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INSIDE THE FAST TRACK TO REBUILDING ATLANTA’S I-85 BRIDGE

Melissa Gallant Manager, New Store Development & Operations

Check out also inside:

The disruptors How Spence Diamonds is redefining the U.S. jewelry game

Exclusive Inside: Vegas cycle shop makeover Signature structures diversify Chicago skyline

Official magazine of

Leading GC and Lighting firms reports

May/June 2017 • www.ccr-mag.com


Advertorial

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protocol, and to train installers to overcome an unexpected concrete slab issue before it cascades into a catastrophic flooring failure. So, we may advertise that AC•Tech “specializes in preventing excessive moisture, alkalinity, and oil contamination from causing commercial flooring failures in renovation, remodeling, and tenant improvement projects.” And we may try to hype our industry awards for product and process innovation in moving moisture mitigation to Division 3 in ground-up, fast-track construction projects. But, our measure lies in our attitude. We believe that helping everyone to do it right the first time is what builds success, reputation, and that “atta boy” feeling when all is said and done. And who doesn’t like that feeling?

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May/June • 2017 Vol. 16, No.3

152

26

159

FEATURES

26 The disruptors  How Spence Diamonds is redefining the U.S. jewelry game 124  Standing tall  Signature structures add diversity to iconic downtown Chicago skyline 130  Seeing the light  How window film can benefit tand modernize your building’s exterior

Wind strong 159   Tornado season underscores importance of reinforced masonry wall systems 185  Rising up  The fast track to rebuilding Atlanta’s I-85 bridge Sign, sign, everywhere a sign... 194   GlobalShop event helps celebrate Las Vegas’ iconic flash

Riding strong 152   How an inviting design welcomed new customers to Vegas bike shop Cover and feature photos by: Stefanie Fournier Photography

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

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May/June • 2017 Vol. 16, No.3 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Minneapolis 22  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Charlotte

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

38  Leading General Contracting firms 70  Leading lighting manufacturers

18

22

SPECIAL SECTION

Commercial Kitchens 135 The High Life  How the Twin Peaks brand is making restaurants fun again 144 A solution that sticks  Red Robin solves hot water woes with proper sizing and equipment selection Federal Construction 159  Safeguarding Virginia  Generating resilient energy to help protect those charged with protecting the state

135

1164 All eyes available  Tracking the reconstruction of the Tempe Town Lake Dam

DEPARTMENTS

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 192 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 196 Product Showcase 196 Classifieds 198 Ad Index 200 Publisher’s Note

159 4

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

Burn baby, burn

I

can’t tell you how many times I’ve driven over that bridge in the

extensive damage in both directions, collapsing 100 feet of the interstate’s northbound lanes. Seven hundred feet of 30 years I’ve lived in Atlanta. On one of the most heavily travelevated highway would have to be demoleled stretches of road in the country (yes, that’s a fact, folks), a ished and rebuilt. All in all, the Georgia Department of massive fire started by a homeless man and his crack pipe caused Transportation (GDOT) estimated that the reconstruction effort would take at least the bridge on Interstate 85 to crumple to the ground in a several months. What’s a city to do, right? “prime-time- bonafide-ready-made-headline-grabbing” mess. For an inside look at one group’s story that worked on the book, check out “Rising Up – The fast track to rebuilding Atlanta’s I-85 bridge,” on page 185. But for how long? And at what cost? To the scores of commuters (my youngest son included) who were helplessly, but safely, trapped for hours in the mother of all rush hour traffic nightmares, those questions didn’t seem important in the moment. That would come later. The long-term “transportation crisis,” as Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed called it, would become the talk of the town. It wasn’t just I-85 that would feel the burn. Other local, state and regional arteries would be impacted, too. The fire caused

Following the first week after the collapse, crews working round the clock completed the heavy demolition and hauled away 13 million pounds of rubble.

It started with clean up. Following the first week after the collapse, crews working round the clock completed the heavy demolition and hauled away 13 million pounds of rubble. Construction kicked off immediately thereafter. With crews and inspectors working non-stop, C.W. Matthews, the firm tasked with tackling the daunting task, finished the rebuild one month ahead of schedule. All told, six weeks from start to finish. The day after the unveiling, my son, one of the many sidetracked during the collapse, called me to see he was rolling across the new structure on his way to work. For an industry that prides itself on tackling even the most daunting of tasks, they were great words to hear.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

6

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


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F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 678.765.6550 • Fax 678.765.6551

EDITORIAL EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 772.232.6614 SCC MISSION Preserve 3.12:Eagle qrt pg FINAL

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678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 CCRP MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Kristen Corson • kristenc@ccr-people.com 770.990.7702

Building REI’s new flagship store in the landmark Puck Building, New York City, required great efforts to preserve and honor the historic building elements while meeting the needs of a modern retailer. Our experience and commitment helped create a unique blend of the historic and the new.

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We’re ready to preserve when you are. Call Joseph Rotondo, Vice President 914.244.9100, x319 or visit www.schimenti.com.

General Contractor. Construction Management. Remodel Program. New York I New Jersey I New England CIRCLE NO. 6

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

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EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS

RESTAURANTS

AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England

RON BIDINOST Vice President of Operations Bubbakoo’s Burritos Corporation

DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes

GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A

STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury

KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

International Director JLL

STEVE JONES

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development JOHN LAPINS Partner, Geolo Capital

GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership

MICHAEL TIERNEY Director of Construction

ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

10

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT

DAVID SHOTWELL Sr. Director of Construction and Facilities Cook Out

ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design

BROOKS HERMAN Senior Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

President Schimenti Construction

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield

JANIS WILLIAMS Director of Store Facilities Tuesday Morning

HEALTHCARE

MATT SCHIMENTI

BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp.

DENNIS MCCARTY Vice President, Technical Services, Construction InterContinental Hotels Group, the Americas

Cumberland Farms

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

SCOTT OFFERMANN Managing Director Global Occupier Services Cushman & Wakefield JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

GINA NODA President Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group

HOSPITALITY LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations RLJ Lodging & Trust

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Herschman Architects STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA

President CESO, Inc.

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA MIKE AUTENRIETH Academic Director Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management The International Culinary School at The Art Institute International Minnesot DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


» CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 8


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail Dollar General Dollar General plans to open 1,000 new stores this year, as well as invest in digital, open smaller stores and expand tests of fresh produce. Target Target will remodel 28 of its 47 stores in the Dallas/Fort Worth market this year, investing $220 million in the projects. The new lineup includes self-checkout lanes, new fixtures and the addition of Starbucks cafes in three locations. The project is part of a plan to invest $7 billion to upgrade U.S. stores over the next three years. Office Depot Office Depot has remodeled 25 U.S. stores with its “store of the future” look, including two in Minnesota. The new footprint, which will be implemented at 75 of the chain’s 1,400 stores, includes more space to try out products, as well as tech support and additional business services. H&M/Arket H&M will add the new concept Arket to its brand portfolio. The first Arket store is slated to open in London by the fall. The Arket brand will offer essentials for women, men and kids, in addition to home

products, with a focus on timelessness and quality at a higher price point than traditional H&M stores. Uniqlo Uniqlo is adjusting its store strategy in the United States, closing locations in suburban malls and focusing on bigger stores in major cities such as New York and Washington, D.C. The move marks the retailer’s third attempt to build its brand in the U.S. market. Publix Publix is partnering with BayCare Health System to offer in-store medical clinics at select Tampa Bay area locations, which will include private areas for patient videoconferencing with physicians. As part of the deal, Publix will operate pharmacies located in five BayCare hospitals. Wegmans Food Markets Wegmans Food Markets will open stores in northern New Jersey in July and September as it continues construction of a store in Brooklyn, N.Y., which is expected to open next year. It will be its first New York City location. The new stores are part of a bigger expansion for the retailer, which will add about 10 more stores in the six states.

Hospitality Marriott International Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels & Resorts expanded the company’s footprint to 122 countries. The Marriott brand expects its total new room count to reach up to 300,000 by the end of 2019. Walt Disney World Disney is asking guests whether they would stay at a hotel resort inside Star Wars Land, which will open at Walt Disney World’s Hollywood Studios in 2019. Guest rooms would be designed to look like the interior of a starship. Waldorf Astoria The Waldorf Astoria New York, which is undergoing an extensive renovation, has received approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission to bring back 1931 design features. The work will take two to three years, and the property will reopen under a long-term management contract with Hilton.

12

Red Roof Inn Red Roof Inns plans to expand to the western United States, Asia and Brazil. Renovations have been under way throughout the chain since 2011. Hotel Julian Hotel Julian will occupy the historical Atlantic Bank building in Chicago once it completes a $75 million transformation. The property will feature 218 guest rooms. Loews Hotels & Resorts/Live by Loews The Live by Loews hotel in Arlington, Texas, will open in 2019 as a $150 million flagship property for Loews Hotels & Resorts. It will be a key feature of the Texas Live! neighborhood, a $250 million project with entertainment, dining and hospitality. Citadines The Citadines brand is coming to the Big Apple in 2018 and will replace Hotel Central Fifth Avenue New York following a $50 million renovation.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


AroundtheIndustry

(continued)

Restaurants Red Lobster Red Lobster has turned its attention to global expansion, opening 21 international restaurants since spinning off from Darden Restaurants in 2014. The company, which is growing through franchising, now has 49 restaurants in international markets, including eight in Mexico. Papaya King New York City hot dog chain Papaya King has teamed with Fransmart to launch a franchising program with the goal of growing to 500 units nationwide. The concept can operate in small spaces, making it ideal for food courts, airports and other non-traditional venues. Fuddruckers/Luby’s Luby’s has unveiled a new Fuddruckers format in the Houston market that it’s calling the future of the brand. The 147-seat eatery includes three selfordering stations and an open kitchen facing a bar with counter seating. Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza Florida-based Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza will expand into the Midwest this year, with eateries planned to open in four Chicago suburbs.

Checkers & Rally’s Restaurants Checkers & Rally’s Restaurants is planning to open 20 new locations in the Washington, D.C., area under the Checkers banner. The company is seeking franchisees to help with the expansion. Wahlburgers Wahlburgers, a hamburger chain founded by actors Mark and Donnie Wahlberg, and led by their brother Paul as executive chef, is expanding to the greater New Orleans area with two restaurants. Bibibop Asian Grill Bibibop Asian Grill will acquire the leases on all 15 ShopHouse Asian Kitchen locations from Chipotle Mexican Grill. Bibibop will have 28 restaurants after converting the new units. Dean & DeLuca Gourmet food retailer Dean & DeLuca will introduce a quickservice concept in New York City this year that will include a rectangular counter where customers can watch their food being prepared and interact with staffers. The company tested the concept at the Design Miami fair last November.

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CIRCLE NO. 10

MAY : JUNE 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

13


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Show me what you have 60% G Study shows hoteliers in buying mood

et ready to bid. More than 60 percent of today’s hotel owners said they are at least considering buying a hotel this year, according to a survey by Hunter Hotel Advisors. Interestingly, fewer are in a position to sell, with 21.2 percent saying they are somewhat likely. Here’s a breakdown of the buying mood:

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CIRCLE NO. 11

6.25 The number, in millions, of jobs the commercial construction industry supported in 2016, according to the Commercial Real Estate Development Association’s “Economic Impacts of Commercial Real Estate” study. The top five states for direct spending (in billions) on commercial construction-related projects included New York ($24.805), Texas ($18.504), California ($14.340), Lousiana ($9.966) and Florida ($7.598), the report stated.

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Did you

know Swedish retailer IKEA is putting a bigger emphasis on food and is considering plans to start opening standalone eateries. About 30 percent of IKEA shoppers stop in just to dine, and the chain sells more than a billion of its signature meatballs annually.

Corrections » March/April 2017: CCRS 2017 Summit listings address corrections: S. Moraitis & Associates, 333 W. Harrison Street, Oak Park, Illinois 60304 The engineering listing for CESO Inc. was incorrect, the information should be: Retail Billings: $5,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000, Restaurant Billings: $1,500,000, Federal: $ N/A, Other Billings: $12,500,000, Total Billings: $20,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 300 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Bloomin Brands, Speedway, Love’s, Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club, Kohl’s, Tim Hortons. The company name in the engineering listing for GPD Group was incorrect and has been corrected in our online issue.

» CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 12

MAY : JUNE 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

A new décor Checkers Drive-In Restaurants is building some of its new Checkers and Rally's restaurants out of used metal shipping containers. The units will be more eco-friendly and less expensive to build than the company's traditional restaurants. In addition to Michigan, franchisees in Texas and Florida also have expressed interest in the new design.

Going modular Marriott International looks to expand construction style

W

ith 50 modular construction hotels in the pipeline, Marriott International continues to grow fond of the prefabrication technique. Launched in 2015, the initiative continues to exceed company expectations. The first hotel produced under this format, which was opened two months ahead of schedule, was the 97-room Folsom Fairfield Inn & Suites in Folsom, Calif. Each unit contained two fully outfitted rooms, including a bed and toilet, with a connecting corridor. Modular projects underway in the second quarter include the Courtyard Pullman, Washington, and the AC in Oklahoma City. During Q3, it expects to open the AC Louisville and the AC Chapel Hill (N.C.).

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

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McCarran International Airport Terminal 1 Baggage Claim & Ticketing Las Vegas, NV Architect: Doug Walton Architect General Contractor: Sletten Construction of Nevada Owner: Clark County Department of Aviation Photographer: David Laudadio CIRCLE NO. 14


Meet me out on the street CCRP networking group hits Minneapolis

F

or the past 20 years, the 8th Street Grill & Taphouse has been a mainstay for Minneapolis natives looking to wind down on weekdays and weekends. The Twin Cities’ institution served as the best meeting spot for the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) networking crew. If you’re looking to hang out with some of the industry’s most connected professionals, join CCRP today. For more information on how to get involved, contact Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

Make plans to join us at CCRP Warner Bros., June 22nd, 2017 in Los Angles, CA 1.

2.

Thank You to Our CCRP Minneapolis Sponsor:

INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1: Jamie Dery, Target; Barry Greive, Target; David Corson, CCR 2: John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; Tim Theroux, Mats Inc. 3: Ross Stecklein, Retail Construction Services; Steve Bachman, Retail Construction Services; Joe Jetland, Api National Services Group

3.

REGISTERED COMPANIES: 3M APi National Service Group Bishop Fixture + Millwork, Inc. | Carlson Rezidor Chain Store Maintenace Command Center EMG Corp Federal Heath Graybar Hammes Co. Sports Dev. IDQ Mats Inc

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Thank You to Our CCRP Minneapolis THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR: Sponsor:

QSI Facilities Retail Consruction Services RetailESP RNR Realty Rose Paving RSP Architects Target The McIntosh Group Thomas Grace Construction Wallace Engineering

Retail Construction Services, Inc. Steve Bachman, President 11343 39th Street North Lake Elmo, MN 55042 (651) 704-9000 www.retailconstruction.com sbachman@retailconstruction.com

Make plans to join us at CCRP Warner Bros., June 22nd, 2017 in Los Angles, CA COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

1: Brandon Finkenhoefer, Rose Paving Inc; Milissa Garrity, Chain Store Maintenance 2: Scott Moseman, Graybar; Kevin Thode, RSP Architects

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3: Bob Meza, Target; Dwight Enget, Command Center 4: Karen MacCannell, The McIntosh Group; Cutter Tyllia, APi National Services Group; Emily Ashbaugh, Wallace Engineering

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

5: Mike Lindamood, Command Center; Jayne Miller, Command Center; Jeffrey Seba, EMG Corp


CIRCLE NO. 16


Throw down in the Queen City Make plans to join us at CCRP Make plans to join us at CCRP Minneapolis, MN – May Minneapolis, 11th, 2017 MN – May 11th, 2017

CCRP Nation invades Charlotte

I

f you’re looking for the place to network in the Queen City, the “Bob Awards – Best of the Best” winner Big Ben’s is a good place to start. One of Charlotte, N.C.’s favorite hot spots served as host to the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) networking caravan. CCRP Nation held court in the vaunted British bar and restaurant. If you want to get your name on the CCRP networking list this year, contact Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

Thank You toThank Our You to Our CCRP Charlotte CCRP Charlotte Sponsors: Sponsors:

INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

REGISTERED COMPANIES: Blue Line Rental

Cornell Storefront Systems

Illuminating Technologies

Thank You toThank Our Little to Our CT Addison Consultanting, LLC You Hospitality Dollar Express CCRP Charlotte CCRPMcKibbon Charlotte Primex Properties Fortney & Weygandt Cook Out Restaurants Sponsors: Sponsors:

Chain Store Maintenance

Cox Schepp Construction

K2M Design

Converge Communications Technology

Radco Roofing

The Apple Gold Group

Storefloors

The Cato Corp

Studio 25 Décor

UHC Construction Services

Subway Restaurants

Urban Architectural Group

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR:

Little Diversified Architectural Consultancy Jeff Roark - Principal - Partner 5815 Westpark Drive Charlotte, NC 28217-3554 Make plans(704) to join us at CCRP 525-6350Make plans to join us at CCRP Minneapolis, jroark@littleonline.com MN – May Minneapolis, 11th, 2017 MN – May 11th, 2017

22

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

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© 3M 2017. All rights reserved. 3M and Envision are trademarks of 3M. CIRCLE NO. 17


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

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3.

2.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

1: Brad Owen, Primex Properties; Jason Loucks, Little 2: J ohn Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; Laura Riendeau, Chain Store Maintenance; Neal Bates, Primex Properties 3: D  avid Shotwell, Cook Out Restaurants; Angela Saladino, Illuminating Technologies; Bob Jensen, Retail Consultant 4: David Handera, Dollar Express; Brad Humphrey, Dollar Express

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5: M  att Frank, Fortney & Weygandt; Kevin Coulter, K2M Design; Leslie Burton, UHC Construction Services 6: Susan Mervine, Dollar Express; Ursula Foxworthy, Radco Roofing 7: L isa Caskey, McKibbon Hospitality; Todd Caskey, Blue Line Rental 8: J eff Roark, Little; Clay Addison, CT Addison Consulting LLC; Chris Slocum, Cornell Storefront Systems

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Build distinction.

Discover our diverse selection of premium full-bed stone, quarried AdairÂŽ limestone and versatile thin stone systems.

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The disruptors How Spence Diamonds is redefining the U.S. jewelry game

L

ast year, when Canada’s leading diamond jewelry retailer entered the U.S. market, heads turned. With splashy new stores in

Austin, Texas, San Jose, Calif. and Scottsdale, Ariz., it now is America’s best new secret.

The retailer’s innovative store concept combines a fun, transparent and educational experience in an open and bright environment. Add this to its breakthrough product offering, namely its Artisan Created Diamonds™, and Spence Diamonds is the Apple of the jewelry retail game. Founded in 1978, Spence is vertically integrated with offices and design studios in Antwerp, Belgium and Vancouver, Canada. Over the years, it has been recognized as one of Canada’s “50 Best Managed Companies” by the National Post, as well as one of the country’s “Most Admired Corporate Cultures” by Waterstone Human Capital. Today, Spence is the only U.S. retail store where consumers can learn about and choose between traditional stones and new Artisan Created Diamonds, carrying a wide array of diamonds for engagement rings and in numerous exclusive jewelry designs. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Melissa Gallant, manager, New Store Development & Operations, to get a look at what the future holds for jewelry retail.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


MAY : JUNE 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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THE DISRUPTORS Give us a snapshot of Spence Diamonds brand?

Spence Diamonds offers consumers a unique and refreshing approach to buying diamond jewelry. We have created an innovative store concept, partnered with a transparent, experiential and entertaining customer experience to sell breakthrough and beautiful product offerings.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

We carry both Artisan Created Diamonds and traditional mined diamonds, making us the only U.S. retail store where consumers can learn about and choose between traditional stones and Artisan Created Diamonds. Thus, whether you’re shopping for an engagement ring on a specific budget or looking for an ethical yet timeless piece, Spence has exactly what you’re looking for.

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Spence has re-written the rules on diamond shopping. Customers are free to browse at their own pace thanks to our open showcases of designer prototypes and upfront pricing.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

What are your customers looking for?

For the business we are in, our customers are looking for a high-quality investment and with that the best experience possible. To go above and beyond their expectations, Spence provides the ultimate combination of personalized service with unprecedented value and a worry-free purchase by guaranteeing each diamond it offers.

How does the design of the stores cater to how today's consumers’ shop?

Spence is designing stores for shoppers who are looking to step away for the traditional, dated diamond store experience. We are giving them a fresh, unique and modern atmosphere with fixtures and a layout that values their time. We have introduced technology that enhances their


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THE DISRUPTORS experience while educating them on various aspects of the company and its product.

Walk us through how and why it designed the way it is? In designing our U.S. store concept, it was important to us that we reinvent the jewelry store shopping experience. The industry is experiencing slowed growth with many retailers looking dated. We really wanted to revive the image by creating a very unique shopping experience. I think the two things that stand out the most is our use of technology through digital displays, smart glass and a paperless system. As well as our open bridal cases, that allow our customers to reach in, and try on any ring they like (they are prototypes) without feeling intimidated. We have married style with technology.

with like-minded contractors, mandating onsite recycling, manufacturing processes, to shipping fixtures in re-usable/recyclable materials. Although it is impossible to be perfect, we consider the impact of everything we do.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

We are proud of our Artisan Created Diamonds, which are more sustainable, ethical and of better quality than mined diamonds. By creating these diamonds in our American-based manufacturer, we can guarantee that its origin is conflict-free. We are also able to minimize our environmental footprint by removing the intense impact of traditional mining. From a store perspective, we are changing our operational processes to allow for paperless systems, installing water filters instead of giving out bottled water, using manufacturing processes that reduce waste while building long lasting fixtures and, of course, always looking for ways to improve.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

With the opening of our first three U.S. stores, I was a one women team (internally). So, it was really important that I create a close working relationship with my GCs, architect and suppliers. We all became a team, working together in unison. The design of the stores is really still a work in progress. We took what we knew worked in the Canadian stores and combined that with our vision for the new U.S. concept, to create what we call Spence 2.0. We are constantly reviewing feedback and looking at ways we can improve for the next store. Over my career, I have been lucky enough to work with some amazing contractors, so when I joined Spence they were excited to be a part of a new and exciting project. I really lean on them to help me keep the project on track and on budget. They have been great in finding ways to continue to improve our design and processes as well.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

For me, I’m extremely passionate about the environment and so the footprint construction leaves is an issue. I do everything I can to reduce this on a job site. From working

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


» CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 20


THE DISRUPTORS What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

We are hoping to add 40-50 stores to the U.S. market. We intentionally don’t have a rigid set of parameters for these locations at this point, as we want to review all variables on what has and hasn’t worked with the first three locations. Our presumption is that we would target hip, urban, mixed-use centers.

What trends are you seeing?

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

Thanks to the successful launch of Spence Diamonds in the high-traffic locations of San Jose, Calif., Austin, Texas and Scottsdale, Ariz., the company intends to open stores in other major U.S. markets during the next several years. Spence also sees its Artisan Created Diamonds as the future of diamond jewelry. In being ethical, sustainable and higher-quality option, Artisan Created Diamonds have the potential to be the primary choice of purchases.

Are you optimistic about what you see in the retail sector?

Yes. Although the industry is continuously changing, I don’t see it going anywhere. I find it exciting. The consumer is evolving, shopping experiences and expectations are changing, and this keeps us on our toes. It means we have to get creative, try new things and think outside the box. Building a store is building a store, but when you have to reinvent your approach, it keeps you engaged.

Why did you pick the locations you did for your stores?

There were a lot of long conversations about where was best to enter the U.S. market, to sum it up, our target market is there, the right real estate opportunity presented itself and it made sense from an operational perspective.

Retailers are really stepping out of the traditional model and mixing things up. Spaces are becoming not only a place to shop, but a place to hang out and be social. I’m also seeing a lot of pop up and mobile shops that are allowing retailers to reach consumers beyond the traditional bricks and mortar. Change is happening and it is very exciting.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” retail experience in today's competitive landscape? Uniqueness, innovation, surprise. People are tired of the same old thing, they want something that is different, inspires them and really connects with them.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Prepping for the next round of stores. We have a lot of work to do to prepare for a successful rollout. I am lucky enough to be leading the charge with a fresh slate and an exec team that really supports me. I want to lay all the ground work now so that when they hit go we are ready to create the most beautiful diamond store experience possible.

Describe a typical day

My days are all over the map right now. I can typically be found reviewing RFPs, tending to maintenance requests, reviewing feedback, redesigning/ reengineering store elements, and creating process and procedures. I’m also working on improving our Canadian stores through an LED lighting retrofit and renovation planning. And, of course, there is always time to stop and check out a diamond or two!

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


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THE DISRUPTORS Tell us what makes the Spence Diamond brand so unique?

Spence has re-written the rules on diamond shopping. Customers are free to browse at their own pace, thanks to our open showcases of designer prototypes and upfront pricing. Our GIA-certified consultants educate and help find the perfect diamond that meets your needs. We even have a lounge at every store, where shoppers can relax or toast to their purchase.

At Spence, we want every customer to have an engaging and enjoyable experience. Another distinctive feature about Spence Diamonds is our Artisan Created Diamonds – identical to mined diamonds in every way, but created in a plasma chamber instead of being dug out of the earth. These diamonds are physically, optically and chemically identical to the finest mined diamonds, but they are substantially larger than mined diamonds at any given price point. CCR

One-on-one with... Melissa Gallant

Manager, New Store Development & Operations Spence Diamonds What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Turnover day. I absolutely love seeing the final project come together and the amazement on the teams face when they see the store.

What was the best advice you ever received? Don’t take sh*t personally. Filter through it and take the real message out. It’s hard when you are in the thick of a project, pouring your heart into it and people are commenting and giving you their feedback. Being able to step back and see it for what it is helps you keep perspective.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? You are one of my favorite PMs to work with because you get it done.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have.

Honesty, patience and empathy. Combine these three traits and you have a truly inspiring leader. Someone who communicates clearly, concisely and often motivates you to do your best all the time. They challenge you by setting high but attainable expectations and give you the support, tools and training to accomplish greatness.

What is the true key to success for any manager?

Their team. Fostering the right team of well supported, engaged and passionate employees will help lead any manager to success.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

What’s your favorite vacation spot and why? Tofino. My boyfriend, Scott and I go camping there every year with the dog (Vegas). We stay at a beautiful spot on the beach and spend the days exploring, relaxing and playing with the dog. It is pure bliss for all three of us.

What book are you reading now?

I don’t read a lot of books after work because they make me fall asleep. But my latest Netflix series is Riverdale. The characters are based on Archie Comics and it’s filmed here in Vancouver. It’s very dramatic (haha) and is fun to watch.

How do you like to spend your down time?

When I’m home. With my boys. Scott and I are parents to a dog (Vegas) and a cat (Earl). They are the loves of our lives and the best to come home to after a long stressful day. We live in a beautiful city, so getting out and enjoying it as much as we can. Trying a new restaurant (there are so many), biking, sipping a cocktail on a patio, checking out a festival or when it’s rainy (which it is a lot), cozying up and watching a movie. If I happen to get some spare time on the road, I like to get in a ball game. I love baseball and find it fun to check out the different stadiums. It’s so much nicer than sitting in your hotel room. And if I’m lucky, I can sucker my GC into coming with me. Go Red Sox!


CIRCLE NO. 22


» CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 23


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING

Leading general contracting firms take center stage

W

ant a beat on the industry’s leading general contractor firms? Check out our annual listing, which gives you the rundown on everything and everyone you need – and more. Our exclusive report provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies in the areas of retail, restaurant and hospitality. If your company was not on the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

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$22,000,000 $15,200,000 $15,000,000 $13,800,000 $13,600,000 $11,054,799 $5,000,000 $4,750,000 $3,000,000 $500,000

RESTAURANT

Zerr Enterprises Inc........................... Integrated Construction..................... Donnelly Industries........................... Construction One, Inc........................ DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc........ Rockford Construction...................... Beam Team Construction, Inc............ Triad Retail Construction Inc.............. Mamais Construction........................ Icon..................................................

Broadway Construction Group, LLC........ $270,000,000 W.H. Bass, Inc.................................... $103,151,658

TOTAL BILLINGS

RETAIL

Whiting-Turner................................. $771,212,272 EMJ Corporation.............................. $285,140,504 Schimenti Construction.................... $195,000,000 Rockford Construction..................... $170,364,991 Choate Construction Company......... $161,399,593 Mycon General Contractors.............. $157,000,000 T.D. Farrell Construction, Inc............. $145,769,519 Gray................................................ $139,000,000 Pepper Construction Group.............. $117,150,000 O’ Neil Industries, Inc....................... $117,000,000

HOSPITALITY

Top Ten Totals

Whiting-Turner...................................... $5,915,644,362

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

Lendlease.......................................... $49,112,000 Whiting-Turner................................... $43,336,508 SL Hayden Construction Inc............... $25,000,000 Rockford Construction....................... $24,908,105 Wolverine Building Group................... $24,000,000 Marco Contractors, Inc....................... $18,000,000 JG Construction................................. $17,956,017 Prairie Contractors, Inc....................... $16,000,000

Gilbane Building Company.................... $4,495,847,000 Lendlease............................................. $2,985,380,000 Pepper Construction Group................... $1,178,710,000 Gray..................................................... $1,127,032,051 EMJ Corporation................................... $1,115,897,915 Choate Construction Company.............. $1,075,093,176 Clune Construction Company, L.P.......... $921,902,359 O’ Neil Industries, Inc............................ $562,000,000 Rockford Construction.......................... $493,815,607


A.F. Alber General Contractor Bogart John Alber, Project Manager

Brad Bogart, President

114 Elephant Rd.

9980 Irvine Center Dr.

Dublin, PA 18917 (215) 249-4885 • (215) 249-1353 www.afalber.com • john@afalber.com Retail: $2,500,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $2,500,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 100 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 240,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Tenant Fit Outs and Roll Outs

Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 453-1400 • (949) 453-1414 www.bogartconstruction.com • brad@bogartconstruction.com Retail: $46,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $46,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 55, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 550,000, Specialize In: N/A

Broadway Construction Anderson & Rodgers Commercial Group, LLC James Spataro, Construction Manager/ Coordinator 137 MacArthur Ct. Nicholasville, KY 40356 (859) 885-8531 • (859) 885-0154 www.anderson-rodgers.com • arcjames2015@gmail.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: $5,000,000, Completed Projects as of

Joe Aiello, Chief Operating Officer 140 Broadway, 41st Floor New York, NY 10005 (212) 837-4614 www.broadwaycg.com • jaiello@broadwaycg.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $160,000,000 Restaurants: $270,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A,

12/31/16: 27, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A,

Total: $430,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A

Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A. Other: N/A, Total: 52,000,

Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants:

Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Addition Renovation

Beam Team Construction, Inc. Tim Hill, Executive Vice President, Business Development 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Blvd. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 www.thebeamteam.com • timhill@thebeamteam.com Retail: $60,000,000, Hospitality: $5,000,000 Restaurants: $5,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $5,000,000, Total: $75,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 3000+ Square Footage: Retail Square: 120,000, Hospitality: 10,000, Restaurants: 10,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 10,000 Total: 150,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants,

N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Hotels, Residential, Mixed Use

Buildrite Construction.com Bryan Alexander, President 600 Chastain Rd., Suite 326 Kennesaw, GA 30144 (770) 971-0787 • (770) 973-3373 www.buildriteconstruction.com • info@buildriteconstruction.com Retail: $4,036,178, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $411,922 Federal: N/A,Other: $17,189,491, Total: $21,637,591, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 253, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Office

MAY : JUNE 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

39


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Capacity Builders Choate Construction Company Wayne Rausch, President 5563 S. Prince St. Littleton, CO 80120 (303) 627-1248 • (303) 627-1249 www.capacitybuilders.com • wayne@capacitybuilders.com Retail: $2,500,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $2,500,000,

Katie Crawford, Marketing Coordinator 8200 Roberts Dr., Suite 600 Atlanta, GA 30350 (678) 892-1200 • (678) 892-1202 www.choateco.com • kcrawford@choateco.com Retail: $161,399,593, Hospitality: $48,344,950 Restaurants: $10,003,013, Federal: $246,616, Other:

Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 850,

$855,099,004, Total: $1,075,093,176, Completed Projects as of

Square Footage: Retail: 64,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants:

12/31/16: 218, Square Footage: Retail: 1,403,911, Hospitality:

N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 64,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

207,917, Restaurants: 45,552, Federal: 359,921, Other: 8,837,127, Total: 10,854,429, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Automotive, Biomedical, Corporate,

C.B. Summer Hospitality, Industrial, Institutional, Retail, Senior Living Construction Co., Inc. CKP Construction

Johnny Wilkins, Sr. Project Manager

595 Colonial Park Dr., Suite 200 Roswell, GA 30075 (770) 772-9018 • (770) 752-7277 www.cbsummer.com • johnny@cbsummer.net Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $10,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

CDO Group, Inc. Anthony Amunategui, President 333 Harrison St. Oak Park, IL 60304 (708) 383-0586 www.cdogroup.com • anthony@cdogroup.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

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Todd Barbour, President 1616 S. Kentucky, Suite C325 Amarillo, TX 79102 (806) 420-0696 www.ckpconstruction.com • tbarbour@ckpconstruction.com Retail: $1,500,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $8,320,000 Federal: N/A, Other: 9,000,000 Total: $18,820,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 96, Square Footage: Retail: 980,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: 32,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 262,000, Total: 1,274,000, Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Office Buildings

Clune Construction Company, L.P. Jack Follman, Communications Manager 10 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 2200 Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 726-6103 www.clunegc.com • jfollman@clunegc.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: $921,902,359, Total: $921,902,359, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Office Interiors

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


DonahueFavret Contractors is a leader in commercial construction throughout the Gulf South. Celebrating 38 years of construction experience and an unwavering dedication to excellence, DonahueFavret is ready to be your construction partner.

CIRCLE NO. 24

Preconstruction • Design-Build • New Construction • Renovation 8 0 0 . 6 2 6 . 4 4 3 1 • D o n a h u e Fa v r e t . c o m


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Coastal Structures Corporation Harby Moses, Owner, Founder

Construction One, Inc. William A. Moberger, President

407 Church St., Suite J

101 E. Town St., Suite 401

Georgetown, SC 29440

Columbus, OH 43215

(843) 546-4491 • (843) 546-6569 www.coastalstructures.com • harby@coastalstructures.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Industrial, Municipal/Civic and Religious such as Libraries, Community Centers, Churches, Tourist Attractions, Banks and Country Clubs

(614) 235-0057 • (614) 237-6769 www.constructionone.com • wmoberger@constructionone.com Retail: $29,500,000, Hospitality: $13,800,000 Restaurants: $2,000,000, Federal: N/A Other: $10,000,000, Total: $55,300,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 690,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: 15,100, Federal: N/A, Other: 100,000, Total: 805,100, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, All Retail and Self- Storage

Commonwealth Building Inc.

Davaco

Chris Fontaine, President

Dallas, TX

265 Willard St. Quincy, MA 02169 (617) 770-0050 • (617) 472-4734

Paul Hamer, EVP 214-373-4700 www.davacoinc.com • info@davaco.com

www.combuild.com • cfontaine@combuild.com

Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 1000+, Retail: $ N/A,

Retail: $14,597,800, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $1,407,400

Hospitality: $ N/A, Restaurant: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A, Other: N/A,

Federal: N/A, Other: $2,544,000, Total: $18,549,200,

Total: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A

Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 48, Square Footage: Retail: 312,427,

Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A,

Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: 3,830, Federal: N/A, Other: 100,000,

Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept,

Total: 416, 257, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Special Projects and Maintenance

Construction Advatage, Inc. Mike Rothholtz, President 1112 Hibbard Rd. Wilmette, IL 60091 (847) 853-9300 constructadvantage@sbcglobal.net Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A

Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

De Jager Construction Inc. Dan De Jager, President/CEO 75 60th St. S.W. Wyoming, MI 49548 (616) 530-0060 • (616) 530-8619 www.dejagerconstruction.com dj1@dejagerci.com Retail: $23,000,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $23,000,000

Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 18

Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 84, Square Footage: Retail:

Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A,

428,713, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A,

Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

42

Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores,

Total: 428,713, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


v

LISTEN BETTER. PLAN BETTER.

BUILD BETTER.

AMARILLO, TEXAS WWW.CKPCONSTRUCTION.COM

CIRCLE NO. 25

806-420-0696


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING DeWees Construction, Inc. Allen Galloway, Senior Vice President 35 N. Baldwin , P.O. Box 691 Bargersville, IN 46106 (317) 709-5135 • (317) 422-5142 www.deweesconstruction.com • allen@deweesconstruction.com Retail: $1,780,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $100,000 Federal: N/A, Other: $2,805,000 Total: $4,685,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 19 Square Footage: Retail: 56,300, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: 2,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 21,300, Total: 79,600, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Industrial, Commercial

DLP Construction Co, Inc Alpharetta, GA 30005 Lynn Kaden, Director Business Development 770-887-3573 • 770-887-2357 www.dlpconstruction.com lkaden@dlpconstruction.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 35 Retail: $ 33,634,495, Hospitality: $ N/A Restaurant: $3,704,789, Federal: $ N/A Other: N/A, Total: $37,339,284 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 211 Square Footage: Retail: 2,300,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant Square Footage: 250,000, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: 2,250,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc. Bryan Hodnett, Director of Business Development 3030 East Causeway Approach Mandeville, LA 70448 (800) 626-4431 • (985) 626-3572 www.donahuefavret.com • dfcinfo@donahuefavret.com Retail: $26,000,000, Hospitality: $13,600,000 Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: $42,500,000 Total: $82,100,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 26 Square Footage: Retail: 225,683, Hospitality: 130,939, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: 345,531 Total: 702,153 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Office Buildings, Tenant Improvements, Religious

44

Donnelly Industries Doug Berry, Sr. Project Manager 557 Route 23 South Wayne, NJ 07470 (973) 672-1800 • (973) 677-1824 www.donnellyind.com • dberry@donnellyind.com Retail: $5,000,000, Hospitality: $15,000,000 Restaurants: $7,500,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 7,500,000 Total: $35,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 50 Square Footage: Retail: 150,000, Hospitality: 250,000 Restaurants: 150,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 175,000 Total: 725,000, Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Confinement

E.C. Provini Co., Inc. Joseph Lembo, President 1 Bethany Rd., Bldg. 2 Suite 24 Hazlet, NJ 07730 (732) 739-8884 • (732) 739-8886 jlembo@ecprovini.com Retail: $35,600,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $35,600,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 96, Square Footage: Retail: 441,000 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 441,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Phased Open Renovations/Expansions

EBCO General Contractor, LTD. William A. Egger, Vice President, Strategy 804 East 1st St. Cameron, TX 76520 (254) 697-8516 • (254) 697-8656 www.ebcogc.com • william.egger@ebcogc.com Retail: N/A , Hospitality: $100,000,000 Restaurants: $5,500,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $28,253,000 Total: $133,753,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 27 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: 560,000 Restaurants: 44,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 200,000 Total: 804,000, Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


CIRCLE NO. 26


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING ELAN General Contracting San Diego, CA 92108 Adrian Johnson, President 619-284-4174 • 619-284-4175 www.elangc.com • ajohnson@elangc.com Year Established: 1981, No. of Employees: 15 Retail: $18,000,000, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A

James Loukusa, President 3185 Terminal Dr. Eagan, MN 55121 (651) 789-0790 www.fcpservices.com • jloukusa@fcpservices.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A

Other Billings: N/A, Billings: $18,000,000

Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of

Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A,

12/31/16: N/A, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A

Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: N/A

ELS Construction Kody Martinez, Business Development Manager

Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

1100 E. Nasa Pkwy.

Federal Heath

Houston, TX 77058

Mark McCreary, Director,

(281) 324-0701 • (281) 966-6969 www.els-construction.com • kmartinez@els-construction.com Retail: $5,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $5,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 21, Square Footage: Retail: 60,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 60,000

Specialty Contracting 1020 Pittsburgh Dr., Suite 4 Delaware, OH 43015 (740) 368-4140 • (740) 368-4121 www.federalheath.com • mmccreary@federalheath.com

Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores,

Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A

Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of

EMJ Corporation Dottie McCallen, Communications Manager 2034 Hamilton Place Blvd., Suite 400 Chattanooga, TN 37421 (423) 855-1550 • (423) 855-6857 www.emjcorp.com • dottie.mccallen@emjcorp.com Retail: $285,140,504, Hospitality: $190,711,994 Restaurants: $463,030, Federal: N/A, Other: $639,582,387 Total: $1,115,897,915, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 124 Square Footage: Retail: 2,779,329, Hospitality: 257,244, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: 1,155,548, Total: 4,192,121 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Casinos,

46

FCP Services

12/31/16: 100+, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Restaurants, Convenience Stores, Gas Stations/Petroleum

First Finish, Inc. Jason Stock, VP of Business Development 8300 Guilford Rd., Suite F Columbia, MD 21046 (410) 290-6450 • (410) 290-6451 www.firstfinish.net • jstock@firstfinish.net Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $85,700,000, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $85,700,000,

Government, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Industrial,

Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 25, Square Footage: Retail: N/A,

Distribution, Warehouse, Multi-Unit Housing,

Hospitality: 2,480,000, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A,

Mixed-Use, Entertainment

Total: 2,480,000, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


CIRCLE NO. 27


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Greg Freeh, President 31269 Bradley Rd. North Olmsted, OH 44070 (440) 716-4000 • (440) 716-4010 www.fortneyweygandt.com gfreeh@fortneyweygandt.com Retail: $40,725,000, Hospitality: $28,537,500 Restaurants: $8,440,000, Federal: N/A, Total: $84,162,500, Other: $6,460,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 113 Square Footage: Retail: 305,253, Hospitality: 205,580 Restaurants: 72,622, Federal: N/A, Other: 47,850 Total: 631,305, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Senior Living

Fulcrum Construction Amy Angeli, Marketing Coordinator 1945 The Exchange, Suite 400 Atlanta, GA 30339 (770) 612-8005 • (770) 612-8115 www.fulcrumconstruction.com aangeli@fulcrumconstruction.com Retail: $92,371,393, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: $1,628,607, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $94,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 364, Square Footage: Retail: 2,100,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: 70,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 2,170,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education

Gilbane Building Company Dennis Cornick, Executive Vice President 7 Jackson Walkway Providence, RI 02903 (609) 462-8963 www.gilbaneco.com • media@gilbaneco.com Retail: $14,755,000, Hospitality: $53,860,000 Restaurants: $2,546,000, Federal: $383,789,000 Other: $4,040,897,000, Total: $ 4,495,847,000, Square Footage: Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 214, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 14,007,000, Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Hotels, Education, Science & Technology, Mission Critical, Industrial

48

N-STORE Services & Granger Contracting Kevin Zigrang, Director of Business Development 600 Trade Center Blvd. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 778-0448 • (636) 778-0449 www.gnhservices.com • kevin@gnhservices.com Retail: $33,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $33,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 780, Square Footage: Retail: 8,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 8,000,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Gray Eric Berg, Senior Vice President 421 E. Cerritos Ave. Anaheim, CA 92805 (714) 491-1317 • (714) 333-9700 www.gray.com • eberg@gray.com Retail: $139,000,000, Hospitality: $46,800,000 Restaurants: $6,900,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $934,332,051, Total: $1,127,032,051, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 430 Square Footage: Retail: 3,400,000, Hospitality: 320,000 Restaurants: 65,200, Federal: N/A, Other: 2,900,000 Total: 6,585,200, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Distribution Centers, Entertainment, Film/TV Studios, Theme Parks

Healy Construction Services Crestwood, IL Jim Healy, Vice President 708-396-0440 • FAX 708-596-0412 www.healyconst.com jhealy@healyconstructionservices.com Year Established: 1988, No. of Employees: N/A Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Billings: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Square Footage: Retail N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Square Footage: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Whole Foods Hampton Inn & Suites

Two Ten Jack Sutherland Cardiology Clinic

Changing the industry one project experience at a time. We want our clients’ construction experience to be so much better than the way things are traditionally done, that we transform the way people think about the industry. Applicable to a first-time builder or those who are familiar with the industry, EMJ’s approach will raise expectations and present a better way to build. CIRCLE NO. 28

BOSTON | CHATTANOOGA | DALLAS | SACRAMENTO | TULSA www.emjcorp.com


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Hirsch Construction Corp Adam Hirsch, President 100 Conifer Hill Drive, Suite 306 Danvers, MA 01923 978-762-8744 • 978-762-8455 www.hirschcorp.com ahirsch@hirschcorp.com Year Established: 1983, No. of Employees: 27 Retail: $25,000,000, Hospitality: $1,000,000, Restaurant: $4,000,000, Federal: $ N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $30,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 50, Square Footage: Retail: 150,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 150,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Other

Hoar Construction Sandra Cox, Corporate Marketing Director 2 Metroplex Dr., Suite 400 Birmingham, AL 35209 (205) 803-2121 • (205) 423-2323

J. Andrew Breuer, Principal P.O. Box 515 Syracuse, NY 13205 (315) 476-7917 • (315) 476-7990 www.hueber-breuer.com • hb@hueberbreuer.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $51,000,000, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: $57,000,000, Total: $108,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 4, Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 75,000, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: 79,000, Total: 154,000, Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Education, Mixed-Use, Student Housing, Athletic, Industrial, Parking and Non Profit

Icon Kevin Hughes, SVP Sales & Marketing 1418 Elmhurst Rd. Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 (847) 631-3210 • (847) 364-1517

www.hoar.com • info@hoar.com

www.iconid.com • khughes@iconid.com

Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A

Retail: $30,000,000, Hospitality: $500,000

Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 127,191,000, Hospitality: 31,300,000, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: 54,874,000, Other: 435,861,000, Total: 649,246,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Government, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Multifamily

Horizon Retail Construction, Inc. Stefanie Martinez, Marketing Manager 1500 Horizon Dr. Sturtevant, WI 53177 (262) 638-6000 • (262) 638-6015 www.horizonretail.com • sales@horizonretail.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: over $200,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 1,529,Square Footage: Retail: 93,263,027 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: 283,793, Federal: N/A Other: 22,660,000, Total: 116,206,820 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Financial Institutions, Airport Concessions

50

Hueber-Breuer

Restaurants: $1,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $31,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 2,740 Square Footage: Retail: 10,000,000, Hospitality: 217,000, Restaurants: 869,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 11,086,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

IDC Construction Valerie Han – Marketing 1000 Churchill Ct. Woodstock, GA 30188 (678) 213-5250 • (678) 213-1109 www.idcconstruction.com • valeriehan@idcconstruction.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $65,000,000, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $65,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 15 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: 1,750,000 Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 1,750,000 Specialize In: Hotels & Resorts

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


CIRCLE NO. 29


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Integrated Construction

Kadean Construction

Justin Beebe, Vice President- Hospitality

Matt Breeze, VP Operations

14827 Mandarin Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32223 (904) 356-6715 • (904) 356-6714 www.integratedfl.com • jbeebe@inteconst.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $15,200,000, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: $43,300,000, Total: $58,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 49, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: 411,000, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: 2,220,000, Total: 2,631,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Senior Living

JA Carpentry, Inc Hackensack, NJ Bob Krykowski, Vice President 201-498-1477 • FAX 201-498-1478 www.jacarpentry.com info@jacarpentry.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 35 Retail: $15,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $15,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores

JG Construction Wally Clark, Vice President 15632 El Prado Rd. Chino, CA 91710 (909) 993-9336 • (909) 993-9361

Fenton, MO 63026 (636) 305-0099 • (636) 305-7232 www.kadean.com • mbreeze@kadean.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: $62,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 22, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 2,765,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Office Buildings, Industrial

Kaufman Lynn Construction Alexandra Brown, Marketing Manager 4850 T-Rex Ave., Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 361-6700 • (561) 361-6979 www.kaufmanlynn.com • abrown@kaufmanlynn.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: $202,608,193, Total: $202,608,193, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 18, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Specialize In: Government, Education, Multifamily, Senior Living

KBE Building Corporation Jonelle Lawhorn, Director of Marketing 76 Batterson Park Rd. Farmington, CT 06032 (860) 284-7431 www.kbebuilding.com • jlawhorn@kbebuilding.com

www.jgconstruction.com • wallyc@jgconstruction.com

Retail: $44,807,056, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $203,310

Retail: $16,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $17,956,017

Federal: $274,083, Other: $2,169,715, Total: $47,454,164

Federal: N/A, Other: $2,000,000, Total: $35,956,017 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 54

Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 38 Square Footage: Retail: 3,227,313, Hospitality: N/A

Square Footage: Retail: 105,000, Hospitality: N/A

Restaurants: 24,386, Federal: 274,900, Other: 785,477

Restaurants: 115,500, Federal: N/A Other: 25,000

Total: 4,312,076, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries,

Total: 245,500, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

52

1558 Fenpark Dr.

Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Senior Living

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


BUILD ON OUR EXPERIENCE

COMMERCIAL CRAFTSMANSHIP PERFECTING OUR CRAFT TO BETTER YOUR BUSINESS CIRCLE NO. 30


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING L & L Retail Construction, LLC Nathan Howard, Manager/Owner 5601 Huettner Dr. Norman, OK 73069 (405) 360-2775 • (405) 360-8897 www.llretailconstruction.com • nathan@llretail.com Retail: $12,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $12,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 103 Square Footage: Retail: 226,600, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 226,600, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Retail Tenant Improvements

Lakeview Construction John Stallman, Marketing Director 10505 Corporate Dr. Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (262) 857-3336 • (262) 857-3424 www.lvconstruction.com • john@lvconstruction.com Retail: $82,400,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $11,500,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $93,900,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 855 Square Footage: Retail: 2,000,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 60,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 2,060,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Lendlease Kurt Lorenz, General Manager 200 Park Ave. New York, NY 10166 (212) 592-6800 • (212) 592-6988 www.lendlease.com • kurt.lorenz@lendlease.com Retail: $44,676,000, Hospitality: $77,667,000 Restaurants: $49,112,000, Federal: $5,682,000, Other: $2,808,243,000, Total: $2,985,380,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 639 Square Footage: Retail: 976,000, Hospitality: 6,992,280 Restaurants: 631,800, Federal: N/A, Other: 11,562,933 Total: 20,163,013, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

54

Mamais Construction Andrea Barragan, Construction Manager 256 West 124th St. New York, NY 10027 (212) 865-1666 ext. 144 • (212) 316-3921 www.mamais.com • andrea.b@mamais.com Retail: $2,000,000, Hospitality: $3,000,000 Restaurants: $250,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $20,000,000, Total: $25,250,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 500+ Square Footage: Retail: 500,000, Hospitality: 2,000,000 Restaurants: 1,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 5,000,000 Total: 7,501,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Other

Marco Contractors, Inc. Samra Savioz, Director of Business Development 100 Commonwealth Dr. Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 814-4547 www.marcocontractors.com • ssavioz@marcocontractors.com Retail: $40,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $18,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $25,000,000, Total: $83,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 215 Square Footage: Retail: 3,000,000, Hospitality: 1,000,000, Restaurants: 1,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 1,000,000, Total: 6,000,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education,

MC Construction Management, Inc. Connie Mollet, Director of Development 38012 N. Linda Dr. Cave Creek, AZ 85331 (480) 367-8600 ext.107 • (480) 367-8625 www.mcbuilders.net • emollet@mcbuilders.net Retail: $34,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $34,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 72 Square Footage: Retail: 846,698, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 846,698, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Entertainment, Retail, Office, Automotive, Financial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


» CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

CIRCLE NO. 31


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING McGuire Builders, Inc. Michael S. Tande, Co-President & C.O.O.

Mycon General Contractors Dana Walters, Vice President 17311 Dallas Pkwy.

2850 Walnut Ave.

Dallas, TX 75248

Signal Hill, CA 90755

(972) 529-2444

(562) 424-3636 www.mcguirebuilders.net • michelle@mcguirebuilders.net Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $59,800,000 Restaurants: $10,200,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $70,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 10 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: 1,012,000 Restaurants: 29,142, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A Total: 1,041,142, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Boutique

www.mycon.com • dwalters@mycon.com Retail: $157,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: $117,000,000, Total: $274,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 51 Square Footage: Retail: 2,400,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: 2,800,000, Total: 5,200,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Shopping Centers

Hotels, Adaptive Reuse

O’ Neil Industries, Inc. MCX Interior R. Shane McNamara, Co-Founder & Managing Principal 11 Broadway, Suite 615 New York, NY 10004 (310) 928-3988 www.mcxinterior.com • contact@mcxinterior.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: $14,000,000, Total: $14,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 100 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A,

Dean Arnold, Retired Vice President-Consultant 1245 West Washington Blvd. Chicago, IL 60607 (773) 755-1611 • (773) 442-0797 www.weoneil.com • darnold@weoneil.com Retail: $117,000,000, Hospitality: $28,000,000 Restaurants: $1,400,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $415,600,000, Total: $562,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 142 Square Footage: Retail: 2,170,000, Hospitality: 1,017,000 Restaurants: 8,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 3,180,000

Federal: N/A, Other: 1,000,000, Total: 1,000,000

Total: 6,375,000, Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty

Specialize In: Office Spaces, Mainly in the Asia Pacific Market

Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Office, Residential-Multi-Family, Manufacturing, Transportation, Power

Mowery David Cross, President

P & C Construction, Inc.

1000 Bent Creek Blvd.

2500 East 18th St.

Mechanicsburg, PA 17050 (717) 506-1000 • (717) 506-1010 www.rsmowery.com • dcross@rsmowery.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 24 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 3,624,284 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department(Warehouse and Distribution Facilities), Healthcare, Education, Senior Living, Nonprofit, Urban Renewal, Auto Dealerships, Corporate and Commercial, Affordable Housing

56

Chattanooga, TN Nic Cornelison, Vice President 423-493-0051 • 423-493-0058 www.pc-const.com • nic@pc-const.com Year Established: 1993, No. of Employees: 57 Retail: $ N/A, Hospitality: $ N/A, Restaurant: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A Other: N/A, Total: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 324 Square Footage: Retail: 670,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: 42,000, Federal: 35,000, Other: 485,000, Total: 1,232,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Food Service

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Discover a contractor who builds from a different perspective...YOURS.

Our vision is to be a recognized leader in the construction industry and set the mark for others to follow. Our team of professionals takes ownership in everything that we do. We are committed to exceeding our clients’ expectations through our company culture of integrity without compromise, professionalism and accountability.

GENERAL CONTRACTORS LICENSED IN 40 STATES RESTAURANT · RETAIL · MEDICAL GROUND-UP · BUILD-OUT · REMODEL www.recrawford.com CIRCLE NO. 32

941-907-0010


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Pepper Construction Group

Prime Retail Services, Inc.

J. Scott Pepper, Executive Vice President

Michael Edmundson, Vice President

643 North Orleans St. Chicago, IL 60654 (312) 266-4700 www.pepperconstruction.com • info@pepperconstruction.com Retail: $117,150,000, Hospitality: $54,560,000 Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: $1,007,000, Total: $1,178,710,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 439 Square Footage: Retail: 1,250,000, Hospitality: 610,000 Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: 10,550,000 Total: 12,410,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Commercial Office, Data Centers, Industrial/Manufacturing, Residential, Institutional, Entertainment

Phoenix Builders, Ltd. Joshua Hendry, Executive Vice President 1801 Winnetka Cir. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 (847) 394-2999 www.phoenixbuilders.com • josh@phoenixbuilders.com Retail: $9,600,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $7,200,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $7,200,000, Total: $24,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 23 Square Footage: Retail: 70,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 60,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 30,000 Total: 160,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education

Prairie Contractors, Inc. Peter Hegarty, President 9318 Gulfstream Rd. Frankfort, IL 60423 (815) 469-1904 • (815) 469-5436 www.prairiecontractors.com • notification@prairie-us.com

Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511 • (866) 584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com medmundson@primeretailservices.com Retail: $27,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $1,000,000 Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $28,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 1,500 Square Footage: Retail: 6,500,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 50,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 6,550,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

PSG Construction Chris Heard, VP of Marketing & Business Development 2135 Defoor Hills Rd. NW Suite D Atlanta GA 30318 (678) 866-1274 www.psg-construction.com • cheard@psg-construction.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Adaptive Reuse, Mixed-Use, Office

PTS Contracting Alan Briskman, Principal 75 Virginia Rd., Suite 400 White Plains , NY 10603 (914) 290-4166 www.ptscontracting.com • alan@ptscontracting.com Retail: $2,000,000, Hospitality: N/A

Retail: $1,640,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $16,000,000

Restaurants: $1,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $5,000,000,

Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $17,640,000,

Total: $8,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 22

Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 76 Square Footage: Retail: 50,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 50,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 100,000 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants,

58

3617 Southland Dr.

Square Footage: Retail: 100,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: 200,000 Total: 300,000, Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Office Fit-Outs

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Any size. All locations. We Build Transportation. 5,000+ Terminal Doors Built 15,0000+ Developed Acres 0 Complaints Schwob Building Company has continued to provide customized construction solutions for the past 40 years. From small dock door additions to new large distribution centers, our experience is unrivaled.

Industries We Serve: Automotive Aviation Trucking & Transportation Warehousing Industrial Complexes Manufacturers Office Buildings Maintenance Facilities PEMB Services

For more information: www.schwob.com | (972) 243-7674

CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

Thank You to Ou CCRP Minneapoli Sponsor:

GENERAL CONTRACTING R.E. Crawford Construction, LLC Susan Courter, Director of Business Development 6650 Professional Pkwy. West, #100 Sarasota, FL 34240 (941) 907-0010 • (941) 907-0030 www.recrawford.com • scourter@recrawford.com Retail: $23,008,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: $3,179,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $2,713,000, Total: $28,900,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 72 Square Footage: Retail: 393,903, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 20,653, Federal: N/A, Other: 12,182 Total: 426,738, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc. Cranberry Township, PA Jerry Rectenwald, VP of Business Development 724-772-8282 • 724-772-8281 www.rectenwald.com • jerry@rectenwald.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 45 Retail: $29,500,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: $500,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $30,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 125 Square Footage: Retail: 390,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: 10,000, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Square Footage: 400,000, Specialize In: Big Box/Dept, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

RenCon Services, Inc. Claudio Forest, VP Construction 8504 S. State Rd. 9 Pendleton, IN 46064 (317) 644-1347 • (317) 841-0701 www.renconservices.com • claudioforest@renconservices.com Retail: $7,650,680, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $8,659,750 Federal: N/A, Other: $265,500, Total: $16,575,930 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 287 Square Footage: Retail: 521,250, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 367,300, Federal: N/A, Other: 20,650 Total: 909,200, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants,

60

Retail Construction Services, Inc.

Steve Bachman, President/CEO 11343 39th St. N. Lake Elmo, MN 55042 (651) 704-9000 • (651) 704-9100 www.retailconstruction.com sbachman@retailconstruction.com Make plans to join us at CCR Warner Bros.,N/A June 22nd, 2017 in Los Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Other

Rockerz Inc. Robert Smith, Director of Business/ National Accounts 100 Commonwealth Dr. Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 612-6520 • (724) 935-4948 www.rockerzinc.com • rsmith@rockerzinc.com Retail: $3,500,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: $1,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $1,000,000, Total: $5,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 260 Square Footage: Retail: 75, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 2,200,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education

Rockford Construction Jennifer Boezwinkle , Executive Vice President 601 First St. NW Grand Rapids, MI 49504 (616) 285-6933 • (616) 285-8001 www.rockfordconstruction.com jboezwinkle@rockfordconstruction.com Retail: $170,364,991, Hospitality: $11,054,799 Restaurants: $24,908,105, Federal: N/A, Other: $287,487,712, Total: $493,815,607, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 376 Square Footage: Retail: 40,244,156 Hospitality: 713,927, Restaurants: 255,812, Federal: N/A Other: 69,269,746, Total: 110,483,641 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Unit and Industrial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


SERVING THE RETAIL INDUSTRY FOR 36 YEARS WALMART + HOME DEPOT + PUBLIC STORAGE DAVE & BUSTER’S + REGENCY CENTERS BEST BUY + THE WINE GROUP + SINGHAIYI GROUP SHEA COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES

ONE PART ART. ONE PART SCIENCE.

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WWW.SHAMES.COM CIRCLE NO. 34


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Russco, Inc. 565 Commerce Drive, Suite 2 Fall River, MA 02720 Phillip Simmonds-Short, Senior Director of Construction 508-674-5280 • 508-673-8855 www.russcoinc.com • phillipss@russcoinc.com Year Established: 1952, No. of Employees: 35 Retail: $35,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: $ N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $35,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 45 Square Footage: Retail: 500,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: 500,000 Specialize In: Big Box/Dept, Specialty Stores

RT Stevens Construction Inc. Troy Stevens, President 420 McKinley, #111-313 Corona, CA 92879 (951) 280-9561 • (951) 549-9360 www.rtstevens.com • tstevens@rtstevens.com Retail: $5,800,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: $290,000, Total: $6,090,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 45 Square Footage: Retail: 146,250, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Total: 146,250 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

S. M. Wilson & Co. Coleen Olson, Corporate Secretary 2185 Hampton Ave. St. Louis, MO 63139 (314) 645-9595 • (314) 645-1700 www.smwilson.com • coleen.olson@smwilson.com Retail: $42,462,541, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: $14,070,543, Other: $225,049,650, Total: $281,582,734, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 5 Square Footage: Retail: 274,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: 252,205, Other: 1,164,736 Total: 1,690,941, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Industrial, Assisted Living

62

Sachse Construction Stephen Barlow, Director of Business Development 1528 Woodward Ave., Suite 600 Detroit, MI 48226 (313) 481-8200 sbarlow@sachse.net Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family/TI

SAJO Ville Mt. Royal, QC Canada Rocco Raco, Director of Marketing & Business Development 877-901-7256 • 514-385-1843 www.sajo.com • rocco@sajo.com Year Established: 1977, No. of Employees: 160, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 185 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Retail

Schimenti Construction Joseph Rotondo, Executive Vice President 650 Danbury Rd. Ridgefield, CT 06877 (914) 244-9100 • (914) 244-9104 www.schimenti.com • jrotondo@schimenti.com Retail: $195,000,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: $40,000,000, Total: $235,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 130 Square Footage: Retail: 1,300,000 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: 1,300,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Construction Manager Self-Performing General Contractor Fixture Installation

National Contractor » CCRS 2018 SPONSOR

MBE - Minority Business Enterprise

COLUMBUS, INDIANA 812.379.9547 | WWW.TBCCI.COM

CIRCLE NO. 35


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Schwob Building Company

SL Hayden Construction Inc.

Natalie Howe, Director of Marketing

Steve Hayden, President

2349 Glenda Ln.

3015 S. IH 35 W.

Dallas, TX 75229

Burleson, TX 76028

(972) 243-7674 • (972) 243-7110 www.schwob.com • nhowe@schwob.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $131,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 38 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 5,368,400 Specialize In: Shopping Centers, Automotive, Aviation, Warehouses, Trucking/Transportation, Manufacturing, Industrial and Office Space

Shames Construction Carolyn Shames, President/CEO 5826 Brisa St. Livermore, CA 94550 (925) 606-3000 • (925) 606-3003 www.shames.com • cshames@shames.com Retail: $94,000,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Total: $94,000,000 Other: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: Square Footage: Retail: 1,000,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 1,000,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

(817) 783-7900 • (817) 783-7902 www.slhaydenconstruction.com • shayden@hcichicago.com Retail: $15,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $25,000,000 Federal: N/A, Other: $5,000,000, Total: $45,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 60 Square Footage: Retail: 56,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 100,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 16,000 Total: 172,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

Solex Contracting, Inc. Jerry Allen, President 42146 Remington Ave. Temecula, CA 92590 951-308-1706 • 951-308-1856 www.solexcontracting.com • jerry@solexcontracting.com Year Established: 2004, No. of Employees: 100 Retail: $16,000,000, Hospitality: $ N/A, Restaurant: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $32,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 150 Square Footage: Retail: 350,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: N/A, Federal: 150,000, Other: N/A, Total: 500,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Telecommunications/Tower Erection

Singleton Construction, LLC Jennifer Danquist Kilgore, Director of Sales & Marketing P.O. Box 491 Carroll, OH 43112 (740) 756-7331 ext. 106 • (740) 756-7441 www.singletonconstruction.net jkilgore@singletonconstruction.net Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: $28,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 700, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Groceries, Drug Stores, Government, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Site Roll-Outs

64

Taylor Bros. Construction Co., Inc. Jeff Chandler, Vice President 4555 Middle Rd. Columbus, IN 47203 812-379-9547 • 812-372-4759 www.tbcci.com • jeff.chandler@tbcci.com Year Established: 1933, No. of Employees: 175 Retail: $30,500,000, Hospitality: $ N/A, Restaurant: $1,000,000, Federal: $ N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $41,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 400 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A , Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


CIRCLE NO. 36


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING T.D. Farrell Construction, Inc. Tim Farrell, President/CEO 530 Staghorn Ct. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (770) 754-3110 • (770) 754-3113 www.tdfarrell.com • bsmith@tdfarrell.com Retail: $145,769,519, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $10,818,516, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $156,588,035, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 55 Square Footage: Retail: 2,149,819, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 45,125, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A Total: 2,194,944, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Shopping Centers, Restaurants,

Thomas Grace Construction, Inc. Kris Johnson, Sr. Project Manager

Aaron Rectenwald, President 330A Perry Hwy. Harmony, PA 16037 724-452-8801 • 724-452-8802 www.tomrectenwald.com • arectenwald@trcgc.net Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 45 Retail: $30,335,052, Hospitality: $ N/A, Restaurant: $ N/A, Federal: $ N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $30,335,052 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 90 Square Footage: Retail: 270,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 270,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Groceries, Specialty Stores, Clothing Retail, Optical

Triad Retail Construction Inc. Brian Holroyd, VP 2304 Fairway Cir.

56-5 Memorial Ave N

Pearland, TX 77581

Stillwater, MN 55082

(281) 485-4700 • (281) 485-7722

(651) 342-1298 • (651) 439-1298 www.thomas-grace.com • kris.johnson@thomas-grace.com Retail: $48,500,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $48,500,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 1,514 Square Footage: Retail: 10,400,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 10,400,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Other

Timberwolff Construction, Inc. Mike Wolff, President 1659 W. Arrow Rte. Upland, CA 91786 (909) 949-0380 • (909) 949-8500 www.timberwolff.com • mike@timberwolff.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 160 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Offices

66

Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc.

www.triadrc.com • bryan@triadrc.com Retail: $29,900,000, Hospitality: $4,750,000 Restaurants: $1,150,000, Federal: N/A Other: $19,999,000, Total: $55,804,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 272,400, Hospitality: 40,000 Restaurants: 8,500, Federal: N/A, Other: 476,190 Total: 797,090, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

TRICON Construction Rich Carlucci, Vice President 3433 Marshall Lane Bensalem, PA 19020 (267) 223-1060 • (215) 633-8363 www.tricon-construction.com r.carlucci@trion-construction.com Retail: $7,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $7,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 50 Square Footage: Retail: 555,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 555,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Casinos, Specialty Stores

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Tri-North Builders Randy Danielson, President of Retail 2625 Research Park Drive Fitchburg, WI 53711 (608) 271-8717 • (608) 271-3354 www.tri-north.com • rdanielson@tri-north.com Retail: $60,000,000, Hospitality: $25,000,000 Restaurants: $10,000,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $100,000,000, Total: $195,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 175 Square Footage: Retail: 1,950,000, Hospitality: 645,250 Restaurants: 83,250, Federal: N/A, Other: 3,875,000 Total: 6,553,500, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Theaters

UHC Construction Services, Inc. Leslie Burton, Director of Business Development 154 E. Aurora Rd., #155 Northfield, OH 44067 (216) 544-7588 • (216) 923-2677 www.uhccorp.com • lburton@uhccorp.com Retail: $12,478,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $5,717,000, Federal: N/A, Other: $790,000, Total: $18,985,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 1,798,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 900,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 475,000 Total: 3,173,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

VENATOR Contracting Group, LLC Suzette Novak, Director of Business Development 44930 Vic Wertz Dr. Clinton Township, MI 48036 (586) 229-2428 • (586) 229-2430 www.venatorcontracting.com suzette@venatorcontracting.com Retail: $5,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $5,000,000 Federal: N/A, Total: $10,140,000, Other: $140,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 42 Square Footage: Retail: 144,000, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 29,000, Federal: N/A, Other: 140,000 Total: 173,000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Fitness Centers

Vintage Construction Management Tyler Arney, Owner 217 E. Stone Ave., Suite 20 Greenville, SC 29609 (864) 252-5099 • (888) 387-7126 tyler@vintagecm.com Retail: $2,900,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $2,900,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 19 Square Footage: Retail: 40,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: 40,000, Specialize In: N/A

Warner Bros. Design Studio Vember Stuart-Lilley, Sr. Manager 4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, CA 91522 (818) 954-4430 • (818) 954-2806 www.warnerbrosdesignstudio.com • wbds@warnerbros.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Entertainment-Custom Specialty Fabrication

Warwick Construction, Inc. Walt Watzinger, Vice President 365 FM 1959 Houston, TX 77034 832-448-7000 • FAX 832-448-3000 www.warwickconstruction.com walt@warwickconstruction.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 70 Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: $84,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 182 Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurant Square Footage: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: 910,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Off Airport Parking Facilities, Gas Station/Convenience/Car Wash

MAY : JUNE 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

67


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Weekes Construction, Inc Hunter Weekes, Vice President 237 Rhett Street Greenvill, SC 29601 864-233-0061 • 864-235-9971 www.weekesconstruction.com hweekes@weekesconstruction.com Year Established: 1975, No. of Employees: 27 Retail: $30,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $30,000,000 Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 44, Square Footage: Retail: 54,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurant: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: N/A, Total: 54,000, Specialize In: N/A

W.H. Bass, Inc. Brian Mulligan, Vice President 11300 Johns Creek Pkwy., Suite 100 Johns Creek, GA 30097 (770) 662-8430 • (770) 662-5636 www.whbass.com • bd@whbass.com Retail: $79,887,126, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $103,151,658, Federal: N/A, Other: $8,585,014, Total: $191,623,798, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 68 Square Footage: Retail: 283,136, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 304,122, Federal: N/A, Other: 61,000 Total: 648,258, Specialize In: Groceries, Restaurants, Convenience/Fuel, Banks/Credit Unions

Whiting-Turner Bob Minutoli, Vice President 135 W. Central Blvd., Suite 840 Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 370-4500 www.whiting-turner.com • bob.minutoli@whiting-turner.com Retail: $771,212,272, Hospitality: $136,515,784 Restaurants: $43,336,508, Federal: $222,325,221 Other: $4,742,254,577, Total: $5,915,644,362 Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 350+ Square Footage: Retail: 14,354,117, Hospitality: 1,144,144 Restaurants: 104,537, Federal: 1,863,293, Other: N/A, Total: 17,466,091 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, E-Commerce, Data Center, Warehouse & Distribution, Theme Parks, Sports Facilities

68

William A. Randolph, Inc. Anthony Riccardi 820 Lakeside Dr., Suite 3 Gurnee, IL 60031 (847) 856-0123 ext.109 • (847) 856-0696 www.warandolph.com • tony.riccardi@warandolph.com Retail: $85,000,000, Hospitality: $76,000,000 Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: $26,000,000, Total: $187,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education,

Winter Construction

Sacha Turpin, Director of Marketing 191 Peachtree St., Suite 2100 Atlanta, GA 30303 (404) 588-3300 www.winter-construction.com • sturpin@wintercompanies.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $42,700,000, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: $74,800,000, Total: $117,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 11, Square Footage: Retail: N/A, Hospitality: 248,692, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Other: 570,237, Total: 818,929, Specialize In: Healthcare, Government, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Aviation, Interior, Multifamily, Office, Parking Deck, Religious, Student Housing, Senior Living

Wolverine Building Group

Mike Houseman, President of North American Division 4045 Barden SE Grand Rapids, MI 49512 (616) 949-3360 • (616) 949-6211 www.wolvgroup.com • mhouseman@wolvgroup.com Retail: $15,000,000, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $24,000,000 Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $39,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: N/A, Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A, Other: N/A Total: N/A, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants

Zerr Enterprises Inc.

Mike Zerr, President 1545 S. Acoma St. Denver, CO 80223 (303) 758-7770 • (303) 758-7776 www.zerrenterprises.com • mike.zerr@zerrenterprises.com Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $22,000,000, Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A, Other: N/A, Total: $22,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/16: 25, Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 880,000, Restaurants: N/A, Federal: N/A Total: 880,000, Specialize In: Hotels

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


CIRCLE NO. 37


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING

Survey shines on industry’s leading lighting manufacturers

I

f your project calls for the best of the best when it comes lighting, it’s time to go to the resource you can trust. Our annual listing gives you everything you need in one spot. The report, which features the industry’s leaders in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors, provides you with the contact information and contact person at each of the reporting firms. If you want to be a part of next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. 3M Lainie Bailen, Marketing Communications 3M Center St .Paul, MN 55144 (651) 736-8507 www.3m.com lbailen@mmm.com Lighting Product Type: Window Film Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

A.L.P. Donny Wall, BBS President 6333 Gross Point Rd. Niles, IL 60714 (773) 774-9550 www.alpadvantage.com info@alplighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Components and LED Fixture Kits Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Industrial

Acclaim Lighting Michael Giradina, Product Manager 6122 S. Eastern Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90040 (323) 213-4557 www.acclaimlighting.com info@acclaimlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

70

American Permalight, Inc.

AMERICAN

INC. Marina Batzke, General Manager 2531 W. 237th St., #101 Torrance, CA 90505 (310) 891-0924 www.americanpermalight.com info@americanpermalight.com Lighting Product Type: Photo Luminescent Emergency Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Anolis Lighting

David Chesal, Sales 12349 SW 53rd St., #202 Cooper City, FL 33330 (954) 680-1901 (954) 680-1910 www.anolislighting.com info@anolislighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Arani

Delia Ceron Gonzalez, Marketing Specialist 5579 Pare St. Montreal, Quebec Canada H4P 1P7 (514) 903-2296 (514) 903-2297 www.arani.ca d.gonzalez@arani.ca Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighitng, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Autec Power Systems Bellacor.com Vence Barnes, National Sales Manager 31328 Via Colina , Suite 102 Westlake Village, CA 91362 (818) 338-7788 (818) 338-7726 www.autec.com venceb@autec.com Lighting Product Type: LED Drivers and Controls, Power Supplies, Signage Power Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Street, Road and Parking

Marlon Heimerl, Content Marketing Manager 251 N. 1st Ave., #600 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (651) 294-2500 www.bellacor.com mheimerl@bellacor.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial

Barn Light USA BioClimatic Structures, LLC

Katie Schilling, Marketing Manager 3405 S. Washington Ave. Titusville, SC 32780 (321) 607-6799 (321) 607-6979 www.barnlight.com kschilling@barnlight.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Nicole Wehmeyer, Business Manager/Co-Owner 101 Alexander Ave., Unit #4, Pompton Plaines, NJ 07444 (973) 513-7016 (973) 513-7175 www.bcstructures.com info@bcstructures.com Lighting Product Type: Outdoor Shading/Rain Protection Structures Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Campus, Residental, Anywhere you would need shade or rain protection

Bitro Group Fritz Meyne Jr., Vice President Sales

Barron Lighting Group 300 Lodi St.

Heather McCune, Sales Manager 7885 N. Glen Harbor Blvd. Glendale, AZ 85307 (623) 580-3948 www.barronltg.com heather.mccune@barronltg.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Hackensack, NY 07601 (201) 641-1004 www.bitrogroup.com fritzm@bitrogroup.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Point of Purchase, RGB, Plastics Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Marine

B.E.G. Controls Bock Lighting MJ Johnson, VP of Sales & Operations 277 Hwy 74 N., Suite 319 Peachtree City, GA 30269 (770) 349-6341 www.begcontrols.com info@begcontrols.com Lighting Product Type: Lighting Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Sales Dept. 2476 Edison Blvd, Twinsburg, OH 44087 (216) 912-7050 (216) 912-7051 www.bocklighting.com sales@bocklighting.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Decorative Pendants Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

MAY : JUNE 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

71


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING C3 Lighting, Inc. Contrast Lighting Rich Farrell, President 2907 S. Croddy Way Santa Ana, CA 92704 (714) 545-5985 (714) 668-0942 www.c3lighting.com sales@c3lighting.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Healthcare Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Martine Legault, VP Marketing and Product Development 1009 Du Parc Industriel, Revis QC G6Z 1C5 Canada (418) 839-4624 (418) 839-7057 www.contrastlighting.com martine.legault@contrastlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Wall Sconces, Commercial Lighting, Blown Glass Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential

CDS Lighting Studio, Inc. Controlled Power Company

Mike Baker, Vice President 4513 Central Ave. NE Albuquerque, NM 87108 (505) 256-9479 www.cdslightingstudio.com cdslighting@gmail.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Commercial

CED

David Van Laeys 150 Stevens St. Santa Ana, CA 92707 (951) 551-5611 www.cednationalaccounts.com vanlaeys@ced.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Solar Panel Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

ConTech Lighting Michelle Frydrych, Marketing Comm Spec 725 Landwehr Rd. Northbrook, IL 60062 (847) 559-5500 (847) 559-5505 www.contechlighting.com mfrydrych@contechlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

72

Suzanne Hooley, Marketing Director 1955 Stephenson Hwy., Troy, MI 48083 (800) 521-4792 www.controlledpwr.com shooley@controlledpwr.com Lighting Product Type: Emergency Lighting Inverters Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Transportation, Worship Facilities

Cooledge Lighting Anne Lam, Marketing Program Manager 120-13551 Commerce Pkwy. Richmond, BC Canada V6V 2L1 ™ (604) 273-2665 (604) 273-2660 www.cooledgelighting.com anne.lam@cooledgelighting.com Lighting Product Type: Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Adaptable LED Lighting System for Luminous Surfaces Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Corbett Lighting Mariel Yohe, Senior Account Manager 14508 Nelson Ave. City of Industry, CA 91744 (818) 981-8210 www.corbettlighting.com mariel@drsandassociates.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Wall Sconces, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial, Decorative

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


How many people does it take to change a lamp? Lighting is one of the largest energy and money drains in your facility. Replacing it with LED lighting will have the quickest impact on your bottom line and will put money in your pocket.

With Genesis, the answer is nada, diddly-squat, zilch, zip,

Zero. 469.322.1906

www.making-light.com

CIRCLE NO. 38


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Cree, Inc. Claire Simmons 4600 Silicon Dr. Durham, NC 27703 (919) 313-5300 www.cree.com media@cree.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

CSL (Creative Systems Lighting) Jocelyn Hutt, PR Rep 10844 Burbank Blvd. North Hollywood, CA 91601 (818) 981-8210 (818) 981-8220 www.cslighting.com jocelyn@drsandassociates.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Dalume Lance Smith, Customer Service 5461 W. Jefferson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90016 (323) 904-0200 (323) 904-0197 www.dalume.com cs@dalume.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi Family Homes

DMF Lighting

Susie Minton, Director of Marketing 1118 E. 223rd St. Carson, CA 90745 (323) 934-7779 www.dmflighting.com marketing@dmflighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multifamily

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Duralamp Cindy Foster Warthen, Marketing 750-A W. 17th St. Costa Mesa, CA (714) 513-1991 www.targetti.us usamarketing@targetti.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential

EarthTronics, Inc.

Kevin Youngquist, Vice President 380 We. Western Ave., Suite 301 Muskegon, MI 49440 (231) 332-1188 (231) 726-5029 www.earthtronics.com contact@earthtronics.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoot Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

EGL Company, Inc.

Mary Barrow, CSM/Sales 100 Industrial Rd. Berkeley Heights, NJ 07922 (908) 508-1111 (908) 508-1122 www.egl-lighting.com mary@egl-lighting.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Signage Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Elemental LED April Mitchell, VP Marketing 1195 Park Ave. , Suite 211 Emeryville, CA 94608 (877) 564-5051 www.elementalled.com solutions@elementalled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


CIRCLE NO. 39


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING ELP Lauri Maines, President 10768 Lower Azusa Rd. El Monte, CA 91731 (626) 579-0943 (626) 579-6803 www.elplighting.com lmaines@elplighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Wall Wash Lighting, Step/Path Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Enhance America Jeff Hasting, VP Global Sales 3463 Grapevine St. Mira Loma, CA 91753 (314) 630-0549 www.enhanceamerica.com jeff.hasting@enhanceamerica.com Lighting Product Type: Indoor Signage, LED Signage, Neon Signage, Simulated Neon-Signage Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Enlighted Rachel Dill, AAE 930 Benecia Ave. Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (650) 964-1094 www.enlightedinc.com racheldill@sweeneypr.com Lighting Product Type: Lighting/IOT Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial

ESPEN Technology John Clancy, Vice President Sales 12257 Florence Ave. Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670 (562) 529-2938 (562) 529-2978 www.espentech.com jclancy@espentech.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Outdoor, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

76

FC Lighting Joe Freehill, Marketing Manager 3609 Swenson Ave. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 889-8100 ext.218 (630) 889-8106 www.fclighting.com jfreehill@fclighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Feelux Lighting, Inc.

Gordon Jamieson, Director 3000 Northwoods Pkwy., Suite 165 Peachtree Corners, GA 30071 (678) 668-7005 (678) 668-7006 www.feeluxlighting.com info@feeluxlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting for Millwork Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Flex Lighting Solutions

Luis Acena, Marketing Manager 6201 America Center Dr. San Jose, CA 95002 (408) 576-3710 www.flexlightingsolutions.com luis.acena@flex.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Commercial Lighting, Low Bay Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Industrial, Warehouses, Distribution Centers, Convention Centers, Food & Beverage Processing and Storage, Indoor Sports Facilities, Parking Garages

Foreverlamp Jim Sekinger, CEO 2550 W. 237th St. Torrance, CA 90505 (844) 533-8811 www.foreverlamp.com marketing@foreverlamp.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Highbay Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Aerospace, Recreational

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


diode led

a division of elemental LED

CIRCLE NO. 40


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Foscarini Fang Guo, PR Associate 20 Greene St. New York, NY 10013 (212) 247-2218 www.foscarini.com fang@dadagoldberg.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family Housing

Fulham Co., Inc. Andy Firchau, Marketing Manager 12705 South Van Ness Hawthorne, CA 90250 (323) 779-2980 (323) 754-9060 www.fulham.com afirchau@fulham.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Commercial and Industrial Lighting, Outdoor Lighting, Government Agencies, etc.

Garden Light LED Michelle Mueller, CMO 6112 Benjamin Rd. Tampa, FL 33634 (800) 511-2099 (813) 901-8493 www.gardenlightled.com marketing@gardenlightled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Genesis Lighting Solutions Doug Head, EVP 700 Parker Sq. , Suite 205 Flower Mound, TX 75028 (469) 322-1900 www.making-light.com doug@adart.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

78

Graybar Electric Co. Scott Moseman, Strategic Account Manager 11885 Lackland Rd. St. Louis, MO 63146 (612) 810-0916 www.graybar.com nationalaccounts@graybar.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Green LED Lighting Solutions Derek Breneol, Business Development 6230 W. Desert Inn Rd. Las Vegas, NV 89146 (888) 580-6366 (888) 453-0576 www.glls.com derek@glls.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Greenlite Simran Kohli, Marketing Director 10 Corporate Park, #100, Irvine, CA 92606 (877) 255-0004 ext. 106 (514) 695-9093 www.greenlite.ca simran@greenlite.ca Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Commercial

Hera Lighting Liz Burroughs, Marketing Coordinator 3025 Business Park Dr. Norcross, GA 30071 (770) 409-8558 (770) 409-8531 www.heralighting.com liz@heralighting.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


CIRCLE NO. 41


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Hermitage Lighting National Accounts

J.D. Ryan, Account Manager 3640 Trousdale Dr., Nashville, TN 37204 (615) 843-3394 (615) 943-3351 nationalaccounts.hermitagelighting.com jdr@hlg.co Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

HTM Lighting Solutions

Hugo Merminod, Lighting Specialist 6420 Benjamin Rd., Suite 3 Tampa, FL 33634 (813) 649-8899 (813) 425-9007 www.htm-lighting.com sales@htm-lighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, Recessed Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Parking Lot Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Industrial

Hubbell Lighting and Hubbell Control Solutions

Customer Service 701 Millennium Blvd. Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 678-1000 www.hubbelllighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighitng, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Hudson Valley Lighting

Jocelyn Hutt, PR Rep 10844 Burbank Blvd. North Hollywood, CA 91601 (818) 981-8210 (818) 981-8220 www.hudsonvalleylighting.com jocelyn@drsandassociates.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, Wall Sconces Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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HyLite LED Lighting Chris Baird, VP of Marketing & Sales 911 E. White St., Rock Hill, SC 29730 (803)-336-2230 www.hyliteledlighting.com info@arva.us Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

IdentiCom Sign Solutions John DiNunzo, President 24657 Halsted Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (248) 344-9590 (248) 946-4198 www.identicomsigns.com info@identicomsigns.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Illuminating Technologies Angela Saladino, Specification Sales P.O. Box 18463 Greensboro, NC 27409 (800) 278-5483 www.illuminatingtechnologies.com angela@illuminatingtechnologies.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Freezer Case Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Grocery Stores/ Supermarkets

Imagilux Erin Wilson, Inside Sales Manager 2877 Chad Dr. Eugene, OR 97408 (541) 228-3650 www.imagiluxled.com info@imagiluxled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Architectural Brilliance The NL line is one of the slimmest LED luminaires LaMar makes: at only 2.25” wide, these fixtures can fit discreetly into almost any architectural application. Comprised of three product groups, the Narrow Linear Wall (NLW), Narrow Linear Surface (NLS) and the Narrow Linear Recessed (NLR), this product line is ideal for retail, office, educational facility or architectural applications with most being suitable for continuous row installations (up & along a wall [90˚ angle] or suspended from ceiling). They are available in 2’, 4’, 6’ & 8’ lengths (nominal) as well as in custom colors. The NL series is an economic alternative to extruded aluminum and features a high efficiency extruded diffuser for excellent light transmission, even illumination and

No LED Hot Spots.

Combine energy efficiency & safety in stairwell lighting ®

occu-smart occu-smart

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LED Bi-Level Lighting Motion controlled bi-level lighting provides an energy saving solution for applications such as stairwells, offices, libraries, laundry rooms, conference rooms and any other areas where maximum light levels may not be needed 100% of the time

ENERGY SAVING Standby Mode When Unoccupied

100% Brightness For Safety Upon Occupancy

Bi-level motion sensor controlled LED luminaires offer increased energy savings with standby power as low as 3 watts without leaving the area dark. Our proven ultra-sonic sensor technology immediately switches the fixture to full light output when occupancy is detected. DE IN TH

485 Smith Street, Farmingdale, NY 11735 | tel 631.777.7700 | fax 631.777.7705 www.lamarled.com | www.occusmart.com | www.ledXpress.net

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Infinity Canopy Alan Shargani, President 11661 San Vicente Blvd., Suite 301 Los Angeles, CA 90049 (844) 422-6679 www.infinitycanopy.com sales@infinitycanopy.com Lighting Product Type: Light Suppression, Shade System Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential

Innovations in Lighting Rob Bruck, President 3115 Foothill Blvd., Suite M213 La Crescenta, CA 91214 (818) 732-9238 (818) 796-4724 www.innovationsinlighting.com info@innovationsinlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Decorative Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Commercial

JESCO Lighting Group Richard Kurtz, President and CEO 15 Harbor Park Dr. Port Washington, NY 11050 (800) 527-7796 (855) 265-5768 www.jescolighting.com info@jescolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

KLIK USA LLC Betsy Ketter, Marketing Manager 2840 N. Brookfield Rd., Suite 3 Brookfield, WI 53045 (262) 505-5124 www.klikusa.com sales@klikusa.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Illuminated Handrail Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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L & S Lighting Jenna Kaba, Marketing Manager 1505 Pavillion Pl., Suite A Norcross, GA 30093 (877) 877-0757 www.ls-light.com jenna.kaba@ls-light.us Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Commercial

LaMar Lighting Co., Inc.

Jeffrey Goldstein, CEO 485 Smith St. Farmingdale, NY 11735 (631) 777-7700 (631) 777-7705 www.lamarled.com/ www.occusmart.com / www.ledxpress.net jeffg@lamarlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Motion Sensor Controlled Bi-Level Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

LEDCONN Corp. Charlene Ro, Marketing Manager 301 Thor Pl. Brea, CA 92821 (714) 256-2111 (714) 256-2118 www.ledconn.com marketing@ledconn.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential, Signage

LED Dynamics Lori Reynolds, Marketing Coordinator 44 Hull St. Randolph, VT 05060 (802) 728-4533 www.leddynamics.com lreynolds@leddynamics.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Tube Lights, LED Drivers, LED Controllers, LED Light Modules, LED Light Engines Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Engineered Custom LED Solutions

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


You know that LED lighting makes sense, but it’s hard to figure out which LED options are best for you. Chances are if you look online or pick up a catalog, you’re going to be even more confused. Which solution is best for your space? When a building has to be lit properly, stop and call one of our lighting specialists at 1-800-GRAYBAR.

LED Renovation is Easier Than You Think graybar.com CIRCLE NO. 43

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING LEDS C4 Daniel Moncunill, USA and Canada Sales Afores Tora Canada 25750 34-609-375560 www.leds-c4.us daniel@leds-c4.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

LEDVANCE Glen Gracia, Head of Media Relations, Americas 200 Ballardvale St. Wilmington, MA 01887 (978) 753-5185 (978) 646-4901 www.sylvania.com glen.gracia@ledvance.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Legrand-Wattstopper Mary Placido, PR Manager 2700 Zanker Rd., Suite 168 San Jose, CA 95134 (408) 988-5331 (408) 986-9300 www.legrand.us/wattstopper.com pr@wattstopper.com Lighting Product Type: Lighting Controls Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Commercial

Lellan Inc. Michelle Johnston, VP Sales & Marketing 2415 Bay Rd. Redwood City, CA 94063 (978) 852-6273 www.lellan.com sales@lellan.com Lighting Product Type: Decorative, Entertainment Ltg Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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Lido Lighting Bill Pierro Jr., President 966 Grand Blvd. Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 595-2000 (631) 595-7010 www.lidolighting.com billpierro@lidolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Controls and Energy Mgmnt. Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Light Efficient Design Jon Fredrikson, Marketing Director 188 S. NW Hwy. Cary, IL 60013 (847) 380-3540 www.led-llc.com jfredrikson@led-llc.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Retrofits Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Light Age Greg Murphy, President 57 S. Main St., Suite 150 Neptune, NJ 07753 (855) 558-9243 www.lightage.com gregmurphy@lightage.lighting Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Circadian Lighting Markets Served: Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Nursing Homes

Lightheaded Lighting Ltd. Gordon Catherwood, Director of Sales & Marketing #1150-572 Nicola Pl. Port Coquitlam, BC, V3B OK4 Canada (604) 464-5644 (604) 464-0888 www.lightheadedlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential/High Rise

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


The Original Specification-Grade LEDpod™ Still the best handrail illumination product on the market.

Phipps Conservatory • Pittsburgh, PA, USA • Photo 5 Years Post-Installation

Let’s Create Something Together www.klikusa.com • 262-505-5124 CIRCLE NO. 44


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Lighting Services, Inc. 2 Holt Dr., Stony Point, NY 10980 (845) 942-2800 ext. 340 (845) 942-6286 www.lightingservicesinc.com sales@maillsi.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Track Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Liton Lighting Eman Zadeh, Product Manager 5461 W. Jefferson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90016 (323) 904-0200 www.liton.eemagroup.com marketing@liton.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

LLI Architectural Lighting

William Hood, CEO 1555 Barclay Blvd. Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 (847) 412-4880 (847) 412-4881 www.llialighting.com bhood@llialighting.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

LSI Industries Inc. Jay Matsueda, Sr. Director of Strategic Marketing & Communications 10000 Alliance Rd. Blue Ash, OH 45242 (513) 793-3200 www.lsi-industries.com jay.matsueda@lsi-industries.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Gas Stations, Convenience Stores, Auto Dealerships, Sports Courts

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Lucifer Lighting Company Adrian Nadeau, Manager of Technical Marketing 3750 I-35 N. San Antonio, TX 78219 (210) 227-7329 (210) 227-4967 www.luciferlighting.com a.nadeau@luciferlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, High End Residential

LumenArt T.J. Wendorf, National Sales Manager 3333 W 47th St. Chicago, IL 60632 (773) 254-0744 (773) 254-0767 www.lumenart.com tj.wendorf@lumenart.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Decorative Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Lumenoptix Gabrielle Santulli, Vice President Marketing 203 Progress Dr. Montgomeryville, PA 18936 (267) 613-6110 (267) 613-6111 www.lumenoptix.com info@lumenoptix.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Industrial Warehouses, Distribution Centers, Fulfillment Centers

Luminis Nicolas Cohen, President 260 Labrosse, Pointe Claire, QC H9R 5L5 (866) 586-4647 www.luminis.com info@luminis.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Š2017 LEDVANCE LLC Licensee of product trademark SYLVANIA in general lighting

www.sylvania.com

Light is personal SYLVANIA LEDVANCE LED Luminaires and Retrofit Kits Straightforward, efficient and easy-to-install products with proven quality and performance, perfectly matched to your everyday requirements. SYLVANIA LEDVANCE LED luminaires and retrofit kits are the ideal solution to fit your needs for everyday applications. The luminaires have all the necessary features and functions offering precisely what they have been developed for – no more and no less. For more information, visit www.sylvania.com/luminaires

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Lunera Danielle Hamel, Head of Corp Comms 1615 Wyatt Dr. Santa Clara, CA 95054 (650) 241-3875 www.lunera.com dhamel@lunera.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, LED HID, LED CFL Markets Served: Retail

LUXX Light Technology (USA) Inc. Shannon Kolpin, Marketing 4830 S. 10th St. Milwaukee, WI 53221 (414) 763-3141 www.luxx.us info@luxx.us Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

MaxLite Amy Silver, Corporate Communications Manager 12 York Ave. West Caldwell, NJ 07006 (973) 244-7300 ext. 111 www.maxlite.com asilver@maxlite.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Moda Light 955 White Dr. Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702) 407-7775 (702) 407-7773 www.modalight.com info@modalight.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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Orion Lighting

Mark Kardon, Vice President Marketing 2210 Woodland Dr. Manitowoc, WI 54220 (800) 660-9340 www.orionlighting.com info@oesx.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

OSRAM

Ellen Slingsby, Head of Media Relations, America 200 Ballardvale St. Wilmington, MA 01887 (978) 570-3755 (978) 646-1294 www.osram-americas.com eslingsby@osram.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Wireless Lighting, Energy Efficient Lighting, Light Management Systems, Lighting Control Systems Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Pathway Lighting

Brigitte Frank, Director of Communications P.O. Box 591 Old Saybrook, CT 06475 (860) 388-6881 (860) 388-5766 www.pathwaylighting.com sales@pathwaylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Wet Location, Healthcare Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

PennSMART Marcia LaFemina, President/ CEO 300 Shaw Rd. North Branford, CT 06471 (203) 484-7749 (203) 484-7758 www.pennsmartlighting.com lafeminam@pennglobe.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Smart Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Penn Globe Marcia LaFemina, President/ CEO 300 Shaw Rd. North Branford, CT 06471 (203) 484-7749 (203) 484-7758 www.pennglobe.com lafeminam@pennglobe.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Other Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Phillips Lighting Heather Milcarek, Marketing Director 200 Franklin Square Dr. Somerset, NJ 08873 (732) 563-3468 www.usa.lighting.phillips.com heather.milcarek@phillips.com

Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Government, Grocery, Petrol, Public Spaces

Plumen Will Latter 60-62 Commercial St., Second Floor London, United Kingdom E1 6LT 44 (0) 207-650-7882 www.plumen.com sales@plumen.com Lighting Product Type: Decorative Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Imagine a space that comes to life...

with DigitalCanvas™ by Lellan. Reinventing Interior Spaces with Light, Color, Motion

For more information or to schedule a demonstration, visit www.lellan.com or contact us at sales@lellan.com

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Progress Lighting Courtney Price, PR Assistant Manager 701 Millennium Blvd. Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 678-1000 www.progresslighting.com courtney@fullcirclepr.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

QuantaLight Robert Demshki, Product Manager Houston, TX 77073 (281) 821-8836 (281) 821-0995 www.quantalight.com rdemshki@quantalight.com Lighting Product Type: Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Regency Lighting Eric Olson, Dir. National Accounts 9261 Jordan Ave. Chatsworth, CA 91311 (800) 284-2024 www.regencylighting.com eric.olson@regencylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Bank, Theatre, Petroleum

Robern Wendy Silverstein, PR Representative 1123 Broadway New York, NY 10010 (212) 533-9261 www.robern.com wsilverstein@domusinc.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, MDU and Residential

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Royal Contract Lighting, Inc. Kyle Jackson, Inside Sales Manager 645 Myles Standish Blvd. Taunton, MA 02780 (508) 824-8880 (508) 824-8877 www.royalcontract.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Restaurants, Casinos

Samsung Semiconductor, Inc. Andy Jung, Manager 7000 Central Pkwy. NE, #1710 Sandy Springs, GA 30328 www.samsungled.com sunghoon.j@samsung.com Lighting Product Type: LED Components Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential

Schreder Lighting Maegan Lee, Marketing Coordinator 2105 W. Corporate Dr. Addison, IL 60101 (219) 241-5905 www.schreder.com mlee@schreder.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Integrated/loT Lighting and Controls Markets Served: Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Stadiums/Arenas. Roadways, Industrial

Sengled Megan Johnson, Marketing Communications Manager 1075 Windward Ridge Pkwy., Suite 150 Alpharetta, GA 30005 (678) 570-6321 www.sengled.com mjohnson@sengled.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Lamps for most all of these categories Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Introducing the Mirada Round Sleek New LED Area Lighting with Precision Silicone Optics •

High-performance silicone optics – scratch resistance and no discoloration over time

Industry-leading LSI photometry through a patent-pending optical system

Sleek, low-profile housing for contemporary appearance

Mirada series includes matching poles and wall sconce with a bollard & post top coming soon

Area Light Side View

H

The majority of LSI’s products are assembled in USA facilities by an American Workforce utilizing both domestic and foreign components.

LSI Industries Inc. Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 (513) 793-3200

www.lsi-industries.com CIRCLE NO. 47


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Sentry Electric LLC Michael Shatzkin, Director of Marketing & Bus. Development 185 Buffalo Ave. Freeport, NY 11520 (516) 379-4660 (516) 378-0624 www.sentrylighting.com michael@sentrylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Municipalities

Sielo Matt Sallee, Director of Strategic Marketing 1830 Lefthand Cir, Ste. B, Longmont, CO 80501 (303) 442-4960 www.sielo.com msallee@sielo.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Retrofit Lighting Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Simplify LED Jessica Pirkle VP Marketing 3490 Venture Dr. San Angelo, TX 76905 (325) 284-3643 www.simplifyled.com info@simplifyled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Softlites LLC Mitch Teller, President 9015 Burroughs Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90046 (818) 489-2510 www.softlitesllc.com softlitesllc@gmail.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial, Residential

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Solar Electric Power Company Stephanie Holloran, National Sales Manager 1521 SE Palm Ct. Stuart, FL 34994 (772) 220-6615 (772) 220-8616 www.sepco-solarlighting.com info@sepconet.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Solar Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Solatube International

Sean Donahue, Commercial Marketing Mgr. 2210 Oak Ridge Way Vista, CA 92081 (888) 765-2882 www.solatube.com sdonahue@solatube.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Task Lighting, Day Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Sonneman-A Way of Light Jackie Crino, Marketing Director 20 North Ave. Larchmont, NY 10538 (914) 834-3600 (845) 565-8930 www.sonnemanawayoflight.com jackiec@sonneman.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Decorative Lighting(Pendants, Sconces & Chandeliers) Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial, Residential

SORRA, Inc. Simon Harrison-Wallace, Sr. Manager, Channel Marketing 6500 Kaiser Dr., Suite 110 Fremont, CA 94555 (510) 656-2200 www.soraa.com info@soraa.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

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CIRCLE NO. 48


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING SuperBright LEDs, Inc. Josh Dunning, Account Manager 4400 Earth City Expressway, Earth City, MO 63045 (866) 590-3533 www.superbrightleds.com josh-d@superbrightleds.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Sign Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Targetti Cindy Foster Warthen, Marketing 750-A W. 17th St. Costa Mesa, CA (714) 513-1991 www.targetti.us usamarketing@targetti.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Residential

Thomas Research Products Michael Wypasek, Marketing Communications Manager 1225 Bowes Rd. Elgin, IL 60123 (847) 515-3057 (847) 515-3047 www.trpssl.com mwypasek@trpssl.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Components Markets Served: Commercial, OEM

Times Square Lighting Lee Crisman, Creative Media Specialist 5 Holt Dr. 10980 (845) 947-3034 ext.213 (845) 947-3047 www.tslight.com lee@tslight.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

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TLS International David Sellam, CEO 300 Montee de Liesse Montreal, QC Canada H4T IN9 (514) 858-6556 www.tls-led.com jessica@tls-led.com/ dudi@tls-led.com Lighting Product Type: LED Surface Lighting Markets Served: Architectural, High End Residential

Tresco Lighting Chris Tress, Director of Lighting 12400 Earl Jones Way Louisville, KY 40229 (800) 227-1171 (502) 491-2215 www.trescolighting.com cservice@trescolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Panel Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Tridonic Brian Fisher, Public Relations 1655 Latitude Dr., # 3 San Jose, CA 95124 (408) 616-0991 www.tridonic.com bfisher@mcapr.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Wall Sconces, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Troy Lighting Mariel Yohe, Senior Account Manager 14508 Nelson Ave. City of Industry, CA 91744 (818) 981-8210 www.troy-lighting.com mariel@drsandassociates.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Wall Sconces, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial, Decorative

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Ultralights Lighting

Teri Avalos, Office Manager, Customer Service 1936 E. 18th St. Tucson, AZ 85719 (520) 623-9829 (520) 623-0081 www.ultralightslighting.com info@ultralightslighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Task Lighting (Note Decorative Task) , Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Ecclesiastical, High End Residential

Universal Lighting Technologies, Inc. Susan Phillips, Marketing Director 51 Century Blvd. Nashville, TN 37214 (800) 225-5278 www.unvlt.com customerservice@unvlt.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Industrial and Warehouse

USAI Lighting Gabriel Rodriguez, PR 1126 River Rd. New Windsor, NY 12553 (212) 966-3759 ext.219 www.usailighting.com gabrielrc@vpcpartners.com Lighting Product Type: Recessed Lighting, LED Fixtures, Optics and Thermal Management and Dimming Technologies Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Commercial

US LED Paul Jeziorowski, VP Business Development 6807 Portwest Dr., Houston, TX 77024 (404) 475-8606 www.usled.com paulj@usled.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

V-TAC USA CORP Christine Song, Marketing Manager 18003 Sky Park Circle, Suite A Irvine, CA 92614 (949) 269-2580 www.v-tacusa.com christine@v-tacusa.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Value Lighting Inc. Joseph Hopfenspirger, Marketing Manager 1255 Champion Cir. Carrollton, TX 75006 (214) 390-7008 (469) 208-0005 www.valuelightinginc.com joseph.hopfenspirger@valuelightinginc.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Apt. Complex

Versalume

Mario Paniccia, CEO 3964 Rivermark Plaza, Suite 151 Santa Clara, CA 95054 (408) 813-7434 www.versalume.com mail.inquiries@versalume.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Light Diffusing Fiber Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

Vista Professional Outdoor Lighting Cruz Perez, VP of Marketing 1625 Surveyor Ave. Simi Valley, CA 93063 (805) 527-0987 (888) 670-8478 www.vistapro.com cperez@vistapro.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Vode Lighting Tom Warton, CEO and Co-Founder 1206 East MacArthur St., #3 Sonoma, CA 95476 (707) 996-9898 (707) 996-9797 www.vode.com vode@antennagroup.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Indoor, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Commercial

Volume Lighting Int. Trista Wright, Builder Sales 21160 Imperial Valley Dr. Houston, TX 77073 (281) 821-6888 (281) 821-6895 www.volumelighting.com trista@volumelighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Multi-Family

Wasco Products, Inc. 85 Spencer Dr. Wells, ME 04090 (800) 388-0293 (800) 933-0593 www.wascoskylights.com/parans csm@wascoproducts.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Fiber Optic Daylighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial

WECO Electrical Connectors Inc. Adriana Galli, T echnical Marketing Specialist 18050 Trans-Canada Hwy. Kirkland, Quebec Canada H9J 4A1 (800) 724-2928 www.wecoconnectors.com agalli@wecoconnectors.com Lighting Product Type: Terminal Blocks and Connectors for Lighting Applications Markets Served: Exterior Street Lights, Horticultural

July/August 2017 issue Don’t miss our surveys for flooring and project management services/software Listing form deadline to be included July 17th

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


MAY/JUNE 2017

For the Craft Brewing Professional

James Watt co-founder Brewdog

Live. Love. Hops. Inside Brewdog’s strategy to revolutionize the craft beer experience

PLUS: The new game board for craft beer Is it the new product or new experience?


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A Division of CIRCLE NO. 49


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contents

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EDITOR’S NOTE Dream big, bet big, leave it all on the field INSIGHTS Industry News BRANDING The real meaning behind what customers tell you (or don’t) STRATEGIC THINKING Inside the new game board for craft beer

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LIVE. LOVE. HOPS. Inside Brewdog’s strategy to revolutionize the craft beer experience ERROR OF CREATION Is it the new product or new experience? EVENTS Texas Craft Brewers METAL TACKERS How to get creative with your brand

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editor’s note

Dream big, bet big, leave it all on the field

Michael J. Pallerino

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There are a lot of lessons to be learned from the entrepreneurs who put everything on the line to walk through the fire that too many others fear.

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Nearly 20 years after Kevin Plank started making T-shirts in his grandmother’s Georgetown basement, his entrepreneurial legacy is one for the ages. Craft brewers take note. There are lots of takeovers from an entrepreneur who defied all odds when he decided he would take on the big boys at a game (sports performance apparel) they already had a stake in. Sports performance apparel, beer, does it really matter what it is? What matters is how you tell the story of your brand. What matters is how your customers view what you do, how you do it and why. Here’s a nugget from Plank’s book of beating the big boys at their own game. One of Plank’s tenets for running his company revolves around three statements.: “This is what I heard.” “This is what I think.” “This is what we’re going to do.” The founder and CEO of Under Armour encourages all of his people to use this approach in tackling their responsibilities. Plank’s strategy is about making sure people’s voices are heard. Did I hear you? Did I understand your meaning? And then, he says, clarity. Everyone must have a voice, and everyone deserves clarity. These are the tenants of leadership and culture that increase performance, satisfaction and speed. Today, in case you haven’t noticed, Under Armour has leapfrogged every single one of its competitors, including Nike, whose revered Swoosh once dominated the sports apparel, performance and footwear market. The secret lies in betting big. Sometimes you win; sometimes you lose. And while Plank will admit he doesn’t always have all of the answers, the key is giving it everything you have. As Plank says, “I don’t have to be right. I just want to win.” It doesn’t have to be his idea. He just wants the best idea. And then his team will bring it to life. There are a lot of lessons to be learned from the entrepreneurs who put everything on the line to walk through the fire that too many others fear. “We must protect this house.” That’s the slogan Plank and company built their reputation on. I remember sitting with Plank in a trade show booth in Atlanta during the early years of his company. He spoke openly and honestly about his mission to make a name for his brand in the then highly competitive sports apparel performance market. Back then; he said all he needed was time and patience for his vision to play out. It worked. And in a time when craft beer is all the rage, it just might for you, too.

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insights

Return to sender Before you hit send on that email, here's a stat to know. Thirteen-percent of business emails are deleted by their recipients without being read, according to Return Path's "The Hidden Metrics of Email Deliverability" report. Overall, 22 percent of emails are read (opened, even if all images don't load). The remainder are deleted immediately, filtered into spam folders, ignored or never reached their intended recipients.

Book Rec The Power of Little Ideas: A Low-Risk, High-Reward Approach to Innovation By David Robertson To survive, companies must move beyond incremental, sustaining innovation and invest in some form of radical innovation. That’s what conventional wisdom says. “Disrupt yourself or be disrupted.” In “The Power of Little Ideas,” authors David Robertson argues there’s a “third way” that is neither sustaining nor disruptive. This low-risk, high-reward strategy is an approach to innovation that all company leaders should understand so that they recognize it when their competitors practice it, and apply it when it will give them a competitive advantage. Robertson provides illustrations of some well-known companies, including CarMax, GoPro, LEGO, Gatorade, Disney, and others, use this approach to stave off competitive threats and achieve great success. He outlines the organizational practices that unintentionally torpedo this approach to innovation in many companies and shows how organizations can overcome those challenges. For leaders in the craft brew marketplace seeking strategies for sustained innovation, “The Power of Little Ideas” provides a logical, organic and enduring third way to innovate.

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The percent of consumers who say they want brands to be honest in their social media posts, according to “The Q2 2017 Sprout Social Index.” The report also shows that consumers want brand to be helpful (78 percent), funny (72 percent), trendy (43 percent) and politically correct (39%). Interestingly. 39 percent say they want their brands to be more snarky. That’s one to raise a glass to.

They second that emotion What grabs your consumers' attention? What makes them want to be a part of your brand? According to CustomerThermometer's "Connecting with Companies" report, 65 percent say they emotionally connect with a brand that makes them feel like it cares about people like themselves. The report, based on data from a survey of 1,000 adults in the United States, also says that 55 percent make an emotional connection when they feel like the brand is making a positive difference, while 45 percent say they connect when they feel like the brand gets them.

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branding

By Kate Zabriskie

The real meaning behind what customers tell you (or don’t)

Your customers talk to you. But do you listen? I mean, really listen. When it comes to customer service, especially in the world of craft beer, what people say and what they mean are not always the same thing. Unfortunately, too many brands are listening impaired when it comes to getting to the heart of their customers’ messages. There's just way too much of that "I’m-just-looking-I'll-get-backto-you" mentality. But do you understand what people mean when they say this? On the surface, sure you do. But do you really get your customer’s intended meaning? Well, you'd better, or else you're going to lose out to the next cool craft beer brand. The good news is there’s hope. With some practice and a little bit of discipline, you can ratchet up your service and grow your relationships. Slowing down and focusing on what others need versus what you can provide is the first step. The second is to listen for a few key phrases and appropriately respond. The following are a couple of the most common red flags to which you should pay attention:

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When customers say “maybe,” they often mean “no” Maybe we’ll place an order in six months. “Maybe” may mean never. When you hear that word, keep asking questions. Don’t wait six months and then act surprised when no order is forthcoming. You have your customer or prospect’s attention now and a chance to both clear up some misconceptions and make a sale or at a minimum to understand why he is resistant.


• I understand you’re on the fence and ordering now isn’t in your plan. Between now and the time when you might order, how will you get ABC done? • When you place an order six months from now, tell me a little about how it can improve your mix. • What other brands have you considered? Any of those follow-up questions will give you some insight into the other person’s needs and decision process. Notice too, those questions aren’t “salesy.” Your follow-up questions – and you, for that matter – should show a genuine interest in your customers and their concerns. The better you understand people and what motivates them, the more likely you’ll be able to help if there is a fit or to get a straightforward answer if there isn’t. The point is, when you hear “maybe,” investigate.

What in the world does "fine" mean? In the same lane that the vague “maybe” occupies is another phrase that communicates very little. You’ve heard it before and probably used it yourself, and that’s the word “fine.” "How is everything?" "Everything’s fine." Maybe it is, and maybe it isn’t. You can’t know unless you do a little more digging. People often will say “everything is fine” in lieu of “go away” or “totally horrible, but I don’t

The better you understand people and what motivates them, the more likely you’ll be able to help if there is a fit or to get a straightforward answer if there isn’t.

feel like engaging in conversation about it.” If you find yourself getting a lot of “everything’s fine,” make subsequent inquiries. At the same time, try to determine if you’re setting yourself up to hear this “tell-nothing” response. By that, I mean “how is everything,” is a C-minus question to begin with. If you ask something specific, you’ll learn more. When you ask what they like most about your beer, it's hard to answer with “fine.” Instead, you’ll most likely discover what your customers liked and what they didn’t.

When customers ask “why,” they are usually expressing displeasure of some sort

Why does my favorite distributor only offer one choice of your beer? Why aren't the others offered? Too often, service and salespeople miss the real meaning behind these inquiries. Listen for “why,” and respond with something better than “I don’t know” or “you’ll have to ask my manager.” Although your customers aren’t jumping up and down with steam coming out of their ears or carrying gigantic flags with the word “why” emblazoned across them, somewhere lurking behind these questions are people on their way to unhappy. Imagine a busy traveler on a tight schedule in a city unfamiliar to him. He hasn’t seen his own bed in two weeks, few of his daily flights have followed his published schedules, and he’s missing another one of his kid’s ball games. It’s 11:30 at night and he’s just entered the door of his Kate Zabriskie hotel and he wants to settle in is the president with his favorite craft beer. of Business You want him to reach for Training Works, yours. So go that extra step with Inc., a Maryeverybody and anybody who disland-based tributes your brand – those who talent development firm. She and are on the front lines of giving their her team help businesses estabcustomers what they want – you. lish customer service strategies Take the time to slow down, and train their people to live up to ask questions and get to the core what’s promised. For more info, of your customer’s message. visit Businesstrainingworks.com.

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Strategic thinking Inside the new game board for craft beer By Eric Balinski

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Back on April 7, Jim Koch, the founder of Boston Beer, wrote an opinion piece in The New York Times. His article discussed beer industry consolidation forming the two worldwide players MillerCoors and InBev, as well as the implications for craft brewers and consumers. Koch ultimately fears: “Beer lovers won’t have the broad range of choices they have today.” Koch’s article recognizes the craft beer industry is changing and perhaps the glory days of craft beer are over. Sure, better antitrust law enforcement and Department of Justice aren’t protecting craft brewers enough, but the real threat to the craft beer industry is if brewers fail to accept the changing landscape and then fail to build a strategy that adapts accordingly. The value of developing a strategy is that it accounts for the changing dynamics. It should force a brewer to rethink what it is doing. The strategy process intent is to discover insights that enable a company to go in new profitable directions. Strategy is about determining what you are going to deliver to customers, with your limited resources. Strategy defines the what, and more important, it is the focal point to deploy your resources. An effective strategy should do two things: • Determine exactly what you are going to deliver to customers- both the product and customer experience • Subsequently allows alignment of your brewery, its staff, your marketing and

your capital to focus on delivering the product & experience you decided was important to your customers The challenge for most companies is figuring out how to do it? While the process can be complex and never very linear, one of the most challenge aspects is in discovering fresh insights to build a new strategy around. To discover fresh insights, start by grasping three core principles that allow you to see new and interesting aspects of your customer’s world: 1. Right Mind-Set – Get yourself in the right mindset by not wasting one moment thinking about the way the industry was. It’s not that way anymore, and it is never going back that way. Focus on creating a new revolution.

The goal is to help everyone recognize customer enjoy your brew, enjoys it in a number of ways and for different reasons.

2. No Beer – Put down the beer, the answer not in the glass. Yes, your love of beer led you to creating a brewery and a business. But the answer to figuring-out a strategy is not in your product. As tempting as it is to believe you will invent the next great brew, the likelihood of achieving it is as likely as the SEC breaking up Miller-Coors or In-Bev. 3. M  ake a Difference – Your insight into people is central to developing a successful strategy. This notion should echo in your brain… “How can we make a difference in our customers’ lives.”

Reinventing your invention Here's an example of what I mean. Take Yeti® coolers, the high performance ice chest that cost ten times more than an Igloo® or Coleman® cooler. In just over 10 years, Yeti grew to over a half billion dollar market leader and reinvented the cooler category. Yes, it is a superior product – its coolers are "virtually indestructible" and the ice last practically forever. This reinvention came by having a clear understanding of user lifestyle, in this case, a fisherman standing on anything to give them more height on the bow of a small fishing skiff to better spot fish.

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With space being scarce on a skiff, choosing a dedicated casting platform or a high performance cooler strong enough to pull double duty improves what the fisherman can do on a small skiff. The insight for developing Yeti coolers came from its founders, Ryan and Roy Seiders, because they lived the life of fisherman/ outdoorsman who put serious demands on their equipment. Maybe you already have insight like the Seider brothers. If so, act on it. Otherwise here is how you can develop unique customer insights for your craft brewery.

Step 1 Create a small team of your own people who actually have been around your customers. Do not involve any customers during this step (yes, I realize this sounds internal focused, bear with me).

There is no formula or software that will spit out what you need to do. It takes intuition and gut feel based upon your insight from this type of exercise.

Step 4

Ask each person to describe what they "see" and "hear" when watching customers enjoying, buying or talking about your brew. Create exact descriptors of what everyone sees or hears. Make no interpretations as to what anything means. This will be hard for people so try this. Have everyone think of their brain as a video camera. You want them to hit playback, without any editing. People should only describe “exactly” what they have personally heard or seen. Ignore anything that sounds like: someone said this or told me that, or I think this is what’s going on. Don’t let people interpret what they think they saw or heard. Force them to use “playback only.”

Summarize the descriptors of each type of customer, with a name that everyone on the team identifies as that customer type. Don’t be surprised if you have three, four, or five different customers’ types. If you have dozens of different customers, go back to Step 3 and ask what so some of the types have in common and reduce the number of groups to 3 to 5. The goal is to help everyone recognize customer enjoy your brew, enjoys it in a number of ways and for different reasons. The second goal is to identify common customer types is so you can effectively focus your resources. You effectively deploy a strtagy do this if you have dozens of customer types.

Step 3

Step 5

What should start to emerge are different patterns of what people are doing and saying. These are likely very different customer type showing themselves, so next name the different customer types. Example: Beer snob – the person who painstakingly tastes a beer. Or maybe Party Person – the one who seems to go from beer to beer with little deference for what they are drinking.

Identify unique insights with what you learned. Looking separately at each group, ask these questions: • What really matters to these people?

Step 2

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In this step, there are no wrong behaviors or bad customer type, nor should you be judging what anything means. Your job is to capture what's going on and try to group common behaviors styles of people. In all likelihood, you will see multiple types. If you only see one type, keep pushing the team for anything else they saw or heard. Did anything look or sound unusual? You have to prime their minds to remember difference their brains recorded.

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• Why does it matter? • How well do we currently deliver what matters most to them? • What can we do to make their life better? • Why would they be better if we did this? There is no formula or software that will spit out what you need to do. It takes intuition and gut feel based upon your insight from this type of exercise. It is likely to take multiple sessions before the light bulbs come on showing new insight, but they will show up. At the point of frustration, keep going back to Step 5. In closing, how did Yeti make a fisherman on a small skiff life

The value of developing a strategy is that it accounts for the changing dynamics. It should force a brewer to rethink what it is doing. better? Instead of buying a dedicated casting platform, the Yeti cooler became a structural platform costing about the same as the old platform and freed up deck and floor space. Secondly, because the brothers knew a long day on the water historically meant warm drinks and maybe spoiled food or caught fish, their coolers kept ice for days making for a far more enjoyable day on the water.

Eric Balinski is the owner of Synection, LLC, which is a strategy and growth consultancy firm. For more information, visit: synection.com.

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Live. Love. Hops. Inside Brewdog’s strategy to revolutionize the craft beer experience By Michael J. Pallerino

Two guys, a dog and slogan for the ages. If you want the snapshot of the Brewdog story, let's start there. Bored with the industrial-styled lagers and way too stuffy ales of the UK beer landscape, James Watt and Martin Dickie decided to take matters into their own hands. The high school friends from Peterhead, a fishing town northeast of Scotland, traveled slightly different paths to reach craft beer nirvana. Watt studied law and economics in Edinburgh, while Dickie attended the prestigious school of brewing and distilling at Heriot-Watt University.

The convened at a time when the craft beer market needed them most. Inspired by the slogan that drives them, “Love Hops and Live the Dream,” Watt and Dickie began producing craft beer under the monicker, Brewdog, back in 2007. BrewDog was one of Britain's first breweries to pioneer a new wave of hoppy, American-style "craft" beers, inspired by breweries on America's West Coast, most notably Stone Brewing and Ballast Point of San Diego. To note, its Punk IPA is one of the most popular and recognizable brands of British craft beer.

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Their recipe – and innovative marketing strategies – continues to pay off. Today, there are 50 BrewDog Bars in the United Kingdom and overseas, a rapidly expanding brewery in Scotland, more than 400 incredible crew members, and 35,000-plus “Equity for Punks” shareholders. And the beat goes on for the brewer that is known for, among other things, marketing initiatives such as dropping taxidermied “fat cats” over the city and driving a tank to the Bank of England. CBAM sat down with Watt, captain and co-founder, to get his take on the never-ending story that is Brewdog.

What is the BrewDog story from a brand perspective? Martin and I realized that we were bored of the industrially brewed lagers and stuffy ales that dominated the UK beer market. We decided the best way to fix this predicament was to brew our own beer. BrewDog was born in Martin's mom's garage in 2007. We started off brewing tiny batches of craft beer, filling the bottles by hand and selling the beers at local markets across Scotland and out of the back of a beat up van. In 2008, the business started to take off – people liked our brews and we persuaded the banks to give us money to buy tanks and a proper bottling machine.

What do you see as your biggest opportunity moving forward? There are tons of new opportunities on the horizon for BrewDog. We're thrilled about continuing our global expansion in the US and the UK, which includes launching projects like our crowdfunded DogHouse craft beer hotel in Ohio and our new spirits distillery LoneWolf. We're also working on plans to build new breweries in Australia and Asia.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Ten years later, we've left the garage for our own brewery in Ellon, Scotland, and are about to open our first U.S. brewery in Columbus, Ohio. We currently export to 60 countries and have 50 global bars. Our biggest mission when we set up BrewDog was to make other people as passionate about great craft beer as we are. That is still our mission today, and it's at the heart of everything we do.

The first item on our to-do list is opening our new Stateside brewery in Columbus, Ohio. Once it's open and running, we're going to get our new sour brewing facility and the DogHouse hotel off the ground. Our dream with the DogHouse is for craft beer fans to enjoy a vacation with a difference – to be fully immersed in a world of beer and come away loving craft beer more than ever. During their stay, DogHouse guests will enjoy a range of amenities from a hot tub filled with our Punk IPA to beer spa treatments and the finest beer cuisine. We're going to make it the "hoppiest" place on Earth.

What is today's craft beer consumer looking for?

Describe a typical day?

Like us, today's craft beer drinker is looking for an alternative to bland "corporate beers." That's where we come in. We are completely dedicated to brewing the best craft beers we possibly can and elevating the status of beer.

At BrewDog, there's no such thing as a typical day. With that said, everything we do from day to day is designed to bring us closer to our mission of making other people as passionate about craft beer as we are.

Define your consumer. What are they looking for? BrewDog fans don't fit into a particular category or definition. They're

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people like us, who just love craft beer and are looking for something exciting made with soul and a purpose.

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Tell us what makes the BrewDog brand so unique? We've embraced our punk mentality and we aren't afraid to push the envelope with our marketing or our beer. Our community is incredibly important to us and we're always looking for ways to keep them involved with the brand and the way we do things. That's why we've launched programs like "Equity for Punks," which lets people in the UK and the U.S. invest and own part of BrewDog. "Equity Punks" also earn amazing, money-can't-buy rewards like lifetime discounts, free brewery tours, a say in how we run the company, tickets to our annual general mayhem (a business, beer and music festival exclusively for our shareholders), and more. We’re also not afraid of a challenge. In the past we've brewed up some standout beers like the "End of History," which tapped out at 55 percent ABV and was the world's strongest and most expensive beer. It even came packaged in taxidermied stoats and squirrels, making a bold statement about beer as art and science. Taking on societal norms surrounding beer helped us pave the way for a changing landscape for both beer and beer’s consumption in the UK, and we’re excited about where the scene has landed today and where it will go next – in the UK and beyond.

What should people expect from BrewDog moving forward? Expect the unexpected. We're always going to be out there making waves, unsettling institutions and testing the limits of what's possible in craft beer.

Expect the unexpected. We’re always going to be out there making waves, unsettling institutions and testing the limits of what’s possible in craft beer. What's the most rewarding part of your job? The most rewarding part of our job is redefining people's perceptions of what beer really is, putting craft beer on the map, and showing people how rewarding and amazing beer can be.

What was the best advice you ever received? When Martin and I were still in the garage, we had a chance encounter with the late, great beer writer, Michael Jackson. He tried our beer and told us, "Boys, quit your jobs and start brewing." The rest, as they say, is history.

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Error of Creation Is it the new product or new experience?

By Eric Balinski

Throughout history, people have always invented new products. The U.S. is known for its ingenuity and inventiveness. The files of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office are filled with success stories, and even many times more stories of failed attempts. No matter the outcome, the thirst for new is innate in many people. Last month, the Pabst Blue Ribbon (PBR) brewery in Milwaukee came back to life. While the brand name has been around since 1889, when a private investor took control of the company in 1996, it closed the founding operation in Milwaukee and relocated the brand to L.A. In September 2014, PBR was sold to a private equity investor group that made the decision to reestablish a Milwaukee operation by opening a small brewery, restaurant and a bar in a church that Pabst once owned. Pabst also opened an innovation center to address the future of Pabst and beer. This story hit me in a couple of ways. First, I went to Marquette University back in the heyday of PBR and the beer industry in Milwaukee. Not only was PBR in full swing, so were Miller, Schlitz and Blatz brewing companies also going strong with headquarters based in Milwaukee. I was there when the drinking age was 18 years old, too. Back then, it was not unusual to have one or all of the local brewers drive a beer truck up onto our campus and let the beer flow freely. I fondly remember the brewery tours we took; especially at Pabst where at the end-of-tour we enjoyed bottomless glasses of beer in Sternewirt Pub. Those were the days – and when I acquired my thirst for beer. Second, the story bewildered me when Pabst’s CEO, Eugene Kashper said, “This is really going to be an innovation laboratory for us.” My first thought was, innovation in beer – weird? How many

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more styles, types and flavor do people need? Though a new beer is intriguing, it raises a more important question for any craft brew business. Is it more critical for a company to focus on product innovation or to create a superior customer experience? Most people would argue both are equally important. And yes, theoretically that’s true. But if you had to bet your resources on only one – a better product or a better customer experience – for your company’s long-term success, which would you chose?

Do you want my answer? Since I'm about to give you my perspective, here 's a bit more on my background. It is not based on having worked in a brewery, or even in the beer industry, though I have tremendous credentials enjoying beer. My view is based on having worked on both new product creation, as well as creating new customer experiences. As the lead marketer on GE’s Living Environment House in the late ’80s, this research project developed innovative new products for home construction and living. Along with 53 partner companies, many ideas were developed and showcased, such as the first home automation system, smart toilets and high performance window systems. Many of these ideas now are in consumers' homes. Later in life, I advised companies in very mature industries, with lots of competition, tight margins and declining prices. Most of these companies dreamed of a new product to free them from the commoditization of their industry.

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Here's what I have learned. Though there are plenty of companies in mature industries who spend big on finding the next unicorn in their industry, I rarely saw them succeed. This is not to say they didn’t invent new things, some of which were pretty cool with seductive features. Typically, these products enjoyed little commercial success, as well as became financial disasters because they were poorly grounded in making a real difference in the customer’s world. Where there was success to be found in mature industries was in discovering something to make a difference in the customer’s world. This might mean something such as faster turnaround on product orders to completely reconfiguring the entire customer experience so a customer got more bang out of a product. As such, I'd always bet first on creating better customer experiences as a growth strategy. The reason is, as any industry matures, including craft brewing, the entire industry tends to become more product focused to the point of ignoring customers and what’s going on in their lives. In the meantime, customers are going about their lives, often looking for better or more meaningful ways to live it. The opportunity for growth in maturing industries comes from working to better understand the day in the life of the customers and to figure out how they could enjoy what the company makes in new and interesting ways.

A new customer experience is far more likely to be achieved because the constant societal change is always presenting new situations to create new experiences.

Woo me away... Here's an example of what I mean. In our home, we cook and entertain frequently. This puts us in the grocery store multiple times every week to buy fresh. We have a nice store nearby, with the typical store elements: produce section, deli counter, fish and meat counter, pharmacy, bakery, etc. Recently, we were in the Wilmington, N.C., area contemplating our escape from New Jersey’s taxes. Our realtor mentioned the local grocery store, Lowes Foods, had a craft beer and wine bar inside the store. I don’t think he was ready for my reaction, as I grilled him mercilessly with questions about Lowes. Sure enough Lowes’ Beer Den existed. I was able to try four brews for free, then buy a pint to go about shopping with my cart’s cup holders to assist – what a concept. Honestly, I don't remember what beer I drank that day, but I knew Lowes had delivered to me an awesome customer experience, in probably my future grocery store. Betting the company’s future on the next big thing is a powerful urge, often yielding little success. Don’t get me wrong, a company that has been as successful as PBR has been in the past 21 years, would be on the top of my list as a candidate to invent such a new beer.

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Lowes Foods – Multiple craft beers on tap to enjoy while shopping. Note cup holder in front of cart.

And I will surely try it when and if it comes out. Craft brewers with weaker balance sheets could also be the one to come up with that new brew. Or all of these folks could get blind-sided by a home brewer. But in a maturing or mature industry, it's ridiculously hard to beat the odds of failure with new products, with greater down side then up. For my money, I would not make this error of product creation as a pathway to the future, but rather invent the next great customer experience, such as what Lowes is doing. A new customer experience is far more likely to be achieved because the constant societal change is always presenting new

situations to create new experiences. The added benefit of focusing on customer experience is it would also increase the novel insights needed to invent a great new product. For my tastes, enjoying beer is all about the experience with friends, food, and fun.

C

M

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CM

Our signage will get your brand noticed.

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From metal tackers, Artlite® and NeonFree® illuminated signage to unique dimensional fixtures and displays, May Group offers an unbeatable range of solutions, all made in the USA.

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www.MayGroupUSA.com marketing@maygroupusa.com

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events

Dalana Morse, Marketing Manager, May Group

Texas Craft Brewers May Group, the nation’s leading producer of tacker signage, hosted an event at their Fort Worth facility on June 1st for Texas Craft Brewers. The event featured a keynote presentation by Jim Prince, Vice President of Sales at Rahr & Sons Brewery, outlining the growth and next steps for their brewery. There was also live music from Telegraph Canyon, a popular Fort Worth based band. Attendees kicked off the evening with a tour of May Group highlighting how signs are made – from the beginning processes of raw material all the way through to assembly and pack out. The tour was followed by dinner, drinks, networking and raffles for free signs.

In addition to the many breweries in attendance from the Dallas-Fort Worth area, breweries from all over Texas such as El Paso, San Antonio, Dripping Springs, Justin, Alpine and Granbury also attended. A few breweries even came in from out of state. May Group expects to do events like this on a regular basis. To get alerts about future events, please email marketing @maygroupusa.com or visit www.welovecraftbrewers.com for more information.

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By Eric Johnson

branding

Metal Tackers How to get creative with your brand Take a look around – tackers for beer advertising are everywhere. Painted metal signs have been used for the purpose since the 1890s. They’ve been around so long that they are considered collectable by beer enthusiasts, antique memorabilia collectors, and even Americana museums.

Lone Star tacker – Tackers are easily rendered with cutaway sections. They also can be sized as large as 40x60 inches.

New Glarus bottle cap tacker – Three-dimensional metal forming techniques with print overlay.

Laser-cutting equipment has diversified metal fab tech.

It’s easy to take for granted the brand potential of metal tackers. Sure, most of us know that tackers are the entry-level building-block item of a POS sign and display portfolio. And rightly so. They are inexpensive, widely-available, durable and utilitarian.

Pabst “vintage” tacker – New production, old style. Sierra Nevada tacker – Highresolution, multi-color print. Excellent example of contemporary design and printing technique.

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Like auto license plates only bigger, right? With modern-day materials, inks, and fabrication techniques there are more ways to create an eye-catching tackers than ever before. Digital printing technology has broadened manufacturing capabilities beyond the tried-and-true screen printing tech. Laser-cutting equipment has diversified metal fab tech.

Substrate selections are more abundant than ever. Including composites of metal and plastics combined. Here are a few selections which we hope will inspire you for adding pizzazz to your own POS sign portfolio. We challenge you to get as creative with your tackers as you do with your beer creations and their labels.

Rahr & Sons tacker – Use of corrugated sheet for dimensional interest. Old-school look, new tech.

El Jimador tacker – Substrate options offer a range of surface specularity. Inks are also available in a range of gloss levels. Including metallic inks.

Saint. Arnold clock tacker – Highly-embossed, metallized surface, working clock incorporated into design.

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Pizza Hut sign – Multi-media design using metal and plastic, with standoff hardware.

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CUSTOM LED

Custom units ship within two business days Choose from millions of stock photos or upload your own artwork Various frame options to choose from including handcrafted wood

commercial pricing: 866-590-3533 / commercial-sales@superbrightleds.com CIRCLE NO. 55


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2018 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit Schedule: Wednesday Jan 10th, 2018: • * Afternoon check-in. • 5:30-7:30 PM: Group Activity • 7:30-9:30 PM: Welcome Reception/ Table Top Exhibit with Dinner. Thursday, January 11th, 2018: • 7:45 - 8:45 AM: Breakfast buffet with Round Tables discussions & Speaker. • 9:00 - 10:15 AM: AIA Seminars. • 10:15 - 10:45 AM: Coffee Break. • 10:45 - Noon: AIA Seminars. • 12:15 - 1:45 PM: Plated Lunch with Speaker. • 2:00 - 5:30 PM: One-On-One Appts. • 7:00 - 10:00 PM: Group Activity Friday, January 12th, 2018: • 8:00- 9:00 AM: End User Breakfast Only. • 9:00- 11:00 AM: Group Activity • Early Afternoon Flight Home

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Standing tall Signature structures add diversity to iconic downtown Chicago skyline By Jeff Alexander

I

n a city as dense as Chicago, new building projects often have very limited space to make their mark. From its iconic skyline that

features the colossal Willis Tower, formerly Sears, to the vast swath of buildings throughout downtown and along the Riverwalk, the Windy City presents a difficult, yet exciting playground in which architects and developers can create.

But for new hotels, Chicago offers an even stiffer challenge, featuring countless historic accommodations and lodgings that have graced the city for over a century. The new Hilton Garden Inn in the North Loop of downtown Chicago faced these obstacles, and had many additional buildings to compete with, including its landmark neighbors, the Chicago Motor Club and the Seventeenth Church of Christ Scientist. With the desire to standout, GREC Architects were called upon to help make a statement and put the signature stamp of Hilton on Chicago. Architects David Ervin and Ryan von Drehle knew they would have a very compact build site in which to erect such a prominent structure. The 26-story hotel spanning 96,000 square-feet needed a way to not only differentiate itself among the sea of other hotels and buildings lining the riverfront and downtown area, but also fit into the mix aesthetically.

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STANDING TALL The solution was to incorporate modern design elements into the building that complemented the hotel’s surroundings, including the unmistakable Chicago River. “We thought about murals and maps, ideas that were more representative, but ultimately the building’s location, as a part of the Chicago River system, became our inspiration," Ervin says. The result is a remarkable piece of artwork that utilizes five shades of complementary grey. The custom 10,000 squarefoot exterior metal mosaic façade faces the river, and was created to be an abstract representation of sunlight reflecting on the surface of water.

With the desire to standout, GREC Architects were called upon to help make a statement and put the signature stamp of Hilton on Chicago. GREC Architects used images of pixelated glints of sunshine, colorful mosaic tiles, and modern art throughout the inspiration and design process to construct the perfect representation. General contractor Walsh Construction teamed up with G&L Associates, which supplied Formawall Dimension Series CENTRIA metal panels for the exterior. Selected for both their sleek aesthetic appearance and strong performance features, Formawall Dimension Series panels provided the perfect exterior product to make up the Hilton’s façade.

Adding to the mix

Offering maximum thermal performance, superior moisture control and a bold,

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SARGENTI ARCHITECTS DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

ROLL OUT ARCHITECTURE

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Since opening in 1997, Sargenti Architects has continued to expand and diversify our services in order to continue to meet and exceed our clients expectations. Sargenti Architects has built our foundation as a retail roll-out firm. Over the years, we’ve developed strong Design & Construction Management Departments, successfully aiding our clients in all elements of architecture. Our core focus is on maintaining our customers brand identity and prototype design in each location.

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STANDING TALL embossed exterior, the panels provide an alluring complement to the structure’s overall design scheme. Coated in five custom grey shades of Valspar’s Fluropon® coatings, Midnight Blue, Stonewall, Sabre Gray, Sleigh Bells and Horizon, the panels provided the team with the necessary medium to achieve their desired aesthetic. The grey hues were chosen because they mixed the designers’ modern inspirations with a classic color palette that will never go out of style. The architects knew they needed the variety of panels to work together and find a coating that would retain the many different individual colors and preserve the integrity of the mosaic for years to come. Fluropon was chosen both for its superior

Additionally, this cohesive wall acts as a frame for the existing church and enables a unified experience to be had by those walking the block, as the building fits in seamlessly among the other structures. This contemporary, multi-colored façade juxtaposes the base of the building, which is made of limestone and aims to reference the historic Chicago Motor Club, another of the hotel’s immediate neighbors. This statement structure was recently converted into a hotel itself, yet remains an art deco gem in the city. GREC Architects again took this into consideration and matched materials to ensure a smooth transition from building to building. Another seamless transition can be seen on the building itself, as the eye-catching mosaic blends seamlessly with the three other sides of the building. These sides were also composed of Formawall Dimension Series CENTRIA metal panels and coated in Valspar’s Midnight Blue shade of Fluropon, adding flow to the facade. As mentioned earlier, even though the mosaic was designed to stand out, it needed to match aesthetically with the other components of the building and appear as a cohesive part of the structure. The use of the Midnight Blue hue across the entire building allows for unity among the different aspects of the building.

Although great emphasis was placed on its exterior, the interior of the Hilton Garden Inn completes the modern and ambitious design. color retention and resistance to chalking when exposed to the different weather elements. These features will help keep the color mosaic of the hotel’s western façade vibrant and protected through the harsh winters and humid summers that frequent the Midwest. The western exterior serves more than just an aesthetic purpose – because of the narrow build site and existing fire codes, no windows could be placed on the western side of the wall. Additionally, the owner of the property, Magna Hospitality Group, elected not to purchase the air rights above one of the hotel’s neighbors, the Seventeenth Church of Christ Scientist. Consequently, if a new building were to be constructed in its place, the western windows of the hotel would be blocked by new construction. To overcome these issues, the metal panels were constructed as a focal point of the design and most certainly make up for the missing windows with their dynamic appearance.

Inside out beauty

Although great emphasis was placed on its exterior, the interior of the Hilton Garden Inn completes the modern and ambitious design, offering 191 total guestrooms, a business center, bar area, lounges, and more. All meticulously designed by architects to provide a luxurious and comfortable stay for business professionals and families alike, the design was not without its own set of challenges. Without any windows to work with on the hotel’s western front, GREC architects needed to be inventive with the interior room design, in order for each bedroom and suites to feature a flood of natural light. With a fair bit of ingenuity, the western rooms were designed to access light from the north and south sides of the building, in order for the magnificent metal exterior to fully function in tandem with the interior. The new Hilton Garden Inn officially opened its doors on Oct. 1, 2015, adding to the roster of more than 625 Hilton hotels worldwide. With the help of a range of colors, coatings and inventive design, Chicago’s Hilton Garden Inn accomplished its goals of becoming a memorable building in the Chicago skyline. It leaves an impression along the riverside and provides a welcoming space for the thousands of guests that will pass through its doors every month. CCR

Jeff Alexander is VP of the Coil and Extrusion Division at Valspar.

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Today’s Construction Demands Better Scheduling

Time is money on a construction site. Your team needs to juggle thousands of tasks, head off delay-causing issues early, and deploy manpower most efficiently. Fortunately, there’s Asta Powerproject. When construction projects get scheduled and proactively managed to that baseline, they are more likely to be profitable. Asta Powerproject makes it easier then ever before to build that schedule, update it, and share information with project partners. All while using the latest, real-time insight to power better decisions and keep your team in control of it all. Asta Powerproject is the choice of more than 100,000 schedulers worldwide because it works the way they do with drag and drop scheduling, customizable templates, resource load planning, multiple views and quick reporting. Productivity boosting features like mobile site-progress updating and 3D BIM model visualizations tap into the power of the latest technology without a heavy learning curve or major expense. Welcome to the future of construction scheduling, today.

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Seeing Y the light How window film can benefit and modernize your building’s exterior By Michael Mancini

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ou can’t see it in most cases, but it’s there, working 24 hours a day helping people in your community live better lives in many ways. We’re talking about window film, which helps provide comfort to building inhabitants by reducing heat and glare, as well as blocking the sun’s harmful UV rays. It also saves money by controlling a building’s energy consumption – keeping heat out in summer months and retaining heat in the winter. Window film offers an added layer of safety by holding together broken glass during a natural disaster or intrusion. It also gives any commercial facility a modern, updated look. Most films are applied to the interior surface of a glass window in a home, school, commercial building or car. There are many different types of window films, each providing unique benefits in safety, comfort and aesthetics.

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SEEING THE LIGHT Take the Ellis Building in Sarasota, Fla., which recently looked to window film to bring their facility into the modern age. The Ellis Building is a 12-story high-rise located in on the West Coast of sunny Florida. The commercial building was considered “ultra-modern” when it was first built back in 1968. But much has changed since then – hairstyles, clothes and, of course, building design. And thanks to a recent boom of modern high-rise construction in the area, the Ellis Building stuck out like a sore thumb. The building’s decision makers knew the Sarasota landmark needed a facelift, the main question was – how and what solution? How do they modernize the building in a cost-effective way while staying true to its architectural integrity?

the design firm hired for renovation. The building owners were just as impressed, and the first major commercial construction project in downtown Sarasota since the 1920s officially had been modernized.

The benefits of window film

For the Ellis Building, the application of window film created a modern, uniform look on all of the windows. And there are many other benefits that window film can add to your project's bottom line:

Aesthetics

Window film is a flexible, adaptable product that can help maintain the unique aesthetic appeal of any commercial building. It doesn’t stand out, but rather effortlessly blends in and enhances the style of the exterior. Many manufacturers also offer decorative films that add a little extra style to interior glass. You often can achieve the look of etched glass at a fraction of the cost with decorative film

Today’s safety films are marketed and thoroughly tested for improving glass performance for safety glazing, intrusion, extreme weather conditions and blast mitigation. UV protection

Window film blocks up to 99 percent of UV rays, and reflects up to 80 percent of the sun’s energy. This was a very important benefit for the Ellis Building property managers, as they wanted to provide comfort to employees working in the building and relief from the hot Florida sun. Blocking UV rays helps reduce glare on computer screens, and protects and prolongs the life of furniture, carpets, artwork, draperies and woodwork. Ellis building before They also had to account for the hot Florida sun when renovating. The initial plans included washing the façade to restore the luster of the marble columns, painting faded and chalky metal window frames, and replacing all windows – all 38,000 square feet of glass. But with that much glass, re-glazing was not a cost-effective option. The team investigated alternative solutions and decided on a scratch-resistant window film from Madico. The decision best met the unique needs of the project and presented numerous benefits. "I think (Madico) has taken 30 years off the age of this building,” says Bryan Lawson, director of construction for Benderson Development,

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Energy savings

Per the International Window Film Association (IWFA), the return on investment is higher for commercial building owners when renovating with window film verses any other method. Up to 30 percent of any building’s cooling and heating load is lost through windows. Installing window film will reduce the stress on a facility’s HVAC system as it’s designed to keep heat out, even during the hottest of summer days. Window films help reduce electricity consumption by over 200,000 kilowatt hours each year, saving thousands of dollars in cooling costs. Over time, window film goes a long way in conserving energy for facilities of all sizes. Many states, including Florida, also offer energy rebates for professionally installed window film.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


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SEEING THE LIGHT Safety and security

Safety and security is an important benefit for commercial buildings with ground floor windows. Glass is an inviting target for vandals intent on mischief or worse. With professionally installed safety and security film, should an intruder attempt to enter through the window, they’ll be delayed. The safety film holds the glass together and prevents it from shattering, delaying the intruder’s entrance, and allowing local authorities to get to the scene in a timely manner. In the event of a natural disaster, window film also limits the amount of dangerous glass shards flying around the area.

Per the International Window Film Association (IWFA), the return on investment is higher for commercial building owners when renovating with window film verses any other method. As with any safety measure, there are limitations to what the product can do. Today’s safety films are marketed and thoroughly tested for improving glass performance for safety glazing, intrusion, extreme weather conditions and blast mitigation. But while films can reduce glass hazards upon initial impact and slow the intrusion process, with repeated impacts they will eventually allow access, as do many anti-intrusion products.

Next steps

Window film is a cost-effective product that can give a commercial building a fresh new look. A professional film installer can assist you in selecting the best film product for your unique building and needs, with a professional installation helping make a lasting impact, benefitting the project for years to come. CCR

Ellis building after

Michael Mancini is the marketing director for Madico Window Films, St. Petersburg, Fla. For more information, visit www.madico.com.

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SUMMER 2017

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Paul Stevens Director of Design and Construction

Robert Pulley, Director of Facilities

The High Life How the Twin Peaks brand is making restaurants fun again

Also Inside: A special supplement to:

A solution that sticks Photography by Jackquelyn Brown


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The High Life How the Twin Peaks brand is making restaurants fun again By Michael J. Pallerino

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scratch kitchen. The ultimate bar experience. Oneof-a-kind happy hours. Late-night fun. Oh, and the food. When you enter a Twin Peaks restaurant,

you're getting everything you want – and much more. Billed as the "ultimate sports lodge," the Twin Peak brand was founded in 2005 in the Dallas suburb of Lewisville. Today, with more than 80 locations in 25 states, the brand continues to amass a serious crowd of followers. With its bevy of HDTVs and “name-your-sport-and-we'll-get-it-on mentality,” 29-degree draft beer, made-to-order menu and the vaunted Twin Peaks Girls, it's a value proposition you cannot afford to miss out on.

After being acquired by La Cima Restaurants LLC, the chain’s largest franchisee, in October 2016, the brand continues to reach down for that something extra in the expansion game. To get a feel for where the brand is heading, Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Paul Stevens, director of Design and Construction.

Give us a snapshot of the Twin Peaks brand?

Twin Peaks is the ultimate sports lodge, where you and your group of friends can

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expect made-from-scratch food, watch sports on the best HDTVs and sound system in the industry and enjoy 29 degree draft beer. You'll also be surrounded by the playful and energetic Twin Peaks Girls, which are there to make your experience special. Picture all of this with a mountain lodge environment as your backdrop. We use heavy wood timbers, antlers, hand carved tables, comfortable seats, fire pits and man caves to complete the experience.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

The ultimate guy’s guy – the sports fan who wants to catch the game, drink freezing cold beer, grab a bite from a great menu and soak up the whole Twin Peaks experience with a group of friends.

As we grow across the country, developing good groups of regional GCs will be really important for our franchisees.

How does the design of your restaurants cater to what today's consumers are looking for?

Our front of house is designed with sports viewing in mind. Seating is mindfully put together so that every guest in the restaurant has multiple views. They never miss a play. The booths are wider, the aisles are larger, and the tables are oversized and communal. This is intentional. It makes groups of people comfortable when they come in for any big game with their friends. Many of our restaurants incorporate patios and outdoor fire pits to take advantage of taking the fun outdoors when weather permits. Who doesn’t love a great patio?

Walk us through how and why it is designed the way it is? Because our business is bar-centric from an energy standpoint, we start with the bar and cascade the TVs out and over from that point in the space. Getting the right size and placement of the bar in the restaurant to maximize energy and views is the critical backbone to our brand. From there, we try to provide multiple seating options via size, height and type. We maximize internal height when we can and insert as many oversized wooden features as we can fit into the building. We want authentic finishes that reflect what every person would want and expect to see in a lodge – stone, rough cut wood and thick live edge table tops.

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Take us through your construction and design strategy.

Many of our restaurants are conversions of previous restaurants. A lot of times in these circumstances, we can get the most bang for our buck with a conversion of an existing restaurant that has good bones to it. When we can be certain we can fit our kitchen and oversized bar into the building and make it not be recognizable as to what it used to be and really make it our own, we go that route. We have also developed ground up restaurants in many markets. The route we take really is dictated by opportunity and economics.


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What's the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

It’s somewhat different between corporate development and franchisees developing their restaurants. Corporately, we have multiple GCs who we bid to that we know can perform. We rarely go outside of who we know. Sometimes, in busy construction markets like we see so much of these days, we find that smaller contractors are chasing the bigger projects. Lower bids can be enticing to try an unknown entity, but it rarely works out without a delay or some unforeseen cost impacts. We will venture out of our comfort zone a little less than our franchisees will for cost savings, but only if we have the manpower to manage in a detailed way.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

Mountain lodges scream “green” in a different kind of way, because we frequently are trying to bring nature inside the building

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Our goal is to always create both an environment and an experience that makes people want to share it with their friends and coworkers.

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with the oversized openings to our patios. We focus on energy efficient systems and LED lighting. By the way, beer poured at near freezing has an incredible yield, so it’s safe to say we have a very low amount of beer waste.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

As we grow across the country, developing good groups of regional GCs will be really important for our franchisees. We will always continue to work on our kitchens and buildings in order to maximize their efficiency and effectiveness. We are starting to roll out a new kitchen engine that promises to reduce our ticket times and heart of house labor, while maintaining or bettering our service and food standards when the food hits our consumers plate. The chance to constantly learn, grow and evolve is one of the biggest opportunities we have as a brand.


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RETAIL | HOSPITALITY | RESTAURANT | C-STORE | GROCERY STORE | MEDICAL | SELF-STORAGE | COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION CIRCLE NO. 62


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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Are you optimistic about what you see today in the marketplace?

Our systems haven’t previously been set up for large scale development. We are in a position now where we have large portions of the country still to develop. Many are great markets with unlimited potential. This requires us to continue to build our staff, our vendors and our consultants up to be able to give ourselves and our franchise partners the ability to build these markets out as efficiently as possible.

There are a lot of really good restauranteurs in play these days. The specialty guys are eating everyone up, because although they only do a few things, they focus on doing them very well. The brands that don’t understand this reality and keep their eye on quality and a superb experience are going to wither and die.

Describe a typical day.

What is the secret to creating a "must visit" shopping environment in today's competitive landscape?

Our goal is to always create both an environment and an experience that makes people want to share it with their friends and coworkers. Our Twin Peaks Girls are the best brand ambassadors in the business.

What is today's consumer looking for?

Today’s consumer focuses on the quality of food and service more so than ever before. Almost everything else is simply window dressing. We attempt to insert as much fun into the equation as we can.

First off is 100 emails, followed up with meetings with operations, facilities, franchisees, vendors, moving on to site visits, diving into plan analysis, budgeting the next thing, developing the coordination of a roll out, ending with conference calls, and repeat.

Tell us what makes your restaurants so unique? Twin Peaks is fun. It’s fun to be at, fun to design, fun to develop and fun to work for as an employee. If you can’t have fun creating mountain lodges filled with HDTVs from every angle and beautiful Twin Peaks Girls who serve the coldest beer and really great food, you honestly aren’t trying hard enough. CK

One-on-One with... » Paul Stevens

Director of Design and Construction Twin Peaks

What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

Making something that is really complicated simpler for someone is what drives my team. If a member of my group can help a franchisee be more successful by developing easier or quicker, that is my reward. If we can build more restaurants because we chose a better site or spent less because of coordination, I am happy. Opening night, when all the hard work that the development and operations team has put in comes together and a restaurant is filled with happy people enjoying themselves is pretty special as well.

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What was the best advice you ever received?

I had a boss tell me years ago that I should overlook small things to find people who are authentic and have character. I have always tried to surround myself with people, vendors and consultants with value systems that align with mine. At the end of the day, you are only as good and as trustworthy as they are.

How do you like to spend your down time?

I like to get my hands dirty in my garden or wet a line fishing. Anything that involves quiet and attention to one thing suits me best in my off time. The constant battery of multiple inputs that is required to be successful in development, design and construction need to be offset after hours or I would lose my sanity.

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$FRA-600_Commercial_ConstRenov_7x9.75_WDA-MayJune2017.indd 1

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A solution F that sticks

ew businesses use as much hot water per square-foot as a restaurant during peak dining times.

Red Robin solves hot water woes with proper sizing and equipment selection

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Between the bar and the kitchen, there can be more than a dozen sinks; some singles, doubles and triples, as well as vegetable washing stations and, of course, a commercial dishwasher and pre-rinse area.


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And as if that’s not enough, many municipalities have food service codes that mandate a minimum water temperature be used for specific cleaning processes. It all adds up to a colossal domestic hot water load. Red Robin restaurants, known nationwide for its gourmet burgers, can use upward of 20 gallons of hot water per minute when running at capacity. Most restaurants are similar; Red Robin locations aren’t unique in the amount of hot water it uses. But the successful chain is unique in the way it has handled its hot water production recently, to the point that it now builds its restaurants around its water heating equipment. Literally. The system on which Red Robin locations nationwide now have standardized serve the facilities almost flawlessly, but that wasn’t always the case. There was a lot of learning involved, a little trial-and-error, and no shortage of retrofit work before they reached a solution that stuck.

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Should a unit come off-line for any reason, whether it be failure or planned service, the hot water system still will be able to cover peak demand.

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Underestimating demand

In 2013, Brian Fenske, specialty channel sales manager at Navien, received a call from Red Robin’s director of facilities, who was painfully aware of the hot water problems the restaurants throughout Oregon and Washington were battling. The year before, he had helped to size a tankless application in Edmonton, Calif., where several Navien tankless units were then used to replace a gas-fired storage-type system. In 2014, Navien’s Northwest regional sales manager, Barry LaDuke, and local Red Robin managers hosted Fenske’s visit to several restaurants throughout the Pacific Northwest. After touring five Red Robin locations in the region, Fenske found that four of the five restaurants were facing problems caused by an undersized hot water system. Each one used the same gas-fired, tankless water heaters. “The biggest problem was that they were using two or three 199 BTUH tankless


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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS units when, in reality, they needed four or five to meet the demand,” Fenske says. “The fifth site had four water heaters, which might have been sufficient if not for some other installation errors.” In nearly every situation, Fenske found that the big dishwashers weren’t equipped with a pressure reducing valve. This not only created pressure drop issues throughout the kitchen, but led to excessive hot water use as well. Fenske explained why the restaurants were experiencing so many problems, and the words resonated. In 2015, several upper-level Red Robin managers visited Navien, in Irvine, Calif., to learn how the use of new NPE tankless water heaters could solve the problems.

Few businesses use as much hot water per square-foot as a restaurant during peak dining times. “After seeing the high-efficiency NPE-240A units in person, and learning about how proper design and installation plays a huge role in system performance, Red Robin made a decision to work with us going forward,” Fenske says. “It planned to convert any problematic installations to Navien units, while standardizing on the NPE-240A for construction of all new restaurants going forward.” Chipman Design, Red Robin’s architect based in Chicago, modified the building design for new restaurants in order to facilitate good access to the robust hot water system.

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A shallow mechanical room is included at the back of the buildings with outdoor access. This not only consolidates all plumbing components (water heaters, softeners, etc.), but provides easy access for service personnel without the need to walk through the kitchen.

Growing with a brand

One of the newest Red Robins is in Lakewood, Colo. It’s so new, in fact, that if you look at W. Colfax Avenue on Google Earth, you’ll only find an empty grass lot where the building now stands. Long before general contractor Catamount Constructors Inc. had broken ground, the building’s blueprint included Fenske’s Navien hot water system design. “All new Red Robins are using either five or six Navien NPE-240A units, piped and plumbed in parallel,” Fenske says. “Based on its anticipated patronage, lower gas BTU contents due to Colorado’s high

All six units at the Lakewood restaurant act as a single system, firing up only as high as needed to perfectly meet current hot water demand. Because the modulating units each provide nearly 200,000 BTUH, the system is able to provide anywhere between 20,000 to 1.2 million BTUH, or roughly .1 to 30 GPM, depending on incoming water temperature and fixture loads.

Installation and service made easy

At 5,500 feet above sea level, Lakewood’s elevation could’ve been cause for concern. Fortunately, setting the Navien units up for Denver’s thinner air is quick and simple. Some gas-fired, condensing appliances require several extra steps during installation, like changing or modifying orifice plates. With the NPE-240A, DIP switches are used to change the air/fuel mixtures and speed of the fan. Another installer-friendly feature of the NPE-240A comes courtesy of Navien’s low input gas pressure requirements. Compared to many units of the same capacity smaller gas piping can be used, saving time, space and money. But the inherent advantages of the NPE-240A aren’t the only thing making life easier for the technicians who install and service the hot water systems at Red Robin locations. The restaurant chain is proactive and refuses to cut corners. In restaurants where four units are needed to provide the entire hot water load, five are installed. Where five are needed, a sixth is added. Using an extra water heater not only ensures that pressure drop will never be an issue, but also provides redundancy. – Brian Fenske, Specialty Channel Sales Manager, Navien Should a unit come off-line for any reason, whether it be failure or planned service, the hot water system still will be elevation and the fact that the Denver area has colder groundwater than able to cover peak demand. many places in the country, it went for the optional sixth unit here.” The NPE-240A is a 199,900 BTUH condensing, wall-hung tankThe right relationships and equipment less water heater that offers a 10-to-one turndown and dual stainless “The feedback we’ve gotten from all the restaurants has been very positive,” Fenske says. “As time goes on and more units steel heat exchangers. It features ComfortFlow technology, which pairs were installed, my involvement has been less and less crucial. a 1/3 gallon buffer tank and internal recirculation pump to provide I think that’s testament to Navien’s ease of use and also to the instantaneous hot water to all fixtures within the building. The unit also talent of the engineers involved.” provides up to three LEED points. In the earlier stages of the Navien’s relationship with Red In applications with a big hot water demand, the NPE models Robin, Fenske worked closely with the restaurant’s MEP engineer, make multi-unit installation simple. As many as 16 units can operate Schnackel Engineers, out of Omaha, Neb., to provide a hard-spec as a single system, while eight units can be common vented so that drawing. From there, the engineer re-draws it and puts it into fewer wall or ceiling penetrations are needed. the blueprints. In existing Red Robin restaurants, where the Navien units are Today, word is spreading through the foodservice industry used as a retrofit solution, the systems are installed in a large closet and Fenske is receiving calls from other restaurant chains. The at the back of kitchen. “The water heaters are installed in two rows, capability of the NPE-240A lends itself perfectly to the large and one above the other,” Fenske says. “Since height isn’t an issue, fluctuating demands of the food service industry, and it hasn’t its able to save a lot of space this way, with room underneath the gone unnoticed. CK bottom row for all piping.”

“The feedback we’ve gotten from all the restaurants has been very positive. I think that’s testament to Navien’s ease of use and also to the talent of the engineers involved.”

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Riding strong

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How an inviting design welcomed new customers to Vegas bike shop By Tiffany Hayden

W

hen longtime bicycle shop owners Mike and Cheri Tillman started to outgrow their retail

space, they knew they wanted to try something unique to stand out from the competition. With at least three bike stores within a five-mile radius, an excellent shopping experience was going to be key in building their business.

The Tillmans moved from their original space in 2016, setting up shop in the Village Square in Las Vegas, located on the corner of W. Sahara and Ft. Apache. The move brought Pro Cyclery closer to many of its customers and gave it more space to serve its die-hard customers. Since 1984, the retailer has been rising to the needs of cyclists in the greater Las Vegas area and surrounding communities. So good at what they do, the Tillmans and their retail team have even gained an international following. That's because the owners, sales staff and mechanics are cycling enthusiasts – some of whom have even competed professionally.

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RIDING STRONG The family-owned shop is dedicated to excellence in customer service – from the point of sale, to maintenance and repair. Ask any of its customers, and they will liken Pro Cyclery to the iconic bar on the old sitcom “Cheers” – when you come in, everybody knows your name. So, when the bike shop decided to make the move, it aimed for a comfortable space, where its loyal customers could spend time together while waiting for repairs and enjoying coffee from the café next door. While hiring a designer to create the ultimate retail space is no new trend, it has been somewhat of an untapped market for bike shops, whose typical layout includes a perimeter of tightly packed bikes with a few retail items near the check out counter. An open layout meant for socializing would create a welcoming and friendly atmosphere, encouraging customers to stay a while and plan their next adventure. The Tillmans enlisted the help of Las Vegas-based, mother-daughter design team, Room Resolutions, to tackle the project. Jane Cunningham, president and CEO, and Amanda Cunningham, design manager, came on board in January 2016 for a whirlwind transformation.

An open layout meant for socializing would create a welcoming and friendly atmosphere, encouraging customers to stay a while and plan their next adventure. So taken by the Tillman's commitment to excellence, they completed the job in less than three months. “This was the first bike shop we had worked on, but we’ve since had several similar retail inquiries,” Jane says. Room Resolutions handles the highend design of Las Vegas’ top residential and commercial spaces. “It’s a growing part of the design industry for sure, with more stores looking to create an experience for everyone – from pro to casual riders,” says Jane, who was brought onto the project last year when Pro Cyclery obtained its new Village Square storefront. Not only does an open, inviting layout make existing customers happy, newcomers were more likely to enter the shop as well.

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Customers who have been shopping with the company for years comment that the new look makes Procyclery feel more like “their” store and a place they want to spend more time.

new products from brands Scott and Yeti. New styles of bicycles and accessories also now can be found in the store. Professional design services at Procyclery were well worth it – the store has seen sales soar since Room Resolutions’ finished the project less than a year ago. Customers who have been shopping with the company for years comment that the new look makes Procyclery feel more like “their” store and a place they want to spend more time. “It was a challenge to complete the project on such a tight timeline, allowing only one day for installation," Amanda Cunningham says. "We were able to give the store a brand new look in time for the store’s grand opening.” With results like this, other bike retailers are taking note and bringing on design teams of their own to bolster sales and gain new customers. CCR Tiffany Hayden is a design writer and public relations supervisor based in Los Angeles. For more information of Room Resolutions, visit www.roomresolutions.com. “Women are the fastest-growing segment in cycling, and we wanted a store that was welcoming and attractive for women shoppers while still being an authentic bike shop,” Cheri Tillman says. “We knew we needed to better merchandise our clothing and accessories, and make the store more inviting to foot traffic in the busy shopping center.”

A part of the retail family

Village Square has other establishments for the active community, with yoga studios, a smoothie shop and Orange Theory Fitness. The design is simple, allowing the merchandise to speak for itself through improved display methods. Stained concrete floors, brick accent walls, reclaimed wooden shelves and homey accents set a casual tone upon entering the store. A wall of windows lets in more natural light and allows pedestrians a view of what’s inside. New stainless steel display walls house the store’s helmet and shoe lines. The open concept repair shop encourages conversation between the employees and the customers they’ve come to know on a first name basis. The larger 4,200 square foot space allowed Procyclery to expand its offering, with

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CIRCLE NO. 68

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Wind strong Tornado season underscores importance of reinforced masonry wall systems By Dawn Henning

A

lthough peak tornado season typically occurs April through June, violent outbursts struck early this year and featured one of the largest tornado events to

ever occur in winter. The Jan. 21-23 spate of storms produced 79 confirmed tornadoes across the Deep South, from Texas to South Carolina, resulting in the second-deadliest January outbreak on record. 156

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According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the U.S. averages more than 1,000 tornadoes per year, more than any other country. Annual insurance losses from U.S. tornadoes and thunderstorms range in the billions, with the costliest event occurring in Tuscaloosa, Ala., and nearby areas in April 2011, resulting in $7.8 billion in insured damages. While events of this magnitude account for only a small percentage of the total number of tornadoes that occur in the


The Jan. 21-23 spate of storms produced 79 confirmed tornadoes across the Deep South, from Texas to South Carolina, resulting in the second-deadliest January outbreak on record.

United States, the Tuscaloosa event, along with the tornado that struck Joplin, Mo., a month later, initiated an ongoing review of building standards and closer scrutiny of materials used in new construction. It was determined that while older homes are susceptible to tornado damage, improved building standards can help save many new structures from destruction, and thereby save lives, during future tornado activity. In addition, since 2011, further studies of a tornado’s path has indicated that greater damage occurs at the center of a tornado, with far less severe damage being inflicted on structures located near the edge. Even in the event of a rare EF-5 tornado, the greatest damage is limited to a narrow path, and most structures don’t experience a tornado’s highest wind speeds. All of this is good news since the majority of U.S. tornadoes are EF-2-level storms or lower. Improved building practices for tornado-resilient structures include correct construction for load transfer, along with proper

connections between the roof, walls and foundation to create a continuous load path and decrease wind force vulnerability. In addition, strengthening openings such as windows and doors, including garage doors, reduces the potential for pressurization, which can occur inside a building when these openings are compromised by wind damage, resulting in significant damage to – and even total destruction of – a building. Reinforced masonry that is adequately connected to other building components can withstand high wind loads – and also offers greater protection against wind-blown debris, which can penetrate a building’s cladding and leave the structure at greater risk for internal pressurization.

Protecting the house

According to the Brick Industry Association, testing performed at the Wind Science and Research Center at Texas Tech University concluded that brick structures offer a much higher degree of protection from wind-blown debris than buildings constructed with other forms of cladding.

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WIND STRONG

Products from manufacturers such as General Shale are designed to withstand stronger winds even better than standard masonry materials. For example, General Shale's Endurance RS4™ Structural Brick offers an advantage when compared to traditional brick products. The material is designed to bear higher loads, meet seismic requirements, and offer greater resistance, which is reassuring for builders and homeowners in areas susceptible to high winds and tornadic events. Structural brick eliminates the need for load-bearing wood or steel framing and has excellent thermal mass properties. Suitable for any type of foundation, it is designed for homes in areas prone to high winds, tornadoes and earthquakes, or for important commercial or government buildings, such as hospitals, schools, courthouses and police stations. Larger engineering and utility-size bricks have been used for reinforced masonry applications for many years. Since it is larger than traditional brick, it can be installed with minimal labor and overall cost

adjustments, which are key benefits for builders, architects and contractors, who need easy-to-install, efficient and cost-effective building solutions. Endurance wall systems also can be used in conjunction with any type of interior wall construction (e.g., furring strips, non-load-bearing metal studs, hat channel, etc.) and insulation systems. The use of continuous rigid insulation, which reduces thermal bridging, is one of the most efficient methods of construction, both in terms of costs and energy savings. The combination of structural brick and continuous insulation helps to dramatically increase a building’s energy efficiency, which can lower a structure’s Home Energy Rating System score. It offers appropriate reinforcement between the wall system and roof, and creates a safer, stronger and more durable structure, all of which provides greater peace of mind for business owners who work in areas at higher risk for significant weather events. CCR

Since 2011, further studies of a tornado’s path has indicated that greater damage occurs at the center of a tornado, with far less severe damage being inflicted on structures located near the edge.

Industry expert Dawn Henning has served as General Shale’s Director of Marketing since 2011. Headquartered in Johnson City, Tenn., General Shale is the North American subsidiary of Wienerberger AG and a leading manufacturer of brick. For more information, visit www.generalshale.com.

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SUMMER 2017

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Safeguarding Virginia Generating resilient energy to help protect those charged with protecting the state

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Safeguarding

Virginia Generating resilient energy to help protect those charged with protecting the state By Tammy Fulop

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T

he Virginia Department of Military Affairs (DMA) has a

critical role in safeguarding the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its mission is to save lives, protect people and property, ensure safety and relieve suffering.

A crucial aspect of its success is maintaining operational readiness, which means keeping armories and training centers open at all times and prepared to operate as shelters and emergency operation centers during unforeseen circumstances such as natural disasters, severe weather and states of emergency. But the DMA, like many federal and government agencies, is hampered by aging infrastructure that does not allow for the state of readiness needed for a military organization. One of its key modernization priorities around mission assurance was devising a plan for energy resiliency in order to have a consistent and reliable supply of electricity at all times. In addition, the DMA also is committed to energy efficiency and minimizing the environmental impact of its facilities and operations. But achieving these goals has been challenging in the face of constrained federal and state budgets. In Virginia, state and federal funding has not been easily allocated to infrastructure upgrades, creating a significant backlog of deferred maintenance projects. Despite this challenge, becoming energy efficient and resilient has been a priority for the DMA since 2011. To date, DMA has invested more than $42 million in energy efficiency and renewable energy, with the overall goal of becoming a net zero energy organization by 2030. To help achieve its goals, it partnered with Schneider Electric to develop a Net Zero Energy Master Plan to ensure energy security, improve energy efficiency and, ultimately, better prepare the DMA to protect the Commonwealth of Virginia. The scope

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of work includes installing new technology, analyzing energy spend, procuring renewable energy and upgrading infrastructure. In addition to helping the DMA advance its net zero objective, the plan also will save more than $52 million in total energy costs over the next 25 years.

Funding through Energy Savings Performance Contracts

One of the ways the DMA is able to fund energy and infrastructure upgrade projects is through the use of energy savings performance contracts (ESPC). With ESPCs, organizations develop comprehensive plans to outline the overall energy savings that can be achieved through infrastructure upgrades. Organizations then can use these plans to secure third-party financing for projects from an energy service company (ESCO), which is paid back over time through guaranteed energy savings that will cover the cost of a project. These contracts allow organizations to make necessary infrastructure upgrades, while investing little to no upfront capital.

existing energy sources with backup generation for instances of power failure. Once the Fort Pickett project plan with identified savings totaling $3.1 million was finalized, the Virginia National Guard was able to secure enough state and federal funding to pay for the entire project. In the first phase of the project, Fort Pickett and Schneider Electric implemented two solar photovoltaic (PV) installations at the Regional Training Institute, covering a 10,000-square-yard solar field and consisting of nearly 2,000 individual solar panels. In addition, the project involved the installation of a 150 kilowatt carport solar PV array on the north side of Fort Pickett’s main administrative building. Together, the solar arrays generate nearly 650 kilowatts of energy and support Fort Pickett’s mission to create a more resilient energy supply. In addition to providing supplemental energy, the organization implemented energy efficiency improvements at various buildings to reduce energy demand. Fort Pickett installed a solar vehicle charging station for greater energy efficiency and carport lighting to increase visibility. In addition, the base now has a dedicated weather station to better prepare for natural weather events that may impact the training center’s operations. The current grid arrangement at Fort Pickett along with energy efficiency initiatives saves the training center more than $130,000 in annual energy costs. There are environmental benefits to this project as well, aligning with the DMA’s goals to minimize environmental impact. The power generated from this project reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 168 eTons and is the first step toward the DMA’s mission to become net zero by 2030. To reach that goal, Fort Pickett intends to install six additional PV array systems. But the plans for reduced resource use don’t stop there. Fort Pickett is working toward zero net waste and is planning to install a biomass power generation plant onsite in a future phase of improvements. When it comes to protecting the residents and Commonwealth of Virginia, the DMA is working to be prepared in any situation. A big part of that mission is establishing a resilient energy supply that allows the DMA to have access to energy under any threat, natural or manmade. With continued work on sites like Fort Pickett and others throughout Virginia, the DMA will not only become a net zero energy organization, but will also ensure its ability to protect and serve the people. Government entities should look to the Virginia DMA as an example of what it means to secure operations through energy resiliency. FC

To date, DMA has invested more than $42 million in energy efficiency and renewable energy, with the overall goal of becoming a net zero energy organization by 2030. One of the greatest challenges to obtaining ESPCs for a federal or state agencies is working with the leadership to understand the benefit of this energy efficiency model. The concern with fluctuating federal and state budgets is that an organization will not have the ability to pay a previously established debt. But with an ESPC, energy savings are guaranteed by the ESCO, and therefore utility expenses that would have been paid simply are redirected to service the debt. ESPCs give government agencies a great opportunity to reinvest energy savings into projects that deliver both energy efficiency and independence to government organizations. In total, the DMA has achieved over 30 percent energy savings in projects where it has implemented energy maintenance through ESPCs.

Fort Pickett’s Renewable Energy Project

One of the initial projects in the DMA’s Net Zero Energy Master Plan was at the Virginia National Guard’s Fort Pickett Maneuver Training Center in Blackstone, Va. Fort Pickett faced the challenges of aging infrastructure and a need to increase energy security, supplementing

Tammy Fulop is VP of Energy and Sustainability Services at Schneider Electric. With 18 years in the industry, Fulop has led her team to successfully implement over 625 ESPC projects across the nation with total savings of more than $1.6 billion over the life of contracts.

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CSB’s BOLLARD EXPERTS WORK WITH ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE DESIGN PROCESS

CALPIPEBOLLARDS.COM • (877) 283-8518 PROUDLY MADE IN AMERICA CIRCLE NO. 69


All eyes available Tracking the reconstruction of the Tempe Town Lake Dam By Ken Pittman

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T

he Tempe Town Lake dam, a state-of-the-art steel dam consisting of seven gates, each 106 feet long, 17 feet tall and weighing 260,000 pounds, has spurred its share of emotions on the surrounding community. The reservoir occupies a portion of the dry riverbed of the Salt River as it passes through the city of Tempe, Ariz., just north of Tempe Butte. The dams are made up of three main elements, including strong, flexible, rubber coated fabric tube, which is fixed securely to a concrete base slab by clamping bars and anchor bolts, an operating system which controls inflation and deflation of the tube, and an automatic safety device which ensures tube deflation in flood situations.


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On the plus side, the lake is stocked with rainbow trout on a monthly basis from November to February. Other species found inhabiting the water include largemouth bass, yellow bass, tilapia, carp, channel catfish and bluegill. Another benefit to the surrounding community is Tempe Beach Park. Originally built in 1931, it was completely renovated in 1999 as part of the construction of Town Lake. The park connects to the five miles of paths for bicycling, jogging or in-line skating that circle Town Lake. When residents see the lake and dam, they see a part of themselves. Everything changed on July 20, 2010. Around 9:45 p.m., one of the aging black rubber bladders on the west end of the man-made Tempe Town Lake gave way to the Valley’s summer heat, according to a report by consulting firm SEA Ltd. The dam burst drained an estimated 1 billion gallons from the Salt River reservoir, shocking city officials and residents. When the sun rose the next morning, it cast a gloomy light on the community – a muddy lot that exposed sunken trash and other lost items. There were even fish splashing in the remaining puddles. The good news was that the major infrastructure failure didn’t cause any injuries.

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Thanks in part to TrueLook cameras facilitating efficient and accurate project tracking, the dam now is the largest hydraulically-operated crest gate dam system in the country.

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • ALL EYES AVAILABLE

And so the cleanup and reconstruction began. Now, think of the oversight necessary to ensure safety, security and efficiency during construction. Accomplishing this feat would take constant vigilance. This was the challenge PCL Construction, the general contractor on the project, faced as the firm evaluated the massive project of replacing an inflatable rubber dam system at the west end of Tempe Town Lake with the new, hydraulically-operated crest gate dam. Tempe-based PCL Construction is one of the largest contracting organizations in North America with an annual construction volume of more than $8 billion. But despite the firm’s size, taking on such an immense project meant planning for a variety of potential problems that might slow construction. Effective project tracking was essential. Some potential issues to prepare for included: • Weather events – Tempe weather is volatile, especially during monsoon season, and, bad weather was sure to cause delays and interfere with scheduling. • Equipment loss – Spillover from the existing dam threatened the construction project and jobsite equipment. Losses would be expensive and potentially put the project over-budget. Ultimately, the firm decided to use TrueLook construction cameras to help them track project progress, and stay on schedule and budget.

The solution at hand

TrueLook cameras were used to track project progress from start to finish. “We used the TrueLook cameras to document when storms began and ended, which enabled us to track weather-related delays to our schedule,” says Adam Gordon, Special Projects Manager, PCL. PCL’s project managers also used the cameras to watch for spillover from the existing dam, so they could pull out equipment on time and prevent capital losses. Footage of weather changes also informed the team of when they’d need to bring in pumps to dewater the work area.

The end results

In addition to alleviating these primary concerns, TrueLook camera provided PCL with a number of other benefits: • Time-lapse photography provided a documented visual history throughout all phases of the project • Security recordings helped protect equipment and materials by deterring violations and after-hours security incidents • Cameras captured progress throughout the project to keep stakeholders current on the construction status and enable the project manager to fine-tune schedules • Enabled continuous vigilance to motivate workers to be productive and follow procedures “TrueLook camera footage can also be used to help PCL satisfy audit requirements from various regulatory agencies, such as the Arizona Department of Water Quality, the Army Corps of Engineers, FEMA and the Flood Control District of Maricopa County,” Gordon says. Thanks in part to TrueLook cameras facilitating efficient and accurate project tracking, the dam now is the largest hydraulically-operated crest gate dam system in the country. The steel gate system will provide flood control to make Tempe safer and enable future development. It also will transform a previously dry riverbed into a beautiful, relaxing community gathering place. TrueLook solutions have been used to enhance project management in a number of construction projects. FC

Ken Pittman is the CMO of TrueLook, which specializes in construction cameras used for remote jobsite monitoring, project time-lapsing, and security video recording. For more information, visit www.truelook.com.

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Commercial

MAY/JUNE, 2017 • VOLUME 3 • ISSUE 1

A McINTOSH GROUP PUBLICATION

Clearing apath Addressing experiential access

INSIDE: ‘Inside, we’re all the same’

How the ‘Ms. Wheelchair Oklahoma’ impacted one accessibility team member

ADA Q&A

If You Have Questions, We Have Answers

Spotlight on...

4 Steps to accessibility


PUBLISHER LETTER

Building the trust factor Dear Reader,

Today it’s easy to call yourself an “expert” on anything if you start a website and produce blog posts. Online self-publishing has great benefits, but it also makes it difficult for readers to filter the credible from the misinformed. We’ve been approached by many retailers looking to re-do their Accessibility Programs because they trusted a company that was not able to deliver. We hope when hiring an ADA consultant, you consider the following:

Brad Gaskins, AIA, NCARB, CASp

1. Are they qualified? Do the consultants have a construction, architecture/engineering background? Have they been certified by the ICC to perform ADA surveys? Were they trained by ADA experts in the field? 2. Do they outsource any work to consultants? Make sure what you see is what you get. 3. How do they develop their checklist? You’re looking for an extensive, comprehensive checklist that’s based on the “2010 Standards for Accessible Design.” 4. Do they understand that the ADA is a civil rights law, not a building code? Indirect consequences matter. The ADA begins with, “No individual shall be discriminated against on the basis of disability…” You need someone who is able to read between the lines, not just follow a building code.

In the meantime, even if you don’t currently have an ADA program, I hope this publication helps you learn some common concerns about the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and shows you tangible ways to make your facility more accessible for all your customers.

5. Are they a full-service architecture firm? A full-service firm can provide construction documents for your general contractor to make the fix, and then go back and certify the barrier removal and ADA compliance.

Sincerely, Brad Gaskins, AIA, NCARB, CASp Principal at The McIntosh Group

Publisher

The McIntosh Group, LLC

Editor Allison Broyles

Managing Editor

Michael J. Pallerino

Art Direction

Brent Cashman

CONTENTS ISSUE 1, 2017 pg 172

How the ‘Ms. Wheelchair Oklahoma’ impacted one accessibility team member

Editorial & Design by: F&J Publishing 678-765-6550

‘Inside, we’re all the same’

pg 173

Get in the know Five practical tips on the ADA

Commercial Transformations is published by The McIntosh Group, copyright 2017 All rights reserved For more information, contact Karen MacCannell KarenM@McIntoshTransforms.com 918-585-8555 www.mcintoshtransforms.com

pg 178

Clearing a path Addressing experiential access

pg 182

AskBrad If you have questions, we have answers. AskBrad is an ADA Q&A designed to be your resource for Title III ADA questions.

pg 183

Accessibility Spotlight: 4 steps to accessibility

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TRANSFORMATIONAL PEOPLE

'Inside, we're all the same' How the 'Ms. Wheelchair Oklahoma' impacted one accessibility team member Sometimes, getting an up close and personal look at the work you work so passionately and diligently to perfect can make all the difference. Bhree Barrett can attest to that. Earlier this year, the accessibility surveyor at The McIntosh Group was invited to judge the "Ms. Wheelchair Oklahoma" contest in Tulsa, Okla. (held at The Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges).

It was there that Bhree had the opportunity to see first hand how this exceptional group of women are embracing their challenges and serving as ambassadors for the cause. The “Ms. Wheelchair Oklahoma” competition is based on an individual’s advocacy,

achievement, communication and presentation. The selected representative must be able to communicate both the needs and the accomplishments of her constituency to the general public, the business community and the legislature.” The competition enabled her to garner a greater appreciation for the work she does. Bhree travels the nation surveying for ADA

“This pageant was very impactful for me,” Bhree says. “There is so much we [able-bodied people] take for granted, and this event put a lot of different things in perspective for me." – Bhree Barrett, CASp compliance and identifying barriers to accessibility so that business and municipalities can be more accommodating to individuals with disabilities. “This pageant was very impactful for me,” Bhree says. “There is so much we [able-bodied people] take for granted, and this event put a lot of different things in perspective for me. I love marshmallow peeps – and as the saying goes, ’Inside we’re all the same.’

For more information on the “Ms. Wheelchair Oklahoma” event, visit www.mswheelchairamerica.org.

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Get in the know

In the fast-moving world of retail and facilities management, compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) can seem like a wild goose chase. And who has time for that, right? But with our population’s increasing accessibility needs and a significant rise in ADA lawsuits, it’s an issue you can’t afford to ignore. Based on information we’ve uncovered in the field, here are five simple tips that can help you address some common accessibility concerns:

Five practical tips on the ADA By Brad Gaskins

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GET IN THE KNOW

No. 1

Check your doors

Interior ADA compliant doors cannot take more than 5 pounds of force to open, but many people don’t realize this alters naturally when the weather changes. The grease viscosity changes the speed of the door opening and the power required to open it. We recommend checking this at least quarterly.

No. 2

Maintain your Accessible toilet rooms

Just because it's marked as “Accessible” does not mean it's actually ADA compliant. Often, someone will buy an “Accessible Restroom” sign and stick it to the wall or door. When these are not actually ADA compliant rooms, the experience can be very frustrating to someone in need of an accessible restroom. Simple things to check for are: • Door maneuvering clearance blocked by trash can – As long as the door opens 90 degrees, you can keep a trash can behind the door. But remember to use caution when you move it anywhere else around the door. You could be limiting the maneuvering space for someone in a wheelchair. (Refer to Section 603.2.3 and 404 of the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.) • Turn radius too small – When you enter the accessible toilet stall, is there room for a wheelchair to turn around? You can measure to make sure there is a clear space 60 inches in diameter or a T-shaped turn space within the toilet room. (Figure 304.3.2) • Dispensers installed incorrectly – Often, when you buy in bulk from a paper company, they'll provide you with new dispensers. When the new dispensers are installed, you must make sure they're still ADA compliant. Usually, they're not installed within one of the required reach heights. (Section 604.9.6, 308.2 and 308.3)

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If an able-bodied person can experience something in your facility, you should make sure a person with a disability can have a similar experience in as independent a manner as possible.

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GET IN THE KNOW

• Signage placed incorrectly – There are rules as to where to put the sign so that's it easy to identify for individuals with disabilities such as vision impairment. The general rule of thumb is that the sign should be placed alongside the door at the latch side. If the door swings in, you can place the sign on the push side of the door. (Figure 703.4.2). When it comes to toilet rooms, the ADA has a lot to say. Please see additional requirements for Toilet Rooms in Section 603 of the "2010 ADA Standards."

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Just because it’s marked as “Accessible” does not mean it’s actually ADA compliant.

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No. 3

Schedule barrier removals with your remodels

The law requires that facilities have an accessibility plan, even if they aren’t currently fully compliant. To make these accessibility updates in a way that makes financial sense for your business, schedule accessibility updates as part of your already planned remodels.

No. 4

Assess your risk Prioritizing your barrier removals will help you


understand what you need to plan for. Certain elements have more of a lawsuit risk than others – particularly accessible parking. Make sure your parking lots and accessible parking spaces won’t make you a target. (Section 208).

No. 5

Train your staff

Facilities can go from compliant to non-compliant quickly when the staff inside doesn’t understand why things are placed where they are. Help them understand that you don’t move trash cans to block the opening

swing of doors, and always keep accessible signs visible. The ADA can be difficult to understand because of the many interpretations and phrasings that seem unclear. To make matters worse, you can think you are in “compliance” with the Standards, but still be in violation because you did not understand the intent of the law. Our recommendation is to always use this rule of thumb: If an individual without a disability can do it in your facility, you must make sure a person with a disability can have a similar experience in as independent a manner as possible.

Brad Gaskins, AIA, CASp is a partner at The McIntosh Group and a leading expert on accessibility and Title III ADA Standards. He also is a continuing education provider and regularly leads presentations, seminars and webinars for professional groups regarding accessibility nationwide.

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Clearing a path Addressing experiential access By Jack McMahan

One in five Americans has a functional impairment that substantially limits a major life activity. Furthermore, one in seven American families is affected by a family member with a disability. Consequently, more than 21 years after the implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), we're seeing Americans traveling with higher expectations regarding the level of accessibility to cultural venues, workplaces, restaurants, hotels, parks, museums, and other major tourism attractions. This expectation rises greatly when the facility and program opportunities are newly constructed, designed and developed.

Architectural Barrier Removal – The Bedrock of ADA

Going places, doing things and having fun and specific. with family and friends.

In general, there are two types of access: physical access and program access. Physical access is what most people think of first. It encompasses access to buildings, structures and the environment. Physical access typically refers to things that are more concrete – things that are tangible, measurable.

Program Access Just as Important Program access addresses access to goods, services or activities; usually the reasons why we go places, or how we enjoy experiences offered. Programs occur in office buildings (atriums, eating areas, auditoriums, etc.), museums, theaters, libraries, restaurants, stadiums, recreation facilities, parks, schools, courtrooms, bankers, and many other facilities. Program access is an abstract concept. It refers to the way we participate in life, typically through our senses (touch, taste, sight, touch and sound). Programs can include exhibits, displays, views, fountains, complex

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CLEARING A PATH signage, building directories, facility lighting (“ambience”, if it's essential to the experience), and so much more. Title II of the U.S. Department of Justice regulations for Title II requires that: a public entity shall operate each service, program, or activity so that the service, program, or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities." This is known as the program access standard. Title II requires that qualified individuals with disabilities must also be provided an "equal opportunity to participate in" and "enjoy the benefits of " programs, services and activities.

Program access is an abstract concept. It refers to the way we participate in life, typically through our senses (touch, taste, sight, touch and sound). Title III does not have as specific a program access standard for places of public accommodations. Instead, it specifies that "goods and services" provided by a public accommodation must be "readily accessible and usable" to people with disabilities. The phrase, “useable to people” provides the similarity with program access requirements of Title II. The wording in both Title II and Title III deliberately is subjective about how we build and deliver programmatic access.

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Key points to remember • References to Program Access will not be found in the “2010 Standards for Accessible Design.” Instead, those standards are identified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 28 Part 35 (Public Entities) or CFR 28 Part 36 (Places of Public Accommodations). Unlike physical access where guidelines to identify and remedy architectural barrier deficiencies are clearly specified, no such guidelines exist for Title II or Title III. That doesn't mean that programmatic access is not required; it is. An overarching obligation of ADA is barrier removal. Like my colleague, Brad Gaskins, advises, "If an able-bodied person can do it (get into it, through it, participate in it or enjoy it), it usually needs to be made accessible." • If an element (exhibit, display, sign, play area, map/diagram, building directory, performance/entertainment, etc.) is core to the intended visitor experience (i.e. emotion, education, discovery, entertainment, etc.), it's likely a "program or service," and should be made accessible. • "Barrier Removal" isn't just for wheelchairs. A guiding principle of ADA is inclusion; recognizing the needs of all people with mobility, sensory (low-vision, blind, limited hearing, deafness, etc.) and/or cognitive (i.e., autism, traumatic brain injury, etc.) disabilities. • Programs, activities and services must be made accessible whether the building is accessible or not. • Making programs accessible can mean providing a physical solution. For example, building a ramp to get on to a stage might make programs accessible.

Jack McMahan is president of Crossing the Chasm LLC, an accessibility management consulting company. As a person with a disability, Jack travels the country to teach about the experiential side of accessibility, helping clients evaluate, build and adapt highly accessible solutions. He specializes in improving spaces with sensory experiences, recreation areas and exhibit accessibility. Some of his projects include the American Indian Culture Center, the Martin Park Nature Center, Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation Hospital, ASA Softball Hall of Fame Museum and Stadium Complex in Oklahoma City, and the Central Christian Camp in Guthrie, Okla.

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ADA Q&A

What percentage of U.S. businesses are compliant with the ADA? Further, what are some of the major common violations that cause issues? – Chase B. My guess would be around .01 percent. There is not a single building that The McIntosh Group has surveyed that has not had some sort of violation. Some of our clients are among the best in the nation, although, their buildings have only become compliant after our surveys and making adjustments.

If the handrail on the side of the toilet is 30 inches in lieu of 42 caused by a door location conflict, what process can we use to modify the ADA dimensional requirements? Is there a waiver of such a minor dimensional oversight? – Connie M. There is no provision for a waiver of the ADA Standards. It is a civil rights law and one cannot discriminate. The only option is to relocate the door.

Can you elaborate on examples of when ADA compliance isn’t required? – Zack R. As a civil rights law, ADA compliance is always required, but there are two reasons that barrier removal does not have to take place. These are when the barrier removals are “Technically Infeasible” and “Not Readily Achievable.” • Technically infeasible has little likelihood of being accomplished (i.e., existing physical/ site constraints that prohibit compliance). • Readily achievable is easily accomplishable and able to be carried out without much difficulty or expense. Even though these sound simple, the determination actually is very complex and depends on many factors. If the barrier is “technically infeasible” or “not readily achievable” to remove, then

it does not have to be removed. But that does not excuse one from not providing access in some other manner. As far as in parking lots, you do have a barrier removal obligation, regardless of whether you repave. The trigger for removal of a barrier is simply that the barrier exists. You should absolutely make sure the lot is compliant.

Do state ADA guidelines act as a companion document or extension to the national guidelines? – Paul A. There are no state ADA guidelines. There are building codes such as the ANSI A117.1, CBC Chapter 11, Florida Accessibility Standards, and Texas Accessibility Standards that must be complied with as part of the construction process. For example, California and Massachusetts, also have a state civil rights law that mimics and in some instances exceeds the ADA. The requirement would be that the most stringent requirement of the ADA Standards, the state standards or local building code would need to be complied with.

Must a complaint must be filed by someone in order for the Department of Justice to investigate an ADA violation? – Andrew A. No. A complaint is not required for the DOJ to take action. The DOJ can take action at any time on its own authority.

If you have questions, we have answers. AskBrad is an ADA Q&A designed to be your resource for Title III ADA questions. To submit a question, visit us at www.mcintoshtransforms.com/ask-brad. Brad Gaskins, AIA, CASp is a partner at The McIntosh Group and a leading expert on accessibility and Title III ADA Standards. He also is a continuing education provider and regularly leads presentations, seminars and webinars for professional groups regarding accessibility nationwide.

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Disclaimer: “AskBrad” is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It is provided with the understanding that Brad is not an attorney and is not engaged in rendering legal or other professional services. Additionally, the ADA is subject to interpretation of the courts and the Department of Justice. If legal advice or other expert professional assistance is required, you must seek competent legal and professional advice.

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ACCESSIBILITY SPOTLIGHT

4 steps to accessibility Trying to meet all the requirements in the 2010 ADA Standards can be convoluted and confusing. Because of the vagueness in some of the wording, business owners often are left guessing at the interpretation. Add in the cost to remove barriers and it can seem insurmountable. While it can be overwhelming, accessibility can be reached. The key is being proactive with scheduling and planning. Barriers don't all have to be removed tomorrow. But you have to know what your barriers are and have a plan for how to remove them on your own schedule. That way, you’ll get to spend your money the way you want to spend it – not the way a defendant and the Department of Justice will require if you're hit with a lawsuit. For example, we had a client who had 500-plus locations across the nation get a complaint about two parking spaces at one of their locations. When the Department of Justice came knocking on their door, they were forced to bring all of their facilities into 100 percent compliance within a three-year period. Because they were forced to be reactive, they spent a lot of money bringing everything into compliance in the short timeframe the

government required, rather than getting to plan and budget for themselves.  e strongly recommend businesses be proactive W about ADA compliance. It’s really pretty simple if you follow the following four steps with a licensed architect specializing in the ADA:

Accessibility Compliance Process 1. 2. 3. Survey

Access Plan

Solution Set

4. Construction

Verify

1. Survey facilities in logical batches in order to discover the issues. 2. Determine how to solve the issues and prepare an Access Plan to help manage the program within your schedule and budget. 3. Implement the design solutions according the Access Plan. 4. Verify that the solutions were implemented correctly. If you just take one step at a time and make consistent efforts to follow your plan, you'll achieve compliance. Not only will this greatly decrease your chance of litigation, but you'll find your customer base will grow. Accessible design serves all customers better. Friends and family of individuals with disabilities will be loyal to your business. Others will notice it feels more open and comfortable to be in your facility. This program takes time, but it's worth the effort. Just stick with it. You can do it.

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Let’s keep things simple.

Your Business:

Banking

Hospitality

Restaurant

Retail

Your Needs:

Approach

Accessibility

Architecture

Feel free to mix and match.

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Rising up

The fast track to rebuilding Atlanta’s I-85 bridge By Chandler McCormack

O

n March 30, the nation breathed a collective sigh of relief when no deaths or injuries were reported in the rush-hour fire and subsequent collapse of the Atlanta I-85 bridge. The quarter-million vehicles that use the corridor daily would have to be absorbed by other already-congested routes, creating a challenging scenario for commuters and businesses throughout the metro area.

In a city that ranks eighth in the nation for traffic congestion, the question on everyone’s mind was, “How long will the corridor be closed?” The Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) estimated that the rebuild would take at least several months. The fire caused extensive damage in both directions, collapsing 100 feet of the northbound lanes. Seven hundred feet of elevated highway would have to be demolished and rebuilt. The bridge reconstruction would be no small undertaking, and for Atlanta it seemed the road ahead was going to be long and slow.

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RISING UP After the Smoke Had Cleared

Over the next few days, the outlook began to brighten. D.H. Griffin Wrecking was already onsite for demolition. C.W. Matthews, the contractor selected for the rebuild, was collaborating with GDOT’s engineers and vendors to identify ways to expedite the project. On April 5, GDOT announced a June 15 completion date, with financial incentives to finish even earlier.

Taking an Alternate Route

For the public, alternate routes meant major slowdowns. For the rebuild, it meant moving full-steam ahead. Instead of following the original bridge design, GDOT engineers came up with a redesign

“The local support was unbelievable, from businesses feeding the crews to people just thanking us for working so hard to get life back to normal.” – Adam Grist, VP of Structures, C.W. Matthews

that made a 10-week completion realistic, including using a different beam type, retrofitting salvageable columns and using an accelerated concrete mix. Had the original bridge design from 1984 been followed, the time for beam fabrication alone would have significantly slowed progress. Retrofitting salvageable columns, which entailed cutting them several feet below the caps, removing the old concrete cover material, and building new columns around the existing steel, further streamlined the effort. Using a concrete mix with 24-hour strength development enabled each phase of construction to proceed at a much faster pace.

Every Second Counts

Dan Garcia, President of C.W. Matthews Contracting Co.

Adam Grist, Vice President – Structures of C.W. Matthews Contracting, Co.

Within a half-hour after the bridge collapsed, GDOT and C.W. Matthews were in communication. Over the next few days, the contractor was right alongside GDOT engineers, providing input on the redesign from a construction perspective. “We’d look for any issues that could be detrimental to the schedule and address them,” says Adam Grist, VP of structures. “The criteria were that it had to work from a design standpoint and be able to be built as quickly as possible.” As the redesign came together, C.W. Matthews immediately lined up its resources and ordered supplies, getting firm commitments from vendors to meet expedited schedules. “All our suppliers were able to meet or beat the schedule,” Grist says. “And the concrete plant was flexible enough to get us what we needed whenever we needed it. We never waited on concrete.”

24/7 Construction and Public Outreach

As the week following the collapse came to a close, all heavy demolition was complete and 13 million pounds of rubble were hauled away. Construction was beginning, and the public would have virtual access to the jobsite through two construction cameras. The Georgia Department of Transportation contracted OxBlue for all of the project’s construction camera service needs. The cameras on the jobsite provided still images, time-lapse video,

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


ANYWHERE, ANYTIME, AND FROM ANY DEVICE A construction camera provides powerful photography, high-definition time-lapse movies, and intuitive tools to let you monitor progress and manage projects -- even when you’re not there. It’s easy because everything comes in one complete package.

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• Increase efficiency

• Increase client transparency

• Reduce travel costs

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• Improve communications • Enhance project management

• Produce time-lapse movies for marketing and public relations

CONSTRUCTION CAMERAS CIRCLE NO. 72

Visit OxBlue.com to see live demos and time-lapse videos. For a quote, call us at (888) 849-2583.


RISING UP and live-streamed footage available via desktop computer or mobile device. Watching progress via the construction cameras assisted stakeholders with project management, documentation and communication efforts. “The cameras allowed the public to see we truly did everything possible to get this project finished,” Grist says. “The local support was unbelievable, from businesses feeding the crews to people just thanking us for working so hard to get life back to normal.”

Getting It Done in Six Weeks

Had the original bridge design from 1984 been followed, the time for beam fabrication alone would have significantly slowed progress.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017

C.W. Matthews finished the I-85 rebuild one month ahead of schedule, completing the reconstruction in an impressive six weeks. Crews and inspectors worked around the clock to keep the project moving forward. “Everyone understood the extent of the situation and really stepped up,” says day superintendent Steve Aponik. “No one asked, ‘How long will we be here?’ or ‘How many hours are we working today?’ The crews did everything that was asked of them and did a real fine job of it.”


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RISING UP

Aponik says the construction cameras helped keep things moving forward, too. The cameras allowed project teams to view the jobsite remotely on computers and mobile devices. “I could see what did or didn’t happen overnight and arrive in the morning geared up for what we needed to do that day.” “The cameras helped get the project done quickly because you didn’t miss anything when you were offsite,” says Dan Garcia, president of C.W. Matthews. “Everyone was able to see what was going on all of the time.” GM Brad Nelson was offsite for two weeks due to knee surgery, but was still actively participating in the project. “I was able to follow developments and keep up with the schedule. When I got called with questions, I could answer them right away because I could see everything happening.” Given the urgency of this project, C.W. Matthews had to have a contingency plan in case something did not happen as expected. Grist, who headed up the project and was on site during the day, says the

“In roughly 25 years, I have never seen a bridge be designed and constructed this quickly. The quality in what’s being done is second to none.” – Marc Mastronardi, Director of Construction, GDOT

cameras helped with those efforts. “If we were expecting a delivery by 8 p.m., I could verify that it happened. If it didn’t, I could start making calls to find out why and figure out what to do next so that we didn’t lose any time.”

Atlanta Reconnected

On May 13, I-85 opened to traffic, reconnecting northeast Atlanta to the rest of the city and earning C.W. Matthews a $3.1 million bonus. GDOT’s director of construction, Marc Mastronardi, praised the effort, saying, "In roughly 25 years, I have never seen a bridge be designed and constructed this quickly. The quality in what's being done is second to none." C.W. Matthews emphasizes that the achievement is the result of extraordinary coordination and communication among everyone involved, including the state, subcontractors and suppliers. Additionally, specific equipment and materials, such as the accelerated concrete mix, an 800-ton crane, and the construction cameras, collectively saved a significant amount of time. CCR

Chandler McCormack is CEO of OxBlue, a global provider of construction cameras used to monitor, manage, and promote construction projects. For more information, contact jangela@oxblue.com, or visit OxBlue.com.

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CIRCLE NO. 74


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE: Blue Ribbon BBQ

Dedham, MA

$1,000,000.00

2,600

Tenant Improvement

Q3 2017

The Capital Grille #8004

Chestnut Hill, MA

$800,000.00

5,000

Remodel

Q3 2017

Qdoba #1781

Nashua, NH

$500,000.00

3,000

Remodel

Q4 2017

Dunkin Donuts

Torrington, CT

$100,000.00

694

New Construction

Q3 2017

Whole Foods - North Shore Crossing

Beverly, MA

$20,000,000.00

70,000

New Construction

Q3 2017

Dollar General

Damariscotta, ME

$1,500,000.00

7,191

New Construction

Q3 2017

Walmart #1930-219

Plaistor, NH

$900,000.00

115,890

Renovation

Q3 2017

O'Reilly Auto Parts

Bristol, CT

$300,000.00

3,950

Remodel

Q3 2017

Carter's Babies & Kids & Oshkosh B'Gosh #1216

Stoneham, MA

$300,000.00

4,000

Renovation

Q3 2017

Hope Point Towers

Providence, RI

$500,000,000.00

1,000,000

New Construction

Q4 2017

Indigo Block

Dorchester, MA

$37,000,000.00

123,400

New Construction

Q1 2018

Colonial Theater Redevelopment

Laconia, NH

$12,000,000.00

38,000

Renovation/Addition

Q3 2017

French Block

Montpelier, VT

$4,000,000.00

25,500

Renovation

Q4 2017

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY: Bayside DoubleTree Hotel Addition

Boston, MA

$28,000,000.00

68,500

Addition

Q4 2017

Newport Yachting Center Hotel

Newport, RI

$14,000,000.00

47,790

New Construction

Q1 2018

Residence Inn by Marriott

Scottsdale, AZ

$12,000,000.00

77,000

New Construction

Q4 2017

La Quinta Inn & Suites

San Antonio, TX

$4,750,000.00

49,470

New Construction

Q2 2017

Q3 2017

EDUCATION: Strong School

New Haven, CT

$45,000,000.00

65,000

New Construction

Rhode Island College Residence Hall

Providence, RI

$25,000,000.00

105,000

New Construction

Q1 2018

UMass Lowell North Quad Renewel - Phase 2

Lowell, MA

$12,000,000.00

20,000

Renovation

Q4 2017

New Courthouse - York County

Biddeford, ME

$46,500,000.00

130,000

New Construction

Q4 2017

New Public Safety Complex

Greenfield, MA

$12,000,000.00

50,000

New Construction

Q1 2018

Hopkinton Town Hall Addition

Hopkinton, RI

$1,000,000.00

4,000

Addition

Q4 2017

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

192

Charles Dean Memorial Hospital

Greenville, ME

$22,500,000.00

65,000

New Construction

Q4 2017

Hospice Volunteers of Hancock County

Ellsworth, ME

$350,000.00

500

Addition/Renovation

Q4 2017

Smile Rite Dental

Southington, CT

$100,000.00

2,300

Renovation

Q3 2017

StayWell Waterbury Auxiliary Pediatric Suite

Waterbury, CT

$100,000.00

2,058

Renovation

Q3 2017

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Our Best Lead Management Solution The result of more than 40 years of construction data expertise, Lead Manager+ delivers the best projects and the most up-to-date project information—so you can find and win more work. + Find the best projects for your business with custom views, filters, and searches + Get up-to-date project information to create the best possible bid + Grow your network by connecting with key players + Communicate effectively with instant access to actionable information + Intuitive and Easy-to-Use Interface + Search and See Results in Seconds + Easily Export and Download Documents or Search Results + Robust and Detailed Contact Information, Including Emails and LinkedIn Information + Organize Search Results Into Folders

+ Dashboard Provides an Instant Snapshot of Latest Projects, Saved Projects, Reminders, Project Heat Map, and Project Type Data + 80% Attachment Rate on Documents + More Searchable PDF Documents +

+ Access Lead Manager on the Go with Your Mobile Device

1-800-652-0008 www.cdcnews.com/LeadManagerPlus CIRCLE NO. 75


Sign, sign, everywhere a sign... GlobalShop event helps celebrate Las Vegas’ iconic flash

E

very year, people from all over the world come to Las Vegas for three days in March to attend GlobalShop, the largest annual visual merchandising trade show and conference for the retail design industry. Architects, planners, designers and retail experts come to discover cutting-edge products, experience what’s new in retail design and shopper marketing, and to meet new and current business connections. After the show ends each afternoon, visitors look to take advantage of the city’s many attractions and entertainment venues. Attendees at this year’s show were treated to a unique after-hours event – "An Evening in the Boneyard." Held at the Neon Museum in the downtown area of Las Vegas, the Boneyard is part of the Museum that's dedicated to saving and preserving Las Vegas’ most iconic art form: the neon sign. The Boneyard is a top-rated attraction in Las Vegas, taking visitors back to the glory days of Las Vegas, incorporating the city’s culture, history and art. Attendees were treated to a guided tour of the Boneyard, drinks and appetizers, and photos with local celebrities like Marilyn Monroe and Elvis (you get the picture). Event sponsors included Federal Heath, Sloan LED, LiftnStore, Rogers Electric and Commercial Construction & Renovation (CCR). For more information on the museum, visit www.neonmuseum.org

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


Event Sponsored by:

MAY : JUNE 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

195


PRODUCT SHOWCASE

Metropolitan Ceramics® Canton, OH

NEW Slip Resisting Tile Metropolitan Ceramics® is the leading manufacturer of low absorption, high quality unglazed quarry tile in the USA. XA Abrasive combines two grip enhancing additives in one tile for decades of slip resisting performance. With the addition of XA Abrasive to their QUARRYBASICS® product line, Metropolitan Ceramics® introduces the next evolution of slip resisting tile. Use XA Abrasive anywhere spills/moisture and heavy traffic combine to create slip fall concerns. Commercial kitchens and food prep areas are two prime examples of spaces that would benefit from using XA Abrasive.

1-800-325-3945 www.metroceramics.com CIRCLE NO. 76 CIRCLE NO. 77

CLASSIFIEDS New York City

Site Investigator $90,000/year + benefits Ready to break away from your routine? Apply your experience and skills in the construction industry to an exciting new career as a site investigator. This unique opportunity will allow you take your career to the next level as you learn a new and rewarding profession in the construction industry. All investigative training provided. Earn over $90,000/year to start plus benefits with Danbee Investigations one of the most respected names in the entire security industry. We have a position for a candidate who has a background in construction and an interest in learning how to do investigative and loss prevention work. The position requires construction experience, good communication skills, a valid driver’s license, proficiency in MS Word and Excel as well as the ability to implement and use new technology. Additionally, the position will require a flexible work schedule in a fast-paced work environment both inside an office and out in the field. We will prepare you for this exciting new career. No prior investigative experience is needed. Because we are the industry leader, we offer an unbeatable compensation package that includes: • Outstanding salary • Medical coverage • 401k • Career advancement • Professional investigative training • Performance Incentives

Your fast paced career will provide you with interesting and diversified responsibilities. To apply for this position please complete our company application, indicate position: New York City. Go to: http://www.danbeeinvestigations.com/application Please do not send a resume. Only completed applications will be considered. Attention: Our job application is currently undergoing revisions. Please do not fill in the salary history portion of the application. Please just type: “XXX” in the portions that ask for salary history. Required experience: • Construction: Minimum of 1 year • Valid driver’s license • 10 Hour OSHA Certification (construction) is a plus • Bilingual Spanish is a plus Job Type: Full-time Salary: $90,000.00 /year

CIRCLE NO. 78

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


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MAY : JUNE 2017 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

197


AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

3M.........................................................................23....................17

Klik USA.................................................................85....................44

AC•Tech............................................................CVR2-1.................1

L&L Retail..............................................................51....................29

Ad Art/Genesis Light Solutions..................................73....................38

Lakeview Construction, Inc....................................11.....................8

Antigo Sign & Display...........................................107...................50 Arecont Vision........................................................35....................22 Arriscraft...............................................................25....................18 Assa Abloy..............................................................9......................7

LaMar Lighting......................................................81....................42 Laticrete...............................................................151...................67 Lellan....................................................................89....................46

Asta Powerproject.................................................129...................58

LSI Industries, Inc..................................................91....................47

Beam Team Construction.......................................55....................31

Mapes...................................................................33....................21

Bitro Group............................................................75....................39

Marco Contractors, Inc..........................................141...................62

The Blue Book......................................................147...................65

May Group............................................................116...................53

Bogart Construction, Inc........................................149...................66 Bostik....................................................................29....................19 Calpipe Security Bollards......................................163...................69 Capacity Builders...................................................45....................26 CKP Construction...................................................43....................25

Metro Ceramics....................................................196...................76 Mike Levin............................................................196...................77 N-STORE Services & Granger Contracting..............65....................36 National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association.................17....................14

Columbia Forest Products......................................15....................12

Newton...................................................................3......................2

Commerical Construction & Renovation People 2017.......................................199...................79

OxBlue Construction Cameras...............................187...................72

Commerical Construction & Renovation Retreat 2017......................................167...................71 Commerical Construction & Renovation Summit 2018................................. 122-123................56 Construction Data Co. (CDC).................................193...................75

P&C Construction...................................................53....................30 Prime Retail Services............................................189...................73 R.E. Crawford Construction....................................57....................32 Retail Contractors Association...............................165...................70

Commicators International Inc..............................114...................52

Rockerz Inc....................................................... 7, 36-37..............4, 23

CONSTRUCT-ED....................................................191...................74

Rubbermaid...........................................................21....................16

Construction One....................................................5......................3

Salsbury.................................................................8......................5

Controlled Power...................................................16....................13

Sargenti Architects...............................................127...................57

Danbee Investigations...........................................196...................78

Schimenti..........................................................8, CVR4..............6, 81

DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc.............................41....................24 Egan Sign..............................................................31....................20 Elemental LED.......................................................77....................40 EMJ Construction..................................................49....................28

Schwob Building Company, LTD.............................59....................33 Shames Construction.............................................61....................34 ShopTalk 360.........................................................13.....................9

Fast Signs.............................................................131...................59

S.L. Hayden Construction, Inc...............................145...................64

Foreverlamp..........................................................79....................41

SuperBright LEDS ................................................121...................55

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc.......................................155...................68

SYLVANIA LEDVANCE LED......................................87....................45

Georgia Printco.....................................................113...................51

Taylor Bros. Construction Co., Inc...........................63....................35

GPD Group............................................................133...................60 Graybar.................................................................83....................43 Hirsch Corp............................................................69....................37 IDC Construction, LLC............................................47....................27

Techline America...................................................19....................15 Wagner..................................................................13....................10 Warner Bros.........................................................CVR3..................80

ImagiLux................................................................98....................49

Wolverine Building Group......................................139...................61

I.T. Illuminating Technologies.................................93....................48

WoodWorks..........................................................143...................63

Kingsmen.............................................................117...................54

ZipWall..................................................................14....................11

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


2017

Schedule: February 23rd: Atlanta March 23rd: Dallas April 13th: Charlotte May 18th: Minneapolis June 22nd: Los Angeles July 6th: Boston July 27th: Denver August 24th: Nashville September 14th: New York City October 12th: Philadelphia November 30th: Phoenix * Event dates may be subject to change

For information about membership or events, contact Kristen Corson, kristenc@ccr-people.com • 770.990.7702 For information about co-sponsoring an event, contact David Corson, davidc@ccr-mag.com • 678.765.6550

www.ccr-people.com www.ccr-mag.com CIRCLE NO. 79


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

It's crunch time – are you ready?

D

ecisions, decisions, decisions. We make them every

At the end of the game, with very little time left, all the Atlanta Falcons had to do was run day in both our business and personal lives. And, as the ball three times and kick a short field goal. But an inexperienced head coach got caught up they say, you have to sleep in the bed you make. in the moment, made the wrong play calls and gave the ball back to the Patriots. With another chance to win, they did so in exciting fashion. The same held true in the 2017 National Lacrosse League Championship, which was one by the Georgia Swarm. The Swarm were down one goal with 10 seconds left. All the Saskatchewan Rush had to do was throw the ball down to the other end of the field and the seconds would have ticked off. But the Rush coach decided to pull their goalie and play keep away. Unfortunately, they dropped the ball, the Swarm picked it up, and then scored on the open net with three seconds left to tie the game. Then went on to win in overtime, bringing the Championship Cup home to the ATL. In both of these losses, I'm sure these coaches will never make those crucial decisions again. But without these mistakes, how would either learn what “not” to do in the future if faced with the same situations. “To be the best, you have to play the best.” “Play as you practice.” “Practice sloppy and you will lose the Making mistakes and learning from them improves your chancgames when they count.” These sports cliches matter. es of making the right decision in the future. Mistakes make you If you practice hard and simulate game situations, you have a better better. And you can't give in, because remember, whatever you are chance of performing and executing when it comes down to crunch time. doing, nothing comes easy. Trying new ways to improve can be a positive and a negative. Sports are just like construction projects and serve as perfect That's why you must always strive to be the best at what you do, day examples of the decision-making process. Coaches make decisions in and day out, as repetition creates consistency. You should always that can impact how a game is going to end. Sometimes, the right be working on that new play or tweak – the one that can put your moves are simple to see, but are not executed. team over the top when it matters most. Take this year’s Super Bowl, for example. The game looked to be And when you win, your team should hold their heads high on a over at half time. All of us Falcons fans were already celebrating. But job well done. the second half still had to be played, and the Patriots were not going We wish you all much success in the second half of 2017, and to give up. They re-grouped and held steady, thanks to the guidance of as always, keep the faith. their Hall of Fame coach.

If you practice hard and simulate game situations, you have a better chance of performing and executing when it comes down to crunch time.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

200

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — MAY : JUNE 2017


CIRCLE NO. 80


CIRCLE NO. 81

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR MayJune 2017  

CCR MayJune 2017