pletely centered on its target audience. The beer’s does to pay tribute to those who have served and name, Honor, to its packaging, social media and those who are no longer with us. For example, Honeven a patented tap handle for dog tags are all deor Brewing recently started selling in California, with signed to remember and pay tribute to those who its first buyer being the Dodgers. served America. At a home game, the Dodgers The packaging for Honor and Honor Brewing paid tribute Golden Ale and Honor IPA each to a Gold Star mom whose son has a story about the fallen. grew up outside Dodger Stadium. These stories are written by the The ceremony acknowledged families, wives, mothers, etc., to her son’s and family’s sacrifice for celebrate their family member’s our country. The mom noted that life and service to our country. the worst isn’t that her son died, Truly this craft beer that has a soul but that he would be forgotten. tied to it. Her overwhelming gratitude and What about the beer? Honor’s thankfulness will never be forbeer, or your craft beer, is actually gotten by anyone in attendance. only a means to deliver value to Dodger Head Coah Dave Roberts Now this is a mission that makes customers. In Honor’s case, its and Kat Leon. a difference. mission is bigger than any of its six different beers could ever be. And isn’t this the point of creating an inspiring and powerful mission for a company in the first place? If the product is the mission, at some point, it’s just another beer to any consumer no matter how enjoyable it may be. Another interesting aspect of Honor brewing is the beer plays a larger role than a tasty beverage. With Honor beer, each time customers raise a beer, it symbolizes honoring and saying thank you to those who served and sacrificed. As a result, Honor’s beer transcends beer hops to an emotional experience for all who drink it. That becomes pretty powerful brand reinforcement. A company mission, such as one like Honor Brewing’s, can be a mighty force for a company. Soon after the conversation with Keuhner, I spoke with an old friend, Gregg Young in Michigan, about the idea for an CPL Leon. unrelated article.

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As summer kicks in, if you’re in one of the 14 states that carry Honor Beer, lift one and say thank you to all those who sacrificed and served our country. In doing so, you’ll recognize and respect these Americans. Additionally, through the sale of its products, apparel and merchandise sales, as well as charitable auctions and events Honor Brewing contributes to related military charities. Through these fundraising efforts, Honor Brewing Co in the last two years has been able to contribute more than $250,000 to charities of the fallen and injured. God Bless America and those who serve and sacrificed. Eric Balinski is the owner of Synection, LLC, which is a strategy and growth consultancy firm. For more information, visit: synection.com. MayJune-2018.pdf

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Young didn’t know I was writing, so I shared my work with Craft Brand and Marketing, mentioning too that my next article was going to be about Honor Brewing to coincide with the kick-off of summer and Memorial Day. Explaining how I write an article, I shared the Dodger/Honor Beer’s Gold Star mom story. Little did I know, Young knew folks in one of the Dodger’s development teams, The Great Lake Loons. Shortly after, Young had a chance encounter with the incoming president for the Loons and shared the mission of Honor Brewing and its availability in Michigan. His reaction was: “That’s a great idea, and I’m going to run with it.” Imagine if the conversation was only about craft beer. Sure, it would have been business oriented, likely with lots of varying opinions of what may or may not sell in the stadium or what existing beer contracts might have to be reviewed. Instead, the Honor mission immediately sold Honor beer, the rest are just details of getting it into the stadium. C

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branding

By Eric Balinski

Say what now? Why it's not good to skunk your customers

In the story, “Strategic Thinking—The New Game Board,” in our second issue of 2017, we discussed how the founders of Yeti figured out an offering that delivered better value to customers in a world full of popular low performing products. In the fourth issue of 2017, the story, “More Pie Please,” we discussed how a new competitor to Yeti could potentially take share from Yeti or create new customer share without pursuing Yeti’s customers. As a supporter of the NRA Foundation, a member of the NRA and a fan of Yeti products, it was intriguing from a professional marketing perspective to watch what transpired in April when Yeti notified the NRA Foundation (a group that raises money to support gun safety and educational programs) that it was eliminating the discount program. Yeti further explained it was offering an alternative program available to consumers and organizations, including the NRA. The NRA viewed the situation stemmed from early March when Yeti refused to fulfill a previously negotiated NRA order, citing “recent events” as the reason (presumably the Parkland shooting). Next, Yeti notified the NRA Foundation that it was terminating a seven-year agreement and demanded the NRA remove Yeti’s name and logo from all NRA digital assets, as well as refrain from using any Yeti trademarks in future print materials.

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My intention here is not political. Rather for any marketer, what’s particularly strange was Yeti told a long-time customer that it could in no way show or represent any identity of the Yeti brand with the NRA brand. This suggests something more going on than just a new discount program for the NRA. Regardless of where you stand on this debate, what you should consider is how your company can make the same mistake—alienating or even betraying long-time customers. Maybe your actions may not grab headlines, but nonetheless the result can be the same. All too often, companies lose-sight of what’s meaningful and important to the customers. This becomes more complex as you grow, as different customers types show up in your customer mix over time. Your original craft beer aficionado customers, now includes folks who are more casual about their beer consumption. This Yeti story is also similar to what plays out when a craft brewer sells out to a Big Beer producer. The Big Beer buyer just wants the customers of the craft brewer. The craft brewer’s beer is the hook to keep the customer, without necessarily keeping the same values and mission the craft

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branding

brewer funded the company on. It’s inevitable, too, as Big Beer companies have entirely different metrics and financial performance objectives.

Your customers have a vision, too In Yeti’s case, the two founding brothers, Ryan and Roy Seiders, are passionate outdoor enthusiasts. Their customers related to the founders’ ethos and intense outdoor lifestyle. But after the brothers sold equity to a private equity firm in 2012, their destiny with customers was pretty much sealed, as private equity only holds an investment for four to seven years and then exits, hopefully for much more than the $67 million the PE firm invested into Yeti. This generates the return on the funds they manage. To make it more valuable, the PE firm must cut costs and grow sales. Yeti started

The craft brewer’s beer is the hook to keep the customer, without necessarily keeping the same values and mission the craft brewer funded the company on.

producing more of its products in China to cut costs. To grow sales, it needed to either find more customers exactly like its current customers or, more likely, customers who buy coolers for other reasons. Concurrently, competitors had figured out Yeti’s magic, and put Yeti’s customers under fierce competitive pressure. Simply, it was becoming incredibly difficult for Yeti to grow with the same customers who now have many equally performing, less expensive options to buy. Enter the non-rugged outdoor brand buyers into Yeti customer-mix, who will buy expensive Yeti products for other reasons. For example, my significant other passed a shop window last spring while we were on vacation and noticed a “beautiful beach bag”—actually a soft-sided Yeti Hopper 30. I talked her out of buying it, and then in the summer gave it to her for her birthday along with chilled Veuve Clicquot champagne and frozen King Crab Legs. I’m sure the Seider’s never envisioned a proud card carrying girly girl as one of their customers. (she does love to fish with me though.) The story between the lines with the Yeti and the NRA is that many NRA members truly are within the original customer base of Yeti customer. They are extremely dedicated to all things rugged and outdoors. The Yeti move felt like a total betrayal to them. And it was. On the other hand, the PE firm planned to exit its Yeti investment through an IPO announced in late 2016, and probably were concerned over customer sentiment around the issue of guns. Its move away from the NRA suggests it believed other buyers were needed more than its rugged outdoor folks to pull off the IPO. And given the outrage by the rugged outdoors folks, it better be right, as many rugged types are likely gone from its mix.

This case holds many lessons for craft brewers. They are: • There are only so many craft beer aficionados to go around for the 5,500 brewers. • Inevitable, you will need to find new customer types. Choose them wisely; don’t just believe all customers want the same thing. Many of my prior articles offered helpful methods to figure this out.

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• If you want to sell your operation, more than likely, it’s to Big Beer. They will never keep the same ethos and mission you created, even if you stay aboard. That’s reality. If you are fine with cashing out, no matter what happens after, so be it. Don’t look back.

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• But there may be an exception. In my other story in this issue (see “Swear by the Oath,” page 152), about “Honor Brewing,” its mission is so compelling, it’s more important than the beer they brew. If it ever sells the company, and any future buyer would likely buy it for its mission more than the beer it brews.


CIRCLE NO. 69


AND THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY By Peggy Newquist

I

t was the late 1980s, and hanging in most jobsite trailers was a tool catalog that featured scantily clad women wearing hard hats and tool belts. I was a young engineer

who had just finished an intern assignment for the summer on a construction site. My project manager and superintendent invited me to lunch to celebrate.

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Imagine my surprise when after ordering lunch, the lights were dimmed in the restaurant and the lingerie show began, It was about that same time I realized I was one of the only women sitting at a table, as opposed to one of the those walking around in her underwear. As I recall, I didn’t even react. I think I was too stunned, so I ate my cheeseburger, said thank you and goodbye, and beat a hasty retreat to my car. At that time, my experience wasn’t really unusual. A woman I knew who owned a general contracting firm was forced to endure pre-bid meetings held in men’s restrooms because the men didn’t want her around. She went anyway. And countless women experienced catcalls or unwanted advances on the jobsite.

Judd speaking up on their behalf. Even a Google search of “#MeToo in the construction industry” turns up very little information. And while I know it's still an issue on far too many jobsites, I'm also optimistic that many contractors and industry partners recognize the importance of women to the success of construction and have zero tolerance for this behavior. Why am I optimistic? Between 2007 and 2016, women-owned construction firms grew 56 percent, with women now owning 13 percent of the construction firms in the United States. A recent google search found that only two construction industry suppliers still put out calendars featuring women and tools. Women in Construction organizations like The National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC), Federation of

While sexual harassment may be waning, gender bias remains one of the biggest challenges for women in the commercial construction industry. How #MeToo is taking charge

I’ve interviewed more than 20 women in the last 18 months about their careers and experiences in the industry. Almost everyone of them has a #MeToo moment, most involving their time in the field. Here we are in 2018, and Hollywood, the finance industry, news and media are all reeling from the stories about powerful men using their positions to control women. Interestingly enough, the construction industry isn’t even in the discussion. Not because sexual harassment doesn’t exist in the industry, but rather because women make up only 9 percent of the industry. There is no Ashley

Women Contractors (FWC) and Women Construction Owners & Executives (WCOE) continue to do great work by supporting women in the industry and opening doors to opportunity for bidding, learning and networking. And over the last 18 months, more organizations are getting in the game. In our area, a local trade association hosted a "Women in the Industry" breakfast featuring an amazing group of panelists. The standing-room only event followed that up with a networking-through-improv event for women that was overflowing as well. Several large general contractors have launched Women Employee Affinity groups focused on providing education and most importantly access for women in their organizations.

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I’ve interviewed more than 20 women in the last 18 months about their careers and experiences in the industry. Almost everyone of them has a #MeToo moment, most involving their time in the field.

Procore launched the “Women in Construction” initiative, holding several sold-out events across the country. ENR held its 13th annual “Ground Breaking Women in Construction” event, which had more than 700 attendees this year. Both events attracted a large number of participants, which speaks to both the number of companies supporting their female employees and the increased number of women employed in the industry. And HBO's Vice News presented, “Male Construction Workers say #MeToo has Changed their Jobsites,” which featured an open discussion about the changes they knew were needed to make women more comfortable in the industry. On a smaller scale, a local general contractor in the Chicago area made golf lessons available to all their project engineers to ensure women and men were comfortable participating in an upcoming company sponsored event. Another local contractor increased their maternity and paternity leave this year to make it easier for both their female and male employees to stay engaged in their career and start a family. And, most importantly, as we continue to mentor women in college programs and those who have recently entered the workforce, fewer report they are encountering sexual harassment.

While sexual harassment may be waning, gender bias remains one of the biggest challenges for women in the commercial construction industry. A case study presented in January by the American Society of Civil Engineers recounted the story of a young woman working at her first engineering job. It was a small firm, where the employees not only worked together, but socialized, too. She was the only female engineer. The company president’s wife objected to her presence on the team, and unfortunately, she began to lose prime assignments and was eventually laid off. The idea that this young woman was somehow a distraction or temptation to the male staff is insulting and her treatment was likely illegal. She found a better job and chose not to file suit, rather chalking it up to a bad life experience. This case illustrates that society and construction still have a long way to go in creating work environments that are female friendly. We must all do our part to encourage continued efforts to create an inclusive industry as we will all benefit in the long run. For help in creating a more inclusive work environment, contact us at info@constructingopportunity.com WC

Peggy Newquist is principal of Constructing Opportunity LLC, a premier leadership skills and diversity awareness training company for the construction industry. With 30 years of industry experience, Newquist has created Leadership Development Programs, mentoring programs and resource networks within the industry. Currently a member of the Purdue University, Construction Engineering Department Industry Advisory Committee, she holds several positions with NAWIC (National Association of Women in Construction), serving as a Director of the Board of the Chicago Metro chapter, a National Co-chair for the Professional Development & Education Committee, a Trustee and Regional Liaison for the NAWIC Education Foundation (NEF), and a member of the Federation of Women Contractors (FWC).

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CIRCLE NO. 70


Achieving a Contemporary Aesthetic with Masonry Brick and manufactured stone solutions for modern commercial designs By Luke Guinn, Marketing Manager for General Shale

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ou never get a second chance to make a first impression. This is particularly true with commercial design. A well-designed façade goes a long way toward projecting a particular image that reflects a building’s purpose. At the same time, a building’s materials must also function well in its surrounding environment, be durable and contribute to the structure’s energy efficiency.

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MASONRY

Today’s building professionals are faced with an overwhelming array of design choices for commercial façades, but only a few meet all of these important requirements. Masonry is one of them. Brick and manufactured stone are two of the most robust, resilient and sustainable building resources available to architects and designers, offering unparalleled protection from the elements, long-lasting value, greater energy efficiency and less maintenance than other materials. They also afford superior design choices, exquisite natural beauty, and a stunning selection of colors and styles that provide unique aesthetic advantages. Brick colors are no longer relegated to the red hues so commonly seen on banks,

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Commercial designers are requesting highly textured materials for their projects, and the brick and manufactured stone industries continue to add more texture to product lines to meet increased demand.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018

shopping centers, health care and educational facilities, and many other commercial buildings. While red brick remains a popular choice among our customers for numerous commercial applications, we have seen a shift over the past few years toward non-traditional brick colors that continues to rapidly grow. These colors include clean, crisp white bricks – with white mortar for a monochromatic design or dark gray mortar for a high-definition look. Additional popular brick tones include ivory, cream, pink, light taupe and sand – either for a full project or in conjunction with a darker brick or stone. Subtle, elegant light and silver grays, along with sleek pewter and steel grays, are also in high demand for modern designs. Architects are also incorporating deep, rich chestnut browns, raw, earthy charcoal grays and muted blacks into commercial projects for an impressive visual statement. Combining brick and stone in the same neutral color palette achieves an even more contemporary design. Some of General Shale’s most popular brick colors utilized by commercial designers and specifiers are our Smoke Gray Velour and Graystone Velour – both for main field brick and accent brick. Highly requested light colors include Oatmeal Velour, Diamond White and Cascade White, and we’re seeing strong interest in dark colors, such as Java, Shadow Canyon and Dutch Chocolate. Color, however, is not the only element impacting today’s masonry trends. Elongated brick and stone shapes are changing the face of today’s commercial projects as architects continue to seek cleaner lines and sophisticated profiles for their designs. Longer masonry sizes enable architects to bring a fresh dimension to their projects by emphasizing the linearity of a building’s façade, resulting in a dramatic presentation. We have a number of products that assist architects in achieving such an aesthetic. General Shale’s line of commercial brick selections includes Norman (11 5/8”L) and Monarch (15 5/8”L) sizes. Arriscraft’s commercial stone products offer a comprehensive range of building stone selections that not only replicate the aesthetics of natural stone, but also deliver modern style and long, sleek lengths (up to 31 3/8”L). Arriscraft’s elongated Contemporary Brick is popular for current building designs


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MASONRY

and comes in random lengths. Our new Architectural Linear Series from Arriscraft introduces an elegant, extra-long (23 5/8”L) brick for the North American architectural community that rivals the popular premium products offered by European companies. This brick series features a distressed finish ideal for modern designs with rustic appeal. Both of these Arriscraft products are composed of calcium silicate, just like natural stone. Longer, thinner masonry units are striking elements for contemporary designs. They can be laid in a singular bond pattern across the entire façade or by combining varying patterns for a stunning effect. Whether incorporating the brick with matching mortar for a monolithic effect, using contrasting mortar for visual interest, or mixing brick sizes to achieve a multi-layered pattern, wider masonry profiles offer more opportunities for architectural designers who seek to establish a distinctively modern look. Part of what makes masonry a compelling building product is the character it provides, not only via color and shape, but through texture. Commercial designers are requesting highly textured materials for their projects, and the brick and manufactured stone industries continue to add more texture to product lines to meet increased demand. General Shale’s commercial brick has a unique rock face texture that allows architects to change from a traditional brick texture to a chiseled stone texture without changing body color. It also has the same fired-clay body, so any movement from expansion and contraction will be the same in the brick courses, despite the texture. This unique texture is less absorptive than concrete products and will

last the life of a building, with no sealing needed. Popular with customers, this stone look affords varying depths and dimensions. Combining a rock-faced brick with a smooth, velour brick on the same project provides the look of stone accents using all-clay brick. Another popular product is distressed or tumbled brick for a weathered effect, lending a rustic, old-world appearance that is extremely effective for architects seeking to replicate a historic look or create an industrial feel for their projects. This highly sought-after characteristic is also available in our thin brick products, providing a realistic, hand-laid look that allows for the incorporation of additional architectural design elements. One of our newer thin building stone products, Arriscraft’s Coastal Series, provides a split face texture in a distinct linear style that is ideal for designers who prefer a sleek, “ashlar” look with a mortar joint. Midtown Thin Building Stone, another newer Arriscraft thin product, also provides a split face texture in a thin stone that is reminiscent of a linear brick, available in lengths up to 23 5/8”. Today’s brick and manufactured stone products afford architects an extensive and diverse selection of contemporary options for achieving stunning and distinctive commercial projects. The versatility of masonry colors, textures, profiles and sizes – combined with custom shape capabilities for bullnoses, water tables, arches, sills, corners, lintels, soffits and more – offers unlimited design possibilities, enabling architects to dress up a façade well beyond what is typically available with other building materials – and not only make a great first impression, but a lasting one. CCR

Industry expert Luke Guinn is General Shale’s Marketing Manager. Headquartered in Johnson City, Tennessee, General Shale is the North American subsidiary of Wienerberger AG and a leading manufacturer of brick. Arriscraft is the stone products group of General Shale. For more information, visit www.generalshale.com or www.arriscraft.com.

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CIRCLE NO. 73


Virtually speaking How the technology is transforming today's sign companies By Marilyn Brennan

V

irtual reality is real. While it is the future of gaming and entertainment, the technology also is changing the way some sign companies are developing and recommending effective signage to their clients. While 3D engineering of signage is widely used throughout the sign industry, the addition of virtual reality capabilities to the 3D sign engineering technology allows for a much more realistic presentation to the client.

When developing a site-specific sign package, most sign companies will utilize construction drawings, survey details and photos to present a 2D recommendation to a retailer. This industry standard has its limitations. The signage typically is presented in a straight on perspective, which is rarely how the signage is viewed. A 2D elevation can serve to determine installation height and fabrication details needed for both manufacturing and permitting; however, those do not always determine or present the effectiveness of the sign.

the sign will look from a variety of perspectives. The technology allows a virtual drive by of the site with the surrounding buildings, trees and other elements that can restrict viewing, depicted accurately. Traffic patterns and access to sites can greatly affect the visibility of a sign. 3D VR provides the sign company and the retailer the visual documentation to determine the readability of the sign with respect to size and viewing distances. The 3D files created for the various views can be shared with those stakeholders who cannot visit the site. This allows for greater input from upper management and the branding or marketing team. This will ensure that all aspects of the signage will meet everyone’s criteria for overall effectiveness. During new sign development, whether due to rebranding, unique architecture or re-engineering of signage, it is often difficult to determine how the sign will look from all angles. Prior to investing in the fabrication of prototypes and installing them on a building, the software can be used to replicate the actual building and sign design details. This is a more cost and time effective method. Allowing the design team to test their designs with little downside is an immeasurable tool.

Advantages of 3D software

Making a case for more effective signage

Disadvantages of 2D rendering

The advantages and uses of the 3D Virtual Reality technology include better sign package recommendations. Retailers can see exactly how

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The other use for this software is in permitting. While most codes are developed with a sign square footage allowed based on a calculation of building

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


CIRCLE NO. 74


VIRTUALLY SPEAKING

size, this does not always take into consideration the building setback, other site line obstructions and the traffic patterns. If a retailer is going to spend money on a sign, that money should be well spent. The effectiveness of a sign is important when determining if the allowable square footage outlined in the zoning code is adequate. As stated earlier, most 2D drawings are from the straight on perspective and relatively close in viewing distance.

As our industry moves forward with no technologies, we can all conclude that 3D Virtual Reality technology adds a level of visual field perspective in the convenience of your office.

The 3D VR software technology allows the sign company to first determine if the proposed allowable square feet of signage is effective and provides the necessary perspective to determine if a variance to the code is recommended. Once it is determined to be needed, a variance application is submitted and a series of tours is developed for presentation at the variance hearing. This determination is largely dependent on the sign company’s experience in developing a strategy for a permit variance. The software is only as effective as the sign company’s abilities. These virtual tours allow the entire zoning board and community members in attendance to see first-hand that the proposed allowable signage is ineffective and may cause traffic incidences, because of a lack of safe turning distance due to last minute turns and signage readability issues, on the part of the consumer. Most townships have

large overhead screens for viewing of documents being presented. These screens are utilized to present these tours. The tours also allow the entire zoning board and the members of the community to see how the proposed larger signage would appear in the actual setting. This usually results in an understanding that the requested relief is not without merit. In addition to the size of the signage being requested, the tours can also be used to highlight additional signage needed due to traffic patterns and additional access to the site. It can also be modified to adjust to different speeds at which vehicles approach the site.

How the 3D tours are created

Now you know why the 3D Virtual Reality technology is needed, here's how it is developed by the sign company. We start with a combination of files, such as "Construction Site Plans" and "Elevations" site survey details and photos and Google Earth photos. These are all utilized to create the building and the surrounding area, including other buildings, tree lines, lamp posts, roadways and traffic patterns. The level of detail required is determined on the individual clients needs and any request from relief from the zoning ordinance. The specific building materials are replicated for use in viewing contrast between building and signage. The tours can be viewed on any computer without any specific software, when saved as a MP4 file. This file can be shared with all stakeholders or at variance hearings. To fully engage in the virtual reality aspect of this software, VR Goggles can be used with most iPhones or Androids to allow a self-guided tour. This is typically utilized by the design team to allow for complete navigation around all angles of the signage. You may have used this technology in an interior architecture environment or in an entertainment venue. As our industry moves forward with new technologies, we can all conclude that 3D Virtual Reality technology adds a level of visual field perspective in the convenience of your office. Even the most straight-forward, simplistic signage project will benefit from this added level of expertise that 3D VR provides. You can virtually be anywhere you need to be. CCR

Marilyn Brennan is the director of business development and account management at Egan Sign. With more than nine years of experience in the sign industry, and a background in business development and project management, she joined Egan Sign in August 2016. She is responsible for managing all leads, promoting the company’s capabilities and implementing sales programs.

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WWW.CDOGROUP.COM

A DIGITAL

FUTURE Staying ahead of technology


WWW.CDOGROUP.COM

Letter from the President

The brand behind the brand If you would have told me 30 years ago that our industry, the construction business, was going to evolve into outsourcing, I wouldn’t have believed you. Nobody would have. Yet, here we are. With over twenty years of experience, CDO Group has grown into one of the most trusted names in construction management solutions. We like to think of ourselves as “the brand behind the brand.”

Our industry is growing and changing every day. As technology evolves, so does the need to keep up. Our clients want new and better ways of doing things. They want to move faster and more efficiently.

Our reputation is built on the relationships we have forged with some of the biggest multi-unit retail names in the country: Chipotle, Starbucks, Hertz, Barry’s Bootcamp, Flywheel, CorePower Yoga, Gap, McDonald’s, Dunkin’ Donuts, Red Lobster and T.G.I. Friday’s, just to name a few. These and other brands have entrusted us with their business.

CDO Group keeps projects on time and on budget. The key to our success is our ability to listen, adapt, and overcome the challenges that occur with any construction job. By creating a one-stop shop for our clients’ needs,

CDO Group delivers time and time again. The proof is in our longevity and passion. Our industry is growing and changing every day. As technology evolves, so does the need to keep up. Our clients want new and better ways of doing things. They want to move faster and more efficiently. Gone are the days of 18-month construction cycles. Most importantly, brands want an ally that can help make all of this happen. That’s where we come in. Our job is to evolve with you. We are here to make sure everything moves more effectively down the line. As the president of the CDO Group, that’s my promise to you.

Anthony Amunategui


PASSION • PRECISION • DEPENDABILITY EFFICIENCY • ENERGY • HEART.

These are the qualities that drive CDO Group. With thousands of projects under our belt over the past 20 years, CDO Group can satisfy your needs whether it is a simple refresh program, a downsize and remodel, or a complicated new build. CDO takes the pressure off the process and allows you to focus on your other needs by providing comprehensive, reliable and cost-effective construction management alternatives.

WWW.CDOGROUP.COM

20+ Strong


WWW.CDOGROUP.COM

Your advisors in the field

Our group of seasoned industry professionals offers a wide range of experiences in expanding multi-unit concepts in all 50 states. With our dedicated team of project managers strategically placed around the country, we ensure that every project gets the attention to detail it both needs and deserves. Whether you need short-term manpower or a project manager to help refine the process, we are a one-stop resource designed to tackle construction

projects in every region of the country. Be it a retainer or per-project basis, you pay for what you need. Each project begins by setting reporting and/or process expectations to ensure that everyone involved in the program operates efficiently from Day 1. Thanks to our proven set of best-practice requirements and benchmarks, we can implement a strategic course of action designed to maximize your time and cost savings, minimize errors and exceed your expectations.


In today’s ever-changing technological landscape, working with new technologies for each new project comes with its own unique set of needs. Remote controlled machines. Robots. Drones. Computer chips in building materials. Self-powered buildings with new materials that can improve safety and speed up repairs or repair themselves. Every new idea requires new skills and the ability to manage high-tech equipment and software. CDO Group will help you navigate through the process.

CDO Group is on the forefront of these innovations. For example, our live WebCast communication via our website enables you to tour your job site without ever leaving your office. In addition, the CDOgroup.com website is a flexible, passwordprotected tool that serves as a central point of communication for a wide variety of real-time documents, including weekly reports, forms, schedules, budgets, drawings, change orders, vendor contacts, photos, and more. Our clients are able to efficiently communicate with their vendors, architects, contractors and employees through one source of communication.

WWW.CDOGROUP.COM

Your Technology Solution


WWW.CDOGROUP.COM

CDO delivers... CDO Group offers customized resources to get the job done. CDO is Your Expert in... Construction Management * Pre-Construction Diligence: •O  ffer preliminary estimates in pro forma model, based on scope of work & landlord delivery •D  efine scope of work & negotiate landlord delivery & allowance • Provide Site Investigation Report to identify municipal approvals & associated fees * Value Engineered Prototypes: • Assist with development of a cost-efficient prototype for multi-unit expansion

* Construction Coordination: •M  anage architectural & other design related consultants

* Facilities Management • Manage on-going repair & maintenance of your real estate asset base

•N  egotiate construction contract with GCs •O  ff construction scheduling for tracking adherence to critical dates & projected time frames • Pursue necessary permits & approvals, including appearances at special use hearings (if required) •P  rovide project management supervision to ensure quality standards & avoid project pitfalls

... Real Estate Management * Market Research • Create customer profiles •D  etermine appropriate number of new locations for market(s) • Establish site criteria • Utilize proprietary software to analyze cannibalization and competition •T  rade area delineation and prioritization

* Site Selection • Focus search for ideal locations based on market research analysis •C  ustomize site profile report • Deal & contract negotiation •D  esign & prepare site packages •P  rovide deal tracking reports

* Disposition & Assessment of Existing Sites • Coordinate disposition of under-performing sites •R  enegotiate existing leases to improve profitability


WWW.CDOGROUP.COM

Trust the Process

To help get your project delivered on time and specific to your vision, the CDO Group team helps coordinate two or threeday onsite interactive workshops. Together, we analyze the current program structure, information flow, shareholder needs and company goals, helping to identify strengths, weaknesses and opportunities for improvement. We elicit participation and feedback from you – the key stakeholder – so that you’re comfortable the direction of the program. Our goal is generate a cohesive, integrated plan that gets everyone moving in the same direction.

We create tailored reference manuals and/or online interface that outlines the new or revised set of program elements. The plan typically includes: •P  rocess flowcharts and/or step-by-step narratives with timing & accountability noted for each critical stage • Planning, tracking & reporting forms • Specification manuals • Prototype drawings


333 Harrison Street Oak Park, IL 60304 Mail us Business: anthony@cdogroup.com General: info@cdogroup.com Call Us 708-383-0586

For more information about the CDO Group, visit us at www.cdogroup.com


The ‘1099 Employee’ effect What it means to you – and why you should know

T

By Robert Moore​

he construction industry is a highly competitive, razor-thin margin industry, with enormous risks for all stakeholders. To become more competitive, contractors, subcontractors and vendors are choosing a “1099

employee” strategy to shift employer costs to employees by classifying them as independent contractors. The costs, taxes and risks shifted include workers compensation, unemployment insurance, worker eligibility verification, social security taxes, Medicare taxes and contractor licensing, to the “1099 employee.” The only problem – This scheme is almost always illegal. For clarity sake, there is no such thing as a “1099 Employee.” If someone is not your employee, they are an independent contractor. Agreements alone do not make a person “independent” from an employer. For example, you may have an agreement with a person to supervise your job site, but if they are not a licensed contractor (where required)

control and relationship factors. For example, here are a few basic questions to ask yourself, your vendors, your subcontractors: • Does the worker decide what kind of reporting to send to your company, have their own employees and maintain insurance? • Is the worker a licensed contractor in states requiring licensing? • Is the worker at risk for profit or loss based on their decisions and serve other clients? • Does the worker have a registered legal entity enabling them to provide a valid social security number (e-verify) or Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN)?

Robert Moore is president, West Region, of Gray Construction, a pioneer in design-build specializing in engineering, architecture and construction services to both domestic and international customers. The Lexington, Kentucky-based company has offices across the United States, Canada and Japan.

For clarity sake, there is no such thing as a “1099 Employee.” If someone is not your employee, they are an independent contractor. Agreements alone do not make a person “independent” from an employer. and their duties are not independent, by definition, the IRS, the department of labor and state agencies would consider them your employee. Consequences for misclassifying an employee can be severe, but enforcement is lax due to the difficulty of detecting the illegal activity and enforcement resource shortages. The IRS publishes guidelines to help you determine when you must consider a worker an employee and what factors must be in place to consider a worker an independent contractor. Most of these guidelines fall into behavioral control, financial

Whether intentional or unintentional, many owner contracts turn a blind eye to the endemic problem to the commercial construction industry. A few of the consequences of this illegal activity is unfair competition, burdening others with the costs and leaving workers unprotected. The result might be lower construction costs for owners, but they are simply shifting costs to others. Given enforcement challenges, buyers of construction services must take the lead, like some major retailers have done, to require proper classification of employees, I-9 employment eligibility certification for general contractors and subcontractors and proof of licensing by contract. General contractors must pass these requirements through to their subcontractors and not hire workers under the guise of calling them an independent contractor. We are a nation of laws; let’s follow them for the benefit of all. CCR MAY : JUNE 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE


COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

P E O P L E 2018 SCHEDULE: February 20th (Tuesday) in Atlanta GA

March 13th (Tuesday) in Dallas, TX

April 17th

(Tuesday) in Charlotte, NC

May 17th

(Thursday) in Minneapolis, MN

June 14th

(Thursday) Philadelphia, PA

July 12th

(Thursday) in Boston, MA

July 26th

(Thursday) in Cleveland, OH

August 23rd (Thursday) in Nashville, TN

September 13th ( Thursday) in New York City, NY

October 18th

(Thursday) in Los Angeles, CA

November 29th (Thursday) in Scottsdale, AZ

For information about membership or events, contact Kristen Corson, kristenc@ccr-people.com • 770.990.7702 For information about co-sponsoring an event, contact David Corson, davidc@ccr-mag.com • 678.765.6550

www.ccr-people.com www.ccr-mag.com CIRCLE NO. 75


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Time to

collaborate

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


Is Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) right for you? By Clint Stancil & Stephen Powell

O

ne of the most important decisions when launching a project is defining the project delivery method,

specifically how a project is designed and constructed. Design-bid-build (DBB) and Construction Management at Risk (CMAR) represent the majority of project delivery systems used today.

Design-build is an alternative approach to DBB that can successfully deliver both horizontal and vertical construction projects no matter the project type. There is, however, a fourth delivery approach that has gained popularity known as integrated project delivery (IPD).

What is IPD?

IPD is a project delivery approach that integrates people, systems, business structures, and practices into a process that collaboratively harnesses the talents and insights of all participants. This approach was developed to optimize project results, increase owner value, reduce waste and maximize efficiency through all phases of design, fabrication, and construction. In the 1990s, various groups began focusing on project collaboration due to the declining productivity in the construction industry. On the heels of that focus, the IPD model started to gain momentum in the early 2000s. At its core, IPD consists of a tri-party agreement. This is a contractual arrangement among an owner/project manager, constructor, and design professional that aligns business interests of all parties. IPD is more than just a contractual vehicle, but a collaborative approach to delivery where there’s mutual trust between the team members and inefficiencies are avoided. Many delivery models can create silos and messy handoffs from the various stakeholders, who can be more focused on individual goals rather than overall project goals. Instead, IPD looks to create better partnerships and foster an environment focused on shared goals.

IPD is focused on creative ways for the project teams to become a central core with tools to operate and deliver a steady model for decisions and management.

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TIME TO COLLABORATE Is IPD right for you?

While owners may desire a collaborative team focused on project-level goals over individual ones, a full IPD model is not right for every project. This system is best aligned to complex projects that last over 12 months and carry multi-million dollar budgets. Historically, IPD is successfully implemented in healthcare, higher education, manufacturing, and mission-critical and infrastructure project sectors. Current trends include organizations looking for ways to align process improvement and team health with capital improvement projects. IPD enables organizations to use collaborative delivery methods to drive value through innovative approaches and improvement measures driven by teamwork with risk and reward sharing for successful delivery. IPD is focused on creative ways for the project teams to become a central core with tools to operate and deliver a steady model for decisions and management. IPD can: • Eliminate waste in project design • Establish the correct point of contact for each project task • Improve job productivity • Increase project value • Improve construction methods • Establish innovative tactics for approaching field work • Create cost savings • Produce innovative ways to reach goals • Improve production techniques that will in turn improve the client’s bottom line project cost

IPD Pros and Cons

IPD projects share a common theme around collaboration, focused on a team mentality backed by an agreement. IPD contracts are built to bring teams together through the challenges they face. Although there are ways to be successful through trials in a collaborative delivery model, the IPD contract is built to prevent a team from sliding off track. The IPD structure creates an environment of open communication and establishes chain of command. The process removes waste using a format that moves decisions and conversations through a defined reporting structure of core teams. Core teams provide opportunities for barriers to be removed between traditional roles and team member expectations. Varying groups in this delivery model may build strong relationships and want to work together again to nurture their partnership and success.

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Studies have shown project outcomes are more successful using an IPD model versus others. Based on the University of Minnesota School of Architecture IPD Case Study, it realized IPD created a “striking uniformity of success for all the teams in this study, regardless of project type, scope, geographic location or previous experience with IPD.” This is a testament to the nature of expectations set using this team approach with a contractual model that reiterates the value created with the enhanced team environment. Although there are quite a few pros to using IPD, there are a handful of cons. This delivery method requires teams to give (and take) to improve the overall project. This sort of ebb and flow can result in challenges being presented to teams that will take the brunt of the workload to assist in overall project success. It’s imperative each team member understand his results in the greater good of the

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


information is readily available through an open environment can require some additional work and time from key parties. As an example, given the decrease in change orders due to open communication, the team is likely to be fully engaged in development, conversation and documentation versus a traditional delivery method where it’s tossed back and forth for design and pricing exercises. Lastly, IPD works well with three project types: • Repetitive projects • Complex projects • Large projects A repetitive project resembles an assembly line in the way it garners improved results by maintaining a consistent team with incentives to increase outcomes from project to project. Complex projects harbor a very focused team effort, regardless of size, focused on proper planning, innovation and results. The final project type that has been successful using IPD is large projects. Large projects benefit from strong team alliances and processes because the teams work together over a long period of time.

IPD projects require intense time and work investments from team members, particularly in the early stages of the project.

project, even when he may be required to pass normal tasks to other responsible parties on the team. When striving for innovative ideas, high functioning teams need strong partners. This will require team members to be flexible, knowledgeable and always available. This process will show strengths and weaknesses of team members, pushing the stronger members to work harder. Unfortunately, IPD is not always considered a lean delivery model in terms of personnel time. Ensuring documentation and

Integrated project delivery (IPD) is a project delivery approach that integrates people, systems, business structures and practices into a process that collaboratively harnesses the talents and insights of all participants. This approach was developed to optimize project results, increase owner value, reduce waste, and maximize efficiency through all phases of design, fabrication and construction. IPD will continue to gain momentum in the world of complex projects, but trying to implement a full IPD model across projects with budgets less than $5 million may create more administrative burden than desired. The procurement issues alone may be a stumbling block for many organizations. IPD projects require intense time and work investments from team members, particularly in the early stages of the project. Owners should look first to engage a professional project management team to help determine the appropriate delivery system for their projects. CCR

Clint Stancil works on CBRE's Global Project Management Platform team supporting account and local market teams in areas of operational risk assessments, new account and program transitions, and developing best-in-class team structures that provide client-focused processes and deliverables aimed at providing quantitative value while maintaining overall consistency. Stephen Powell, CBRE's director of project management, is responsible for project scheduling; budget development and management; contract negotiation; proposal development and review; and overall client coordination. For more information, they can be reached at Clint.Stancil@cbre.com or Stephen.Powell@cbre.com.

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PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE: Eddie V's #8524

Burlington, MA

$3,000,000.00

9,999

New Construction

Q3 2018

McDonald's Replacement - South Main Street

Rutland, VT

$1,600,000.00

5,250

New Construction

Q4 2018

Chili's Grill & Bar Restaurant

Pittsfield, MA

$1,500,000.00

4,867

New Construction

Q3 2018

Auntie Anne's Pretzels

Kennebunk, ME

$150,000.00

354

Renovation

Q3 2018

Claremont, NH

$2,363,030.00

164,234

Renovation

Q3 2018

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS: Walmart Supercenter #1975-231 O'Reilly Auto Parts

West Hartford, CT

$1,500,000.00

7,648

New Construction

Q3 2018

CVS Pharmacy #04544

North Kingstown, RI

$1,500,000.00

13,319

New Construction

Q3 2018

Old Navy #8380 - Solomon Pond Mall

Marlborough, MA

$700,000.00

12,000

Remodel

Q3 2018

Athleta #461 - The Berry Shoes Building

Portland, ME

$200,000.00

4,030

Remodel

Q3 2018

Washington Village

South Boston, MA

$400,000,000.00

894,600

New Construction

Q4 2018

40 Trinity Place

Boston, MA

$225,000,000.00

429,000

New Construction

Q1 2019

Evergreen Crossing Retirement Community

South Windsor, CT

$25,000,000.00

183,682

New Construction

Q3 2018

15 Sea Street

Eastport, ME

$18,000,000.00

28,800

Renovation

Q4 2018

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY: Hilton Garden Inn

Brookline, MA

$35,000,000.00

153,500

New Construction

Q3 2018

Extended Stay Hotel

Monroe, CT

$4,500,000.00

15,142

New Construction

Q4 2018

Braintree East Middle School

Braintree, MA

$67,736,700.00

184,425

Addition/Renovation

Q4 2018

Rockwell School Renovation Bethel Public Schools

Bethel, CT

$24,700,000.00

51,340

Renovation

Q4 2018

Brunswick Elementary School

Brunswick, ME

$22,000,000.00

90,000

New Construction

Q4 2018

Oak Bluffs Town Hall

Oak Bluffs, MA

$7,650,000.00

21,000

New Construction

Q4 2018

Department of Public Works Maintenance Garage

Merrimack, NH

$2,000,000.00

24,800

Addition/Renovation

Q4 2018

Ambulatory Surgery Center Lawrence Memorial Hospital

Medford, MA

$16,000,000.00

17,500

New Construction

Q1 2019

United Health Care

Hooksett, NH

$9,000,000.00

59,670

Renovation

Q3 2018

Providence VAMC Pharmacy Relocation

Providence, RI

$7,500,000.00

2,650

Addition/Renovation

Q4 2018

Aspen Dental

Ellsworth, ME

$800,000.00

3,500

Remodel

Q3 2018

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


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AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

3mg............................................................................ 67.........................37

Georgia Printco.................................................... 159......................69

Acclaim Lighting......................................................... 73.........................39

GPD Group............................................................ 51.......................29

Ad Art/Genesis Light Solutions.............................. 88, 99.................47, 52

Henderson Engineers........................................... 117......................59

ANP Lighting......................................................... 75.......................40

Jesco Lighting Group............................................ 91.......................49

Astek................................................................... 107......................55

KWC...................................................................... 5.........................3

Auroralight............................................................ 77.......................41

L2M Architects...................................................... 31.......................19

B.E.G. Controls...................................................... 79.......................42

Lakeview Construction, Inc................................... 53.......................30

Beam Team Construction...................................... 65.......................36

Lamar LED............................................................ 93.......................50

Benjamin Moore.................................................... 9.........................7

Laticrete............................................................... 33.......................20

Bitro..................................................................... 81.......................43

MainSource Roof Management............................. 25.......................17

Britten Inc......................................................... CVR2-1....................1 Boelter................................................................. 145......................64 Bogart Construction Inc........................................ 43.......................25 Bostik.................................................................36-37....................22 The Blue Book..................................................... 129......................61

Mapes Architectural Canopies.............................. 165......................71 May Group........................................................... 149......................65 Metropolitan Ceramics......................................... 155......................67 MyCon General Contractors.................................. 49.......................28

Capacity Builders.................................................. 45.......................26

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association............................................... 23.......................16

CKP Construction.................................................. 47.......................27

Newton.................................................................. 3.........................2

Create Architecture Planning & Design, Inc.......... 115......................58

Nora........................................................................... 136........................62

Commerical Construction & Renovation Retreats............................................. 171......................74

Permit.com........................................................... 19.......................14

Commerical Construction & Renovation People............................................182-183..................75 Commerical Construction & Renovation Summit............................................. 100......................53 Connect Source Consulting Group........................ 169......................73 Construction Data Co. (CDC)................................ 189......................76 CONSTRUCT-ED................................................... 167......................72 Construction One.................................................. 39.......................23 Controlled Power.................................................. 14.......................11 Dynamic Air Quality Solutions.............................. 141......................63 Egan Sign............................................................. 11........................8

Philadelphia Sign.................................................. 29.......................18 Pukka.................................................................. 157......................68 R.E. Crawford Construction................................... 55.......................31 Rockerz Inc............................................................ 7.........................4 S.L. Hayden Construction, Inc............................... 59.......................33 Schimenti......................................................... 8, CVR4.................6, 78 ShopTalk 360º...................................................... 13........................9 Signage Solutions................................................ 109......................56 SOS • Retail Services........................................... 61.......................34 Taylor Bros. Construction Co., Inc.......................... 63.......................35

Elemental LED...................................................... 83.......................44

Timberwolff Construction, Inc............................118-119..................60

EMG Corp............................................................ 111......................57

Tridonic................................................................ 95.......................51

EarthTronics.......................................................... 21.......................15

UHC Construction Services................................... 69.......................38

Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber...................... 163......................70

Wagner................................................................. 13.......................10

Flex Lighting Solutions.......................................... 85.......................45

Warner Bros........................................................ CVR3.....................77

FMD Architects.................................................... 151......................66

Window Film Depot............................................... 17.......................13

Forest Lighting...................................................... 87.......................46

Winter Construction.............................................. 41.......................24

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc....................................... 57.......................32

Wolverine Building Group..................................... 105......................54

Garden Light LED.................................................. 89.......................48

WoodWorks.......................................................... 35.......................21

Garland.................................................................. 8.........................5

ZipWall................................................................. 15.......................12

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2018


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PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Aim. Shoot. Score. W

hen opportunity knocks, open the door and take a look. It might be just what the doctor ordered, so to speak. Recently, when we were sending out invites to our inaugural Women in Construction: Building Connections 2018 Conference, I received a reply from a female professional who said she had an unscheduled week of travel that came up and would not be able to attend. She was also confirmed to speak at the PMI Atlanta Chapter monthly meeting and asked if I would fill in for her. I was honored she thought of me but voiced my concern that I might not be the right person for that audience. We’ve known each other for a long time and she felt that I had a good story to tell.

simple, yet very powerful act. You start each day by accomplishing something simple, and then move on to the rest of the items on your to-do list for that day. That really stuck with me as a thought process for my presentation. Project Management 101: Make your bed. It really is very powerful. In the construction sector, we know you have to get up early and set your sights on the work ahead. And the advice is not just for us construction people. The advice goes for everyone—moms, dads, children, military personnel, prisoners, athletes, teachers and

With consistency and determination, you can create a smooth ride to the finish line.

Understanding what happens when you need things on short notice, I agreed. The hard part now was finding the right topic. Then a light bulb when off. Whether it’s personal, business or even sports, we all perform some sort of project management to get things done. You have to create a plan with an achievable and obtainable goal. Surround yourself with the right people. Work smart, i.e., don’t bite off more than you can chew. There are so many hours in a day. Be flexible as there are always bumps on the road during every project that can hinder the your progress. But with consistency and determination, you can create a smooth ride to the finish line. I remembered hearing a speech by Retired 4-Star Navy Admiral William H. McRaven, who said life lesson No. 1 is to make your bed the after you get up in the morning. It’s a Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

192

even publishers like myself. The photo of me in front of an axe target is very appropriate. The bulls-eye is the prize we are all after, so make every throw as accurate as you can and learn from it. Practice makes perfect and correct repetition is perfection. We wish all of you good planning in the second half of 2018. And we hope to see you at our Women’s & Commercial Retreats, which are coming up in early August and late September. And don’t forget about our remaining CCRP receptions to stop by and say hello as well be our guest at the January 2019 Summit on the Gulf Coast in Biloxi, Mississippi. Remember: Aim, shoot, score! CCR

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

President’s Message....................... pg 3 Member Directory......................... pg 4-5 RCA’s 28th Annual Conference.......... pg 7

SPRING EDITION • 2018

NEWSLETTER

The Moving Pieces of E-Commerce Legislation What it means to our industry

By Steve Bachman, President/CEO, Retail Construction Services, Inc.; Vice President, Retail Contractors Association As a result of the 1992 ruling by the U.S. When Quill was decided, it was not feasible for states to identify Supreme Court in Quill vs. North Dakota, states were customers of absentee retailers, and the amount of lost sales taxes—while prevented from collecting sales tax from e-commerce large—had not yet reached the level of “extreme harm” that is now depriving transactions unless the seller has a physical presence states of their ability to fund their education systems, health care services, in the state. This decision basically ensured that mail and infrastructure. order companies such as Wayfair, Overstock, and Amazon, as an early entrant, located its facilities in remote areas rather others, did NOT have to collect state sales taxes for than heavily populated areas so that the tax imposed on its items did not affect Steve Bachman purchases made by consumers and shipped to them the sales price in major markets. This trounced Barnes and Noble with a price in their state, unless they had a retail store there, i.e. Sears, Wards, JC Penney. advantage, with the Bronx store in New York City as the first Amazon casualty. When this law was created, the industry did not see a relevance or need Today, Amazon DOES collect and subsequently pay sales tax on its as the market was a very small percentage of total retail dollars spent, and purchases. However, this is a recent development. the collection process was considered fairly burdensome. Last fall, South The premises and promises of the physical presence requirement have not Dakota filed a petition for certiorari, under the case name South Dakota held true. Quill assumed that: (1) if absentee retail (then, mail order) lost its tax v. Wayfair, Inc., urging the U.S. Supreme Court to “abrogate Quill’s salesshelter, it would not thrive; (2) if a retailer was not physically present in a state, it tax-only, physical-presence requirement.” The state is arguing that advances in In 1995, three years after Quill was decided, Newsweek (then still a print technology make it easier publication) scoffed at the notion that “e-commerce and business will shift from to track and collect taxes on e-commence purchases. The offices and malls to networks and modems” and declared that a “local mall does Justices heard oral arguments more business in an afternoon than the entire Internet handles in a month.” in April, and a decision is expected by the end of the Court’s current term in June. At the time of the 1992 ruling, a few of these companies, as named would not be persistently active there; (3) if absentee retailers were not required above, had a fairly large brick and mortar footprint that the average to collect taxes, their sales would be “tax exempt”; and (4) if an absentee customer shopped in regularly (again, think Sears, Wards, JC Penney), retailer were required to collect sales taxes, the burden would be onerous. which were not impacted or wouldn’t benefit from the law. In addition, Indeed, retailers hesitate to expand into new states fearing—as when the law was enacted the “internet” was not even referenced, only the respondent Overstock.com puts it—that it is not “worth the cost of additional “goliath” mail order business. sales tax burden to open a new facility in [a new] state.” Fast forward to today, when brick and mortar retail sales are contracting amid the advancement and sophistication of e-commerce and online Under further consideration by the Court, we currently have the following arguments: shopping, whether it is through mail order catalogs or companies who really • E-commerce is huge and robust and does not need a tax shelter; have only a virtual presence. The goliath of 1992 has now given way to the • E-commerce is omnipresent even without a physical footprint; e-commerce leviathan. • Sales/use taxes are owed regardless of whether they are collected at In 1992, the mail order segment was $180 billion. Today, online sales are the point of sale; and roughly $6 trillion. • Collecting sales/use taxes online is straightforward. When the law was enacted, the physical presence clause gave mail order a sales advantage; their pricing appeared to be lower because they did not In 1992, only 2% of American households had internet access. Today, have to collect sales tax. This lost tax revenue was still to be collected, but the that number is 89%. Amazon’s capitalization is greater than Walmart, Target, burden was on the consumer, who rarely—if ever—paid. and Costco combined. Quill ’s reasoning conflates two distinct concepts: retailers’ obligation to In 1995, three years after Quill was decided, Newsweek (then still a print collect sales taxes and customers’ obligation to pay sales taxes. publication) scoffed at the notion that “e-commerce and business will shift from Main Street retailers suffered the loss, and so did local communities offices and malls to networks and modems” and declared that a “local mall does without the revenue from the collection of sales tax. more business in an afternoon than the entire Internet handles in a month.” (Continued on page 2 )

RCA’s mission is to promote professionalism and integrity in retail construction through industry leadership in education, information exchange, and jobsite safety.


NEWSLETTER (Continued from page 1) Three years later, Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman declared that “[b]y 2005 or so, it will become clear that the Internet’s impact on the economy has been no greater than the fax machine.” Now, let’s consider how some companies have responded to the reopening of the case. As Overstock.com puts it, e-commerce “is here to stay.” Many of the businesses represented in the current case operate successful online stores—as well as brick-and-mortar stores—and those online stores collect sales taxes. They can speak from experience when they say that collecting sales taxes online is not a crippling burden. Case in point: if e-commerce success required an exemption from sales tax collections, Walmart would not be expanding its online portal and offering free secondday delivery without any membership fee.

Over the course of decades, conventional retailers have invested billions of dollars to literally build up local communities, only to discover that this footprint carries a significant competitive tax disadvantage when it comes to retail sales, whether in their own stores or via their online portals. So, what does it mean to states when they can start collecting the sales taxes owed, currently estimated at $8 to $13 billion annually? Will it go into the general fund, can it help support schools, infrastructure, or are there other uses? What will the landscape look like for construction, our industry? Consider this: as Amazon’s practices confirm, warehouses and distribution centers will be moved closer to population centers, reducing delivery times and cost. In fact, some absentee retailers might even decide to join the local community and open a store on Main Street, as Amazon has, or set up shop in a mall near you.

In conclusion, we ask you to consider supporting the following organizations who have enjoined in the current Supreme Court case: • The Retail Litigation Center • National Retail Federation • American Specialty Toy Retailing Association • American Lighting Association • American Supply Association • American Veterinary Medical Association • Auto Care Association

• Council of State Retail Associations • Food Industry Association Executives • Home Furnishings • Independent Office Products and Furniture Dealers Association • Jewelers of America

• National Association of College Stores • National Grocers Association • National Association of Electrical Distributors • National Association of Wholesaler-Distributors • National Ski and Snowboard Retailers Association

A version of this article first appeared in the CCR April 2018 eNewsletter.

2

SPRING EDITION • 2018

National Sporting Goods Association • North American Retail Hardware Association • Outdoor Industry Association • Retail Industry Leaders • Running Industry Association


ADVISORY BOARD

President’s Message Rick Winkel, CEO, Winkel Construction, Inc.,

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Board of Directors for giving me the opportunity to serve as President of the Retail Contractor’s Association. As many of you know, I have the honor of being the first second-generation president of the RCA. My father, Bill Winkel, a.k.a. Keeper of the Scrolls, was president in 1993, and a founding member of the RCA. I was grateful that he was in Rick Winkel attendance at the annual meeting to see me take the helm of an organization of which our family has been a part since its inception. We had a great turn out for the annual conference in Dallas in March, and what a conference it was! A couple of the highlights: Rich Chapman, author of The Greater Game, spoke about how leadership is everyone’s business. If you were not in attendance for Rich’s presentation, I recommend that you grab a copy of his book. Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO of Sage Policy Group, Inc. once again entertained everyone while presenting his economic outlook. Our Advisory Board members hosted a discussion on retailer and landlord expectations of GCs, the state of the industry, and upcoming retailer initiatives. Lastly, we had a panel of industry experts discussing the changing tides in retail. Following the annual conference, we held our second annual golf tournament, at the Cowboys Golf Club. The weather and event were great and we are looking forward to continuing this tradition next year. If you were not able to be at this year’s conference, I can tell you that one of the greatest reasons for being a RCA member is the time spent with other members. The amount of industry knowledge among the RCA membership is in valuable. I invite all members to make sure that they are in the room anytime that the RCA gathers. Currently, our most significant initiative is the Superintendent Training Program. We have partnered with FMI and are in the process of finalizing the training manual, course, and exam. We anticipate implementing the course for the general membership in fall of 2018. The RCA continues to be a strong organization and I look forward to serving as the President and accomplishing the goals set forth by the organization. If you have any feedback or ideas for the organization, please contact me. We are always looking for ways to continue strengthening the organization. I hope everyone has a successful year!

Currently, our most significant initiative is the Superintendent Training Program. We have partnered with FMI and are in the process of finalizing the training manual, course, and exam. We anticipate implementing the course for the general membership in fall of 2018.

Rick

— rickw@winkelconstruction.com

Chuck Barnes - Spinoso Real Estate Group

Jeffrey D. Mahler - L2M, Inc.

Ken Christopher - LBrands

Jason Miller - JCPenney Company

Mike Clancy - FMI

Steven R. Olson, AIA - CESO, Inc.

Craig Hale, AIA -

Kristen Roodvoets - ALEX AND ANI

HFA - Harrison French Associates

Brad Sanders - CBRE | Skye Group

COMMITTEE CHAIRS EDUCATION/CAREER DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Mike Wolff

SCHOLARSHIP & STUDENT OUTREACH

MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS

Justin Elder 952-345-6069 justin@elderjones.com

909-949-0380 mike@timberwolff.com

Jack Grothe 909-993-9332 jackG@JGConstruction.com

Mike McBride 817-302-2050 mikem@westwoodcontractors.com

MEMBERSHIP

SPONSORSHIP/MEMBER BENEFITS

Hunter Weekes 864-233-0061 hweekes@weekesconstruction.com

Phil Eckinger 330-453-2566 phil@eckinger.com

MILITARY SERVICE INITIATIVE

STRATEGIC PLAN

Jay Dorsey 281-485-4700 J.Dorsey@triadrc.com

Eric Handley 847-856-0123 eric.handley@warandolph.com

SAFETY

TECHNOLOGY

David Martin 920-490-3104 david@hjmartin.com

Robert Moore 714-491-1317 RAMoore@gray.com

OFFICERS President - Rick Winkel

Secretary/Treasurer - Ray Catlin

Vice President - Steve Bachman

Immediate Past President - Brad Bogart

Winkel Construction, Inc.

Retail Construction Services, Inc.

Schimenti Construction Company Bogart Construction, Inc.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2021 Jay Dorsey

2020 Mike Wolff Timberwolff Construction, Inc.

2021 Phil Eckinger

2019 Ray Catlin

2021 Jack Grothe

2019 Eric Handley

2021 David Martin

2020 Steve Bachman

2021 Mike McBride

2020 Brad Bogart

2021 Hunter Weekes

2020 Justin Elder

Triad Retail Construction, Inc. Eckinger Construction Co. JG Construction

Schimenti Construction Company William A. Randolph, Inc.

H.J. Martin & Son, Inc. Westwood Contractors Weekes Construction, Inc.

Retail Construction Services, Inc. Bogart Construction, Inc. Elder-Jones, Inc.

2020 Robert Moore Gray

2020 Rick Winkel

Winkel Construction, Inc.

PAST PRESIDENTS David Weekes 1990-1992 W. L. Winkel 1993 Robert D. Benda 1994 John S. Elder 1995 Ronald M. Martinez 1996 Jack E. Sims 1997 Michael H. Ratner 1998 Barry Shames 1999 Win Johnson 2000 Dean Olivieri 2001

Thomas Eckinger 2002 James Healy 2003 Robert D. Benda 2004-2006 K. Eugene Colley 2006-2008 Matthew Schimenti 2008-2012 Art Rectenwald 2012-2014 Mike Wolff 2014-2016 Robert Moore 2016-2017 Brad Bogart 2017-2018

2018 • SPRING EDITION

3


NEWSLETTER

RCA Membership

RCA members must meet and maintain a series of qualifications and are approved by the Board of Directors for membership. They have been in the retail construction business as general contractors for at least five years; agree to comply with the Association’s Code of Ethics and Bylaws; are properly insured and bonded; are licensed in the states in which they do business; and have submitted letters of recommendation.

COMPANY CONTACT A. F. Alber General Contractor, Inc. Anthony Alber Acme Enterprises, Inc. Robert Russell All-Rite Construction Co., Inc. Warren Zysman Atlas Building Group Brian Boettler BALI Construction Kevin Balestrieri Bogart Construction, Inc. Brad Bogart Buildrite Construction Corp. Bryan Alexander Burdg, Dunham and Associates Harry Burdg Comet Construction Bernard Keith Danzansky Commercial Contractors, Inc. Kenneth Sharkey Commonwealth Building, Inc. Frank Trainor Construction One, Inc. Bill Moberger David A. Nice Builders Brian Bacon De Jager Construction, Inc. Dan De Jager Desco Professional Builders, Inc. Bob Anderson DGC Capital Contracting Corp. Gerry Ryan Diamond Contractors Lori Perry DLP Construction Dennis Pigg, Jr. E.C. Provini, Co., Inc. Joseph Lembo Eckinger Construction Company Philip Eckinger EDC Christopher Johnson ELAN General Contracting Inc. Adrian Johnson Elder-Jones, Inc. Justin Elder EMJ Corporation Ray Caitlin Engineered Structures, Inc. Mike Magill Fi Companies Kevin Bakalian Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Greg Freeh Fred Olivieri Construction Company Dean Olivieri Fulcrum Construction, LLC Willy Rosner Go Green Construction, Inc. Anthony Winkco Gray Robert Moore H.J. Martin & Sons, Inc. David Martin Hanna Design Group Jason Mick Harmon Construction, Inc. William Harmon Hays Construction Company, Inc. Roy Hays Healy Construction Services, Inc. James Healy Herman/Stewart Construction Terry Varner Howard Immel Inc. Pete Smits International Contractors, Inc. Bruce Bronge J. G. Construction Jack Grothe James Agresta Carpentry Inc. James Agresta KBE Building Corporation Michael Kolakowski Kerricook Construction, Inc. Ann Smith Lakeview Construction, Inc. Kent Moon M. Cary, Inc. Bill Tucker Management Resources Systems, Inc. Doug Marion Marco Contractors, Inc. Martin Smith Metropolitan Contracting Co., Ltd. Jane Feigenbaum Montgomery Development Carolina Corp. John Fugo Murray Costello Construction, Inc. Murray Costello National Building Contractors William Corcoran Pinnacle Commercial Development, Inc. Dennis Rome Prime Retail Services, Inc. Donald Bloom PWI Construction, Inc. Jeff Price R.E. Crawford Construction LLC Jeffrey T. Smith Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc. Art Rectenwald Retail Construction Services, Inc. Stephen Bachman Retail Contractors of Puerto Rico Sean Pfent Rockford Construction Co. Thomas McGovern Royal Seal Construction, Inc. Gene Colley Russco, Inc. Matthew Pichette Sachse Construction and Development Corp. Jeff Katkowsky

PHONE STATE EMAIL MEMBER SINCE 215-249-4885 PA office@afalber.com 2015 586-771-4800 MI rrussell@acme-enterprises.com 2009 973-340-3100 NJ warren@all-riteconstruction.com 1993 636-368-5234 MO bboettler@abgbuilds.com 2017 925-478-8182 CA kevin@bali-construction.com 2017 949-453-1400 CA brad@bogartconstruction.com 2008 770-971-0787 GA bryan@buildriteconstruction.com 2013 816-583-2123 MO harry@burdg-dunham.com 2016 561-672-8310 FL barney@danzansky.com 2016 616-842-4540 MI ken.t.sharkey@teamcci.net 1990 617-770-0050 MA frankt@combuild.com 1992 614-235-0057 OH wmoberger@constructionone.com 2015 757-566-3032 VA bbacon@davidnicebuilders.com 2011 616-530-0060 MI dandj@dejagerconstruction.com 1990 860-870-7070 CT banderson@descopro.com 1995 914-664-7244 NY gryan@dgccapital.com 2013 816-650-9200 MO loriperry@diamondcontractors.org 2015 770-887-3573 GA dpigg@dlpconstruction.com 2008 732-739-8884 NJ jlembo@eprovini.com 1992 330-453-2566 OH phil@eckinger.com 1994 804-897-0900 VA cjohnson@edcweb.com 1998 619-284-4174 CA ajohnson@elangc.com 2010 952-345-6069 MN justin@elderjones.com 1990 972-580-1210 TX RCaitlin@emjcorp.com 2014 208-362-3040 ID mikemagill@esiconstruction.com 2016 732-727-8100 NJ kbakalian@ficompanies.com 2017 440-716-4000 OH gfreeh@fortneyweygandt.com 2013 330-494-1007 OH dean@fredolivieri.com 1992 770-612-8005 GA wrosner@fulcrumconstruction.com 2014 412-367-5870 PA anthony@ggc-pgh.com 2017 714-491-1317 CA ramoore@gray.com 2005 920-494-3461 WI david@hjmartin.com 2016 847-719-0370 IL jmick@hannadesigngroup.com 2016 812-346-2048 IN bill.harmon@harmonconstruction.com 2017 303-794-5469 CO r.hays@haysco.biz 2002 708-396-0440 IL jhealy@healyconstructionservices.com 1996 301-731-5555 MD tvarner@herman-stewart.com 1995 920-468-8208 WI psmits@immel-builds.com 2018 630-834-8043 IL bbronge@iciinc.com 1995 909-993-9332 CA JackG@jgconstruction.com 1998 201-498-1477 NJ jim.agresta@jacarpentryinc.com 2013 860-284-7110 CT mkolakowski@kbebuilding.com 1998 440-647-4200 OH ann@kerricook.com 2012 262-857-3336 WI kent@lvconstruction.com 1998 631-501-0024 NY btucker@mcaryinc.com 2014 336-861-1960 NC dmarion@mrs1977.com 1992 724-741-0300 PA marty@marcocontractors.com 1994 210-829-5542 TX jfeigenbaum@metcontracting.com 1995 919-969-7301 NC jfugo@montgomerydevelopment.com 1999 239-482-2770 FL Susan@MCIUSA.com 2014 651-288-1900 MN bill@nbcconstruction.us 2013 732-528-0080 NJ dennis@pinnaclecommercial.us 2012 866-504-3511 GA dbloom@primeretailservices.com 2014 480-461-0777 AZ price@pwiconstruction.com 2003 941-907-0010 FL jeffs@recrawford.com 2011 724-772-8282 PA art@rectenwald.com 1996 651-704-9000 MN sbachman@retailconstruction.com 1998 586-725-4400 MI spfent@rcofusa.com 1996 616-285-6933 MI info@rockfordconstruction.com 2014 817-491-6400 TX gene@royalseal.com 1994 508-674-5280 MA mattp@russcoinc.com 1995 248-647-4200 MI jkatkowsky@sachseconstruction.com 2009 (Continued on page 5)

4

SPRING EDITION • 2018


Scheiner Commercial Group, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Shames Construction Co., Ltd. Shrader & Martinez Construction, Inc. Singleton Construction, LLC Solex Contracting Southwestern Services Sullivan Construction Company Taylor Brothers Construction Company, Inc. TDS Construction, Inc. Thomas-Grace Construction, Inc. Timberwolff Construction, Inc. TJU Construction, Inc. Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Trainor Commercial Construction, Inc. Travisano Construction, LLC Tri-North Builders, Inc. Triad Retail Construction Warwick Construction, Inc. Weekes Construction, Inc. Westwood Contractors, Inc. William A. Randolph, Inc. Winkel Construction, Inc. Wolverine Building Group Woods Construction, Inc.

Joe Scheiner Matthew Schimenti Carolyn Shames Ronald Martinez Denise Doczy-Delong Gerald Allen John S. Lee, Amanda Sullivan Jeff Chandler Robert Baker Don Harvieux Mike Wolff Tim Uhler Aaron Rectenwald John Taylor Peter J. Travisano Randy Danielson Jay Dorsey Walt Watzinger Hunter Weekes Mike McBride Tony Riccardi Rick Winkel Michael Houseman John Bodary

719-487-1600 914-244-9100 925-606-3000 928-282-7554 740-756-7331 951-308-1706 817-921-2466 954-484-3200 812-379-9547 941-795-6100 651-342-1298 909-949-0380 530-823-7200 724-452-8801 415-259-0200 412-321-1234 608-271-8717 281-485-4700 832-448-7000 864-233-0061 817-302-2050 847-856-0123 352-860-0500 616-949-3360 586-939-9991

CO NY CA AZ OH CA TX FL IN FL MN CA CA PA CA PA WI TX TX SC TX IL FL MI MI

joe@scheinercg.com 2012 mschimenti@schimenti.com 1994 cshames@shames.com 1994 info@shradermartinez.com 1990 denisedelong@singletoncontruction.net 2012 jerry@solexcontracting.com 2015 JLee@southwesternservices.com 2017 amanda@buildwithsullivan.com 2012 jchandler@tbcci.com 2014 inbox@tdsconstruction.com 1994 don.harvieux@thomas-grace.com 2012 mike@timberwolff.com 2008 tim@tjuconstruction.com 2016 arectenwald@trcgc.net 2010 john.taylor@trainorconstruction.com 2012 pj@travisanocontruction.com 2015 rdanielson@tri-north.com 2015 j.dorsey@triadrc.com 2013 walt@warwickconstruction.com 2008 hweekes@weekesconstruction.com 1990 mikem@westwoodcontractors.com 1990 tony.riccardi@warandolph.com 2011 rickw@winkel-construction.com 1990 mhouseman@wolvgroup.com 2012 jbodary@woodsconstruction.com 1996

Visit retailcontractors.org to view the profile of each RCA member company. Click on “Find a Contractor” on the home page to search the member list. Please notify the RCA Office (800-847-5085 or info@retailcontractors.org) of any changes to your contact information.

RCA Members Pre-Show Discount Expires Feb.14

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2018 • SPRING EDITION

5


NEWSLETTER

RCA’s 28th Annual Conference

Advisory Board panel: Ken Christopher, Brad Sanders, Kristen Roodvoets, Jason Miller & Steve Olson

RCA’s 28th Annual Conference was held March 16-18, at the Gaylord Texan in Grapevine, Texas. About 150 members, retailers, architects, and sponsor representatives attended the event, which included keynote speakers, panels, receptions, owners’ event, and a golf tournament. Save the date for our 29th Annual Conference, to be held prior to SPECS, March 1-3, 2019, back at the Gaylord Texan.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

P E O P L E

Don’t miss our CCRP events July 12th July 26th August 23rd

(Thursday) in Boston, MA (Thursday) in Cleveland, OH (Thursday) in Nashville, TN

If you would like to sponsor a CCRP event, please contact David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com 6

SPRING EDITION • 2018

Vice President Rick Winkel presented President Brad Bogart with a gavel in recognition of his service.


Steve Olson, Phil Eckinger, Doug Marion & Rick Winkel

Nate Bachman, Jay Dorsey, Brian Langhorst & Ross Stecklein

Cole Manning, Andrew Cohen, Keith Schultz & Michael Sullivan

Jack Grothe, June Grothe, Mike Magill & Mike Schmitt

Many thanks to our conference underwriters. Platinum Commercial Contractors, Inc.

Gold Bogart Construction, Inc. Retail Construction Services Management Resource Systems, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Gray

Silver Timberwolff Construction, Inc. Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Elder-Jones, Inc. Commonwealth Building, Inc.

Bronze Westwood Contractors, Inc.

We’re We’re Commitment to adjust to the demands of jobs. Commitment toyour adjust to Not the other way around. the demands of your jobs.

Lion Tamers Lion Tamers Proactive support, consistency, trademark Proactiveand support, transparency. consistency, and trademark

Not the other way around. transparency. Access to everything on site at any hour, even at 3am. Access to everything on site at any hour, even at 3am.

Meet us at SPECS • Booth #617 Meet us at SPECS • Booth #617

800-915-9002 800-915-9002 cmi-usa.com cmi-usa.com

2018 • SPRING EDITION

7


NEWSLETTER

RCA Sustaining Sponsors PLATINUM

GOLD

SILVER

8

SPRING EDITION • 2018

2800 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 210, Alexandria, VA 22314 800.847.5085 • www.retailcontractors.org

CCR May/June 18  
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