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FIND OUT WHAT YOU MISSED AT OUR CCR RETREAT IN LEXINGTON

Hilton Hospitality

Tod Langdon, Senior Director, Architecture & Construction, Latin America & the Caribbean, Hilton

Entering its 100th year, the globally lauded brand continues to lead the way

Exclusive Inside:

Official magazine of

Leveraging the IoT for hurricane resilience Survey taps leading architecture firms & fixture manufacturers

January/February 2019 • www.ccr-mag.com

Check out also inside:


Capacity Builders What's in a Name

Twenty-Two years ago I thought, "What am I doing starting a business?" My uncertainty didn't last long as my next thought was, "Well get on with it, and give it a good name." I remember thinking... capacity is the definitive aspect of business success. Not enough capacity and you miss sales opportunities. You incur lost revenue. Your customers suffer from

'6£1p>f&'6Dff ilYJDl!.@rn�$ 8�'6

name. My background at the time was process engineering. So my challenge, make it easy. Retail construction and installation (RCI) is a service driven industry. It relies on people to do the work, and therefore capacity in this industry is direct math. The number of projects you win equals the number of people required. With that equation in mind, add to it the national service needs of retail chains, factor in national and regional unemployment rates, project length (or lack of it}, skill requirements, transportation, schedule crunches, and approved project budgets. The result? There's a high level of complexity needed to succeed in RCI capacity. In order to find this success, I could see the factors: We had to be national in scope. We had to understand project skill requirements. We had to have people available for project duty in an on-again off-again time rotation. In the back end of the company, we needed to simultaneously manage a large number of projects with an even larger sequence of locations. We needed to build our customers' capacity when they needed it and allow them to avoid the cash drain when they didn't. Thus the name Capacity Builders.

So now, 22 years later, with our new

lack of service. Too much capacity and you have excessive costs. Margins are pinched. Burden is high. Either of these conditions and you have a sluggish business. Simply stated in the macro sense, capacity drives the overall economy. Too much money in the system and inflation rises. Not enough money and interest rates choke business. Controlling capacity is the key to our working economy. So with the words "it ain't easy" ringing in my head I decided capacity had to be part of the

website we talk in terms of XHP, PHP, JavaScript, Apache, and Social (Work) Networking. We developed a process driven site that emulates our customers needs and allows our employees and job site candidates to have their own CBI profile. This gives them protection to gain project and location infonmation based on crew assignment. It texts and emails reminders, project changes, project documents, and creates a project infonmation base for job success... it promotes a work community. When you are ready to roll-out, install, work across the country in an effort to service your 2019 goals ... remember Capacity Builders. We ARE engineered to serve you. Feel free to contact us at capacitybuilders.com or call the office at 303.617.0900. Or you can call or text me direct 303.356.9672. - Thank you. Wayne.


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January/February • 2019 Vol. 18, No.1

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22 FEATURES

136

22 Hilton Hospitality  Entering its 100th year, the globally lauded brand continues to lead the way

136  Eye on the prize  Construction trend changes that may reward the aware contractor

142  Standing on the edge  AI for construction document 129 In demand management? Not so fast  Why is porcelain tile continually specified for the commercial sector? 148  Storm warning  How building managers can leverage the IoT for hurricane resilience Cover and feature photos by: Miguel Valdivielso

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

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CIRCLE NO. 2


January/February • 2019 Vol. 18, No.1 SPECIAL COVERAGE Industry Events 18  CCRP – Phoenix, AZ

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS 50  Architect/Design Firms 66  Fixtures

DEPARTMENTS

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 188 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 190 Ad Index 192 Publisher’s Note

18

158 SPECIAL SECTION

Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat 32  Legacies  Attendees discuss their beginnings in the commercial construction market Perspective 134 Why one-on-one meetings matter more than you know  Commercial Kitchens 79  The ‘twisted’ life  Why the Philly Pretzel Factory’s success story continues to rise 90 Sweet success  The recipe for success for a commercial bakery floor Federal Construction 154 Next man up  Army Corps modernizes USMA Barracks for future leaders

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Healthcare 158 Cutting edge  Cooling system helps save both water and energy at new biolab facility Multi-Housing 164 Dialed-in comfort  Minnesota housing project gets energy/comfort upgrade Craft Brand and Marketing 174 New England Made  Inside the wonderful world of the Lord Hobo Brewing Company 178 We must change now!  The environment, what we must do and why it matters to craft brewers

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

184 Why your business needs a social media marketing plan


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CIRCLE NO. 3

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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

I'll have what he's having... W ings. Salads. Burgers. Pizza. Desserts. A kids menu. The new restaurant has everything that your average family loves to snack on—with a twist. What if I said you could sit down and have that burger with Batman. No, really, Batman. The Caped Crusader. Not a Batman fan. How about grabbing some wings with Spider-Man? Yes, that Spider-Man. The Wall Crawler. If you haven't heard the news, Mexico's popular Comicx is opening its comic book-theme restaurant in the Desert Ridge Marketplace in Phoenix. The family-friendly 8,000-square-foot restaurant and bar will be the first U.S. location for the chain, which promises something for every super hero fan.

Similar to the 36 Comicx restaurants in Mexico, the Phoenix location not only offers a full menu of food and beverages, but diners can also browse and purchase collectibles from their favorite comic book icons. And if that's not enough to get the kids amped up, there are myriad life-size superheroes and villains strategically located throughout the restaurant for cool photo ops. The Comicx story was created in 2010 in Hermosillo Sonora when four friends decided to marry their two passion together: good food and comics. And in a time when setting yourself apart from your competition is paramount, the Vestar, which owns the Desert Ridge Marketplace, continues to test the waters. The company recently has invested $22 million into the property, enticing a number of unique tenants, including Barrio Queen, CB Live and Flower Child. It's the kind of story that will continue to define the commercial construction landscape, especially if Comicx captures the kind of attention that its creators and Vestar expect. Where does your brand stand? What new and exciting things do you have planned for 2019 and beyond? In a time when consumers are taking a full inventory of where their discretionary income goes, the opportunity to get into their plans is now. More stores. A remodel. New services. On a personal level, the path you choose is up to you. This year may be the year of living differently and challenging yourself. Good things happen when you think out of the box. Just ask the folks at Vestar. Who knows? You may even wind up having lunch with a super hero. And if you do, well, bon appétit. Here's to the best in 2019.

This year may be the year of living differently and challenging yourself. Good things happen when you think out of the box.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 561-203-2981

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CIRCLE NO. 5

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F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC CIRCLE NO. 6

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


CIRCLE NO. 7


EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Design & Construction Belk Inc. STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design COLLEEN BIGGS Director, Brand Leadership The Little Gym

HEALTHCARE CLINTON “BROOKS” HERMAN, PMP Senior Facilities Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

RESTAURANTS RON BIDINOST Vice President of Operations Bubbakoo’s Burritos Corporation

PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

GREGG LOLLIS Sr. Director, Design Development Chick-fil-A

LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations and Project Management Interserv Hospitality

BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp. DAVID SHOTWELL Construction Manager, Flynn Restaurant Group ISYOL E. CABRERA Director Design and Construction Carvel

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

DEMETRIA PETERSON Construction Manager II Checkers & Rally’s Drive in Restaurants

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield

DAVID THOMPSON Director of Construction WHICH WICH® SUPERIOR SANDWICHES

International Director JLL

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development JOHN LAPINS VP of Design & Construction Auro Hotels GARY RALL Vice President of Design and Development, Holiday Inn Club Vacations ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality

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HOSPITALITY

STEVE JONES

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President EMG

CONSULTANT GINA NODA President Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little

JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President Nelson HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Onyx Creative STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA

President CESO, Inc.

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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CIRCLE NO. 8


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Hospitality Postcard Hotel The Postcard Hotel brand aims to create luxury hotels for the modern audience. With three properties in Goa, India, the brand has ambitious expansion plans to grow to 50 properties.

Vision Hospitality Vision Hospitality Group will launch its boutique Kinley brand in Cincinnati late next year. Kinley is part of Humanist, Vision’s new portfolio that has The Grady Hotel in Louisville, which will also open in 2019.

Standard Hotels U.S.-based Standard Hotels will begin its international expansion in London. The Standard London will feature 266 guest rooms.

Las Vegas Convention Center The site of the now-demolished Riviera hotel-casino in Las Vegas will host an $860 million expansion of the Las Vegas Convention Center.

citizenM Netherlands-based citizenM hotels is developing a 348-key hotel within Miami Worldcenter, one of the largest private mixed-use developments underway in the United States, occupying 27 acres in downtown Miami.

Hotel Arrass Mission Health‘s new tower and Hotel Arras and Arras Residences are expected to open in 2019 amid a flurry of notable development projects in Asheville, North Carolina.

Kerten Hospitality Kerten Hospitality‘s two hotel brands, Cloud7 and The House Hotel, figure in expansion plans by parent company Kerten. Mixed-use projects are likely for the hotels, which cover a range of rates and generational appeals.

Element Detroit The sustainability-themed Element Detroit hotel reopened after about 40 years of vacancy. Michigan’s first Element Hotel chain property includes such features as low-flow faucets and LED lighting throughout.

Restaurants Domino’s Pizza Domino’s Pizza plans to add 9,700 more units by 2025. The chain will continue its tech innovation and focus the bulk of its growth on international markets. Chuck E. Cheese A Chuck E. Cheese restaurant in Indianapolis is one of the first in the country to unveil the chain’s new look, a rebranding that includes a new menu and an interactive dance floor. The location has eliminated animatronic robots in favor of live shows and performances by a person playing the brand’s namesake character. Del Taco Del Taco will sell at least 60 of its 310 company-owned units to franchisees as part of a plan to cut the number of restaurants owned from 55 percent to 45 percent by mid-2020. Spread Bagelry Spread Bagelry is expanding beyond Philadelphia thanks to investment from MVP Capital Partners. The company plans to open around 25 locations over the next few years and will launch an e-commerce site for nationwide delivery. ComicX Mexico-based comic book-themed restaurant chain ComicX will open its first U.S. eatery in Phoenix this summer. Life-size comic book characters placed around the restaurant will offer selfie opportunities and an attached retail shop will sell collectibles. Stoners Pizza Joint New owner HHI Hospitality has plans to take Stoner’s Pizza Joint national with a combination of franchise and company-owned stores. The small Southeastern chain has 11 locations. Its first franchisee has signed on to open six units in Texas. Giant Food Giant Food will spend $175 million over the next two years to add one store and remodel 24 others. The company is adding a store built from the ground up in Fairfax Circle, Virginia.

12

Maggiano’s Little Italy Brinker International has opened the first nontraditional Maggiano’s Little Italy location at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, in partnership with HMSHost and Java Star. The restaurant features a bar flanked by two dining rooms that can seat up to 225, as well as a grab-and-go section. Buffalo Wild Wings Buffalo Wild Wings has unveiled a new tech-driven restaurant prototype with features including an LED lighting system that can put on a light show in response to the roar of sports-watching crowds. The restaurant also boasts oversized TV screens, cutting-edge resolution technology and flexible seating arrangements that can include areas for viewing pay-per-view games. Cousins Subs Cousins Subs will return to Minnesota’s Twin Cities after shuttering its five units in the market in 2015. The chain, which will offer a new look and refreshed branding, plans to open upwards of 20 eateries over the next few years. Baskin-Robbins Baskin-Robbins has created a new store design that it will test in Fresno, California, before rolling it out to more markets next year. The shop boasts an updated menu, murals inspired by the local landscape that are designed to be shared on Instagram and long glass cases to display the ice cream. Crafthouse Crafthouse will team with American Development Partners in a $250 million deal that will turn the three-unit chain into a franchise company with more than 100 locations over the next five years. Crafthouse restaurants feature a pub food menu and a selection of about 300 craft beers and ciders. Dave & Buster’s/T&T Tacos Dave & Buster’s Entertainment has opened a fast-casual concept, T&T Tacos, after testing the format in one of its Dallas restaurants. The menu features tacos made with a variety of meats, as well as a version made with plant-based meat from Impossible Foods.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


AroundtheIndustry (continued) Retail RYU Vancouver, British Columbia-based workout wear retailer RYU has opened its first U.S. store in Brooklyn, New York. Lush Bath and beauty retailer Lush will expand its Naked store concept to the UK with a location in Manchester, England. The concept shop, which is already in place in Berlin and Milan, enables shoppers use an app to access information about every product as part of an effort to cut down on packaging. Parachute Bedding and bath brand Parachute has grown to six brick-and-mortar stores since launching as a digital direct-to-consumer brand five years ago. Parachute plans to grow to 20 stores by 2020. Crate and Barrel Housewares store Crate and Barrel is planning to open a store in The Mall at Green Hills in Nashville, Tennessee. Dollar General Dollar General plans to add 975 stores while remodeling 1,000 others in its next fiscal year. The retailer is considering several different configurations for stores, including those that focus on refrigerated and other foods in areas that are considered food deserts.

Joe’s Jeans Los Angeles-based retailer Joe’s Jeans will open a 1,500-square-foot flagship in New York City’s SoHo neighborhood, a few doors down from a former store that was twice the size. The store will feature a less-cluttered look than the old location, with a smaller inventory on hand and more of a focus on experiences. IKEA IKEA plans to open its first stores in Mumbai, including a superstore and smaller city center locations. The chain also opened its newest full-line store in the London market in Greenwich, England. The store focuses on sustainability, with features including a roof garden and other green spaces. Toys R Us Asia Toys R Us Asia will open 60 new stores this year, mostly in mainland China, after separating from its U.S. parent company late last year. The company, backed by Fung Retailing Group, has more than 550 stores in 10 markets. Birchbox Walgreens has unveiled in-store Birchbox shops in three New York stores. The retailer plans for eight more locations in cities, including Chicago, Dallas and Los Angeles.

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CIRCLE NO. 9

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Did you

know The Lower Manhattan area in New York City currently has a dozen ongoing hotel projects with 1,901 rooms under construction, according to the Alliance for Downtown New York. Hotels slated to open by year’s end include the AC Hotel NYC Downtown, Moxy NYC Downtown and Artezen Hotel.

Look what they’re saying... “Our guests come from a wide range of demographics and generations, but the common thread is that they value real food and clean ingredients. That’s what’s important to our guest and it guides all we do. So, we build loyalty with our customers by promising not to sacrifice quality.”

– Nicole Bushnell, VP marketing for Luna Grill Restaurants, on what today’s patrons are looking for from restaurant brands

“Successful restaurant marketing starts with understanding the target demographic and meeting them where they are, instead of trying to be all things to all people.”

– Jeff Jenkins, CMO of CKE Restaurants Holdings, on how the brand connects with Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. brand fans

“We looked at our overall target—millennial moms with two kids under 10 years old—but our overall percentage of sales wasn’t tracking to where we thought it should be with kids. We dug deeper and found out that our guests had some little pain points with the menu and how it was structured.”

– Robert Dimson, VP of Marketing for McAlister’s Deli, on how limited-service brands are accommodating younger customers

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


The numbers game

18 32 66.7

The percentage increase expected for project delivery for the design-build model between 2018 and 2021, according to an FMI report. The total will account for 44 percent of industry spending. Interestingly, in a quarter of the projects FMI reviewed, AEC firms did not fully understand the parameters of a designbuild contract, the study showed.

The number, in billions, that food delivery could generate by 2020, according to a Morgan Stanley report. The number represents 11 percent of total restaurant sales, the study reported.

The percent of hotel room occupancy recorded for the 12 months ending this past September, according to a CoStar Portfolio Strategy study. The demand is the strongest number ever recorded by CoStar.

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www.making-light.com CIRCLE NO. 11

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

On your mark... Leading hotel markets in the U.S. construction pipeline

T

hings are kicking in the hospitality market. The top five largest hotel construction pipelines as of the third quarter of 2018 were in New York City, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles and Nashville, according to Lodging Econometrics. It is a cyclical high for the U.S. market, with the projects already under construction and those scheduled to start construction in the next 12 months, combined, totally 3,782 projects/213,798 rooms. Here's a look at the numbers in the leading markets: New York

145 projects/24,675 rooms

Dallas

112 projects/13,854 rooms

Houston

103 projects/11,562 rooms

Los Angeles

92 projects/14,249 rooms

Nashville

88 projects/12,322 rooms

Green construction poised for growth

G

reen is, well, the new green. According to Dodge Data & Analytics' "World Green Building Trends 2018 SmartMarket Report," 47 percent of construction executives around the world plan to incorporate green practices in more than 60 percent of the their projects by 2021. Highlights of the report include: • The biggest challenge to increased green building—the perception that it costs more than traditional construction—declined dramatically from over three-quarters in 2012 to under half today. • Many respondents plan to build green in the next three years without seeking certification, while more than two thirds of study participants using certification find that doing so allows them to create better performing buildings. • There is a 20 point projected jump from those who currently report a majority of green projects.

The report, which spotlighted work in 19 countries, surveyed participants more than 2,000 architects, engineers, contractors, owners, specialists/consultants and investors from 86 countries. For more information, visit www.construction.com/ toolkit/reports/world-green-building-trends-2018.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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CIRCLE NO. 12

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Lodge life CCRP hits Twin Peaks in Phoenix swing

I

t's way more than a sports bar, even though it is a sports bar. Twin Peaks on Camelback Road in Phoenix is one of the area's true treasures. Defined by it comfy cabin-like decor, Twin Peaks offers something for everyone, including signature beer (try the signature 29° draft beer) and great food (delivered from its Scratch Kitchen). The venue served as the perfect getaway for Commercial Construction & Renovation (CCRP) Nation's laid back brand of networking. If you're looking for a good place to expand your industry contacts, reach out to Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

Midtown to attan Beach. REGISTERED COMPANIES:

Academy Sports Allegion Ameriprise Financial Services ANP APSM Systems Architectural Design Guild ArcVision Benihana Big Red Rooster Bogart Construction oast Boss Faclity Services building high profile Capacityretail Builders world’s largest brands. CDO Group CEC Ceso Inc Chain Store Maintenance ment Manager Chick-fil-A n@schimenti.com Coast 2 Coast Command Center Concept Entertainment Group

/ LOS ANGELES

Construction One Cornell Storefront Systems De Jager Construction Discount Waste Don Penn Consulting Engineer Don Penn Consulting Engineer EBI EMG Corp Entouch Controls Fitch Flynn Construction Fortney & Weygandt Frontier Building Glassman Planning Associates Inc Greater Oklahoma City Chamber Grimaldi’s Pizzeria HDG

Pantera Global Technology Petsense Petsmart Phoenix Drone Pros Pinnacle Commercial Development, Inc Poma Retail ProCoat Products Rainmaker Mastery RCA Rectenwald Brothers Construction Retail Construction Services Retail Maintenance Specialists Rockerz Inc Sargenti SBLM Schimenti Construction Shames Construction Sierra Contracting

SignResource Singleton Construction SMA Law South Water Signs Southern Company State Permits Storefloors Target The Little Gym The McIntosh Group Thomas Grace Construction Timberwolff Construction TJX Triad Retail Construction Tricarico Tri-North Builders True Food Kitchen Warwick Construction Watkins Real Estate Group

HQ / CONNECTICUT

Retail Contractors Association Carol Montoya, CAE, Executive Director carol@retailcontractors.org 2800 Eisenhower Ave, Suite 210 Alexandria, VA 22314 (703) 683-5637 • Fax: (703) 683-0018 www.retailcontractors.org

Pantera Global Technology Dewayne Adamson, President 10411 Corporate Dr. #208 Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (877) 219-9777 dewayne.adamson@gmail.com www.panteratools.com

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Identicom Sign Solutions IFTI ImageOne Industries Impact Specialties IndieSignage JLL Kennethpark Architects Kingsmen Inter L2M Lakeview Construction L-Brands Little Lowes Marco Contrators Martin Architectural MC Sign Company Mitsubishi Jet Towel Multatech Architects & Engineers Onyx Creative

Schimenti Construction Joe Rotondo, Vice President 650 Danbury Road Ridgefield, CT 06877 (914) 244-1900, ext 319 rotondo@schimenti.com www.schimenti.com

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Mitch Lapin, VP 31269 Bradley Road North Olmsted, OH 44070 (440) 716-4000 mlapin@fortneyweygandt.com www.fortneyweygandt.com

Construction One, Inc. Don Skorupski, Business Development dskorupski@constructionone.com 101 E Town St, Suite 401 Columbus, OH 43215 (480) 528-1145 www.constructionone.com

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

Architectural Design Guild Sam Estes, Vice President 2710 Sutton Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63143 (314) 644-1234 Fax: (314) 644-4373 www.adg-stl.com sestes@adg-stl.com

Command Center Dwight Enget, Corporate National Accounts 3609 S. Wadsworth Blvd. Suite 250 Lakewood, CO 80235 (866) 464-5844 dwight.enget@commandonline.com


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1. Diana Rinck, Petsmart;, Sam Estes, Architectural Design Guild 2. Tim West, Coast 2 Coast; David & Keith Glassman, Glassman Planning Associates, Inc. 3. Brian Massengill, Lowes; David Corson, CCR 4. Seam McGuinness, Sargenti; Rob Sargenti, Sargenti; Eric West, Allegion; Brent Rosen, Allegion 5. Mike Wolff, Timberwolff Construction; John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; John DiNunzio, Identicom Sign Solutions; Robert Biggs, Phoenix Drone Pros 6. Don Skorupski, Construction One; Vaun Podlogar, State Permits 7. Craig Brauks, ANP Lighting; Nate Doney, SignResource 8. Larry Schwartz, IFTI; Lisa Schwartz, ProCoat Products

9. John Fox, TJX; Jan McKenzie, ASSA ABLOY; Adam Schleyer, TJX 10. Dwight Enget, Command Center; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors; Tommy Everage, Commmand Center 11. Jim Murty, Encore Construction; Jeff Mahler, L2M; Joe McCafferty, Encore Construction; Jose Villanueva, IndieSignage 12. William Jungerman, APSM Systems; Andrew Kolikoff, Rainmaker Mastery; Steve Hekman, Kingsmen International 13. Paul Veteri, Ameriprise Financial Services; Steve Olson, Kevin Bohman, & Jeff Tibbits from Ceso Inc. 14. Kelli Buhay, Retail Maintenance Specialists; Ken Kosinski, Retail Consultant; Gina Noda, Connect Source Consulting Group 15. Art Rectenwald, Rectenwald Brothers Construction; Greg Everett, Watkins Real Estate Group; Logan Webb, Warwick Construction

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

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1. Tony Poma, Poma Retail Development; Rob Sargenti, Sargenti; David Corson, CCR 2. J im Rieckel, Entouch Controls; Bob Smith, Rockerz Inc; Joseph Naticchione, ImageOne Industries; Hugh Hazelquist, Entouch Controls 3. Mark Yager, Capacity Builders; Nikole Mikula, ImageOne Industries, John Czepiel, Tricarico; Jennifer Sussman, Tricarico 4. Sophia Moraitis, SMA Law; Jennifer Danquist Kilgore, Singleton Construction 5. Fred Margulies, Onyx Creative; Greg Mooney, EBI Consulting 6. Sam Pena, Multatech Architects & Engineers; Janine Buettner, ArcVision 7. Blake Brosa, EMG Corp; Tammy Fate, Greater Oklahoma City Chamber, Mitch Lapin, Fortney & Weygandt; Matt Frank, Fortney & Weygandt; Karen MacCannell, The McIntosh Group

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8. Kris Johnson, Thomas-Grace Construction; Sean McGuinness, Sargenti; Melanie Gifford, Sargenti 9. Lauren Bishop, The Beam Team; Rick Hall, The Beam Team 10. Kristine Kliphouse, Discount Waste; Logan Webb, Warwick Construction; Kaitlyn Kilby, Discount Waste; Thomas Lagos, Discount Waste; Richard Cheek, Sierra Contracting; Nick Hemmer, Sierra Contracting 11. Sara Brindley, MC Sign Company; Drew Romanic, Martin Architectural; Anthony Amunategui, CDO Group; Nick Petruska, CDO Group 12. Scott Kerman, Mitsubishi Electric; Jeff Roark, Little

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


RETAIL & RESTAURANT DEVELOPMENT SERVICES . . . . . . . .

TEAVANA 2016 RETAIL DESIGN INSTITUTE STORE DESIGN AWARD WINNER

CIRCLE NO. 13

ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS MEP ENGINEERING (IN HOUSE) SPACE PLANNING INTERIOR DESIGN PERMITTING SITE SURVEYS PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT LICENSED NATIONWIDE


Hilton

Hospitality Entering its 100th year, the globally lauded brand continues to lead the way By Michael J. Pallerino

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O

ne hundred years in and the premise on which it was founded remains the same for the Hilton brand: “Travel can make the world a better place.” Known as one of the world’s most hospitable companies, the proof is right in front of you: 16 world-class brands comprising of more than 5,500 properties with nearly 895,000 rooms, in 109 countries and territories, four straight years of record-breaking growth in deals signed, construction starts and new openings, and one of the “World’s Best Workplaces” designation.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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HILTON HOSPITALITY At the heart of Hilton’s signature achievements lies the commitment to do better. Take 2018, where the brand opened more than one hotel a day, achieved almost seven percent net unit growth. In addition, it was recognized as the “Most JUST Company” in the hospitality industry on America’s “Top 100 Most JUST” companies by Forbes, debuted as the only hospitality company on FORTUNE’s Change the World List and was awarded 2018 Best Corporate Steward by US Chamber of Commerce Foundation. And in true team fashion, Hilton Team Members volunteered more than 235,000 hours across 93 countries during “Global Week of Service.” That’s the Hilton way. Driven by a phenomenon it calls The Hilton Effect, the brand has served more than three billion guests and provided $1 trillion of economic impact during its first 100 years of service. The numbers and accolades, as

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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Retail | Restaurant | Hospitality | Medical | Financial CIRCLE NO. 14


HILTON HOSPITALITY impressive as they are, just set the tone for what’s to come. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Tod Langdon, Senior Director, Architecture & Construction, Latin America & the Caribbean, to get his thoughts on where the brand is heading in 2019 and beyond.

Tell us what makes the Hilton brand so unique?

We have the best-performing portfolio of brands in the business, with 16 brands positioned across more than 5,600 properties in 113 countries and territories to serve any guest, anywhere they want to be in the world, for any travel need they have. Through the award-winning guest loyalty program, Hilton Honors, more than 85 million members who book directly with Hilton have access to instant benefits,

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An important and rewarding part of the job is relationship building. I am privileged to work alongside some of the most experienced professionals and owners.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

including digital check-in with room selection, Digital Key and Connected Room.

Why did you pick the locations you did for your hotels?

In CALA, Hilton has more than 140 hotels open, more than 90 projects in the development pipeline in 25 countries, nine brands in operation and 11 brands in pipeline.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” hotel/resort in today’s competitive landscape?

It is important to keep current trends in mind and stay up to date on what guests are looking for when they travel, from adventure tourism and culinary vacations to business travel and staycations, the guest experience is evolving, and so too is the way we design hotels. We need to embrace this, as well as


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CIRCLE NO. 15

9/30/18 6:53 PM


HILTON HOSPITALITY

one of 39 countries. Meetings with owners and architects, construction walk throughs and brushing up on my Spanish language skills. Sprinkle in a few webinars. I fly 300,000-plus miles a year, live in Las Vegas and commute to the office is in Miami. This atypical day is exactly what keeps me happy.

What are the projects you are most proud of and why?

be forward looking in our approach, as we need to look at how hotels will be positioned when construction is completed two to three years into the future.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Some projects start with a vision shared with a hotel developer, and from that vision we move forward to create one of the most impactful architectural features in a city.

Maintaining close partnerships with our owners and developers is on the to-do-list right now and always. The majority of our business comes from first-time owners, and if we develop a positive relationship with them, they will look to Hilton when building their second, 10th or 20th hotel. Plus, this relationship building is in large part what makes this an exciting and rewarding job.

Describe a typical day.

My day starts with a 3 a.m. wake-up call—a car to the airport at 4 a.m.—security, customs and immigration—and the first flight out to

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I’m most proud of the projects that start out with an owner’s vision, a pencil and a cocktail napkin and turn into some of the best hotels in a market. We are so fortunate to be able to use our creativity to build huge, lasting projects that change the world’s skyline.

What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

As a company born 100 years ago, Hilton has positively shaped the industry over the last century. As pioneers of innovation in hospitality, it is incredibly rewarding to play a role in bringing Hilton’s innovations to life. Some projects start with a vision shared with a hotel developer, and from that vision we move forward to create one of the most impactful architectural features in a city. There is an immense sense of pride when walking by a project like this, knowing I had a hand in its development from vision to fruition. An important and rewarding part of the job is relationship building. I am privileged to work alongside some of the most experienced professionals and owners. We begin projects by getting to know each other, and by the time we open our doors, we are colleagues and partners. CCR

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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CIRCLE NO. 16

WWW.CONSTRUCTIONONE.COM Licensed Contractor in all 50 States 101 East Town Street - Suite 401 - Columbus, OH 43215 • 614.235.0057


HILTON HOSPITALITY

One-on-one with... Tod Langdon

Senior Director, Architecture & Construction, Latin America & the Caribbean, Hilton What was the best advice you ever received? I have two pieces of advice that I hold close. I worked with a partner for a decade in the contracting business, and he would often say, “Tod, we need to stick to our knitting.” It is important that we stay focused on our core business and values, as we will be most successful when utilizing our time and resources on the work we are best at doing.

The second piece of advice I often keep in mind came from my grandfather. “When you work for someone, work for them.” When we are given an opportunity to work on a project, we must give that project our best and always keep our customer top of mind.

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oping strategy and goals, the team feels part of the process and will be committed to seeing their contributions come to life. Recognize when your Team Members need support, and provide the support to help them succeed. Support can drive success, and it can be in the form of tools and resources to do their job, or knowing their manager “has their backs” with guidance, experience and problem-solving. Engage in open and honest communication. This starts with providing the team clear direction from the onset so they can hit the ground running, but then serves to successfully and quickly adapt if needs change. I often refer to Sun Tzu’s “The Art of War” as a guide for leadership, particularly when he said, “Great results, can be achieved with small forces,” and larger forces can be overcome by remaining mobile, controlling the lines of communication and supply, and making sure “everyone knows what they are supposed to be doing.”

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? There is nothing better than a genuine and heartfelt, “Thank you, Tod.”

What is the true key to success for any manager? Successful managers look after “their team.”

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why. Create collaborative objectives with your team that draw on the team’s strengths. If you keep your Team Members in mind and engaged when devel-

How do you like to spend your down time? I enjoy sailing.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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CIRCLE NO. 17


Legacies H

ow did you get your start in the business? It’s a

Attendees discuss their beginnings in the commercial construction market 32

question that can spark a wall of memories. It can also provide an introspective snapshot into the

people who help define our industry.

In our continuing quest to spotlight the people who make up the commercial construction industry, here’s a look at how and why the attendees of the latest Commercial Construction & Renovation retreat do (and love) what they do. The discussion was part of the Retreat, held in September at the 21c Museum Hotel in Lexington, Kentucky. Attendees included some of the industry’s leading executives across the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. Sponsored by Commercial Construction & Renovation, the three-day event offered a series of business meetings and networking events, including a tour of the historical Keeneland Race Track and Mill Ridge Farm.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


Kevin Bales

Ron Bidinost

Colleen Biggs

L2M Architects

Bubbakoo’s Burritos

The Little Gym

Marilyn Brennan

Isyol Cabrera

Jennifer Grieser

Egan Sign

Focus Brands

Projectmates

Tim Hill

Sean Holmes

John Mcnamara

The Beam Team

H2 Hospitality Group

Bluegrass Hospitality Group

John Ott

David Shotwell

Mark Stocker

EMG

Flynn Restaurant Group

Saninc

Bibi Sukey

Jeff Terry

Brookfield Properties

Prime Retail Services Inc.

David Thompson

Rodney Worley

Which Wich Superior Sandwiches

Automated Cutting Technologies

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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LEGACIES Following is a final installment of the two-part wrap up of the Friday roundtable, where attendees discussed a number of industry-related topics:

CCR: What’s your story? How did you get started in the industry? Isy Cabrera, Focus Brands: I’m an architect by trade. I’ve worked in residential architecture for 12 years. That’s how I ended up in the States. I got tired of residential and went to work for an architecture firm that did work for Starbucks, Urban Outfitters, Gap, Banana Republic, Old Navy, then Church’s Chicken, and after that Focus Brand’s Carvel. Sean Holmes, H2 Hospitality: I was educated in Ireland, where I studied hotel management. In 1988 I arrived in the U.S. with the plan to spend a year working in the industry, and then returning to Ireland to do some more studies. I started working at the Roosevelt Hotel on

Madison Avenue in New York City. In that year I was promoted twice. I was 21. When the time rolled around to return, it was difficult to leave. I had money in my hand. I was being promoted. And, I was in the most vibrant city on the planet. Did I want to go back to student life in Ireland? The country, at that time, had reached 17% unemployment. To me, it was a no-brainer! After two years of working at the Roosevelt, I received a call from an Irish Hotel Group who had been given my name. Fitzpatrick Hotel Group where in the process of opening a boutique hotel in New York City. I joined them and subsequently spent the following 16 years working with them. In the process, opening additional

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properties in New York City and Chicago and eventually running the entire operation for seven of those 16 years. In 2007, I decided to get out and establish my own company. It was terrible timing to start any company, as the economic meltdown was just commencing. We survived the meltdown thankfully, and we’re still here today. We started, initially, as a full service hotel support company and gradually evolved into development. We’re currently developing projects in New York City and Northern New Jersey. One is a church site conversion that we’re working on in midtown Manhattan. The others are in transit-oriented-development zones in New Jersey. We hope to add some additional development projects, or going concerns, in 2019. Rodney Worley, ACT: I was going to school to be an electrical engineer designing CnC machines—robotic machinery. I was offered a job with the company to quit school and design machines with them. After a few years, I wanted to go into business for myself making those machines. I built one and tried to sell it. It was the early ‘90s and people were a little afraid of computers. The first person I tried to sell it to asked if I could cut some parts of the machine. If it worked out, he’d think about buying the machine. I cut him some parts and realized I could put food on the table doing that. Word spread and I started machining more and more parts around town. One day somebody asked if I could laminate the parts, put them in a cash wrap. That was 1998. I’d had a sign shop in Florida in the middle ‘90s until I started ACT in 1998, just doing the woodworking side of things as a second tier supplier for larger millwork companies. In the mid 2000s, I started doing direct for retailers, franchises, hotels and dental offices. In 2014 I opened an office in Shanghai to bring in metal to marry with the millwork so we could offer the complete package. It was onwards and upwards from there.

I’m an architect by trade. I’ve worked in residential architecture for 12 years. That’s how I ended up in the States. – Isy Cabrera, Focus Brands

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

David Shotwell, Flynn Restaurant Group: Started off as a carpenter through Graham High School then went on to ACC community college into the carpentry programs. I stay in the trade industry building houses for several years as a GC licensed of North Carolina. Then I decided to move to Texas where my family was. I started with a nationwide commercial General Contractor as superintendent, project manager and sr.


CIRCLE NO. 18


LEGACIES project manager over the course of 10 years building so many national brands (Starbucks Coffee, Jamba Juice, Chili’s, TGIF’s and municipal projects. Then I crossed over to the dark side to work for retailer industry. In the last 11 years I have represent different owners as a Director of Construction/Facilities, Director of Construction, Sr. Director of Facilities/ Construction (Biscuitville, Bojangles, Cookout Restaurants). Now as Construction Manager for Flynn Restaurant group (Brands: Panera Bread, Taco Bell, Applebee’s and recently Arby’s) which I have always love walking the sites again interacting with GC’s and subs.

Out of high school, I worked with my grandfather, who was a carpenter, building custom houses. Eventually, I went into the low voltage side of electricity. I was kind of a freelance installer. – Jeff Terry, Prime Retail Services

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

Mark Stocker, Construction Jobs Network: About seven years ago, when I went through what I like to call my “nuptial reversal”, I rented a house from the owner of a 20-year recruiting firm. After several Wednesday-night conversations and quite a few beers, Bill, the owner, convinced me to quit what I was doing to help him run his company, MetalJobs Network. Our recruiting focused on businesses in metal production, distribution, and construction throughout the United States and China. I spent the next few years revamping and modernizing the company; so when Bill was ready to retire, I was ready to buy MetalJobs Network. As a new owner I needed advice. Luckily, I met Jeff Kay at KBIC, one of the top recruiting firms in the country. Jeff was a great mentor; and a year later, we joined him at Sanford Rose and Associates International (SRAI) for access to their more robust resources. That connection gave us the confidence to launch a new division: ConstructionJobs Network (CJN) which focuses on recruiting and placing PM’s, superintendents, and estimators with general contractors and developers. CJN started in the Midwest. Over the past 3 years the division has expanded from the Northeast to the Southeast, and by the end of 2020 it will have a national presence. Lately, we have launched two other business units: PlasticJobs Network and ITJobs Network. Our four divisions are collectively known as Search Associates


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LEGACIES experiencing a lot of different opportunities, I headed to college, and received my degree in Psychology and Ministerial Studies. Thereafter I had an opportunity, when I moved to Columbus, to attend Ohio State University and study architecture, eventually leading to me becoming an architect. All of the pieces fell together, more people helped me get through school and into my career than you can imagine. My current endeavor is here with L2M Architects where I am excited to use my knowledge and experience in the retail and restaurant realm to our client’s benefit.

Network (SANINC), and we are proud to have just finished our 6th straight year of record revenue.

After high school I joined the Marine Corps. I served just over four years. After serving, I got into single/ multi-family construction.

John McNamara, Bluegrass Hospitality Group: I grew up in Kentucky, but graduated from Louisiana State University. I worked for the LSU basketball team while in college and I was fortunate enough to find a group in the restaurant business that had eight Ruth’s Chris Steak House franchises, based out of Baton Rouge. After two years in the restaurant business, I transferred to the Chicago location and was fortunate enough to work under Glenn Keefer, who taught me the passion of the restaurant business. I had some breaks go my way and became the General Manager of the Chicago location at the age of 28. After six years in Chicago, the Bluegrass Hospitality, out of Lexington, KY recruited me to come home to Kentucky. I was the Managing Partner of four different locations in Lexington, before moving the corporate office as the Chief Business Officer. It has been a challenge to learn our industry from a development perspective, from a banking perspective, from a finance perspective, but I have loved the journey.

Bibi Sukey, Brookfield Properties: I had a fine art degree in sculpture and my parents were really worried I wouldn’t be able to find a job. During high school and college years, my mom had always pushed me to find job—any job. She didn’t want to me to starve because I was an art student. I got a job as an interior designer’s assistant. From there I grew to like the construction side of the business because it’s like putting models together. It has organization and logic, and it complement my creative artistic side. I have been fortunate to have met several good mentors along the way. I’ve been with Loews Cineplex, starting as a project coordinator. I worked my way up and learn construction process and building Marilyn Brennan, Egan Sign: I actually codes. I have held project manager positions – David Thompson, Superior Sandwiches started off with a degree in elementary with Hertz Rent a Car, H&M, Gensler, and education. I like to say that I use those Brookfield. My story is that I hope that I can skills every day at work. I had different become a mentor to some of the younger interests and chose a career in the business world after working professional starting out their career. I want to be able to reciprofor a real estate developer. I enjoyed the whole development cate the kindness and mentorship I receive from those good folks I process of working with different government agencies and of benefited along my career course, the clients. From there, I transferred over to the retail fixture manufacturing world, where I became a project manager Kevin Bales, L2M Architects: I have been very blessed. I grew up in a family-owned construction business, we built residential and at a national company where some of my clients were Yankee light commercial. I literally grew up in a pickup truck. Through the Candle, Tommy Hilfiger and Anne Klein. This is where my project years I got my own toolbox and performed finished carpentry with management career started. Always balancing the needs of the my family, my brother did the rough framing, all in the family. After client with the needs of the fabrication facility.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


CIRCLE NO. 20


LEGACIES Then I moved into signage and worked for two companies that were fabricators. Managing the whole fabrication process and installation department has really led me here, working for a national sign management company. It encompasses all of my interpersonal relationship building ability as well as my technical knowledge. I’ve been in business development for the last three years. I really enjoy what I do and am very passionate at about understanding the client and looking for those long-term partnerships.

I have been fortunate to have met several good mentors along the way. My story is that I hope that I can be a mentor to some of the younger women and men coming up. I want to be able to give them some tips and advice. – Bibi Sukey, Brookfield

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

Ron Bidinost, Bubbakoo’s Burritos: I started my career in 1975 in the restaurant business. I had been working since I was 12, so my father said to get a real job—in the restaurant business. I ended up staying in the restaurant business with a company called Rustler Steak House, which is long gone. It was a subsidiary of Gino’s Hamburgers. I was there for seven years. I became the GM at the age of 19, which was kind of unusual since my assistant managers were all in their 40s. Over the years, I picked up a mentor or two. I worked at Howard Johnson’s, which is also gone. I worked in the restaurant division there, where I got my first district position in 1983. I moved to Virginia and lived in Washington D.C. I eventually moved back home to Jersey, where I worked for Sbarro Pizza, in both franchising and the corporate office. From there, I worked with Johnny Rockets, where I spent 11 years on the east coast and six years in California. That’s when I started my build up career. Two people who I worked with at Johnny Rockets ended up starting Bubbakoo’s Burritos. We had always kept in touch. They asked for advice and things like that. After Johnny Rockets was sold, I joined a company called Ruby’s Diner. It gave me a great build on what it was like to run a company. I started to learn how to build restaurants and took over the franchising side, even though I had zero experience. I ended up making a seven-year stop at Marie Callender’s, where all we did was remodels and close a bunch of restaurants. It was a rough time for the company, but lucrative for me because I had a great team of people. After much pleading, I ended up


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visit us at primeretailservices.com CIRCLE NO. 21


LEGACIES

joining my friends at Bubbakoo’s. As I grew up in my commercial construction career, I kept my operations career. Today I literally do all three—operations, franchise and construction. It’s kind of my thing. David Thompson, Superior Sandwiches: After high school I joined the Marine Corps. I served just over four years. After serving, I got into single/multi-family construction. I worked my way up to project manager and area manager. That was about that time the industry took a dip so I moved into the restaurant industry. I worked as a superintendent and traveled across the country building all types of restaurants. From there, I moved into project management and eventually ended up on the construction management side. Later I made the move to join the Which Wich family and I have been here for six years now.

In 2014 I opened an office in Shanghai to bring in metal to marry with the millwork so we could offer the complete package. It was onwards and upwards from there.

to find a job and so I became a road warrior in retail construction. I installed fixtures for a company called Royston in 7-Eleven stores across the country. I became one of those “the grass is always greener” people so I quit my job in 2012 and helped a friend start a business. After only a few months that went out of business, and I was introduced to Prime Retail Services. I started there working as a field manager, was promoted to project manager and now my role is Business Development Officer.

Colleen Biggs, The Little Gym International: I am where I am all because of hard work and passion. I have been working since I was eight years old, where I mowed lawns and delivered the PennySaver, if anyone knows what that is. I had a paper route. I have had a job ever since then. I started working at a “real” job at the age of Jeff Terry, Prime Retail Services: During 15 after my parents went through a divorce the summer months and the after high when I was 12. I needed to get a job to school I worked with my grandfather, who help pay the bills, so I had to forge my birth – Rodney Worley, ACT was a carpenter building custom houses. certificate. I would skip school to go work Eventually after several job changes I went full-time at a restaurant. into the low voltage side of electricity—I stress LOW voltage because I’ve been supporting myself and living on my own since I was I don’t really even like plugging a drill into the wall. I began working 17 years old. The first “big girl” job was when I was working for the for myself as a freelance installer. In the late 90s, early 2000s, that local phone company. From there, I went to work for a construcwas about the time that the home theatre and home entertainment tion company that we outsourced work to during my time with the systems started catching on. In addition we installed central vacs, phone company. I outsourced jobs for their buried service wire intercom systems and security systems. I had started my own busidivision. They were impressed by my organization and ability to ness, doing pretty well up until 2008. complete the tickets under budget, so they hired me to penetrate I did a lot of work in the high end builder’s market, which that department from within to save them money moving forward. closed down almost overnight due to the recession. I was forced After working for that company for a few years, I had accomplished

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


OWNER-FOCUSED CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE

CIRCLE NO. 22


LEGACIES At 23 years old I had a staff of 14 and we were building 160 ground-up projects a year nationwide. Our pipeline was two to three years in advance and moving at warp speed. I was tasked with organizing, controlling and standardizing processes, procedures and documents as well as qualifying and educating general contractors on those processes and procedures. In addition to the construction program I also spearheaded the project to streamline the remodel program. When the recession of 2008 hit, the market bottomed out and in February of that year I was part of a major layoff. I went to work in the Development Department of a general contractor. I was responsible for all permit expediting for Chuck E. Cheese Corporation, as well as due diligence, managing licenses and legal issues for other clients. While with this general contractor, I was what I set out to do and moved on to puroffered an opportunity to be part of startup sue something I could be passionate about. segment of another company. I accepted I took on a part-time position as a server in a position with a facilities management the meantime. company to manage proactive rollout I was looking for anything that would projects for 7-11, McDonald’s, Burger King, challenge my abilities and provide a career Dollar General, Coca-Cola, and closings for with a future. Then one day I picked up the Blockbuster stores. This was the start of my phone and called The Little Gym Internationrollout project management experience. I al. The rest was history. I’ve been working learned as I went. for The Little Gym just over 16 years and A couple years later I went back into love it! I started at a very entry level as a the restaurant world, working with LeDuff project coordinator and eventually worked America (LDA), who owned and operated my way up through the ranks to my current La Madeleine, Mimi’s Café and Bruegger’s position as a Director. Bagels. After their plans for development I have built strong relationships with slowed, I was recruited to Tuesday Mornthose I serve including the franchisees, ing, where I was department head for the which assisted me in gaining the knowledge construction and project team and was later and experience needed to be able to serve named head of facilities. With a staff of in my current position overseeing the equity three, I managed facilities for 720 locations. of the brand for the company’s future. Due to the workload, I had to use a lot of Jennifer Grieser, ProjectMates: I started outsourced resources. There was a great deal of ongoing process inventing and college as a Chemistry major with a minor – Ron Bidinost, Bubbakoo’s Burritos creative management. in Secondary Education. While in college, I I had been using ProjectMates for at tended bar and quickly realized I could make least six years with LDA and Tuesday Mornmore in other jobs, including bartending, ing, and was a power user on their software. Since I like process than I could as a teacher. improvement and enjoy helping others fix problems, what better I stumbled into the construction/development industry. Not way is there than to do that for a company? I can’t wait to see what sure of what my path would be, I dabbled briefly in banking happens next. before I reached back to the restaurant industry and took a position with Brinker International as a project coordinator. I was Tim Hill, The Beam Team: One of the themes I think about is the in that role for about six months before I was given addition young people who are being hired. Some of these young people responsibilities. This was a great early career challenge for me.

I started my career in 1975 in the restaurant business. I had been working since I was 12, so my father said to get a real job—in the restaurant business.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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For more information, visit emgcorp.com or contact: Chris Varney, Executive Vice President | cvarney@emgcorp.com | 800.733.0660 ext. 7608 www.EMGcorp.com CIRCLE NO. 23


LEGACIES want an immediate high position without on the job experience. When I hear the stories around the room I see that no one here was handed anything in their careers. They worked themselves up from the bottom. I used to do in-store service and sets at retail stores. I would travel from store to store every day. I would travel over 50,000 or more miles per year by car. I traveled from Sunday night until Friday night every week. My boss allowed me to share a room at a Red Roof or Knightsbridge Inn. I started doing merchandising, installations, roll-outs and build-outs in retail stores all over Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, Indiana, Missouri, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kentucky

I actually started off with a degree in elementary education. I like to say that I use those skills every day at work. – Marilyn Brennan, Egan Sign

and the Midwest. I left them to take a job with Stanley Works in New Britain, Connecticut. They offered me low salary which to me was a large increase. Since then, I worked and lived in Detroit, Cleveland, Boston and Chicago, where I live now. I have held executive, sales, marketing, and operations positions in this industry for over 30 years now. Positions with manufacturers, sales brokers, service companies and construction companies. One of the things that’s helped me in recent years is the experience I have gained in project management and account management. It helps in the business development field if you have 20-plus years of experience in various positions. CCR

Trend Watch 2019

Attendees discuss what new year may have in store When you look into your crystal ball for 2019, what do you see? It’s a question that has many sides, depending on where you sit in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sides. Here’s a snapshot of some of the trends and challenges the commercial construction market can expect to see in the new year. Mark Stocker, Construction Jobs Network: Although commercial construction projects continue to expand, there is a significant talent shortage. When I compare searching for project-management candidates in commercial construction to searching for talent in other markets, there is a stark difference. For example, if we were to place marketing calls to ten businesses in our metals, plastics, or IT segment, we might find one or two businesses that have a strong need to hire. If we made those same ten calls in commercial construction, more than five of those companies would have an urgent need. It’s finding qualified talent that is the challenge. When the market contracted ten years ago, a lot of young people left the industry. Additionally, some senior people who were financially able retired earlier than they would have, leaving many positions to be filled with those lower down the ladder. When the industry

46

rebounded, young people sought construction careers again; yet there was a five-year gap in which there were very few people in entry-level jobs. Today, that gap equates to a shortage of project-management professionals at the mid-career level (5-15 years’ experience), which means that tracking down good candidates who are open to a career change is tough. Of course, there is always an abundance of recycled talent—people who change jobs frequently and whom nobody wants to hire. When we post an opening on a job board or in our newsletter, most of what we get is recycled talent. That makes it even harder to find specialized talent. Strong candidates know that they are in short supply. They know they have options, and that is driving up salaries. Another trend we’re seeing is obvious: technology is showing up in all aspects of project management, from software to drones. I cannot tell you how many times we have had a client inform us that a candidate must be fluent in technology. Most seasoned superintendents and project managers didn’t grow up around technology, and this is a huge detriment to their employability. However, those who are tech savvy are poised to take great advantage of the higher-level positions left behind.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


CIRCLE NO. 24


LEGACIES

David, Shotwell, Flynn Restaurant Group: I want to touch base a little bit on the topic of GCs. I have found base on my experiences having the role on both side (Owner/GC) of taking a closer look into the average bids number which in most cases they have everything included because of them doing their due diligences. The industry is in its highest demands in a long time which giving opportunity for subcontractor to price higher however their work are lacking in quality because lack in resources. It’s great to be part of Flynn Restaurant Group which we believe as company about building strong relationships in quality, cost saving and being efficiently. That’s important to us. Rodney Worley, ACT: We see raw material prices go up, up, up on the wood side and on the metal side. You can’t pass it on. We talk a lot about the hiring issues and not being able to bring in people who are trained, especially a machinist, woodworkers, cabinet makers, things like that. We talk about younger project managers and managers who don’t even know what they’re managing. We’re seeing more turnover in our customers. I know that GCs feel like they’re the last to get paid. I can’t even put fixtures in until the GCs are done. When I listen to myself and to what everybody’s saying, it sounds really negative. But at the same time, I’m not negative on what I do. I wish I had more people, better people. I wish there was more loyalty. I don’t know if it’s the eastern Kentucky boy in me that I still kind of believe in the handshake. I believe in giving my word. I wish there was more of that. Sean Holmes, H2 Hospitality: I think the trend we see is hindrance. Labor is obviously the biggest issue out there. A good laborer who does a good job from the ground up can earn a $100,000 easily. So I hear what people are saying, “Don’t pass it down.” But in the end, somebody has to pay for it somewhere, so it gets passed on in some shape or form. Cycles have changed. At one time it would take five to seven years before you’d do anything in terms of refurbs. We’re down now to probably three years. The problem I see with a lot of it is that when it’s three years the quality is cheaper. And what’s worse is that

48

the brands are actually starting to do the same thing. They want it done in a shorter amount of time, so instead of handing you the blueprint of their products, they just say, “Here’s the parameter to work within.” At least that is a little bit of leverage. Isy Cabrera, Carvel: I have the same issues with contractors. I think that is because we are a franchisee-based brand. Also, when I find a GC that works and recommend him to other franchisees, I’m the enemy. They think I must be getting something out of that particular vendor. I’m not. I just want it done the right way. It makes my life easier and will make yours easier. But they don’t see it that way. They want to find somebody who is cheaper and they do not want any recommendations from corporate. I have no ties with anybody. I just want to be able to make a recommendation. The other issue that I have is language barriers. A huge percentage of my franchisees are Asian. English is not the first language and communication is hard sometimes. We just hire a field guide who speaks Mandarin, so we have somebody who can be a translator. Colleen Biggs, The Little Gym: Have you thought about having a network of franchisees that uses specific GCs and have all recommendation filter through the franchisee? Carvel’s Cabrera: That’s what we’re doing. The Little Gym’s Biggs: Because we’re 100 percent franchisee-owned, we onboard our franchisees with a few additional requirements than most. It’s important to us that they understand that they must use a specific GC for brand consistency, ease of responsibility to them as well as ease of coordination throughout all departments and vendors involved. Carvel’s Cabrera: I have no problems with new franchisees. It is in the agreement. This is what you need to do. This is the person to use. My issue is with the old franchisee who wants to open new stores. They are used to doing things a certain way.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


CIRCLE NO. 25


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Listing gives the lowdown on industry’s leading architecture firms

Y

50

RESTAURANT

Stantec Architecture Inc................................. $19,362,791.00 Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates, Inc........................... $7,915,059.00 Chipman Design Architecture......................... $5,750,000.00 NELSON......................................................... $5,268,574.00 LEO A DALY.................................................... $3,492,416.00 Rebel Design+Group...................................... $2,884,945.00 GreenbergFarrow........................................... $2,107,000.00 Ware Malcomb............................................... $1,358,115.00 LGA Partners, LP............................................ $1,200,000.00 J. Banks Design Group................................... $1,017,000.00

HEALTHCARE

HOSPITALITY

Hirsch Bedner Associates................................. $140,000,000.00 Wilson Associates............................................. $32,000,000.00 NELSON............................................................ $18,206,526.00 Rebel Design+Group........................................ $16,898,977.00 LEO A DALY....................................................... $14,141,028.00 Stantec Architecture Inc.................................... $11,121,424.00 J. Banks Design Group..................................... $10,296,899.00 DiLeonardo International................................... $9,810,000.00 Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates, Inc............................. $7,406,316.00 GSB, Inc............................................................ $7,250,000.00

Core States Group........................................... WD Partners................................................... GreenbergFarrow............................................ Sevan Multi-Site Solutions.............................. Interplan LLC.................................................. Stantec Architecture Inc.................................. Chipman Design Architecture.......................... LEO A DALY..................................................... Wilson Associates........................................... Rebel Design+Group.......................................

Stantec Architecture Inc............................... $138,681,991.00 LEO A DALY.................................................. $34,775,448.00 WD Partners................................................ $9,000,000.00 NELSON....................................................... $7,499,276.00 Little............................................................ $6,706,500.00 Chipman Design Architecture....................... $5,750,000.00 Hobbs + Black............................................. $5,400,000.00 Ware Malcomb............................................ $2,517,630.00 LK Architecture............................................ $1,700,000.00 Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber.............. $1,700,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

RETAIL

Stantec Architecture Inc............................... $38,916,915.00 GreenbergFarrow......................................... $32,000,000.00 HFA.............................................................. $30,050,000.00 Little............................................................ $26,606,900.00 WD Partners................................................ $24,500,000.00 SGA Design Group....................................... $24,400,000.00 NELSON....................................................... $23,724,103.00 Sargenti Architects...................................... $22,400,000.00 Core States Group........................................ $17,246,361.00 CESO, Inc..................................................... $13,100,000.00

MULTI-HOUSING

ou can find some of the industry’s leading architecture firms right here. Our exclusive annual listing provides all of the information you need from leading firms in the retail, restaurant, hospitality & other commercial sectors. The report provides the contact information and contact person at each company. And if your firm didn’t make the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

Stantec Architecture Inc.......................... NELSON.............................................. LEO A DALY.......................................... Hirsch Bedner Associates........................ Ware Malcomb...................................... Little................................................... GreenbergFarrow.................................. WD Partners......................................... Core States Group................................. Wilson Associates..................................

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

$20,200,186.00 $14,900,000.00 $12,300,000.00 $12,000,000.00 $10,193,715.00 $5,818,579.00 $5,750,000.00 $5,747,693.00 $5,000,000.00 $4,223,445.00

$714,333,969.00 $222,608,600.00 $187,167,175.00 $140,000,000.00 $103,819,760.00 $82,191,000.00 $54,000,000.00 $54,000,000.00 $51,187,833.00 $41,000,000.00


//3877 ArcVision Inc.

David Shove-Brown, Co-Founder 3333 K St. NW, Suite 60 Washington, DC 20007 (202) 350-4244 • Fax: (202) 350-4245 www.3877.design • dsb@studio3877.com Year Established: 2011, No. of Employees: 22 Retail Billings: $34,500.00, Hospitality Billings: $2,658,559.62 Restaurant Billings: $538,198.50, Healthcare Billings: $86,387.92 Multi-Housing Billings: $165,119.44, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,482,765.48 Completed Projects in 2018: 45, Specialize In: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Health & Wellness, Bar Design, Residential Projects, Leading Clients: Courtyard Marriott, Renaissance, Mi Vida, Hilton Garden Inn, Succotash, DIRT, Midici Pizza, Hampton Inn, The Smith

Janine Buettner, Dir. Of Business Development 1950 Craig Rd.#, 300 St. Louis, MO 63146 (800) 489-2233 • Fax: (314) 415-2300 www.arcv.com • jbuettner@arcv.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 100 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2018: 100 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, All Retail, Office Leading Clients: Five Below, Skechers, Panera, Taco Bell, KFC

BBGM/MONOGRAM 555 International Bill Pelham, Marketing Manager

James Geier, President 4501 S Western Blvd. Chicago, IL 60609 (773) 869-0555 • Fax: (773) 376-0555 www.555.com • jgeier@555.com Year Established: N/A, No. of Employees: N/A Retail Billings: $2,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $2,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $6,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 40, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Pro Sports Retail and Concessions Leading Clients: Chicago Bulls & Blackhawks Madhouse Team Store

1825 K St. NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20006 (202) 452-1644 • Fax: (202) 452-1647 www.bbgm.com • info@bbgm.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 35 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $3,400,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $283,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $703,000.00, Total Billings: $4,386,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 6, Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Workplace Leading Clients: Carr City Centers, R.D. Olson, Five Star Development

CASCO + R5

E Cutter, President api(+) Daniel 12 Sunnen Dr., Suite 100

Juliette Lauer, Marketing & Public Relations Administrator 2709 N Rocky Point Dr. Tampa, FL 33607 (813) 281-9299 • Fax: (813) 281-9292 www.apiplus.com • jlauer@apiplus.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 30 Retail Billings: $4,236,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $320,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,400,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $44,000.00, Total Billings: $6,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 78, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Planet Hollywood, International, Publix Supermarkets, Regency Centers, Darden Restaurants

St. Louis , MO 63143 (314) 821-1100 www.cascocorp.com • info@cascocorp.com Year Established: 1959, No. of Employees: 115 Retail Billings: $10,460,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $120,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $200,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $775,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $3,335,000.00, Total Billings: $14,890,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 850, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, State and Local Government, Industrial Leading Clients: Bed Bath & Beyond, Burlington, Dollar General, Dollar Tree, Drury Hotels, Enterprise, Family Dollar, Five Below, Fresenius Medical Care, Jiffy Lube, Gerard Craft, Illy, O’Reilly Automotive, Primrose, Rooms to Go, Ross Stores, Rumble Fitness, State of Missouri, The Learning Experience

Sam Estes, Vice President 2710 Sutton Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63143 (314) 644-1234 • Fax: (314) 644-4373 www.adg-stl.com • sestes@asg-stl.com Year Established: 1981, No. of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: $3,300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $100,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,900,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 125, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department Leading Clients: Floor & Décor, Office Depot, PetSmart

175 Montrose W Ave., # 400 Akron, OH 44321 (330) 933-8820 www.cesoinc.com • olson@cesoinc.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 185 Retail Billings: $13,100,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $100,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,800,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $100,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $13,400,000.00, Total Billings: $29,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 1750, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Industrial/ Warehouse, Leading Clients: KFC, Bloomin Brands, Speedway, Love’s, Valvoline, Kohl’s, Burlington, Tractor Supply, Cracker Barrel

CESO, Inc. Architectural Design Guild Steven R Olson, AIA, President

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

51


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Chipman Design Architecture CREATE Architecture Kate Kerin, Principal/HR & Corp. Affairs Planning & Design

1350 E Touhy Ave., 1st Floor East Des Plaines, IL 60018 (847) 298-6900 • Fax: (847) 298-6966 www.chipman-design.com • info@chipman-design.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 130 Retail Billings: $5,750,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $17,750,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $25,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 452, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Sustainable Design, 3D Photo-Accurate Renderings, Virtual Reality and Immersive Project Walk Throughs Leading Clients: N/A

C.M. Architecture, PA

Nicole Urista, Marketing Coordinator 800 Washington Ave. N, 208 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 547-1300 www.cmarch.com • nurista@cmarch.com Year Established: 1977, No. Of Employees: 69 Retail Billings: $7,965,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $27,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,880,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $248,000.00, Federal Billings: $117,000.00 Other Billings: $969,000.00, Total Billings: $12,206,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 787, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Taco Bell, Torrid, Skechers, McDonalds, Gander Outdoors, Best Buy, Auntie Anne’s, Advance Auto, Jimmy John’s

Coast2Coast Survey Corporation

Tim West, Director, Multi-Site 7704 Basswood Dr. Chattanooga, TN 37416 (423) 710-4714 www.coast2coast.net • twest@coast2coast.net Year Established: 2000, No. of Employees: 75 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2018: 900+ Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal Leading Clients: Remington Hotels, Ware Malcomb, Ace Hardware, CallisonRTKL, Cortland Partners, HFRAA, Benson, Volkswagen, Stonehill & Taylor

Core States Group

Natalie Rodriguez, Marketing Manager 3039 Premiere Pkwy., Suite 700 Duluth, GA 30097 (813) 319-8755 www.core-eng.com • nrodriguez@core-eng.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 283 Retail Billings: $17,246,361.00, Hospitality Billings: $257,213.00 Restaurant Billings: $20,200,186.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $51,187,833.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 1,866, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Primark, Fossil, CVS, TD Bank, JP Morgan Chase, Saks Fifth Avenue-Off Fifth, Wegmans, Verizon, Fogo de Chao, Applebee’s, Darden, McDonald’s, Panera Bread, Hardee’s, Newk’s Eatery, Pressed Juicery, Pilot Flying J, 7-Eleven, Buc-ee’s, and others

52

Frankie J Campione, Principal 45 W 34th St., Penthouse New York, NY 10001 (212) 297-0880 • Fax: (212) 297-0899 www.createworldwide.com • info@createapd.com Year Established: 1996, No. of Employees: 14 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2018: 55, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

Cutler Design Consulting Ltd.

Paula Funk, Office Administrator 195 Alexander St., 2nd Floor Vancouver, BC Canada V6A 1B8 (604) 681-5050 www.cutlerdc.com • info@cutlerdc.com Year Established: 2010, No. of Employees: 15 Retail Billings: $2,160,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $720,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $720,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,600,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 50, Specialize In: Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Office, Fitness Leading Clients: Flight Centre, DHL, Geox

Cyntergy

Jim Turner, CAO 810 S Cincinnati Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 877-6000 • Fax: (918) 877-4000 www.cyntergy.com • jeturner@cyntergy.com Year Established: 1997, No. of Employees: 137 Retail Billings: $10,960,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,236,707.00 Restaurant Billings: $770,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: $3,203,137.00 Other Billings: $1,640,000.00, Total Billings: $ 17,749,844.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 91, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Education, Federal, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Dollar Tree, Tractor Supply, Slim Chickens, US Beef, AAFES

Darkhorse Lightworks, LLC

® Dawn Hollingsworth, Principal 14541 Sylvan St., Suite 105 Van Nuys, CA 91411 (818) 514-2272 www.darkhorselightworks.com • dawnh@darkhorselightworks.com Year Established: 2016, No. of Employees: 1 Retail Billings: $36,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $144,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 2, Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: The Void

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


CREATING INSPIRED PL ACES FOR THE WORLDâ„¢

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175+ TEAMM ATES

CIRCLE NO. 26

NINE OFFICES

OLSON@CESOINC.COM


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Degen & Degen Architecture FHA Architects & Interior Design Brandon Beatty, Architect

Melissa Walling, Principal-Marketing Director 1402 Third Ave., Suite 1100 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 623-6368 • Fax: (206) 623-6368 www.ddseattle.com • melissa@ddseattle.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 17 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $1,500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $1,000,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $2,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 13, Specialize In: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Leading Clients: N/A

14344 Y St., Suite 204 Omaha, NE 68137 (402) 895-0878 • Fax: (402) 895-9561 www.fhaarchitects.com fhainfo@fhaarchitects.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 18 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $2,800,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $2,800,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 65, Specialize In: Restaurants Leading Clients: Chipotle, Sweetgreen, Tacodeli, Snooze an AM Eatery, Peet’s Coffee, The Boiling Crab, Postino’s

Thompson, DiLeonardo International Fishbeck, Carr & Huber James Lehouiller, Managing Partner/CEO 2348 Post Rd. Warwick, RI 02886 (401) 732-2900 • Fax: (401) 732-5315 www.dileonardo.com • info@dileonardo.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 80 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $9,810,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $545,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $545,000.00, Total Billings: $10,900,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: N/A, Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

Jenny Waugh, Marketing Operations Director 1515 Arboretum Dr. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49546 (615) 575-3824 www.ftch.com • info@ftch.com Year Established: 1956, No. of Employees: 409 Retail Billings: $5,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $900,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $1,700,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,100,000.00, Total Billings: $9,200,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 51, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: AMC, Hertz, Meijer Inc., Bissell

Distinctive Hospitality Fisher Architecture, LLC Designs LLC Keith P. Fisher, Principal/Architect

Jemma Cox, Managing Partner 2221 E Parham Rd., Suite B Richmond, VA 23228 (804) 672-2121 www.distinctivehospitality.com jemma@distinctivehospitality.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: 17 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $2,339,372.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $2,339,372.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 20, Specialize In: Hotels Leading Clients: Hilton, Marriott, IHG, Wyndham, LaQuinta

ESa (Earl Swensson Associates)

Sandy Dickerson, Director of Communications/Marketing 1033 Demonbreun St., Suite 800 Nashville, TN 37203 (615) 329-9445 • Fax: (615) 329-0046 www.esarch.com • sandyd@esarch.com Year Established: N/A, No. of Employees: N/A Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2018: N/A, Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Corporate Office, Leading Clients: N/A

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542 Riverside Dr. Salisbury, MD 21801 (410) 742-0238 • Fax: (888) 879-7149 www.fisherarchitecture.com kfisher@fisherarchitecture.com Year Established: 2009, No. of Employees: 12 Retail Billings: $250,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $600,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $230,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $300,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $250,000.00, Federal Billings: $100,000.00 Other Billings: $300,000.00, Total Billings: $1,930,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 150, Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Residential Leading Clients: Hyatt, Cambria, Hampton Inn, Holiday Inn, Hilton, Comfort Inn, La Quinta, Jimmy Johns, Starbucks, Dairy Queen, Harley Davidson, Long & Foster, Toyota, Chevrolet, Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Ford, Chrysler, Saladworks

Flick Mars

James Flick, Partner 10440 N Central Expy., Suite 1210 Dallas, TX 75231 (214) 653-1900 www.flickmars.com • james@flickmars.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: 24 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $3,433,500.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,433,500.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 10, Specialize In: Casinos, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: White Lodging, Harrell Hospitality, Rockbridge Hospitality Development, Tavistock, Thrash Development

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


Architecture | Interior Design Hospitality | Medical Restaurant | Retail | Multi-family

CIRCLE NO. 27


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS GreenbergFarrow Hirsch Bedner Associates

Shannon Dennis, Marketing Manager 44 W 28th St., 16th Floor New York, NY 10001 (212) 725-9530 www.greenbergfarrow.com • sdennis@greenbergfarrow.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 320 Retail Billings: $32,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $483,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $12,300,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $2,107,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $7,110,000.00, Total Billings: $54,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 1800, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, High-Rise Residential, Mixed-Use Leading Clients: L. Brands, Murphy Oil USA, The Home Depot, Tailored Brands, Circle K, IKEA, Whole Foods Market, Wal-Mart, Meijer, ALDI, Michaels Stores, Levi Strauss & Co., DSW, Gap, Bed Bath & Beyond, Target, Smart Fit, Blink Fitness, Texas Roadhouse, Starbucks, McDonald’s, Honeygrow, Chipotle, Panda Restaurant Group, Panera Bread

Group 7 Design, Inc.

Luanne Perry, VP Design 83 Cedar St. Milford, MA 01757 (508) 458-4545 • Fax: (508) 458-4546 www.group7design.net • 1perry@group7design.net Year Established: 2008, No. of Employees: 6 Retail Billings: $2,421,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $250,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $150,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $100,000.00, Total Billings: $741,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 48, Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Office Leading Clients: The Talbots, Inc., The Seven Hills Foundation

GSB, Inc.

Ronald G Smith, AIA, NCARB President 3555 NW 58th St., Suite 700W Oklahoma City, OK 73112 (405) 848-9549 • Fax: (405) 848-9783 www.gsb-inc.com • gsb@gsb-inc.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 34 Retail Billings: $549,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $7,250,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $850,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $149,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $989,000.00, Total Billings: $9,787,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 39, Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Entertainment Leading Clients: Disney, Marriott, Love’s

HFA

Larry Lott, AIA, President/COO 1705 S Walton Blvd., Suite 3 Bentonville, AR 72712 (479) 273-7780 www.hfa-ae.com • info@hfa-ae.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 240 Retail Billings: $30,050,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $1,850,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $31,900,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 600, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Fueling, Leading Clients: Walmart, Love’s, Cumberland Farms, Chick-fil-A, IWG

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Tiffany Hayden, PR Manager 3216 Nebraska Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-9087 www.hba.com • tiffany.hayden@hba.com Year Established: 1965, No. of Employees: 1,700 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $140,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $140,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 550, Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Cruise Lines Leading Clients: St. Regis, Four Seasons, Marriott, Hilton, Intercontinental Hotel Group, Kimpton

Hixson Architecture, Engineering, Interiors

Scott Schroeder, Vice President and Manager, Client Development 659 Van Meter Street Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 241-1230 • Fax: (513) 241-1287 www.hixson-inc.com • sschroeder@hixson-inc.com Year Established: 1948, No. of Employees: 120 Retail Billings: $2,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $19,500,000.00, Total Billings: $21,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 10, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s, Brookfield

Hobbs + Black

Amanda Ciliberti, Marketing Manager 100 N State St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (734) 663-4189 • Fax: (734) 663-1770 www.hobbs-black.com • aciliberti@hobbs-black.com Year Established: 1965, No. of Employees: 73 Retail Billings: $5,400,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $330,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $32,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $5,400,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $442,000.00, Federal Billings: $2,600,000.00 Other Billings: $3,700,000.00, Total Billings: $17,904,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 65, Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Education, Senior Living, Office, Worship Leading Clients: The Taubman Co, State of Michigan, Maricopa Integrated Health System, Restoration Hardware, Macomb Community College, Henry Ford Health System

Hospitality Design Group

Robert L Herbage, AIAPrincipal/Architect 4035 Naco Perrin Blvd., Suite 200D San Antonio, TX 78217 (210) 831-3580 • Fax: (210) 399-9063 www.hospitalitydesigngroup.com rherbage@hospitalitydesigngroup.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 4 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $260,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $260,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 23, Specialize In: Restaurants Leading Clients: Subway

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


CIRCLE NO. 28


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Interplan LLC JW Displays, Incorporated

PatrickRinglever, Managing Director 604 Courtland St., Suite 100 Orlando, FL 32804 (407) 645-5008 • Fax: (407) 629-9124 www.interplanllc.com • pringlever@interplanllc.com Year Established: 1972, No. of Employees: 172 Retail Billings: $10,249,384.00, Hospitality Billings: $197,880.00 Restaurant Billings: $10,193,715.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $659,595.00, Total Billings: $21,300,574.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 1,200, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Banks Leading Clients: N/A

ARCHITECTURE - ENGINEERING - INTERIOR DESIGN

Joel Warnick, President 822 A1A North, Suite 310 Ponte Vedra, FL 32082 (888) 412-4009 www.jwdisplays.com • sales@jwdisplays.com Year Established: 2016, No. of Employees: 6 Retail Billings: $300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $50,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $80,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $10,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $440,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 24, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal Leading Clients: Coastal Specialists

J. Banks Design Group Kenneth Park Architects

Elizabeth Simpson, Graphics & Marketing Specialist 35 N Main St. Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 (843) 681-5122 www.jbanksdesign.com • elizabeth.simpson@jbanksdesign.com Year Established: 1986, No. of Employees: 48 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $10,296,899.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $1,017,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $143,000.00, Total Billings: $11,456,899.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 26, Specialize In: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Hospitality, Resorts, Villas, Clubhouses, Leading Clients: Timbers Resorts, Branded Hotels(Marriott Courtyard, Embassy Suites, Hilton Garden Inn)

Jencen Architecture

Juleen Russell, AIA, Principal, Business Development Director 2850 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, OH 44115 (216) 781-0131 • Fax: (216) 781-0134 www.jencen.com • jrussell@jencen.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 21 Retail Billings: $2,343,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $462,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $495,000.00, Total Billings: $3,300,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 136, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Branded Environments, Leading Clients: Alex and Ani, Kay Jewelers, Jared the Galleria of Jewelry, Refresh Dental, Precision Orthodontics, Seritage Growth Properties, Johnston & Murphy, Journeys

Amie E Tesler, Director of Business Development, Associate 360 Lexington Ave. New York, NY 10017 (212) 599-0044 www.kennethpark.com • abentley@kennethpark.com Year Established: 1930, No. of Employees: 55 Retail Billings: $10,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $10,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 130, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Leading Clients: Columbia Sportswear, MCM, Lacoste, Hugo Boss, Bailey 44, H&M, Casper Wave, Christian Louboutin, Dover Street Market, Zadig & Voltaire

L2M Architects

Jeffrey Mahler, Vice President 811 Cromwell Park Dr., 113 Glen Burnie, MD 21061 (410) 863-1302 www.l2m.com • jmahler@l2m.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 24 Retail Billings: $3,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $200,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,200,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $800,000.00, Total Billings: $5,200,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: N/A, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: KIMCO, Federal Realty, Hannaford, Hair Cuttery, Floyds 99

LEO A DALY JGA John McGauvran, Director of Marketing

Ken Nisch, Chairman 29110 Inkster Rd, Ste 200 Southfield, MI 48034 (248) 355-0890 • Fax: (248) 355-0895 www.jga.com • info@jga.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 31 Retail Billings: $5,300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $5,300,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 200, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Sundance, Soft Surroundings, H&M, Paradies, Blue Nile, James Allen, Allen Edmonds

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8600 Indian Hills Dr. Omaha, NE 68114 (402) 390-4433 • Fax: (402) 391-8564 www.leoadaly.com • jtmcgauvran@leoadaly.com Year Established: 1915, No. of Employees: 800, Retail Billings: $4,519,663.00, Hospitality Billings: $14,141,028.00 Restaurant Billings: $5,747,693.00, Healthcare Billings: $34,775,448.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $3,492,416.00, Federal Billings: $25,077,960.00 Other Billings: $99,412,967.00, Total Billings: $187,167,175.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 223, Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Leading Clients: Capital One Services, Hilton, Marriott, Publix, Dollar General, Blackstone, United Airlines, Delta Airlines, G6 Hospitality, Office Depot, Arthrex

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


GSB, INC. ARCHITECTS & PLANNERS Turning Visions Into Reality Since 1979.

HOSPITALITY | COMMERCIAL | ENTERTAINMENT CIVIC | RESIDENTIAL | EDUCATIONAL | COMMUNITY CIRCLE NO. 29

www.gsb-inc.com


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS LGA Partners, LP

Paulette Burns, Partner 1425 Forbes Ave., Suite 400 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 243-3430 • Fax: (412) 224-4747 www.lga-partners.com • pauletteb@lga-partners.com Year Established: 1993, No. of Employees: 54 Retail Billings: $3,300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $413,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $448,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $447,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $1,200,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,500,000.00, Total Billings: $7,308,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 495, Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Airport Retail & Restaurant, Leading Clients: Aeropostale, Rue21, Bluemercury, Brahmin, Claires, DTLR, FRAPORT USA, H&M, J.Jill, Morphe, NYDJ, TUMI

Little

Bruce A Barteldt, Jr., Partner & Retail Practice Leader 615 S College St. Charlotte, NC 28202 (704) 525-6350 • Fax: (704) 561-8700 www.littleonline.com • bbarteldt@littleonline.com Year Established: 1964, No. of Employees: 400 Retail Billings: $26,606,900.00, Hospitality Billings: $460,920.00 Restaurant Billings: $3,200,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $6,706,500.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $45,216,680, Total Billings: $82,191,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 965, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Banking Financial Centers, Leading Clients: Bank of America, Publix Supermarkets, CVS/Caremark, BB&T, Bealls Department Stores, Pandora Jewelry, Marriott International, United Healthcare, Belk, Marukai Corp., Chelsea Groton Bank, The Home Depot

LK Architecture

Dennis D Smith, AIA, President 345 Riverview, Suite 200 Wichita, KS 67203 (316) 268-0230 • Fax: (316) 268-0205 www.lk-architecture.com • dsmith@lk-architecture.com Year Established: 1967, No. of Employees: 110 Retail Billings: $8,300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $5,500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,300,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $1,700,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,000,000.00, Total Billings: $17,800,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 37, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Walmart, Panera Bread, Hilton, Marriott, IHG

LSArchitecture, PLLC

Terri Lewis Stevens, CEO/Architect P.O. Box 1287 Mandeville, LA 70470 (409) 299-0162 www.lsarchitecture.com lsainfo@lsarchitecture.com Year Established: 2004, No. of Employees: Varies Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2018: 15, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Worship/Education, Leading Clients: MidWest Commercial Construction(Client List Confidential), Nationwide Orthodontic Provider, Nationwide Quick-Service Restaurant Chain

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MatchLine Design Group

Lesley H Wyman, Principal/Partner 10300 N Central Expy., Suite 335 Dallas, TX 75231 (972) 707-0568 www.matchlinedesign.com • lesley@matchlinedesign.com Year Established: 2009, No. of Employees: 8 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $845,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $65,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $125,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,035,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 23, Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Newcrest Image, Magnolia Hospitality, O’Reilly Hospitality Managament

MBI Companies, Inc.

Louis Cortina, President 299 N Weisgarber Rd. Knoxville, TN 37919 (865) 584-0997 www.mbicompanies.com louisc@mbicompanies.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 92 Retail Billings: $1,300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $200,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $1,100,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $700,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $10,700,000.00, Total Billings: $14,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 100+, Specialize In: Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Industrial, Jails, Leading Clients: Pilot Travel Centers, Clayton Homes, Bojangles

The McIntosh Group

Karen MacCannell, Sr. Associate-Dir BD 1850 S Boulder Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 585-8555 www.mcintoshtransforms.com karenm@mcintoshtransforms.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 15, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 469, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Banking, Leading Clients: Massage Envy, CitiBank

MCX Interior

R. Shane McNamara, Co-Founder and Managing Principal 11 Broadway, Suite 615 New York, NY 10004 (310) 928-3988 www.mcxinterior.com • contact@mcxinterior.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: 50-100, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $13,000,000.00, Total Billings: $13,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 25, Specialize In: Corporate Interiors and Luxury Showrooms, Leading Clients: N/A

MRP Design Group

Ken Dalton, President 3450 Acworth Due West Rd., Building 100, Suite 120 Kennesaw, GA 30144 (770) 917-9172 • Fax: (770) 917-9470 www.mrpdesign.com • kdalton@mrpdesign.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 12, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2018: 157 Specialize In: Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Culver’s, Zaxby’s, Wendy’s, Hilton, Holiday Inn, Tony Romas, Yum Brands

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


CIRCLE NO. 30


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS NELSON P2 Interiors

Jim Harkin, SVP, Principal 311 Elm St. Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 241-3000 ¶ Fax: (513) 241-5015 www.nelsonworldwide.com • jharkin@nelsonww.com Year Established: 1977, No. of Employees: 1100 Retail Billings: $23,724,103.00, Hospitality Billings: $18,206,526.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,504,074.00, Healthcare Billings: $7,499,276.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $5,268,574.00, Federal Billings: $13,429,933.00 Other Billings: $151,976,114.00, Total Billings: $222,608,600.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 4000, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Corporate Office, Leading Clients: Simon Premium Outlets, Westfield, Brookfield Properties, Cordish Companies, North American Properties, Macy’s, Dicks Sporting Goods, Target, Saks Fifth Avenue

Nudell Architects

Wendi Nudell, Project Designer 31690 W 12 Mile Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48334 (248) 324-8800 • Fax: (248) 324-0661 www.nudellarchitects.com • info@jhn.com Year Established: 1976, No. of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: $3,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $750,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $500,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $500,000.00, Total Billings: $4,750,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: N/A, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Federal, Leading Clients: N/A

Nvironment

Christopher Collins, AIA, NCARB, Principal 27 E Russell St., Suite 300 Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 725-4644 www.nvironmentdesign.com • christopher@nvironmentdesign.com Year Established: 2008, No. of Employees: 15 Retail Billings: $300,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $1,750,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $2,050,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 59, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Compass Group, Starbucks, Primanti Brothers

Ponch Herrera, Owner 1801 Banks Rd. Margate, FL 33063 (954) 642-2255 • Fax: (954) 642-2255 www.p2interiors.com • ponch@p2interiors.com Year Established: 2007, No. of Employees: 12 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2018: 52, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Automotive, Retail, Corporate, Leading Clients: Ultimate Software, Oneblood

PFI Displays, Inc.

Anthony R Tricomi, CEO 40 Industrial St. Rittman, OH 44270 (330) 925-9015 • Fax: (330) 925-8520 www.pfidisplays.com • artricomi@pfidisplays.com Year Established: 1970, No. of Employees: 22 Retail Billings: $2,331,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $74,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $74,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,221,000.00, Total Billings: $3,700,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 30, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Macy’s, Bosch, Vector

Pod Architecture + Design PLLC

Douglas Pierson, Architect 201A E Main St. Carrboro, NC 27510 (919) 246-6466 www.podand.com • doug@podand.com Year Established: 2016, No. of Employees: 4 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $205,000.00, Total Billings: $205,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 2 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Distilleries Leading Clients: Rabbit Hole Distillery, Sixty Hotels

Onyx Creative Raymond and Associates Fred Margulies, P.A. Architects/Planners

Director of Retail Architecture 25001 Emery Rd., # 400 Cleveland, OH 44128 (216) 223-3200 • Fax: (216) 223-3210 www.onyxcreative.com • fmargulies@onyxcreative.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 105 Retail Billings: $10,827,315.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $319,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $446,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $3,703,715.00, Total Billings: $15,296,030.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 457, Specialize In: Retail, Shopping Centers, Commercial, Leading Clients: Dick’s Sporting Goods, Fabletics, Pet People

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Alex Raymond, Architect P.O. Box 579 Palm Harbor, FL 34682 (727) 786-1937 • Fax: (727) 787-5205 www.rayarch.com • alex@rayarch.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 4 Retail Billings: $15,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $65,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $10,000.00, Total Billings: $90,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 12, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Remodel and Single Family Homes Leading Clients: Sarku Japan-U.S.A., Wide Angle Marketing-U.S.A.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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630-733-9647 | 3025 Highland Parkway | Suite 850 | Downers Grove, IL 60515 | sevansolutions.com/ccr CIRCLE NO. 31

S T A T E S


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Rebel Design+Group Sevan Multi-Site Solutions

Douglas DeBoer, Founder/CEO 2554 Lincoln Blvd. Marina Del Rey, CA 90292 (800) 92-REBEL www.rebeldesign.com • douglas@rebeldesign.com Year Established: 1985, No. of Employees: 127 Retail Billings: $1,488,669.00, Hospitality Billings: $16,898,977.00 Restaurant Billings: $4,223,445.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $2,884,945.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $25,496,036.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 18, Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Other Hospitality Projects Leading Clients: Waldorf Astoria, 4 Seasons, Gansevoort, Ovolo Hotels, Ruby Hotels

SAJO Inc.

Victor Khoueiry, Director 1320 Graham Mont-Royal, QC Canada H3P 3C8 (514) 385-0333 • Fax: (514) 385-1108 www.sajo.com • vkhoueiry@sajo.com Year Established: 1977, No. of Employees: 160 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2018: 175 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Retail, Leading Clients: N/A

Sargenti Architects

Agata Torbus, Marketing Manager 461 From Rd. Paramus, NJ 07652 (973) 253-9393 Ext.246 www.sargarch.com • atorbus@sargarch.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 150 Retail Billings: $22,400,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $3,520,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $580,000.00, Total Billings: $26,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 1805, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Automotive, Corporate & Commercial, Health/Wellness Leading Clients: Planet Fitness, Chopt Creative Salad, Sweetgreen, WeWork, Warby Parker, H&M, Victoria’s Secret, Sephora, Burlington, Uniqlo, Five Below, GAP, Foot Locker

Selser Schaefer Architects

Whitney Stauffer, Principal 2002 E 6th St. Tulsa, OK 74104 (918) 587-2282 www.selserschaefer.com • wstauffer@selserschaefer.com Year Established: 1993, No. of Employees: 30 Retail Billings: $1,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $117,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $461,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $135,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $842,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $3,000,000.00, Total Billings: $5,555,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 34, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Other Leading Clients: HEB Grocery Company, Dollar General Stores, Truett’s Chick-fil-A

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Joe Defilippis, V.P. Design 3025 Highland Pkwy., Suite 850 Downers Grove, IL 60515 (630) 733-9647 www.sevansolutions.com • joseph.defilippis@sevansolutions.com Year Established: 2011, No. of Employees: 425 Retail Billings: $4,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $12,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $2,200,000.00, Total Billings: $18,700,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 350 + 1500(+) Exist Building Surveys, Scanning, Modeling, Etc., Specialize In: Grocery, Drug Stores, Restaurants, Fuel/C-Stores, ADA Surveys, Exist. Bldg. Surveys, 3D Scanning + Modeling, Leading Clients: 7-11, Walgreens, Mc Donald’s, Speedway, BP

SGA Design Group

Daryl Bray, COO 1437 S Boulder, Suite 550 Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 587-8600 • Fax: (918) 587-8601 www.sgadesigngroup.com • darylb@sgadesigngroup.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 97 Retail Billings: $24,400,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $2,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $592,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $394,000.00, Total Billings: $25,388,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 1,008, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants Leading Clients: Walmart, Target, Hobby Lobby, Burlington, BSRO, Aldi, Casey’s, Hanger Clinic, Walgreens

The S/L/A/M Collaborative

Derek Czenczelewski Marketing & Business Development 80 Glastonbury Blvd. Glastonbury, CT 06033 (860) 657-8077 • Fax: (860) 657-3141 www.slamcoll.com • dczenczelewski@slamcoll.com Year Established: 1976, No. Of Employees: 190, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2018: N/A Specialize in: Healthcare, Education, Corporate/Commercial Practice Leading Clients: The Hartford, Pfizer, Sanofi Pasteur, L’Oreal, TATA, BELIMO, United Technologies, ESPN, Medtronic, GE, Vistra Energy

Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates, Inc.

Gil Garrison, AIA, CEO 3565 Piedmont Rd., One Piedmont Center, Suite 303 Atlanta, GA 30305 (404) 233-5453 • Fax: (404) 264-0929 www.srssa.com • info@srssa.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 119 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $7,406,316.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $7,915,059.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $8,804,475.00, Total Billings: $24,125,850.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 15, Specialize In: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Education, Mixed-Use, Office, Retail, Government, Industrial, Parking Decks, Performing Arts, Worship, Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


Stantec Architecture Inc. Valerio Architects, Inc.

Darren Burns, Vice President 1100-111 Dunsmuir St. Vancouver, BC V6B 6A3 (604) 696-8009 www.stantec.com • darren.burns@stantec.com Year Established: 1954, No. of Employees: 22,000 Retail Billings: $38,916,915.00, Hospitality Billings: $11,121,424.00 Restaurant Billings: $5,818,579.00, Healthcare Billings: $138,681,991.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $19,362,791.00, Federal Billings: $21,880,239.00 Other Billings: $478,552,030.00, Total Billings: $714,333,969.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 6,356, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Airports, Industrial Buildings, Justice and Civic, Entertainment Leading Clients: AutoNation, CIBC, Hines, Ivanhoe Cambridge, JPMorgan Chase, Marriott, McDonald’s, Walmart, Walgreens

Thomas Hamilton & Associates, P.C.

AshleeHeid, Director of Marketing 5925 School Ave. Richmond, VA 23228 (804) 266-4853 • Fax: (804) 266-5203 www.thomashamiltonassociates.com aheid@thomashamiltonassociates.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 20, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: $1,742,859.00, Restaurant Billings: N/A Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,742,859.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 65, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Marriott, Hilton, IHG

Tricarico Architecture & Design Jenn Sussman, Marketing & Business Development 502 Valley Rd. Wayne, NJ 07470 (973) 612-0222 • Fax: (973) 629-0223 www.tricarico.com • jennifers@tricarico.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 70, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $9,364,954.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 500, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Automotive, Barnes & Noble, College Bookstores Leading Clients: BMW, Kate Spade, Footlocker, Warby Parker, Coach

Urban Architectural Group PA

John R Urban, AIA, Principal 1242 Mann Dr., Suite 200 Matthews, NC 28105 (704) 841-1899 www.urbanaia.com johnurban@urbanaia.com Year Established: 1997, No. of Employees: 7, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2018: 110, Specialize In: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Medical Leading Clients: Dunkin Brands, IHOP

Alicia Zaayer, Project Manager 5858 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 200 Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 954-8996 Ext. 122 • Fax: (323) 954-8965 www.valerioinc.com • azaayer@valerioinc.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 45 Retail Billings: $2,800,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $3,300,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A Total Billings: $6,100,000.00, Completed Projects in 2018: 134 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants Leading Clients: Bottega Veneta, Fendi, Delvaux, Graff Diamonds, Blink Fitness, Yeti, Nespresso, Pacific Catch, Mendocino Farms, Starbucks

Ware Malcomb

Maria Rodgers, Public Relations Manager 10 Edelman Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 660-9128 • Fax: (949) 863-1581 www.waremalcomb.com • mrodgers@waremalcomb.com Year Established: 1972, No. of Employees: 511 Retail Billings: $8,670,472.00, Hospitality Billings: $300,371.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,813,724.00, Healthcare Billings: $2,517,630.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $1,358,115.00, Federal Billings: $136,516.00 Other Billings: $89,022,932.00, Total Billings: $103,819,760.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 3,734, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Leading Clients: Xfinity, L’Oreal, Medline, Verizon, Honeywell, Da Vita

WD Partners

Mark Bateman, VP, Business Development 7007 Discovery Blvd. Dublin, OH 43017 (614) 634-7000 • Fax: (614) 634-7777 www.wdpartners.com • talktous@wdpartners.com Year Established: 1968, No. of Employees: 363 Retail Billings: $24,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $14,900,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $9,000,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $5,600,000.00, Total Billings: $54,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2018: 2,100, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Education Leading Clients: IKEA, Shake Shack, The Home Depot, CVS, WeWork

Wilson Associates

Amanda Tower, Global Communications & Branding 3811 Turtle Creek Blvd., Suite 1600 Dallas, TX 75219 (214) 521-6753 • Fax: (214) 556-3993 www.wilsonassociates.com • wilsonworldwide@wilsonassoc.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 286, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: $32,000,000.00, Restaurant Billings: $5,000,000.00 Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: $1,000,000.00 Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: $3,000,000.00 Total Billings: $41,000,000.00, Completed Projects in 2018: 29 Specialize In: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Restaurants, Residential, Office, Transportation, Leading Clients: Hilton, Ritz-Carlton, Montage, Marriott-Starwood, Hard Rock, IHG, Shangri-La, Fairmont, Four Seasons, Westin, Timbers, Boutique & Independent Property Owners

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

65


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES

Find out who to call when you fixture manufacturers

W

hen your project calls for a fixture manufacturer, go to the source. Our annual listing gives you the contact person and contact information you need to check the item off your to-do list. To see how you can get listed in the next report, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. 555 International B Free Hanger Design & Display Ltd.

James Geier, President 4501 S Western Blvd. Chicago, IL 60609 (773) 869-0555 Fax: (773) 376-0555 www.555.com info@555.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Garment Racks, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Wire, Wood, Lighting MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Pro Sports Retail and Concessions

Bert Spitz, Owner 1410 Broadway, 24 Fl. New York City, NY 10018 (855) 714-2428 www.bfreehangers.com bert@bfreehangers.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Custom Garment Hangers, Garment Racks, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Corporate, Commercial & Residential Interior Design

Automated Cutting Technologies Beam Team, Inc.

Rodney Worley, President 1300 John C Watts Dr. Nicholasville, KY 40356 (859) 881-1228 Fax: (859) 881-0671 www.actky.com info@actky.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Federal, Multi-Housing

Tim Hill, Executive VP, Business Development 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 www.thebeamteam.com timhill@thebeamteam.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, POP, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants

Allegheny Store Fixtures Columbia Forest Products

Darcy DiFazio, CEO 57 Holley Ave. Bradford, PA 16701 (814) 362-6805 Fax: (814) 362-6806 www.allstorefix.com darcy@allstorefix.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/ Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing, Other

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Todd Vogelsinger, Marketing Director 7900 McCloud Dr., #200 Greensboro, NC 27409 (800) 637-1609 Fax: (336) 605-6969 www.cfpwood.com tvogelsinger@cfpwood.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Architectural Millwork, Veneers, Wood, Decorative Hardwood Panels MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


COMBINATION DOOR COMPANY

Five Generations of family owned manufacturing of doors & millwork Since 1912 The Combination Door Company has been a premier source for doors and millwork. All our products are manufactured to your specifications.

Our customized products & services include: • • • • • •

Fitting Room Doors Bathroom Doors Stall Doors Office & Commercial Entry Doors French & Glass Doors 20, 45 & 60 Minute Fire Rated Doors

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Full Service Machining Coordinated Jambs & Frames Availability In Any Wood Species Factory Pre-Finishing CADD Drawings & Specifications Transoms

CIRCLE NO. 32

1000 Morris St. PO Box 1076, Fond du Lac, WI 54936-1076 Phone (920) 922-2050 • Fax (920) 922-2917

www.combinationdoor.com doors@combinationdoor.com


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Combination Door Company Dan Schmidt, President/CEO 1000 Morris St. Fond du Lac, WI 54976 (920) 922-2050 Fax: (920) 922-2917 www.combinationdoor.com doors@combinationdoor.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Architectural Millwork, Wood, Fitting Room &

Gleman and Sons, LLC Ken Marsak, VP 110 Tech Dr. Sanford, FL 32771 (407) 969-9226 www.glemanandsons.com ken@glemanandsons.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Reclaimed Barn-Wood/Fixtures MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate

Commercial Doors MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Gondola Train Brad Walsh, Vice President 135 Tennyson St. Potosi, WI 53820

Commercial Acoustics (608) 763-4216 Shemifhar Freytes,

Fax: (608) 763-4255

Marketing Manager

www.gondolatrain.com

6122 Benjamin Rd.

gondola@gondolatrain.com

Tampa, FL 33634 (888) 815-9691 www.commercial-acoustics.com shemi@commercial-acoustics.com

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Kiosks, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Warehouse

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wallcoverings, Soundproofing Panels, Sound Masking, Floor MARKETS SERVED: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Multi-Housing, Worship Centers, Commercial Development, Club Houses, Architecture, Construction

idX Corporation Lin Courtois, VP Marketing & Communications One Rider Trail Plaza Dr., Suite 400 Earth City, MO 63045

Formica Corporation Owen Serey, PR/Communications Manager 10155 Reading Rd. ®

Cincinnati, OH 45241 (800) FORMICA www.formica.com

FIXTURE MATERIALS: Laminate, Solid Surfacing, Recycled Leather Veneer, Metal Laminate, Solid Color Laminate MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Housing

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(314) 739-4120 Fax: (314) 739-4129 www.idxcorporation.com contactidx@idxcorporation.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Auto, Convenience

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


If your business is

B2B B2C... or

when your locations require a brand refresh, consider idX.

We are

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For detailed information on what idX can do for your brand, scan below:

Evolving Brands. Enhancing Spaces. www.idXcorporation.com CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES JW Displays, Incorporated Madix, Inc. Joel Warnick, President 822 A1A North, Suite 310 Trade Show Displays | Office Branding | Printing | Promotional Products Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (888) 412-4009 www.jwdisplays.com sales@jwdisplays.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, POP, Shelving, Wallcoverings MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

John Clontz, Director of Marketing 500 Airport Rd. Terrell, TX 75160 (214) 515-5400 www.madixinc.com jclontz@madixinc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Shopping Malls

Kaston Fixtures & Design Group, LLC John Steger, President 8610 Directors Row Dallas, TX 75247 (866) 943-5334 Fax: (972) 243-1545 www.kastongroup.com info@kastongroup.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Metal, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Mitsubishi Electric Scott G Kerman, Business Manager, Jet Towel 387 N 2nd Ave., # 2I Phoenix, AZ 85003 (480) 622-9153 www.jettowel.com skerman@hvac.mea.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Washroom Accessories MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls

KC Store Fixtures Shelley Gummig, Vice President, Business Devel. 7400 E 12th St., Unit # 4 Kansas City, MO 64126 (800) 862-0899 Fax: (816) 842-5214 www.kc-store-fixtures.com shelley@kc-store-fixtures.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Construction

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N-Store Services, LLC & Granger Contracting Company, Inc. Kevin Zigrang, Director of Business Development 160 Chesterfield Industrial Blvd. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (800) 726-0330 Fax: (636) 728-0449 www.gnhservices.com kevin@gnhservices.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Fixture Installation Services MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


CIRCLE NO. 34


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Pacific Fixture Co., Inc. Porcelanosa Keith Stark, President 12860 San Fernando Rd., Unit B Sylmar, CA 91342 (818) 362-2130 Fax: (818) 367-8968 www.pacificfixture.com keith@pacificfixture.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Islands/Back Islands, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Wood

David Carmona, National Sales Director 600 Route 17 N Ramsey, NJ 07446 (301) 503-1348 www.porcelanosa-usa.com info@porcelanosa-usa.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wallcoverings, Floor Coverings, Solid Surface Material, Plumbing Fixtures MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

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Prime Retail Services Inc. PixelFLEX Jeff Terry, David Venus, Director of Marketing 700 Cowan Street Nashville, TN 37207 800-930-7954 www.pixelflexled.com sales@pixel-flex.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: LD Video MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Sports Venues, News Studio,

Business Development Officer 3617 Southland Dr. Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511 Fax: (866) 584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com jterry@primeretailservices.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Fixture Installation Services MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES SAJO Inc. Trial Design Inc. Rocco Raco, Director, Marketing & Business Development 1320 Graham Mont-Royal, QC Canada H3P 3C8 (877) 901-7256 Fax: (514) 385-1843 www.sajo.com rocco@sajo.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood, Glass MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate

John French, Director 570, boul. des Érables Salaberry-de-Valleyfield (QC, Canada) J6T 6G4 (450) 370-1377 Ext: 231 www.trial-design.com jfrench@trial-design.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants

Spacewall West Sue Waller, Sales/Marketing Mgr. 350 E Crowther Ave. Placentia, CA 92870 (360) 885-1260 Fax: (714) 961-0976 www.spacewallwest.com swaller@spacewallwest.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Slatwall MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Corporate

VARIDESK, LLC 1221 S. Belt Line, Suite 500 Coppell, TX 75019 (800) 207-2587 Fax: (972) 692-7839 www.varidesk.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Furniture/Upholstery MARKETS SERVED: Corporate, Federal

TC Millwork, Inc. Leo Couchara, Vice President Sales 3433 Marshall Ln. Bensalem, PA 19020 (215) 245-4210 Fax: (215) 245-4605 www.tcmillwork.com couchara@tcmillwork.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

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Warner Bros. Design Studio Craig McNabb, VP Design Studio 4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, CA 91522 818-954-1815 Fax: 818-954-2806 www.warnerbrosdesignstudio.com craig.mcnabb@warnerbros.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Furniture/Upholstery, Wallcoverings, All Custom Display Pieces MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Events & Attractions

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FIXTURES Wilsonart Window Film Depot Customer Service 2501 Wilsonart Dr. Temple, TX 76504 (800) 433-3222 Fax: (254) 207-3209 www.wilsonart.com smartline@wilsonart.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Coordinated Surfaces: HPL, TFL, Edgeband, Cabinet Doors & Componenets MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Wilson Display Elizabeth Wilson, V.P. Account Management 1645 Aimco Blvd. Mississauga, ON Canada L4W 1H8 (905) 625-9200 Fax: (905) 625-3199 www.wilsondisplay.com elizabeth.wilson@wilsondisplay.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal

Jeff Franson, President/CEO 4939 Lower Roswell Rd., Suite 100 Marietta, GA 30068 (866) 933-3456 Fax: (770) 973-3986 www.windowfilmdepot.com jeff@windowfilmdepot.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: N/A MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing, Any Commercial Properties

Yunker Industries Nadine Seitz, Marketing Manager 310 O’Connor Dr. Elkhorn, WI 53121 (262) 741-5048 Fax: (262) 723-3340 www.yunker.com nseitz@yunker.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: End Caps, Kiosks, Metal, POP, Wallcoverings, Wire MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, C-Store, Grocery

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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LATE WINTER 2019

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Frank Weiss, VP Real Estate & Construction, Philly Pretzel Factory

The ‘twisted’ life Why the Philly Pretzel Factory’s success story continues to rise

Also Inside: A special supplement to:

The recipe for success for a commercial bakery floor Cover story photography by Mike Levin


The ‘twisted’ life F Why the Philly Pretzel Factory’s success story continues to rise

By Michael J. Pallerino

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ive for a dollar. Growing up in the Roosevelt Boulevard section of Philadelphia, Dan DiZio walked into the perfect business strategy. After his neighbor, a baker, had a customer cancel an order for 1,000 pretzels, DiZio saw an opportunity. “Can we do this again next weekend?” the entrepreneurial young man asked. Moving forward, he organized neighborhood kids to help sell pretzels in multiple areas around the city. Fast-forward to 1998, when DiZio and his college roommate, Len Lehman, opened the first Philly Pretzel Factory in Philadelphia's Mayfair neighborhood, northeast of the city. The store was so successful that in its second year, franchisees started craving for the concept. In 2004, they started the Soft Pretzel Franchise Systems, franchising the brand across the greater Philly area and into 12 states.

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The rest, as they say, is history. Today, operating under the mantra, “No pretzel is more than one hour old," the Philly Pretzel Factory is a franchising machine, including 175 franchisees in 19 states, from Long Island, New York to Florida. We sat down with Frank Weiss, VP Real Estate & Construction, to get an inside look at where the Philly Pretzel Factory brand is heading.

Give us a snapshot of Philly Pretzel Factory brand?

Philly Pretzel was founded by Dan DiZio and Lenny Lehman in 1998. They originally wanted to open a wholesale operation, but ended up renting a retail space that was immediately successful. Eight years later, after opening another six stores, they began franchising. Today, we have 175 in 19 states and are opening about 20 new

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All of our primary functions— selling, twisting and baking— are out in the open for everyone to see and enjoy.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

locations annually. The brand was founded on fresh pretzels—lots of them hot out of the oven.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

We are a snack item, but we also do wholesaling and catering, so we are really for just about anyone who loves and likes pretzels—young and old.

How does the design of your locations cater to what today's consumers are looking for?

Our concept is about serving our product hot out of the oven, so the freshness aspect really aligns with today’s consumer. Also, pretzels are high in protein with no fats or cholesterol, so you can feel good about eating one or sharing it with your family and friends.


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DIGITAL SIGNAGE

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THE SWEET LIFE

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Is there a location that really shows how the brand interacts with the community and customers? One of your favorites?

The last store we opened is always my favorite and that happens to be in Franklin Square, Long Island. We took an odd shaped building that even the franchisee thought wouldn’t work and turned it into an awesome operation. It has been hitting it out of the park since the day it opened. We are also opening a freshly designed store in Rochester (New York) in the spring that I am excited to see. We really stress community involvement, so there are so many stores that reflect that philosophy, but to name a few that come to mind, the original store in the Mayfair section of Philly, Langhorne, Pennsylvania, Haddon Heights, New Jersey, Aramingo Avenue in Philadelphia, and Bel Air, Maryland.

Walk us through how and why the stores are designed the way they are?

Our stores are all take out, so we want the customer to see a lot when they come in. The first thing you see walking in the store is our heated display with all our various different hot pretzel products. Usually the pretzels are right alongside them. If you look further into the store, you’ll see our employees twisting all the pretzels and our bakers baking. All of our primary functions—selling, twisting and baking—are out in the open for everyone to see and enjoy.

Take us through your construction and design strategy. Once we agree on a space, I design the layout with help from our awesome management team. We then turn the layout over to the architect to make it pretty and compliant. Our design reflects a bit of an industrial feel, as we want people to realize we produce

Our concept is about serving our product hot out of the oven, so the freshness aspect really aligns with today’s consumer. thousands of pretzels a day. You’ll see diamond plate, darker laminates and rich grays. We also use are service area and front counter to merchandize many of our take home items, like our proprietary mustards and sweet dips.

Give us a rundown of the store’s layout.

The front 200 square feet is the customer area for ordering and pickup. The next area, around 200 square feet, is for employee interaction with the customer. All of our pretzel products are ready to be served. Since we hand twist fresh every day, the remainder of the stores is for twisting, baking, and storage.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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THE SWEET LIFE

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS What's the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business? The biggest issue in my mind is balancing continually rising costs with our goal of opening an affordable business.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

We are constantly challenging ourselves to build stores using materials consistent with sustainability.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We are really a unique product, so I feel our opportunities nationally are endless. I look forward to helping the brand achieve our goals. Additionally, now that we’ve planted our flag in numerous new markets, we have huge opportunities to build brand recognition and help everyone get to experience the awesomeness of a real Philly Pretzel.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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THE SWEET LIFE

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Are you optimistic about what you see today in the marketplace?

What trends are you seeing? Delivery is exploding. As we design restaurants, I think we need to be more and more cognizant of how we are setting stores up to handle that end of the business.

Absolutely. Franchising is an extremely competitive business, but I have no doubt that the combination of the passion our team brings to the table every day and our very affordable, freshly made product are the perfect fit for sustained growth.

What is today’s consumer looking for?

More than ever, if feels like they want a wholesome product served in an inviting atmosphere

What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

We plan to continue growing in our core markets, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Long Island, the Midwest, Florida, the Carolinas and parts of Texas.

What is the secret to creating a “must-visit” restaurant environment in today's competitive landscape?

We believe that quality, cleanliness, service and value all play a role in creating a must-visit experience. I don’t ever think that great service will go out of style. Customers really need to walk out the door feeling they’ve been treated right and their business was appreciated.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

Since I also handle real estate, the biggest thing is juggling the 20 stores we currently have in the development process

Describe a typical day.

I’m not sure there is a typical day. I spend roughly 50 percent of my time traveling and assisting new franchisees with site selection and construction. The other half is in our corporate office in Bensalem, Pennsylvania. There is lots of time on the phone with our onboarding coordinator, Maggie Martin, working through our weekly task list with new franchisees. CK

One-on-One with... » Frank Weiss

VP Real Estate & Construction, Philly Pretzel Factory

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? It really is a special feeling of helping an individual or a family realize their dream of owning their own business. There’s nothing more satisfying than helping them reach that goal. What was the best advice you ever received? There’s been so many great people I’ve worked with and tons of great advice. I always liked the expression: “Work hard, play hard.” What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? “Don’t go.” No, seriously, when I see them months or years down the line and they thank me, I know I’ve done my job. That feels great.

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Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why. I’ve always felt you need to be a great listener; you have to trust the people around you and you should always be able to share a laugh with your coworkers. What is the true key to success for any manager? Be someone your employees aspire to emulate. How do you like to spend your down time? I like to get to the gym three to four times a week. I still play in a softball league in the spring and summer. I’m an avid reader. And I love my Philadelphia Eagles and traveling with my wife, Carol.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


CIRCLE NO. 43


The finished floor provides visual appeal while being able to handle the daily demands of a bakery.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


Sweet success The recipe for success for a commercial bakery floor

T

he SpringHouse Country Market and Restaurant has been a favorite spot in southwestern Pennsylvania for

By Steven Reinstadtler

more than 40 years. Visitors come for the farm-fresh

milk, home cooking and ice cream concoctions offered in the SpringHouse Country store, creamery and eatery.

One of the more heavily used areas of the facility is the 1,000-square-foot commercial bakery used to bake a variety of pies, cakes and pastries. The floor is cleaned daily with a variety of disinfecting chemicals. It also experiences abrasion from wheeled carts and shelves, and cleaning equipment. For years the bakery floor was covered with a commercial sheet vinyl applied directly to the concrete slab-on-grade substrate. The sheet vinyl was failing in spots due to infiltration of water and cleaning materials at the seams during cleaning. This eventually required repairs to the damaged seams in the sheet vinyl by cutting out the section next to the failure and installing a new piece of vinyl. The owner decided to renovate the area, which would include new wall coatings and a new floor option. The owner reached out to professional flooring contractor Seman Flooring to discuss renovation ideas that would remediate the bakery area and meet this criteria: • Long lasting and durable — The flooring needed to hold • Attractive aesthetics — Customers can see the bakery up to common contaminants from the baking process, abraarea from multiple points in the facility sion from foot and wheel traffic, staining from spilt materials • Quick turnaround time — Removing the old flooring and resistance to the cleaning process and installing a new floor system needed to take place in a • Superior cleanability — The surface needed to be seamtwo-and-one-half day timeframe since the baked goods are a less and resist dirt to minimize scrubbing significant revenue stream for the owners

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SWEET SUCCESS

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS The biggest challenge was the required rapid turnaround. This meant the contractor would need to remove the existing sheet vinyl, clean and profile the underlying concrete, and perform moisture vapor testing. Then, a new floor system needed to be installed in a span of about two days. “After inspecting the area and taking samples, we suggested replacing the existing sheet vinyl with a multiple-layer, high-performance resinous floor coating system incorporating a polyaspartic coating technology,” says Bob Seman, owner of Seman Flooring. “This solution addresses long-term durability, abrasion resistance, seamless design and aesthetics while enabling us to meet the stringent return to service requirements. This flooring system would also eliminate future sheet bonding problems and offer easier maintenance.

Today, polyaspartic coatings are meeting the unmet needs of the commercial and decorative flooring industry.

Small cracks in the bakery floor were repaired with a fast-curing epoxy mortar.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019

The right recipe for flooring

Polyaspartic coatings are used in high-performance, industrial applications such as bridge, water and wastewater infrastructure, and transportation. These coatings are also utilized in commercial and architectural applications due to their ability to offer protection and durability while meeting aesthetic requirements. Today, polyaspartic coatings are meeting the unmet needs of the commercial and decorative flooring industry. From residential garage floors to commercial applications, such as hotel lobbies, cafeterias to retail spaces, polyaspartic coatings provide durable and attractive floor finishes with minimal downtime and faster return to service. Polyaspartics are in a class of polymers called polyureas. Typical polyureas that one may be familiar with are thick film, fast-reacting, flexible, spray-applied systems similar to a spray-in truck bedliner. Unlike typical polyureas, polyaspartic technology usually has a high hardness, a property preferred for floor coatings to resist scratches, scrapes and chips. Polyaspartics are also applied at a thinner film thickness, typically in the 5-20 mils range suitable for flooring topcoats. Polyaspartics are based on aliphatic hardeners, which impart excellent long-term color and gloss retention and are most often


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SWEET SUCCESS

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

used as a topcoat due to their non-yellowing properties. They can also be formulated to cure slow enough to apply using conventional manual coating methods rather than high-pressure spray equipment. The polyaspartic coating technology has a unique, adjustable reactivity with the capability for fast curing that offers high-gloss retention and excellent abrasion resistance. Traditional two-component aliphatic polyurethanes, the bastion of durability, typically cure enough to accept light foot traffic within six to 12 hours, whereas polyaspartic coatings typically cure in one to four hours. This ultra-low VOC to 100 percent solids coating technology allows formulators the flexibility to control the rate of reaction and cure by a combination of fast and slow resins rather than the use of heavy metal catalysts. Polyaspartic coatings can be applied at temperatures below 50°F, which extends the application season for commercial and residential projects. These coatings are applied by simple brush and roller and do not need special application equipment.

Planning & execution

The bakery floor was constructed as slabon-grade with no vapor mitigation membrane during construction 40 years ago. Recently, it was covered with a commercial vinyl sheet adhered directly to the concrete using a latex-based adhesive and heat welded seams. Due to a flood, heat from the ovens as well as daily cleaning and wear, the floor needed repairs several times. This was accomplished by cutting out the affected vinyl sheet area or seam and gluing in a patch of vinyl sheet cut to size. Once the surface preparation, surface profile, desired coating system and timeline was set, contractor Seman Flooring went to work. “We used a power scraper to remove most of the existing sheet vinyl and adhesive, and used scrapers and solvent to remove any remaining adhesive,” Seman says. “The floor was cleaned with a commercial degreaser to remove years of contamination that crept underneath the seams and into the porous concrete surface.” Next, the floor was prepared with a planetary grinder with 1820 grit diamonds,

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The floor coating system features a rolled on beige pigmented ultra-low VOC polyaspartic basecoat.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


which left the densified surface layer (DSL) intact, and removed any residual adhesive. The prepared concrete surface was left with a profile of ICRI CSP 3. Finally, the surface was vacuumed clean. By first cleaning and then grinding the floor, the contaminants were not ground into the concrete substrate, which can affect long-term adhesion of the coating system. “The inspection revealed some smaller cracks in the floor that needed repair,” Seman says. “Since they were small, we chased them with a fast curing epoxy mortar sanded to the same profile as the concrete.” Now the floor was ready for the application of the new floor coating. Due to the slab-on-grade concrete substrate and past water issues, a clear vapor mitigation epoxy layer was first applied at 12

Due to a flood, heat from the ovens as well as daily cleaning and wear, the floor needed repairs several times. to 15 wet mils using a squeegee and then back rolled. The vapor mitigation layer cured overnight. Next, a beige pigmented ultra-low VOC polyaspartic basecoat was applied at 15 mils thickness. During the application of the polyaspartic coating, the contractor wore a long-sleeve shirt and pants, closed toe shoes, safety glasses, a respirator and appropriate gloves. When following the recommendations on the supplier’s safety data sheet (SDS), these products can be used and applied safely by professional contractors. The required personal protective equipment will vary based on the raw materials and method of application. Refer to the supplier’s SDS for additional information. Color chips were broadcast into the wet basecoat to create a finished, high-end terrazzo look. Once the basecoat cured, about 90 minutes due to the fast return-to-service properties of the polyaspartic coating, the excess color chips were vacuumed up. After the base coat cured further for an additional 30 minutes, two thin layers of a clear ultra-low VOC polyaspartic topcoat, the

proverbial icing on the cake, were applied at 6 to 8 mils thickness using a 3/8-inch nap roller. Polyaspartic coatings are water clear, which results in an eye-catching color pop over color chip or decorative stained floor systems. Two thin coats were applied to ensure the roughness of the color chips was not lost since this texture imparts non-slip characteristics to the floor surface. The new floor provides a joint-free, tight surface that is easier to clean. Compared to other floor coating options, the polyaspartic coatings provided a fast return-to-service time, allowing the bakery to reopen quickly so the owner did not lose revenue due to an extended shutdown. The floor can withstand equipment, wheeled traffic and frequent cleaning without significant wear and tear. It offers a great balance of abrasion, chemical and scratch resistance while providing excellent long-term color and gloss retention. For this project, the polyaspartic coating was the icing on the cake. CK

Steven Reinstadtler is the Construction Market Manager for coatings, adhesives, and sealants - CAS Business Unit of Covestro LLC in Pittsburgh. He works closely with contractors, companies and organizations that build infrastructure with durability and sustainability in mind by educating the market on high-performance coatings and sealant options.

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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CIRCLE NO. 45


The core purpose and mission of SBB Life Coaching is to inspire and empower individuals to believe in themselves, harness their personal power, and master their ability to create positive progressive changes in their lives.

YOUR LIFE YOUR CHOICE YOUR TIME TO SHINE Are you ready to embrace your life and make empowering choices that allow your essence to shine through and change the world forever? SBB Life Coaching would welcome the opportunity to assist you!

SERVICES AVAILABLE • One-on-one weekly coaching sessions in person or phone (one month minimum) • Small group coaching sessions • Strategic planning • Speaking opportunities, workshops, personal development trainings

SAWRIE BECKER, MSE Personal Life Coach 716.479.5011 sawrie@sbblifecoaching.com sbblifecoaching.com


Contents January • February 2019

Owned & Operated by Women’s Association, LLC Mailing Address: PO 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 Editorial Editor: Dalana Morse dalanam@leadupforwomen.com 817-405-4058 Contributing Writer: Jennifer Sussman jennifers@leadupforwomen.com 973-979-6169

The Sweet Spot

PR and Social Media: Shannon Polvino: shannonp@leadupforwomen.com 716-597-5188 Website Design: Brittney Dullin brittneyd@leadupforwomen.com 716-320-0501

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Art Director: Hannah Mong hannahm@leadupforwomen.com 716-262-8148 Circulation/Subscriptions: subscriptions@leadupforwomen.com LUFW Management: Colleen Biggs: Partner, Membership & Content Strategist colleenb@leafupforwomen.com 480-241-3708 Sabina Ramsey: Brand Strategists and Creative Leader sabinar@leadupforwomen.com 716-308-6208

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Founders Corner Lead without permission Editors Note We exist to provide the tools and resources to help women grow personally and professionally.

LEADERSHIP

8 10 11 30

BUSINESS

Advisory Board Code of Ethics Industry News 10 Tips on Balance

LIFESTYLE

David Corson: Operations Manager davidc@leadupforwomen.com 404-931-6569 Lead Up for Women General Inquiry: 602.730.5121 membership@leadupforwomen.com

18 Creating a pipeline of female leaders in the plumbing industry

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22 Born to make a difference one date at a time

26 Perserverance in the face of adversity

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Founders Corner

Lead without permission We are beyond excited for what’s to come for Women leaders and for Lead Up For Women in 2019. We are super excited about the first issue of our magazine and blessed to have our dear friend Connie Dulay Alfonso on the cover as she exemplifies we all have the potential to reach any dream we may have through focus, perseverance, balance, and serving others. We are hard at work every day spreading the word about what Lead Up means to us with everyone we meet. We presented on leveraging influence over title and inspired the attendees on the meaning behind Lead Up at the 2019 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit in Biloxi, MS on January 16th. Our curriculum outlines the cornerstones of what servant leadership is all about. Not long after that, we were interviewed in the studio of Voice-America and are proud to announce that our radio show interview will air on February 15th! We are passionate and focused on what we can do to Connect, Influence, And Lead. Every woman wants to belong and have a community that accepts and celebrates all of our identities. We have worked diligently to create an organization for you and for all women looking to lead without permission, be the badass leader that you know you are, and gain the courage through our 4

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strong womanhood to live your best life. If that means stepping out and starting the business of your dreams, we’re here to take that journey with you. You are the only you there is and you are the only you that will ever be. Be strong, because you are brilliant and the world needs you. We align with this so much, but it means nothing if you don’t hold yourself accountable on a daily basis through concrete daily actions. Those choices make or break us. We are ready to offer you a vehicle to leading your best life and the journey starts now. What are you waiting for? Join us.

Colleen Biggs

Sabina Ramsey January-February 2019


Specializing in management consulting services & outsourced business development

Reach the next level in your business Connections

Networking

Opportunities

Energy

Negotiations

Teamwork

Collaboration

Your Trusted Partner in Business For more information contact: Gina Marie Noda • Gina@connectscg.com • 609-661-9636

www.connectscg.com Let’s CONNECT Today!!!


Editor’s Letter

We exist to provide the tools and resources to help women grow personally and professionally. Welcome to the first issue of Lead Up for Women! Lead Up For Women is much more than just this magazine – it is an organization committed to empowering and encouraging women to become successful leaders and entrepreneurs, no matter what business they are in. We believe that communication and information are critical components to keep you on top of your game, so we provide monthly newsletters along with this bi-monthly magazine to highlight industry news, upcoming events, job listings, industry links and more. We are dedicated to keeping you in the know and making you known. Our annual conventions, workshops, retreats, luncheons and other events held across the United States create the necessary networking opportunities for personal and career growth for all of our members. These events help you and your business increase visibility and grow partnerships because let’s face it, nobody can do it all on their own! Additionally, our radio show that launches March 28th at our New York City Luncheon will provide an additional platform for existing and future members, as well as female listeners. This radio show will provide motivational stories of women who are not just heroes, but everyday women. They have overcome adversity, learned through taking risks, and have chosen to Lead Up from anywhere and everywhere. In studio radio interviews, live luncheon coverage, and opportunities for additional sponsorship, we align seamlessly with our mission to connect, influence, and lead. Our mission is to provide women with all the resources to live their best lives, whether that be rising to the upper rungs of the corporate ladder, launching their own business, or gaining strength through many other women from leadership and inspiration, regardless of her qualifications or achievements. If you have a compelling story or know someone that does, or if you just want to see something or someone featured in the magazine or online, then I would love to hear from you. Please feel free to send me your thoughts on our first issue as well. It’s not a one-sided street. Together you can help us grow, evolve and be better for you. We are happy to be a part of this team. We are here to help.

These women have overcome adversity, learned through taking risks, and have chosen to Lead Up from anywhere and everywhere.

Dalana Morse is the editor of Lead Up For Women magazine. You can reach her at (817) 405-4058 or by email at dalanam@leadupforwomen.com. 6

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January-February 2019


Advisory Board

Marilyn Brennan

Sawrie Becker

Dr. Tammy Bialek

Marilyn Brennan’s success throughout her career is based largely on her ability to connect with people quickly and deeply on multiple levels. Though much of her career has been based in the project management area of business, it is always about understanding others needs and becoming an asset to the business relationship that almost always becomes a long lasting professional and personal connection. Currently, Marilyn is the Associate Director of Business Development for American/ Interstate Signcrafters, a multi-location National Sign Manufacturing company. Marilyn’s core background in project management within the sign industry allows her to connect with clients through shared knowledge of the challenges within that area of business. Marilyn never felt sales was an avenue she would have chosen, with a degree in Elementary Education and most of her work experience in project management, however, being able to utilize a strategic selling method of relationship building was a perfect melding of her core strengths and beliefs.

Sawrie Becker is the founder and owner of SBB Life Coaching and the Director of Development for Westminster Presbyterian Church in Buffalo, New York. As a professional life coach, Sawrie works with individuals and small business owners to achieve personal and business success. Throughout her life, Sawrie has been a dedicated community leader with a genuine commitment to empowering women. She has served as the Commissioner of Public Advocacy and Executive Director of the Commission on the Status of Women for Erie County where she has led many successful efforts on behalf of women in the areas of pay equity and domestic violence awareness. Sawrie is a past-president of the Junior League of Buffalo and the Tennessee Coaches Alliance; a presenter to the United Nations’ Fourth World Conference on Women in Bejing, China. Currently, Sawrie is a member and past-president of the Advisory Board of the Women’s Business Center at Canisus College.

Dr. Bialek is a native of Buffalo, New York. She received a B.A. in Dance from the State University of New York at Buffalo and had a professional dance career abroad in Guam and Japan. It was her own experience as a chiropractic patient that inspired her to receive both a Bachelor of Science and a Doctor of Chiropractic Degree from Logan Chiropractic College in St. Louis, M.O. Dr. Bialek empowers her patients to be able to make strong healthcare decisions, addressing the most prevalent health concerns today. She is passionate about working with families throughout WNY, helping to improve their health and well-being. Dr. Bialek is an Instructor for Activator Methods as well as an Advanced Proficiency Rated Provider. She is a member of the I.C.P.A. {International Chiropractic Pediatric Association} and is Webster In-Utero Constraint Technique Certified. Dr. Bialek has lectured for HAWNY, Audubon Library Lecture Series, West Seneca School District, and for many other businesses throughout the WNY area. Other memberships include NAWBO, Niagara Business Associates and Amherst Chamber of Commerce.

Isyol Cabrera Isyol Cabrera, originally from Venezuela, is a visionary, creative professional, and architect by trade. She has been working with Carvel since April of 2013 and is currently working on the share services team of design and construction for the snacks group within FOCUS BRANDS. As a Director, Isyol’s experience includes over 10 years of store development, design, construction, and project management for different companies, including Starbucks and Church’s Chicken. Isyol is responsible for overseeing the store development phase of a project from initial concept design through construction and store opening. Isyol ensures that the brand’s image and operational standards are upheld to reflect Carvel’s current design guidelines and standards. 8

Lead Up for Women

Kristen Corson Kristen is a mother, sister, aunt, leader, restaurateur, and dog rescuer who has engaged in sales and marketing, mortgage finance, wholesale jewelry and accessories, and now in residential & commercial interior design as KLC Interiors. January-February 2019


Aly Chally Aly Chally is the Manager of the Store Planning and Design team at Aaron’s, Inc. She currently lives in Atlanta, GA and has a BFA in Interior Design from the Illinois Institute of Art. When she is not traveling, either for work or pleasure, she is continuing her work to receive her MBA. She hopes that she is able to motivate others with the telling of her story and owning her truth to achieve their own greatness. She is grateful for the opportunity to help influence and inspire other women to reach their goals and touch their dreams. She is excited to be involved with Lead Up for Women and can’t wait to see what great surprises this year holds.

Rebecca Easton

Jennifer Grieser

Gina Noda

Rebecca Easton was born and raised in Tucson, Arizona, where she was a proud graduate of both Salpointe Catholic High School and the University of Arizona. While she ultimately found a position she loved after graduation, Rebecca felt she could do something more. It was her desire for something new and challenging which took her to Denver, Colorado for law school. Rebecca attended the University of Denver Sturm College of Law, graduating in 2011. She is now admitted to practice law in both Colorado and Arizona. Having gained experience in finance, collections, foreclosure, compliance analysis, and community association law, Rebecca stepped out to form Easton Law, PLLC in July, 2018. Through her practice she assists families, creatives, and business owners through estate planning and outside general counsel.

Jennifer Grieser, is the senior Solutions Manager at Projectmates. Jennifer has proven successful in developing processes and procedures resulting in significant time and costs savings. She has led numerous projects that streamline operations and increase productivity. Jennifer has consistently demonstrated her expertise in: project management, strategic planning, employee development, contract administration, analytics, and software implementation. In addition to her “hard skills,” Jennifer’s commitment to integrity, combined with her excellent “soft skills” in communication, problem-solving, and process-oriented mentality, translates into a history of driving a unified vision ensuring successful team communication and cooperation. Her career in Development began at Brinker International almost 20 years ago and over time she has worked for: restaurant organizations, a general contractor, a facility management company, and most recently, for a nationwide retailer. Jennifer’s personal goal is to share her knowledge and success by mentoring women into their personal best-self.

Gina Noda is the Founder & Principal Consultant of Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC. (CSCG) - Connect Source CONNECTS the retail world’s suppliers and various consulting companies to retail corporations across the country, specializing in Management Consultant and outsourced Business Development Services, helping individuals and businesses get to the next level. Her company is based on the foundation of Conscious Capitalism, doing business with her heart to elevate all of humanity. Every contract that she receives she donates a portion to something that is near and dear to her heart. She has a true passion and love for connecting with people on a deeper personal and professional level. Her mission is showing others not only a better way to do business, how to lead from within and do business from your heart, with purpose to help others, but also a better way to live life consciously all the way around; the way life was intended for us to live! She is a proud and active member of: RCA, ICSC, RDI, CCRP, Pipeline for Women, Pink Petro, Lead Up for Women.

Shannon Polvino Shannon Polvino is the PR and Account Manager at Insight International LLC in Buffalo, NY. She graduated with her B.A. in Public Communication from SUNY Buffalo State in 2014. She has practiced public relations for more than four years on regional and national levels, serving clients in Buffalo, Miami, and Washington, DC. Shannon has worked with non-profits such as Change MS Wellness Foundation and Devin’s Message and has always enjoyed helping the community.

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Code of Ethics

“THE CODE” of Professional Ethics

Our “Code” lays down the standards of integrity, professionalism and confidentiality by which all members of the Association shall be bound by. As leaders, we are responsible for uplifting supporting women through our words, actions, and all our dealings at work and in our communities. We each believe that inspiring others through servant leadership earns us the right to become true leaders because we all have the power to reach the impossible. As we continue to influence those around us, we elevate women in the workforce, welcome them back, and provide a solid foundation for all of 10 Lead Up for Women

the young women that follow. We are the leaders of the future for our daughters, our granddaughters, and for those that look to us for guidance. Leading without permission not only revolutionizes how women lead, but increases the number of women leaders and entrepreneurs in the workplace. Believing in each other, treating others the way we want to be treated, and influencing our way to a more passionate world is achieved through our strong community of women that believe the vision is possible. Lead with love, love with intent, and build up other women through the power of praise. January-February 2019


Industry News

BUSINESS

LEADERSHIP

Wins in boardrooms and at the ballot box In the business world, women earned leading positions in 2018. Check out these job announcements. • Heineken named Maggie Timoney as CEO, breaking the glass ceiling in the U.S. beer industry. • B etty Liu joined the New York Stock Exchange as an executive vice chairman. Her appointment came just a few weeks after Stacey Cunningham was named the first female leader of the NYSE. • Dhivya Suryadevara became the first female CFO of GM. With CEO Mary Barra, the multinational corporation now has two senior leadership members who are female. • K atie Haun became the first female partner of venture capital firm Andreessen

Horowitz, a step in the right direction in an industry where women have struggled to reach the top. • Land O’Lakes named Beth Ford as its president and CEO, making her one of 25 women running a Fortune 500 company. Ford will also be one of three openly gay Fortune 500 CEOs and the only openly lesbian CEO. • J.C. Penney, the department chain that has seen better days, has appointed Jill Soltau, CEO of fabric and crafts retailer JOANN Crafts and Hobbies, as its new CEO to breathe life into the company’s stagnating sales.

LIFESTYLE

#ThriveThursday:

Meet Britannia Leo of BikeOrBar How do you inspire women to better themselves at BikeOrBar and what message do you like to promote? I think BikeOrBar in general has a strong “girl gang” vibe. From the owners being women (my mom and myself), to our female dominant staff, to the clientele, which is predominantly women. Personally, I have gained a lot of my own confidence though fitness, so I like to see that for other women that come into our studio. My hope is that they can own their badassness with no apologies! What is the most rewarding aspect of what you do at BikeOrBar? I truly think the most rewarding part of this gig is seeing the progress that clients make. I’ve seen countless transformations not only physically, but mentally. I have watched members go from not being able to plank, to doing pushups on their toes with no problem. I have also watched, women in particular, go from closed off and insecure to happy and beaming with confidence. It’s insanely rewarding to see these transformations and know you had a place in that journey. leadupforwomen.com

Flotek announces leadership changes Flotek Industries, Inc. (“Flotek” or the “Company”) announces changes among its executive leadership team.

Flotek is pleased to announce Elizabeth T. Wilkinson has been appointed as Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of Flotek Industries, effective December 28, 2018. In this role, she will serve as the senior executive responsible for the Company’s financial strategy, planning and reporting, as well as investor relations, treasury and corporate development functions. She will be based in Houston, reporting directly to Flotek’s Chief Executive Officer, President & Chairman of the Board, John W. Chisholm. “Elizabeth is a strong and experienced executive who has served in diverse leadership roles for E&P, energy service, and midstream organizations, ranging from CFO to controller to vice president-investor relations and treasurer,” said Chisholm. “We welcome the tremendous strengths she brings to help deliver value to all of our stakeholders by expanding our market penetration through differentiated chemistry technology, strengthening our balance sheet and managing general and administrative costs to deliver positive operating cash flow.” “I’m truly honored to join the Flotek team. One of the most exciting aspects about the Company is its maturity as a business, which is underpinned by its strong, proven technology. I look forward to collaborating with the team on developing and executing the Company’s strategy and rationalizing cost structure to deliver value to shareholders,” said Wilkinson. Lead Up for Women

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Connie Dulay Alfonso

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How Connie balances the joys of being a wife, mother, and entrepreneur of Sweet Cocoa Flour Give us a snapshot of the Sweet Cocoa Flour brand. Sweet Cocoa Flour is a business I started because of my love for baking. I’ve been baking ever since my dad bought me my very first cookbook, Mrs. Fields. I started baking in elementary school, then on and off during high school and college. When my husband and I moved to Arizona, I became a stay-at-home mom and decided to turn my passion into a business. I try to create different kinds of goodies that can appeal to different audiences. Tell us about what makes the Sweet Cocoa Flour brand so unique? I think every business brings something to the table. What makes my brand unique is that I try to incorporate different flavors into my baked goodies. For example, I add cayenne pepper into my double chocolate chip cookies. It is supposed to give you that sweet taste leadupforwomen.com

at first bite and then a spicy cayenne pepper kick at the end. It gives an extra layer that one may not expect. What type of consumer/ client are you targeting? Customers of all ages with a sweet tooth who are willing to try unique flavors. Lead Up for Women

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What strategies have you implemented to become successful in your company? I work hard to make sure my baked goods reach different audiences. I travel to different shops around Maricopa County to inquire about their interest in having some of my products sold there. I try to cultivate potential relationships with local businesses and community members. What hurdles have you overcome as a woman in business? As a woman participating in this industry, I personally feel that the hurdles I had to overcome were making business connections in Maricopa County. Not being a native to Arizona was definitely one of my first challenges, as I had to build relationships from the ground up. Even after being here for eight years, I am still figuring out the area and learning to create connections. I want to be able to network with other women in business. Another challenge is balancing life with the business. While I have two children, one of them is autistic and can divert some time and focus. What do you do to give back? I try to participate in my community’s events as much as possible. I want to give back to the audience that helped me get to where I am right now. What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead? My main purpose is to have my business lead a successful journey while providing baked goods for family, friends and clients. I want my unique recipes to leave an everlasting impact and for others to follow suit. I plan to write cookbooks in the near future and hope to publish them. I also hope to further connect with clients and fans, perhaps through blog articles, to empower them and show them that they can succeed as well. 14 Lead Up for Women

January-February 2019


“I give myself 15 minutes to do yoga stretches, get ready, eat breakfast, then check my emails and social media.” What is your method to stay connected with other women in business? Interacting with them through their business social media platforms. I personally believe social media and meet ups are important when making connections. What mentors, sponsors, or coaches have played an important role in your success? My family plays a crucial role in my success. I wouldn’t be able to do anything without my husband, kids, and other family members. How do you stay current with today’s trends? I always do my research online to keep up with what other bakers and businesswomen are doing to help their business grow. What is your growth plan? Expanding my business by reaching out to other businesses and cultivating new relationships. Networking is key for me. leadupforwomen.com

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Continuing to work hard and hopefully succeed in my career endeavors for Sweet Cocoa Flour. What’s the most rewarding part of your career? Being able to provide goods for friends, family, and my community. Baking has always been a passion of mine, and building a career out of it has made its purpose more enjoyable. Describe a typical day. A typical day for me consist of getting the kids ready for school in the morning (except during the weekends). I give myself 15 minutes to do yoga stretches, get ready, eat breakfast then check my emails and social media. After breakfast, I prep for my next day orders. When I don’t have any orders, I usually look through my cookbooks and check to see what kind of baked goods I could test out. After I pick up my daughter from school, I make her lunch; that’s the time

I usually spend time with her. After that, I start baking the orders for the next day. Depending what orders I get, it usually takes me three to four hours to bake, pack, and clean the kitchen. Around 5 pm, I start cooking dinner for my family. I usually cook every day when I’m not busy baking. Sometimes we do take-out if I have a big order the next day. After dinner, my husband gets the kids ready for bed while I wash the dishes and clean the kitchen and living room. Once I’m done cleaning, I write down the activities that I need to do for the next day. I go upstairs to check up on the kids, then check my emails and social media one last time. Before I sleep, I read a book for 30 minutes. The next day is a new day! What is your secret to success? The secret to success is perseverance! No matter what obstacles I have to go through, I have to keep reminding myself not to give up, but to keep continuing on what I love to do in order for me to reach my goals.

Sweet Cocoa Flour Menu: • Banana Bread • Chocolate Zucchini Bread • Ube Crinkles (Purple Yam Cookies) • Chocolate Chip Cookies w/Maldon Sea Salt • Chocolate Espresso Sugar Cookies • Peanut Butter Chocolate Cookies • Snickerdoodle Cookies • Brownies • Cookies & Cream Mallows • Chocolate Mallows • Coffee Mallows • Chocolate Cake pops • Vanilla Cake pops Orders can be placed anytime through email, phone, or Facebook messenger. Cell: (323) 383-2220 sweetcocoaflour@gmail.com www.facebook.com/sweetcocoaflour

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One-on-One with... Connie Dulay Alfonso Owner, Sweet Cocoa Flour

What are your strongest traits as a leader? What traits of other leaders inspire you?

Tell us about your family. I have a loving husband and two fantastic kids. My husband takes care of what I need while I’m working and my kids motivate me to keep going.

How do you balance your health, family, and career? My family comes first before anything. I try to spend as much time as I can with my husband and kids when I’m not baking. As for health, I attend fitness classes in our community whenever I get a chance. Lastly, having a small home based baking business allows me to do whatever I want. I don’t have a boss to answer to and I don’t have the typical Monday through Friday eight hour work day. There are also times that I need to take a step back and reassess where I’m at in the moment. I always try to focus on the present and what I can do that day.

Being vocal about decisions that can affect my family or me, being strong-willed, and having passion for what I pursue! The traits that inspire me from other leaders is that they mean business. They don’t joke around when it comes to business and they are passionate about what they do.

How are you mentoring/sponsoring others? When it comes to mentoring others who want to become entrepreneurs, I always tell them that success doesn’t happen overnight. It happens when you don’t give up on what you are trying to build and surrounding yourself with positive people.

What book are you reading now?

The book I’m reading right now is The Secret.

What are your favorite hobbies? When I’m not in the kitchen, I love spending time with my family and friends, traveling, shopping, trying new restaurants and bakeries, and attending fitness classes, yoga, or pilates.

What motivates you everyday?

How do you like to spend your down time?

Not what, but who! My family keeps me motivated to become a successful business/woman.

Relaxing whenever I get a chance, watching Food Network, listening to inspirational music and reading cookbooks

Who inspires you?

What was the best advice you ever received?

My family gives me inspiration to keep doing what I do.

What inspires you? Seeing entrepreneurs I follow make it in the world!

What’s the best thing a consumer/client ever said to you? They enjoyed the baked goods they ordered and can’t get enough of it.

16 Lead Up for Women

Everything takes time, and a person needs to WANT to make their dream happen, then take the necessary steps to make it happen.

What does “Lead up” mean to you? To me, “lead up” means not to just be a leader, but a pioneer. I want to help bring women leaders from the next generation to the forefront.

January-February 2019


LEADERSHIP

Creating a pipeline of female leaders in the plumbing industry How Audrey Monell has broken barriers, established herself as a leader, and paid it forward for other women in the plumbing and HVAC industry Audrey Monell

By Erica Fetherston

18 Lead Up for Women

Audrey Monell is not one to let gender stereotypes hold her back. Over the last eight years, she’s been making waves as the President of Forrest Anderson Plumbing and Air Conditioning, a family-owned business based in the Phoenix, Arizona, area since 1961. Since taking over the family business that her grandfather started, Audrey has broken boundaries and overcome enormous challenges as a young woman in a traditionally male-dominated industry. January-February 2019


when a new technician joined Forrest Anderson but avoided talking to Audrey whenever possible. Audrey soon found out her new employee thought she was closed off and unapproachable. This news shocked Audrey and made her re-evaluate how she presented herself in the workplace and interacted with employees. Audrey now makes an overly conscious effort to be open and inviting with every employee and customer, while maintaining her professionalism.

Deciding to Go into the Family Business As a championship barrel racer, Audrey earned a rodeo and academic scholarship to Texas Tech University. However, Audrey soon realized the best opportunity to make a difference was back in Phoenix, so she transferred to Arizona State University to be close to family while earning her economics degree. “Although I loved what I was doing in Texas, I kept feeling a pull to return back to Arizona and support my family and our business,” said Monell. “The idea of supporting my grandfather’s legacy that he started decades ago was a motivating factor for me.” Audrey paid for school by working as a waitress, veterinarian hospital receptionist, in-home caregiver, and even on a watermelon farm. She earned her B.S. of Economics from the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University in 2008, and upon graduating, returned home to run the family business. leadupforwomen.com

Warming Up a Cold Welcome Growing up, Audrey spent many of her early years helping her family at Forrest Anderson in a variety of odd jobs including cleaning the headquarters, delivering parts to job sites, completing administrative tasks, and overseeing projects. However, when Audrey assumed the position of President, she initially faced challenges from some of the male technicians with traditional views. She had one plumbing technician quit right on the spot, saying he would “never work for a woman.” Audrey was disappointed that she had lost a talented plumber, but in hindsight was glad that he had quit straight away instead of keeping his negativity in the company. To avoid further negative situations with employees, Audrey has had to be extremely aware of the tone she was setting and the company culture that she was contributing to. There is one specific situation early on that helped set her on a positive trajectory,

“As a woman in my industry, there are sometimes extra steps that I need to take in order to create a positive working environment for my company and employees,” said Monell. “Some may see this as a burden, but I see it as leading with compassion for the people that I am working with. I’ve discovered I’ve been a more successful leader when I put the wellbeing of others, particularly my employees and customers, at the forefront.”

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LEADERSHIP

To further improve communication with her team, Audrey developed an open-door policy. Her office has no walls or a door, and her desk is out in the open so every employee can feel comfortable walking up to her desk to ask a question, report a concern, or share their weekend plans. Audrey believes in leading by example and prides herself on transparency, setting an example by admitting to errors, accepting responsibility, and taking corrective action.

Leading the Company into the Future In addition to establishing a positive company culture, Audrey initiated several changes to help the company transition fully into the twenty-first century. To help her team be more efficient, Audrey studied daily processes and got creative to remove the barriers that took up too much of her employee’s workday. She introduced new technology including paperless invoicing, mobile payment processing and more. While some employees

20 Lead Up for Women

were hesitant at first, they eventually realized the time and effort they saved gave them more opportunities to work directly with their customers. With these advancements, Audrey has increased revenue by 23% while decreasing costs by 10% in the last four years. “I’ve found that there will always be some kind of resistance to any change, so the key in implementing new strategies and technologies is to help people understand the changes and why they’re necessary,” said Monell. “We took extra steps to help those who were more averse to some of these changes, checking in with them and offering extra training. We discovered that these folks were actually quicker than others in some instances in adapting to new technologies.

Paying it Forward for Other Women The U.S. Census reports only 1.5% of plumbers are women, and far fewer run their own companies. That is why Audrey sees the importance of serving

as a role model and help other women find opportunities in her industry, as well as in any career field. She often speaks to young women about the opportunities for a good career in the plumbing/HVAC industry that does not require an expensive college degree and can lead to business ownership in a short time. In April 2018, Audrey organized a team of women volunteers to host an inaugural “Women in Industry” Workshop to encourage young women to consider career options in specialty trades. The half-day workshop was run by women who worked in the plumbing and HVAC industries who could share their experiences as technicians, distributors, sales, human resources, and business owners. Audrey led discussions about training, career opportunities and overcoming challenges in male-dominated workplaces. She also worked with volunteers to provide hands-on instruction for basic plumbing repairs. It was a great success that Audrey plans to replicate next year. Audrey was also recently named Vice-President/President-Elect of the Executive Women International (EWI) Phoenix Chapter. EWI is a global women’s organization with an equal focus on connections, careers, and community that brings together key individuals from diverse businesses to enhance personal and professional development, and encourage community involvement. Every year, Audrey helps to raise money for two scholarships for deserving women, including adults facing economic, social or physical challenges. “Mechanical industries such as plumbing and air conditioning tend to be male dominated, which inherently create increased boundaries and challenges for female leaders,” said Monell. “I hope that I can use my success to inspire other women within and outside my industry to work towards their goals and know that there are other women and men out there who will help to support them on their journey.” January-February 2019


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480.577.8584 rebecca@eastonlawpllc.com

Rebecca Easton

Easton Law, PLLC 9221 East Baseline Road Suite 109 #412 Mesa, Arizona 85209

“

I've owned my own firm in Eastmark since July 2018, and I practice estate planning (wills, trusts, powers of attorney), and work with small businesses and non-profits.

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BUSINESS

Born to make a difference one date at a time Jolene Beaton

By Jennifer Sussman

22

Lead Up for Women

Many years ago, I helped New York City singles seek out their soulmates, hidden within the cracks of the concrete jungle they called home. As a matchmaker, I was a businesswoman first, but I was also a friend, a confidant, a therapist, and an eternal optimist. I wanted my clients to find love, but more importantly to discover the confidence and strength that was buried deep within them. The Manhattan, “It’s Just Lunch,” office was bustling with so many dreamers looking for their life partner, and we needed help. San Diego beauty, Jolene Beaton, arrived to assist us and changed the lives of every person she encountered, including mine. Her perpetual enthusiasm cracked the stone façades of those who had long since given up hope. She was born to make a difference in this world and it just so happened she was doing it one date at a time. January-February 2019


After seven years of matchmaking, Jolene realized there was an unmistakable deficiency in our otherwise successful company model. She thoroughly examined the negative feedback collected and realized that singles weren’t taking accountability for their own mistakes, and placing blame on the system rather than learning to advance their social skills. In that moment of clarity, Jolene launched the now thriving “Love Coaching” service offered to “It’s Just Lunch” clients. She now spends her days and nights educating over 250 people every month on how to effectively build and maintain relationships. She compels her clients to face their fears and chip away at the emotional walls they have created. People often ask what it’s like to work in such a unique industry, so I asked Jolene to answer some of your burning questions.

Did you actively seek out a role as a matchmaker or did this industry find you? I adore every aspect of dating. Over the years, I loved hearing my friends’ stories and listening to tales of sordid love affairs. And yes, I always had an opinion! But, most of all, I appreciated hearing the narratives from old married couples whose relationships withstood the test of time. When I discovered that you could get paid for setting people up on dates, I was driven to turn my hobby into a career. I sought out one of the largest dating services in the country and began perfecting my craft.

What is the most challenging part about helping your clients navigate the rocky waters of dating? It is tricky to give tough-love to already vulnerable people, but it’s necessary to help them grow. Often times, my clients could gain from some more self-reflection. I tell them kindness and charm goes a long way and leadupforwomen.com

increases their chances of having a better experience. Dating should not be an interview, nor should it be an opportunity to complain about all of the tribulations of your past, especially in the first hour of your date!

What is the most common complaint women have about dating? Women seem largely disappointed by the lack of “spark” on dates. They want to feel more engaged and listened to. They also have expressed some frustration with the men’s overall style, or lack thereof. Come on guys, iron that shirt, and while you’re at it, make sure it’s clean!

A little charisma and grace go a long way. I hear first date feedback every single day and most people are fearful of being honest if they are uninterested.

What is the best piece of dating advice you could give our readers who are out there looking for love? Discover what it is like to truly enjoy meeting someone new. Learn how to be a good date, even in the event you are not interested. Being single today is very different than in the past. Technology has allowed people to put in less effort and they shouldn’t. A little charisma and grace go a long way. I hear first date feedback every single day and most people are fearful of being honest if they are uninterested. Let the person know that you appreciated their time but you are looking for a different connection and wish them luck. Be kind and honest. Lead Up for Women

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BUSINESS

divorce was highly disparaged. Newly single in her 30’s, she met an extraordinary man, who became an amazing stepfather, dedicated partner and true love of her life. After 20 blissful years, she lost him to cancer. Her mindset at 57 was you only get one love of your life, but she went back out there and hoped to prove the old adage wrong. As luck would have it, she met an exceptional man who took her hand in marriage. For well over a decade, he helped her heal from the loss of her husband and reminded her that a broken heart can be mended with enough tenderness. Sadly, he passed as well three years ago. Instead of letting tragedy dictate her future, she decided to give love another shot. She said to me, “I’m not sure if I can have it a third time, but I’m sure going to try.” That kind of hopefulness gives me the chills and reminds me why I do this.

Is there one client's story that touched you the most and why?

My most inspiring client is a 73 year old woman. We joked that she was probably going to teach me more than I could ever teach her. She went on to tell me that she got married young and ended up in a dreadful marriage. Has this job changed the way you look at love and relationships? Being a matchmaker made me see people for more than their resume or physical appearance. I find attractiveness in someone’s heart in a way I didn’t think was possible before. When my career evolved into relationship coaching, I came to realize that finding love is the most important passion project you will ever take on. It’s not just about a destination, but the journey as well. 24 Lead Up for Women

I'm sure many of your clients have found love with your help. What is the most uplifting story you've been a part of thus far? My most inspiring client is a 73 year old woman. We joked that she was probably going to teach me more than I could ever teach her. She went on to tell me that she got married young and ended up in a dreadful marriage. She had wonderful children, but escaped the toxicity of that relationship during a time when

I had a male client that had never been kissed, let alone been in a relationship. He was a great dater because he was attractive and kind but couldn’t figure out how to progress past that. We started working together and he told me that his mother intensely guarded him throughout his youth and he never had to face challenges on his own. He didn’t recognize that those deep-seated issues were holding him back from finding a partner. After a couple months of working together and learning how to face setbacks head-on, he has his first kiss. Shortly thereafter, he met his first girlfriend and they were ecstatic to tell me about their upcoming wedding. (I will be cheering them on as they walk down the aisle).

Do you consider yourself a hopeless romantic? No, I love romance and I believe it can be created in every relationship. We control our own destinies on some level as far as I’m concerned. January-February 2019


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LIFESTYLE

Perserverance in the face of adversity

By Jennifer Sussman

26 Lead Up for Women

It takes grit, determination, and willpower to be an exceptional high school athlete. Sammy Leng personified those characteristics, choosing to resist the lure of parties and chasing boys for a life of discipline, on and off the soccer field. Her hard work paid off, earning her an illustrious spot on Cleveland State University’s Division 1 soccer team. Like most college students, Sammy worked diligently to find a balance between maintaining heavy course loads and athletic prowess. A fall and subsequent foot surgery nearly sidelined her for the season, yet she crawled her way back stronger than before, until the unthinkable happened. Sammy started to feel sick. She felt cloaked in a blanket of dizziness and was relentlessly depleted of energy. She explained it away as most teenagers would, telling the first-rate Cleveland Clinic doctors it was probably a result of her mac and cheese and panini diet. But, as her health plummeted, her desire to find out the root cause intensified. January-February 2019


A previous bout with anemia compelled one of the doctors to run a red blood cell count. Red blood cells (RBC) carry oxygen to all the body’s cells. They contain a protein called hemoglobin, which picks up oxygen in the lungs and delivers it to the tissues everywhere in your body. Sammy’s RBC was shockingly low at 3.9. The average Hemoglobin number for women is 12 to 16. Sammy recalled being awoken by her rattled athletic coach insisting that she head directly to the Emergency Room. She said, “I told him I had a physics test and I would stop there afterwards. His words shook me to my core. He said if I didn’t go immediately, he would pick me up and take me there himself.” She knew at that moment that something was seriously wrong but the devastation that lay ahead was yet to be unearthed. The next few hours in the ER were a massive blur; a dense fog filled with blood transfusions, tests, and anxious doctors dashing around comparing notes. Despite their best efforts, she was released the next day with no answers. “The not-knowing was overwhelming and soul crushing. I needed to know why this was happening to me,” Sammy explained. The shattering diagnosis came from the results of a colonoscopy and endoscopy, taken with the assumption that Celiac disease was wreaking havoc on Sammy’s body. When the words, “it’s cancer” escaped the lips of the doctor on call, it was as though the world collapsed under her feet. “I just remember crying the kind of tears that you can drown in.” The details of what came next were filled with elaborate medical jargon. In layman’s terms, Sammy was a 19 year old elite athlete with Stage 3 Colon Cancer and a tumor the size of a large fist. A mere two weeks after being diagnosed, she was in surgery to remove half her colon and ovary. Forced to give up the sport she devoted her life to, she adamantly refused to give up her education too. leadupforwomen.com

Sammy Leng and her husband, Marc.

After meeting her military husband, she decided to put her career on hold and moved to Germany in pursuit of her other dream, starting a family.

Sammy was required to drop out for a semester but was insistent on taking two summer classes and working part-time, even with an infusion pump intravenously injecting chemotherapy drugs into her bloodstream at all times. These exceptionally strong drugs not only take a physical and mental toll, but can also harm the cells in the patient’s bone marrow. To counteract this internal destruction, she was mandated to get incredibly painful injections in addition to chemotherapy. She refused to allow cancer to rob her of her aspirations and delineate

her path in life. So, she carefully hid the chemo pump in a cross body bag, wore high neck shirts to conceal the taping needle and tubing of the port, cut the stringy remains of her hair into a bob and went back to class with her head held high. Sammy kept her diagnosis a secret from fellow students because she didn’t want sympathy. She craved normalcy. We often don’t appreciate the luxury of the ordinary until the concept of routine no longer exists. With soccer off the table, Sammy transferred to Ohio State University and found beauty in life outside of the sport Lead Up for Women

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LIFESTYLE

that once defined her. She carved her trail to recovery with her supportive family by her side until senior year, when a standard check-up uncovered an inconceivable finding: the cancer had resurfaced on her liver. A liver resection surgery followed, causing Sammy to work furiously to catch up on missed classes. In typical fashion, she refused to permit her illness from determining her future. Not only did she graduate on time with a degree in Civil Engineering, she was quickly presented with multiple job offers vying for her to be part of their team. “I accepted a position with the top bridge engineering firm in Ohio, paving the way towards my long anticipated goals.” But love had other plans for Sammy. After meeting her military husband, she decided to put her career on hold and moved to Germany in pursuit of her other dream, starting a family. She and her loving husband Marc decided to use Invitro Fertilization (commonly known as IVF) as a means of avoiding passing along the genetic disorder that caused her cancer onto her future children. Sammy had been diagnosed with Lynch syndrome, which was the

Pastor Charles R. Swindoll once said, “Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it.” catalyst for her cancer. Lynch syndrome, often called hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is an inherited disorder that increases the risk of many types of cancer. As a parent, one takes an unspoken oath to protect their children. That pledge often starts at inception. So, Sammy and Marc ventured into the arduous, expensive and exhausting realm of IVF. Genetic testing is not allowed in Germany, forcing them to travel two and a half hours away to the city of Prague in the Czech Republic. Months of blood tests and ensuing egg retrievals passed. After two mentally grueling rounds, four healthy embryos were harvested. The hardest part was yet to come.

The first transfer attempt took place and they anxiously waited for two weeks to see if it was successful. Sammy said, “I swore I had pregnancy symptoms. Maybe it was a placebo effect…maybe it was blind optimism.” Time felt frozen, days slogged along as though they were years. When the news came that the transfer had failed, the grief was overwhelming. “Why me, why us? Haven’t I been through enough?” Sammy lamented. Two more rounds of the process came and passed, each with the same heartbreaking update, “You are not pregnant.” Fourteen appointments in Prague, four healthy embryos, three failed transfers, countless stomach shots, pills, and interminable despair. The emotional rollercoaster ended with sorrow. One can read books and listen to stories in hope, of emotionally preparing oneself for the IVF journey but it is unfeasible to adequately safeguard ones heart. As women, we are inclined to analyze our future aspirations and craft a predetermined course towards achieving them. However, sometimes life detonates the foundation of our best-laid plans. And this was the case for Marc and Sammy. One month after their IVF prospects diminished, Sammy became pregnant naturally. Pastor Charles R. Swindoll once said, “Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it.” Instead of spending the next nine months fearing what could happen if their child is born with the same disorder, they have chosen to rise above the panic. They are arming themselves with knowledge about Lynch syndrome, actively participating in support groups and most of all, continuing to stay hopeful. At only thirteen weeks pregnant, the future is uncertain. But, with the genes of a tenacious survivor like Sammy, there is no doubt this child will grow up to be a warrior.

For more information on IVF and fertility, please visit https://www.fertilityiq.com/ For more information on Lynch syndrome, please visit https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/lynch-syndrome 28

Lead Up for Women

January-February 2019


Lead Up Tips

1.

2.

3.

Look Out for Number One

Make sure you take care of yourself first and know what your priorities are; what makes you feel good, and what doesn’t. Many women take care of others first and feel selfish for going to exercise classes or enjoying friends. However, all will benefit if women put themselves first. When we are in a happy and healthy place as an individual, we are a force to be reckoned with.

4.

Don’t Get Stuck on Perfection

5.

Create a Self Care Routine

6.

Working Out is a Must

7.

Surround Yourself with Loving People

8.

Reflect

9.

Prioritize

Set Boundaries

Setting boundaries is one of the most difficult things we can do. Often, we break our boundaries because we want to be loved and appreciated by others. We sacrifice ourselves, our passions, and time - sometimes without reward. By listening to ourselves and setting boundaries with others we can hear our own voice and live a life of balance.

Live Heart Centered

People with passion in their heart live purposefully. It is sometimes hard to live a heart centered life when we have other duties to attend to. People rely on us and we don’t want to let them down. Living heart centered - listening to your heart’s desires - gives you that extra push that is necessary to live a strong, healthy and balanced life.

30 Lead Up for Women

10.

You are not perfect. Things around us are not perfect. Let go. Perfection can push us forward but it can also hold us back. We need to let go of being a perfect mother, partner, daughter, sister, friend, and colleague. The more we accept the imperfections in ourselves and in others, the healthier we will be. Choose to be compassionate and empathetic instead of a perfectionist.

You might have the best intentions to have a well-balanced day, but a sudden issue will arise and throw you off. It is in these moments that a self care routine is important. Starting off the day with meditation and reflection, walking your dog, or hitting the gym can bring immense value during times of stress. Never sacrifice your self care routine.

Physical exercise is important and must be prioritized if you want to live a healthy balanced life. It can prevent disease, provide immediate and long-term health benefits, relieve stress, and improve your overall quality of life. Even just scheduling an evening walk with friends can make a big difference.

Choose to surround yourself with loving, caring, kind, and happy people. Positive people enrich your life. They will inspire you to be a better person, provide you with the motivation to achieve your goals, empower you to make critical changes, and cheer on your successes.

To truly understand where you are as a well-balanced individual, you must reflect. Reflection is a critical part in addressing your own state of affairs. The right course of action can’t be taken if you don’t acknowledge and assess your own feelings.

What is really important to you? Is it your family? Is it your work or your creative hobby? Make sure your priorities line up not only with your heart, but your overall priorities. Being clear about priorities can help you better decide what to focus on.

Be Your Best Leader

You are in charge of your life. You are the CEO, CFO and COO. You have the power to change your course of action. Be the leader you need to be for your own life. You are worth it.

January-February 2019


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In demand Why is porcelain tile continually specified for the commercial sector?

F

or more than three decades, when architectural spec-

Today’s technology makes it possible for floor tiles to be as sizable as 36 inches x 48 inches and still perform at optimal levels. ifications call for beautiful and highly durable flooring These tiles generally outlive the structure, in for commercial construction projects, porcelain tile has which they’ve been installed. Porcelain tile technology was invented been a major selection. Soon after it was introduced, 12-inch in Italy, in and around the city of Sassulo, widely considered to be tile capital of the x 12-inch tiles were actually considered to be very large. world. The Florim Group, located right in the midst of that region, for years has been a leader within the global ceramic sector. In 2000, Florim USA began producing porcelain materials in its new stateside production By Ron Treister facility, located in Clarksville, Tennessee. Photography provided by Now, clearly one of the largest North American producers, Florim USA regularly invests Florim USA, MILESTONE® in technology ($60 million since 2012), is environmentally conscious (the firm recycles 99.9 percent of production waste) and focuses upon providing more and more rewarding career opportunities for American workers.

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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IN DEMAND Commercial Construction & Renovation recently caught up with Marco Fregni, CEO of Florim USA, to get his thoughts on the state of porcelain tile today. In the commercial construction sector, why is porcelain tile still so much in demand? A major reason is because of the unique requirements these types of projects have for their flooring selections. Projects like restaurants, retail centers, hotels and medical facilities all require flooring options that provide many of the same benefits, including: • High-traffic durability • Ease of maintenance • Frost- chemical- and stain-resistance • Anti-slip surfaces • Antimicrobial protection • Designs and colors that reflect the personality of the business Durability, practicality and cost-efficiency are critical to any commercial project, and porcelain’s ability to meet each of these needs is why its demand has only grown throughout the commercial construction sector. Porcelain has demonstrated the ability to operate in high-traffic areas that require durability and long wear, while still providing a greater flexibility of application across different indoor and outdoor environments when compared to other flooring options. What do specifiers and building owners need to know about today's porcelain tile? (What commercial applications are best suited for this material?) It is suited for a range of light, medium or heavy commercial applications, from retail establishments to office spaces, medical practices and hotels. Naturally able to withstand the highest level of foot traffic, while retaining its beauty, ease of maintenance and long lifespan, porcelain tiles are unmatched in the commercial flooring sector. On top of that, this material comes with very unique features such as water-proof anti-slip and consistent color, which doesn't change over time under natural exposure to the UV light cold or high temperature. Is there a way to project the lifecycle of a commercial porcelain tile installation based upon foot-traffic? Many porcelain tile lines are rated for use by the Porcelain Enamel Institute (PEI) abrasion test. This test is recommended by the American Society for Testing & Materials (ASTM). PEI ratings indicate which tiles are best for different uses. The scale ranges from one to five, with five being the strongest and most durable. A “five” is a strong indicator of an installation’s lifecycle. The PEI rating indicates the tile hardness, durability and strength, and these ratings are valuable to help in tile choices for different projects. It determines these ratings by determining the

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resistance of the surface in relation to the amount of traffic and wear the surface will endure once installed. When you follow the PEI rating scale, it will allow you to be sure that you are selecting the correct porcelain tile for your project and ensuring that it withstands the foot traffic you expect. Why did you decide to start manufacturing in America? When we entered the North American market in 2000, we did so with the goal of becoming the leading tile manufacturer in North America. We saw opportunity in North America in both the residential and booming commercial construction markets, and we wanted to position our company at the forefront of these competitive fields. We felt then, and we still do now, that Florim USA could bring the talent and experience of Italy’s finest tile manufacturer to America and produce a product at the same level of quality and sophistication as that of our Italian operations. Immodestly, we have been able to do just that from our cutting-edge production facility in Clarksville, Tennessee.

Your company has become very well known for its green initiatives. What have you have implemented at Florim USA/MILESTONE® that's most noteworthy? We are totally committed to the environment. Approximately 99.9 percent of our production material is recycled internally. There are no industrial wastewater discharges; all water we use is recycled into the process. We have also completed a product-specific Environmental Product Declaration (EPD), and a site-specific Life Cycle Analysis. Additionally, Florim USA recently received Silver Certification in the Clarksville-Montgomery County Green Certification Program. We’ve added air pollution control treatment chemical substitution resulting in a 2/3 reduction in chemical use and increased pollution control. This also decreased air pollution, despite production expansion and resulted in decreased landfill utilization. Florim USA recycles other materials including cardboard, plastic shrink-wrap, office paper, aluminum cans and obsolete electronics. We’ve eliminated the consumption of single-use plastic water bottles by providing Florim water bottles and refill stations. This process has eliminated 12,000 bottles annually from the landfill.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


Spotlight on the Milestone® brand Florim USA's MILESTONE® brand represents the culmination of its efforts to produce collections specifically for the A & D marketplace. This means that Florim USA, via its MILESTONE® brand, is designing and manufacturing—directly in the United States for the first time. These collections are aimed at a new Marco Fregni generation of designers who have been showing increased interest in Italian design trends in recent years, with colors and formats that were previously only offered in the North American market through imported products. The strategy represents a revolutionary departure from other Italian ceramic groups with subsidiaries And, we’ve also identified off-site industrial wastes and post-consumer recyclable materials to utilize as raw materials, resulting in up to 40 percent recycled content in tile body production.

abroad. The mission of MILESTONE® is to create various types of color-body, rectified ‘Italian’ porcelain tile that to date, have been viewed as luxury imported products domestically. MILESTONE® actually brings the indoors outdoors. The collection now includes a unique 2cm (3/4 inch) thick paving system produced in a variety of sizes of innovative porcelain exterior floor coverings, offering a blend of design, versatility, performance, simplicity of installation and eco-sustainability. Because space is a premium in today’s commercial construction projects, Florim USA is providing savvy designers the opportunity to increase their clients’ workspaces. By effectively and seamlessly, extending an indoor environment into the outdoors is now possible via the extensive MILESTONE® exterior paver collection, which complements the firm’s indoor offerings.

“When we entered the North American market in 2000, we did so with the goal of becoming the leading tile manufacturer in North America.”

which offers moderate moisture-resistance, but is prone to scratching and excessive wear if the floor isn't kept clean. Porcelain, on the other hand, is one of the hardest and most durable materials one can choose, naturally waterproof and What are "newer" applications for resistant to heavy foot traffic. today's porcelain tile? The soft quality of vinyl flooring means The applications for porcelain tile are endsharp objects can easily gouge it, after less; floor, wall, cladding, raised technical which it is difficult to repair. And while floors, high traffic, residential, commercial durable and moisture-resistant, once water and hospitality are all excellent applications has found its way underneath this product, it for porcelain. must be removed. – Marco Fregni, CEO, Florim USA Because of its non-allergic characVinyl acts as a vapor barrier and does teristics and imperviousness to mold or not allow for evaporation, which is needresistance to chemicals, it is a perfect fit ed in the drying process. Porcelain tile is for applications such as the food industry, industrial kitchens or extremely durable and waterproof, and individual tiles can easily be hospitals. At the end of the day, durability and inalterable nature of replaced if they are chipped or cracked. Whereas vinyl can turn color the technical features offer the key for the end user. if exposed to UV light, that won’t be the case with porcelain. Carpet can quickly be damaged by frequent moisture, spills and In general, why should a savvy building owner insist upon stains and can be unsanitary under heavy use. Porcelain is naturally porcelain tile over other commercial-grade flooring materials? stain resistant and can easily be cleaned and easily sterilized. In a commercial construction project, porcelain offers some specific In terms of color and overall style options, porcelain tile is by far the advantages over other flooring options. One of the main drawbacks most versatile flooring material available. Certainly, it continues to be of hardwood flooring is maintenance. All hardwood must be finished, the product of choice for the commercial construction sector.” CCR Ron Treister is President/Founder of Communicators International, Inc., a marketing communications firm headquartered in Jupiter, Fla. For three decades, his firm has worked with major accounts focusing on the commercial construction sector. He may be reached at: rlt@communicatorsintl.com

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION PEOPLE

2019 SCHEDULE: February 26th Tampa, FL

March 20th Fort Worth, TX

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Los Angeles, CA at Warner Bros. Design Studio

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Dates/location will be confirmed by December 31st, 2018 on CCRP site at www.ccr-people.com.

For information about membership or events, contact Kristen Corson, kristenc@ccr-people.com • 770.990.7702 For information about co-sponsoring an event, contact David Corson, davidc@ccr-mag.com • 678.765.6550

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QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS • Ques ons regarding CCRP Membership? • Interested in co-sponsoring a CCRP Event? • Wish to invite a vendor or execu ve to a CCRP Event? CONTACT Kristen Corson, Membership Director, Commercial Construc on & Renova on People (CCRP) (P) 770.990.7702 (F) 678.765.6551 (Email) kristenc@ccr-people.com I hereby apply for membership with Commercial Construc on & Renova on People (CCRP). If granted, I will abide by the membership regula ons and by-laws, supports objec ves and pay the dues established by F&J Publica ons for my class of membership. If applying for Associate Membership, I a est that I am a salaried employee of the official member company and not a franchisee of that company. I authorize CCRP to send announcements (via e-mail, phone or otherwise) regarding CCRP programs and services that may be of interest to me or any of my business associates.

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Fax completed applica on to 678.765.6551 or save me and apply online at: www.ccr-people.com CIRCLE NO. 46


INSIGHT

PERSPECTIVE

Why one-on-one meetings matter more than you know

By Kate Zabriskie

T

here are only two of us in my department. Why should I bother with a formal meeting? We sit right across from each other. I tried meeting individually with my direct

reports, but they had nothing to talk about. Besides, we’re all adults. We know what we’re supposed to be doing at work.

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I work in a matrix environment. I see my direct report about once a month, and that’s usually at a larger meeting or when we’re passing each other in the hallway. I have no idea what he does. At review time, I rely on other people to tell me. The volume of reasons does not outweigh the value and importance of a regularly scheduled meeting with a direct report. If used correctly, managers and employees can enjoy many benefits by meeting one on one. Consider: • Visible appreciation: Time is currency. If managers carve out time for their people and are prepared when they meet, they show they value their direct reports. • Better thinking: Regular one-on-one meetings give managers and employees space to step away from the urgent and immediate and to think more holistically and strategically about work, goals, and development opportunities. • Stronger results: Accountability tends to improve when people have an opportunity or a requirement to report on their progress.

The perfect one-on-one

Once a manager has bought into the value of one-on-one meetings, the next step is to execute them in a way that works for everyone involved. Good one-on-one meetings are not one-size-fits-all activities. That said, there are a few guidelines that can make one-on-ones successful. 1. Pick a schedule and stick to it — One-on-ones shouldn’t regularly disappear from the calendar because something else suddenly comes up.

Troubleshooting obstacles

One-on-one meetings rarely go from nonexistent or dysfunctional to perfect overnight. That said, prepare to overcome a variety of obstacles. Obstacle 1: Employees question the new meeting. Solution: Reduce the surprise factor. If a manager has never held one-on-one meetings, that might come as a surprise to employees. To avoid feelings of uncertainty, confusion, or worse, socialize the idea before loading the calendar with unexpected surprises. Obstacle 2: An employee doesn’t take charge of the meeting. Solution: Show them how. A good agenda can go a long way toward making the conversation flow. Although employees should have ultimate responsibility for keeping the agenda, this may take time. In the beginning, managers may have to model what they want to see. Obstacle 3: An employee gives short or general answers to questions. Solution: Get specific. The more focused a manager’s questions

One-on-one meetings rarely go from nonexistent or dysfunctional to perfect overnight. For that reason, managers should prepare to overcome a variety of obstacles.

2. Choose a frequency that makes sense — For some, meeting once a month may be enough. For others, meeting weekly may be more appropriate. Every relationship is different. Depending on what’s happening inside and outside of the organization, an employee’s needs could change drastically. Meeting frequency should be reviewed from time to time. If the rate of meetings is correct, you should not routinely find yourself with no reason to meet. 3. Follow a written agenda — Well-run one-on-one meetings are not free-for-all conversations. They should follow an agenda. A one-on-one meeting agenda might include topics like current projects, progress on yearly development goals, current challenges, etc. 4. Put employees in the driver’s seat by having them manage and document the agenda — As a manager, create the initial agenda format. Once you do, your employees should eventually take ownership of the documents associated with the meetings.

are, the better the conversation tends to be. For example, instead of asking, “What are you working on,” a manager might say, “Tell me about the project that is going best right now and why that is.” Obstacle 4: An employee seems unresponsive. Solution: Leverage silence. When managers don’t get immediate feedback, they sometimes mistake silence for non-responsiveness. It’s important for managers to remember they already know the questions.

Reevaluate from time-to-time

Like anything, one-on-one meetings can get stale. Review the format and frequency from time to time and solicit feedback about what works and what doesn’t. If you’ve fallen out of the habit of holding regular one-on-ones or if you’re not getting all you could from Kate Zabriskie is president them, take another of Business Training Works, look. Can you really a Maryland-based talent afford not to? development firm.

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Eye on the prize Construction trend changes that may reward the aware contractor By Jeff Winke

H

op in a car and drive anywhere and chances are the drive will be on roads and highways that need

patching, resurfacing or widening, and bridges that often show signs of needing maintenance. Sadly, things are in bad shape.

On the last two report cards from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the U.S. infrastructure scored a D+. This year’s report urges the government and private sector to increase spending by two trillion dollars within the next 10 years to not only improve the physical infrastructure, but the American economy as well. The roadway infrastructure is badly deteriorated. Robert Puente, writing for the Brookings Institute, said, “Infrastructure enables trade, powers businesses, connects workers to their jobs, creates opportunities for struggling communities and protects the nation from an increasingly unpredictable natural environment—infrastructure is the backbone of a healthy economy.”

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EYE ON THE PRIZE In many respects, the future of construction is bright. Construction workers, contractors and people who know how to design, maintain, rehab and construct the roadways are in high demand. The care and maintenance of America’s road network has been ignored too long, and with the increased population, the needs have changed. The construction industry will be crucial to fulfilling the requirements and goals of the country’s future. Construction has been changing and evolving rapidly during the past 20 years and its dynamic advances will continue. The successful contractor in the future will operate quite differently than today. The key to all of this is technology. “Construction contractors have experienced tremendous benefits in newer, more technologically advanced machines and equipment,” says Kris Maas, director of construction product development for Topcon Positioning Group. “And the highly successful contractor has adopted precision measurement systems, GNSS machine control, and geospatial management and collaboration software to ensure seamless coordination among all involved in their projects—which have revolutionized grading, excavation and paving.” There appear to be five technology trends shaping the future of construction:

Trend No. 1 — Data

Acquiring, using and sharing data in real time gives contractors advantages of enabling their machines to “talk.” Through connected machines, contractors can remotely monitor progress, communicate with the operator, diagnose and repair problems, track machine location, and provide support. Data collected can confirm quality results and help with bidding on future similar projects. There will be the time when a job site or highway can tell how it should be built through instant data, seamless communication and exact material amounts. “Our MAGNET software solutions suite, currently provides real-time connected support for hardware as well as integration with our Sitelink3D service for instant data transfer and connectivity into active project sites,” Maas says. “Additionally, Sitelink3D allows customers to plan, schedule, assign tasks and get reports, all in real time.”

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CIRCLE NO. 47


EYE ON THE PRIZE

Trend No. 2 — Constructioneering

The aware construction contractor will exploit the opportunities provided by technology to ensure greater productivity, better quality and longer lasting results.

Constructioneering is a term Bentley Systems and Topcon use to refer to automating the digital construction process through surveying, engineering design, constructible model development, and as-built data collection within a connected data environment to improve construction execution and reduce project costs. It is the creation of collaborative systems to bring all the data into digital models that can be seamlessly shared with machines, operators, supervisors, civil engineers and project owners. Unmanned aerial vehicles or drones are an example of the type of data that will be collected. Drones can provide virtual reality perspective and data about job sites too difficult or dangerous to reach.

Trend No. 3 — Smart roads

Roadways will do more than carry traffic in the future. As solar collector ribbons, they may very well be contributing to fueling the vehicles of the future. Or embedded wireless technology could maintain an electric

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car’s charge. Metal street name signs will become nostalgic artifacts of times past, since the self-driving pods will be told by the road what street it is on. Roads will heal themselves as cracks form since the concrete or asphalt mix will be embedded with tiny capsules of sodium silicate. When a crack forms, the capsules rupture and release a gel-like healing agent that will harden to fill the void.

Trend No. 4 — Overcoming the skills gap

Technology can help with the labor shortfall and fill the skills gap of new employees. Take a smart, inexperienced worker and place him in the cab of a dozer or motor grader governed by GPS machine control with a 3D site plan displayed, and with proper training, he will become productive. Technology has not only proved to save time and improve accuracy, but it’s impact on productivity has been significant. As technology permeates the construction industry, there is a need for university and technology school graduate technicians. The need and challenge is there.

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Trend No. 5 — IoT

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the communication connectedness of machines and objects through sensors via online. Think of IoT as the data aggregation and collection going into a central repository, where intelligent decisions can be made based on what has been collected in real-time. Workers can be tracked in the field and ensure that they are protected from or at least aware of job site hazards and other potential injuries. Equipment sensors can monitor whether machinery is being productive or in need of repair or preventive maintenance. “The future is getting closer to us—it’s inevitable,” Maas says. “We continue to develop new technologies and refine the innovations we’ve brought to the market—all with the objective of helping construction

The construction industry will be crucial to fulfilling the requirements and goals of the country's future. Construction has been changing and evolving rapidly during the past 20 years and its dynamic advances will continue.

contractors to be more efficient, accurate and productive in what is referred to as The Intersection of Infrastructure and Technology. The future expects that of us.” As was reported at the World Economic Forum, “ Over the past decade, digital progress has transformed whole industries, ushering in a new technological era now known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution. These new technologies are not only satisfying consumer demand for better entertainment, shopping and transport. Innovation has improved companies’ productivity and sustainability and redefined the skills and competencies needed to thrive.” Clearly, the aware construction contractor will exploit the opportunities provided by technology to ensure greater productivity, better quality and longer lasting results.. CCR Jeff Winke is a business and construction writer based in Milwaukee. He can be reached through jeff_winke@yahoo.com.

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Standing on the edge

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AI for construction document management? Not so fast

T

By Nick Carter

he architect, engineering, construction and owner (AECO) industry faces a dilemma. Business is booming, but barriers to profitability abound. How

can an industry with a historical reluctance to change address challenges in order to reap the full benefits of economic prosperity?

To understand the opportunity, you must first examine the problem. Construction projects across the nation are accelerating, particularly in high-growth cities where technology, health care, financial services and other sectors are generating thousands of new jobs. Along with this building boom comes a host of new concerns and risks. In a rush to secure projects, companies overextend themselves in regards to both resources and finances. Worker shortages may hamper progress on key projects, driving up wages yielding budget challenges. Spikes in the costs of building materials can wreak even more havoc on budgets. Projects run over budget, and out of time. As is true with so many other industries today, technological advancements promise an answer. In particular, the rise of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to help identify issues, allocate resources and auto-correct processes seems like a surefire solution. Unfortunately, there are a few stumbling blocks to overcome.

Construction projects across the nation are accelerating, particularly in high-growth cities where technology, health care, financial services and other sectors are generating thousands of new jobs.

Document versus Data Management

In today’s AECO industry (just as in many other sectors), document management drives processes. Job site managers rely on accurate information to tell them what work is being performed on any given day, when supplies will be available, how many workers are on-site and what issues (if any) are creating delays.

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STANDING ON THE EDGE Workers rely on documentation to tell them when they need to work and what tasks they’ll be required to perform. Suppliers use information to schedule deliveries. Everyone creates documentation to detail what action is occurring, and when. But problems arise when one vendor’s documentation contradicts what the foreman (or anyone else on the ground) understands to be the facts. A delivery of materials may arrive at the scheduled time, but the deliverer has no idea that inclement weather has pushed the project back two days. There are multiple versions of “the truth” floating about within various documents—and very little communication among the parties involved as to which version accurately reflects what’s occurring on the project. Today’s ecosystem

inaccurate reporting from one source to another, an appropriate AI system easily eliminates the guessing game of which information is accurate. It can even identify discrepancies within the data that appear to be conflicting. In order to accomplish this, any AI system worth its salt must be based in the cloud so that all information is considered. Over time, the reliance on documents will diminish, leaving data at the core of all decisions, and enabling data to create the one single version of the truth. When implemented properly, AI intelligently tracks progress across all projects, whether they are active job sites, proposals in development, projects near completion (or recently completed), budgets, architectural drawings, etc. Using this single source of information allows managers to respond to RFIs on deadline, schedule resources or create and maintain budgets. With everyone operating from the same platform, confusion and surprises are avoided, complicating issues are reduced—and those that do arise are more quickly and easily resolved.

What AI needs to work

of document and email management systems can’t address the challenges that arise from these miscommunications. Even the most up-to-date information management systems can’t account for all these disparate pieces of information, and injecting AI capabilities into antiquated systems won’t resolve this critical problem. In order to work, AI must be driven from a data perspective. So what does this mean? It means removing silos between all sources of information to enable a single version of the truth that can be shared among all parties. It also means accessing every piece of information to allow that single version of the truth to emerge. No more

The AECO industry stands at a crossroads. Until the industry advances technologically, it will continue to struggle with the ebb and flow of economic conditions—neither escaping the pitfalls of the lows nor capitalizing on the bounty of the highs. Conversely, the industry can modernize through innovation, allowing it to react with appropriate action when circumstances warrant. Deploying an AI system to manage processes can go a long way toward allowing the industry to meet its long-term goals. But first, a few “must haves” are required. Any AI-driven process must be cloud based to allow all information to be analyzed and retrieved by all parties, creating a clear single source of “truth” that can be acted upon. With a cloud-based solution, all information management becomes data driven versus document dependent, enabling smarter decisions based on accurate information. Any lesser system will not allow the industry to take full advantage of data intelligence. Without breaking down silos, decision makers and others are left with the same inadequate capabilities that currently persist with current document management systems. It is the only way for AI to fulfill its promise and meet the industry’s needs for profitability. CCR

With a love for technological innovation, Nick started his first company, Ingenious Development, at the age of 23. He is motivated by a driving passion for software development and defining it with efficient business processes. He has worked as an engineer at Cisco Systems, with various startups and consulted with Fortune 100 companies. His career path in technology, business and economics has enabled him to implement streamlined solutions. Currently, Nick Carter is the Founder and CEO of IngeniousIO.

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CIRCLE NO. 48


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Storm warning How building managers can leverage the IoT for hurricane resilience By Alban Cambournac

A

s building managers look at what lies ahead for them in 2019 and the threats that their buildings are likely to face, they should consider hurricane

season and the ways that they can ensure their building is prepared well ahead of time, including how new building management technologies can assist in this critical area.

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STORM WARNING

The Internet of Things (IoT) is driving new levels of connectivity and visibility across functions, and building management is no different. So how can building managers use IoT-enabled building, power and security management technology to help make hurricane preparation easier?

Before the hurricane: Preparation

The emergence of smart, connected technologies that power the IoT has created vast new data sets—and opportunities—for facility managers. The IoT fosters a dynamic and intelligent network of electrical and mechanical connected products that are managed by an integrated building management system (BMS). With this type of network and the right analytics tools, operations staff can gain powerful new insights into their building’s system maintenance and energy use that traditional systems don’t reveal. Before a hurricane makes its impact, the diagnostics of the BMS with advanced power management capabilities can preemptively identify issues in the health and power quality of the electrical system. For example, harmonic mitigation solutions like active filters can ensure the electrical system will be less susceptible to power tripping in the event of power disturbances on the network. Another important aspect of hurricane preparedness is to anticipate the power going out well before the hurricane hits the building. This means that building teams must optimize their

generator power and energy consumption for emergency supply to last for an extended period. To do this, an advanced and integrated building and energy management system will help assess the capacity usage of power equipment, and identify critical loads that must remain on and their power demand. Fuel consumption on emergency power should also be carefully evaluated and monitored with a strong integration of the generator fuel oil system and the building management system to plan for proper reserves and supply routes during the hurricane. On top of this, an essential capability of IoT-enabled automated building technology is remote monitoring. Remote monitoring allows facility and building managers to collect data from all connected elements of the facility and transmit those data points to a remote platform, such as a central crisis cell, which can monitor building performance leading up to and during the hurricane strike. A building management system sends data on many critical points, up to tens of thousands on some facilities such as large campuses. No human operator can check every one of those to ensure they’re configured properly and functioning—and time is of the essence with a hurricane on the horizon. Strong building and power analytics within a building management solution can identify and prioritize maintenance on those critical points that are not functioning as they should—whether they’re working but not configured properly, not working at all or working inefficiently.

The more information available in the immediate lead-up and mid-impact of the hurricane, the better.

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www.PhoenixDronePros.com CIRCLE NO. 50


STORM WARNING

After the Hurricane: Damage evaluation, recovery and learning The hurricane has subsided, and it’s time to follow the path to normalcy. Technology can play an important role in evaluating damage, while safely and quickly switching out of emergency mode to normal operation mode. This will include: • Integrated video management systems that allow first responders and building owners to quickly survey impacted areas. • Integrated security management systems that allow building owners to over-ride schedules and set areas to lock down to limit building access if needed. • Advanced and integrated building and power management systems with strong local and remote logging as well as reporting capabilities. These reporting functions can help replay the sequence of all electrical, mechanical and security events before and during the hurricane. This allows facility teams as well as crisis response teams to understand the root causes of the issues encountered, identify vulnerabilities in building operations and create a prioritized list of remediation maintenance actions. IoT-enabled building management systems serve many important roles on an average day, but their importance is amplified even further in hurricane season. By implementing and using the cloudbased technologies they have available well ahead of hurricane season, building and facility managers can ensure they are well prepared to maximize resilience in the worst of storms.

Finally, it is critical to back up all database software and keep copies onsite and off-site in the cloud. In the event of a lost computer, the database can be recovered and reloaded into a new computer. Having a strong, IoT-enabled infrastructure goes a long way toward ensuring hurricane readiness. Once a BMS is in place, ensuring readiness means that connected monitoring systems are in place and issues are identified in the critical prestorm days and weeks.

During the hurricane: Emergency response activities

Pre-hurricane preparation—while leveraging connected systems—is the most important point in the timeline to ensure that the adverse effects of the storm can best be mitigated. But without question, the right steps must be taken when the storm hits. Because a hurricane affects everyone in a facility, nothing is more important than open communication. Some disruption is to be expected in the wake of a serious storm. Building owners and occupants will be far more understanding of the challenges that building managers are facing and far more likely to follow advice if they receive regular communication about the conditions the building faces, as well as expectations for disruption and recovery efforts. To make sending these notifications far more straightforward, integrated security management systems include databases of all the people who have access to the building. Building managers can use this list to facilitate mass messaging, keeping everyone informed about what is happening and what they must to do to prepare and react to the emergency. Once it is clear that the hurricane’s arrival is imminent and the power is going out, the building must be quickly switched to emergency mode: shedding the non-critical loads, performing temperature resets to reduce demand on the HVAC system and setting the security system to appropriate emergency configuration. Resilient building and security management controllers can operate on a standalone basis without a network connection, as long as they have power. There is also a high chance that internet and cell phone connection will be lost. A control room on emergency power should therefore be located in the building. In addition, leveraging an integrated building management system, also on a generator, will create an aggregation of alarms and easy access to all power management, HVAC management and security management of the building. When the hurricane hits, different types of security issues can arise. Even if they’re remote, security managers can use their BMS and integrated security systems to add users or take actions—such as manually control doors or set doors to lockdown—to deal with any kind of security or access control request that may be out of the ordinary amidst a hurricane. Video management helps these teams identify damage such as broken windows and helps them see if someone is trying to access a particularly damaged or restricted area. An advanced building management system can also help provide analytics on the hundreds of alarms that may be triggered during a hurricane and quickly provide a root cause and source for the event. This will help building managers identify the specific area in which an equipment fault has occurred. The more information available in the immediate lead-up and mid-impact of the hurricane, the better. Building managers can effectively use this to maintain safety and security during the storm and streamline the recovery process afterward. CCR Alban Cambournac is VP of U.S. EcoBuilding at Schneider Electric.

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ES T

2010

CIRCLE NO. 51


By JoAnne Castagna, Ed.D.

Next man up

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Eisenhower Barracks is being renovated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District under the West Point Cadet Barracks Upgrade Program. Photo Credit: Dan Desmet, PAO.

Army Corps modernizes USMA Barracks for future leaders

O

n June 6, 1944, American and allied forces, stormed the beaches of Normandy, France and liberated Western

Europe from Nazi Germany's control. The invasion was one of the largest military assaults in history. The day, known as D-Day, was considered the beginning of the end of World War II. U.S. Army Five-Star General Dwight D. Eisenhower, supreme commander of Allied Expeditionary Forces, was influential in bringing the war to an end, especially with the planning and execution of D-Day. He later became the 34th President of the United States. The 75th Anniversary of D-Day will be on June 6, 2019, and coincidently a barracks named after Eisenhower is being renovated and will be completed for the anniversary. Eisenhower Barracks is located at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, where Eisenhower graduated in 1915. The renovation work is being performed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. The academy is modernizing its barracks under the West Point Cadet Barracks Upgrade Program. The program involves the renovation and modernization of nine existing or "legacy" cadet barracks and facilities, including Eisenhower Barracks that was originally built in 1968. "The Army Corps is delivering a modernized barracks. Renovations will increase space and decrease costs," says Caitlin Slattery, project manager, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The renovation includes a complete gut and remodel of the existing structure and the floor plans will be optimized to utilize space in a more practical way. The building will also be outfitted

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will be energy-efficient making the barracks Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certifiable. For example, high-efficiency, low flow plumbing fixtures will be installed that will reduce water use by more than 40 percent. The inside of the structure is being modernized and the exterior's gothic revival architecture is being maintained in order to blend in with the rest of the historic 200-year old campus. The barrack's original granite exterior is being maintained and repointed to waterproof the building. Repointing is when the joints of brick or stonework are repaired by filling in with grout or mortar," Slattery says. "The primary purpose of this is to prevent water from infiltrating into the building." In addition, the building's large parwith completely new mechanical, electrical apet stones—that sit along the perimeter and plumbing systems. of the roof—are also being removed to The Eisenhower Barracks is unique replace the flashing. from other barrack renovations in that the "Flashing is typically a strip of metal building is connected to Washington Hall—a which is used to prevent water from penemulti-purpose facility that includes academic trating the junction of a building's roof with rooms, office space and the primary dining the surrounding areas," Slattery says. facility. "As such, the Army Corps is required In addition, the sidewalk or "Troop Walk" to take extra care to ensure minimal disturfacing the flat expansive area where the Cadets bance to ongoing operations essential to the march, will be finished to match the sidewalk on academy's daily life," Slattery says. the opposite side at MacArthur Long Barracks, When completed, the 235,040 square thereby preserving the historic atmosphere foot, multi-story barracks will have 314 rooms of the area where the Cadets complete the to sleep 612 Cadets, along with 16 Tactical famous U.S. Military Academy parades. Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers. All "The renovation will provide the Cadets – Caitlin Slattery, Project Manager, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will have access to two laundry rooms. a more comfortable and modern space for daily life, which will allow them to spend Room(s) to learn more time focusing on their course work and To assist the Cadets with their academics, each Cadet company will other obligations," Slattery says. have Collaboration Rooms that will allow them to meet in large numThe barracks is expected to be completed by summer 2019 bers to work on group projects or participate in team building activities. and available for occupancy that fall. Cadets will also have such amenities as water bottle filling Leaders like Eisenhower, helped end a war and bring freedom stations in the hallways and work stations equipped with cable to many people. Part of who he was stems from the education he connectors and power supply between computers and devices—Uni- received at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. versal Serial Bus (USB) ports. In order for the Academy to continue to be a world-renowned The barracks will also get something that it didn't have beleader development institution, the Barracks Program will ensure that fore—air conditioning. Many of these new and upgraded features it grows and adapts to the nation's future challenges. FC

“The renovation will provide the Cadets a more comfortable and modern space for daily life, which will allow them to spend more time focusing on their course work and other obligations.”

Regular Federal Construction contributor Dr. JoAnne Castagna is a Public Affairs Specialist and writer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. She can be reached at joanne.castagna@usace.army.mil

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CIRCLE NO. 52


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Cutting edge

Cooling system helps save both water and energy at new biolab facility By John Vastyan

B

ehind the scenes of the most cutting-edge genetic science lies the work and expertise of companies like New England BioLabs Inc., in Ipswich, Massachusetts. Since the 1970s, New England BioLabs has provided enzymes for use in molecular biology research and clinical trials, serving a network of customers internationally.

The enzymes produced at New England BioLabs are used in applications like cloning, DNA modification and protein analysis—applications that are highly precise, requiring components that are predictable, repeatable and of the highest quality. To better serve the ever evolving needs of their customers, New England BioLabs (NEB) recently built a 40,000-square-foot cleanroom production facility in Rowley, Massachusetts.

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Reviewing mechanical plans

The right construction team

Pulling it all together was the project management firm, Columbia Construction Company, a Boston-based company with more than 90 years’ experience in multiple sectors: academic, life sciences, corporate, healthcare and hospitality. “Columbia was involved with the construction of NEB’s new facility for the entire process, from design review to final commissioning,” says Neal Swain, project manager. Columbia worked with AHA Consulting Engineers, Inc. (AHA) for building’s engineering infrastructure, including the plant’s process cooling mechanical system. AHA’s clients include companies such as Vertex, Takeda, Merck, and NEB itself, as AHA served as the design engineers for its main facility. As is customary in the industry, AHA worked with suppliers to find the right equipment to meet the NEB’s specific requirements. Manufacturer’s rep firm, Fluid Equipment Solutions of New England (FES), provided technical assistance for the cooling system at this new facility.

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Decco riggers complete cooling tower installations at New England BioLab’s new facility.

Accurate and robust temperature control of the equipment and environment is critical to the success of the tightly-controlled manufacturing processes.

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Tight tolerances for cooling

Accurate and robust temperature control of the equipment and environment is critical to the success of the tightly-controlled manufacturing processes. A key component of the cooling system that meets the stringent cooling needs at NEB’s facility is its fluid cooler, a 1.6 million BTU closed circuit cooling tower designed to provide cooling to process water for a wide variety of sophisticated plant processes. “The fluid cooler provides condenser water to one side of a heat exchanger,” says Thomas Joyner, partner, and AHA project manager. “The process water on the other side of the heat exchanger serves several pieces of plant equipment as well as a process chiller to provide chilled water for manufacturing.” For such a large, yet critical piece of the cooling puzzle, AHA considered several options for the fluid cooler. With the rising cost of energy and concern about water consumption, the amount of electricity and water used was an additional factor in deciding which cooling system to specify.


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“We compared the performance of multiple evaporative fluid coolers in terms of meeting the required temperature as well as energy and water use,” says Ben McLaughlin, sales engineer at FES. After careful analysis, EVAPCO’s eco ATWB-H series hybrid fluid cooler was selected. The system is specifically designed to optimize both the evaporative (latent) and dry (sensible) modes of cooling simultaneously—combining the advantages of an evaporative cooler and a dry cooler into one unit.

Balancing act

There were three aspects of the fluid cooling system that were critical for this application. The first was the cooling tower’s wet and dry performance, McLaughlin says. The hybrid fluid cooler has both wet and dry operation with the ability to handle full capacity in “dry mode” up to an ambient dry bulb temperature of 50F degrees. This reduces water consumption for every hour of operation below 50F degrees when the water is turned off and the fan alone is doing all the cooling.

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“In addition to water savings, the five-horsepower spray pump is turned off during dry cooling and that results in energy savings when compared to the standard fluid cooler using evaporative cooling only,” McLaughlin says. “So we have about 60 percent less water used and a 30 percent reduction in electricity consumption.” Process water first enters the dry coil, which is outside the evaporative water spray stream. This coil serves to pre-cool the high temperature water. The cooled water then enters the coil, just below the spray stream. Depending on the dry bulb temperature, the spray pump may be on or off. A key benefit of the dry coil, piped in series with the wet coil, is that the evaporation rate off of the wet coil is maximized because a significant portion of the heat load from the process has already been rejected by the dry coil before entering the wet coil. This means that water is always saved, even when spray pumps are required for full load. The additional dry coil also allows for reduced water vapor leaving the cooling tower, which happens because of efficient transfer of heat from the process water to the moist air leaving the cooling tower. Increasing the temperature of the air leaving the tower, without adding moisture, reduces its relative humidity from a saturated state (at 100 percent), which greatly reduces the visible plume. In order to get the most out of this hybrid system, the fan and spray pump operation are controlled to maximize savings. The SAGE® control system provided with the cooler plays a key role in optimizing water and energy savings. “The controller leverages outdoor or ambient conditions,” McLaughlin says. “Specifically, the wet bulb and dry bulb temperatures are used to best meet load requirements while reducing water and energy consumption. This sophisticated operation is handled in stride by the SAGE control system.” This tight control is what gives NEB the level of utility savings as well as the consistency and predictability needed for their manufacturing processes.


Eco-friendly accessories

The other key evaporative cooling system components are the water treatment, and the quiet fan, also selected by the design team. Although water treatment is necessary to maintain evaporative cooled equipment during wet operation, a substantial benefit to a primarily dry cooler is that scale cannot form when the unit is operating in dry operation. To prevent scale buildup or corrosion from deposits when water is evaporated in the cooler, the water must be treated. In order to maintain an environmentally friendly manufacturing facility, a non-chemical treatment system was provided for this evaporative water. “We included the Pulse-Pure® non-chemical water treatment system with the fluid cooler,” McLaughlin says. “This system uses a high frequency electromagnetic pulse to take care of the corrosive or scale-forming solids that would otherwise concentrate on the cooler’s components when water evaporates. It also takes care of anything biological that we’re usually concerned with because it renders microorganisms incapable of reproduction.

In addition to reducing chemicals used on site, the unit itself produces less sound pollution. The super low sound fan selected boasts a nine to 16 decibel reduction in sound when compared to the standard fluid cooler fan. “The reduction in sound is concentrated in the low-frequency octave band, which travel further distances and penetrate structures,” McLaughlin says, “so these are the fans specifically designed for applications that are sound-sensitive in nature.” With EVAPCO’s hybrid fluid cooler serving the manufacturing process, New England BioLabs’ new cleanroom production facility achieves both high quality product and lower water and energy consumption. “We took the shell of a building and turned it into a 40,000-square-foot cleanroom production facility,” Swain says. "The process cooling system assures utility savings while delivering predictable outcomes for NEB’s customers, both existing and those we expect to serve in the future.” HC

John Vastyan is president of Common Ground and a senior contributor for Commercial Construction & Renovation magazine.

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Dialed-in comfort Minnesota housing project gets energy/comfort upgrade By Rachel Ruhl

I

t’s rare to hear about “comfort” and “affordable housing” together as one. Too often, there’s compromise. At the losing end, it’s

comfort that gives way to price and ease of installation. Yet, managers of Prairie Meadows, a Section 8 housing community in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, a suburb if Minneapolis, stood firm to make the change. Built in the ’70s, the housing complex is undergoing a sweeping retrofit, helped by government funding.

Richard Reynolds, 15-year boiler maintenance manager at Prairie Meadows, says it’s not common for residents of Section 8 housing to experience the unusual comfort of hydronic heat. But the way facility managers saw it, Prairie Meadows is home for 500-plus residents, where they seek comfort. Why shouldn’t they experience a level of comfort too often reserved for people of greater means? At Prairie Meadows, many of the occupants are families with children, though there are plenty of seniors, and those with physical disabilities, tool. Apartments range from 850 to 1,000 square feet with one, two and three bedrooms.

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While there was some attention given to cracked sidewalks, kitchen upgrades and plumbing fixtures, the main focus was an energy retrofit to all of the apartment buildings.

Started last year, the phased, $10 million renovations to Prairie Meadows, a 10-building, 180-unit campus, concluded in late 2017. While there was some attention given to cracked sidewalks, kitchen upgrades and plumbing fixtures, the main focus was an energy retrofit to all of the apartment buildings. Work included door and window replacements, some new appliances, insulation, and some roofing. While the big, old cast iron boilers still worked, they were gluttons for maintenance and natural gas. Reynolds says it was decided that the old systems, while still in operating condition, operated at efficiencies of 65 to 75 percent AFUE. It’s no mystery that a bump of 20 to 30 percent fuel efficiency caught the attention of managers tasked with planning the renovations.

Rigors of winter

Another facet to the need for new boilers was their tendency—more frequently through the years—to require expensive or time consuming maintenance or service work, all too often during the winter months when down time meant real potential discomfort or trouble for residents. For those who’ve never experienced winter at its worst in Minnesota, it’s hard to describe the level of discomfort that can happen when a heating system won’t work. Roaring winds frequently sweep through the state, delivering an average of 170 inches of snow. Temperatures can reach -50F degrees, too cold even for ice fishing. And, try as it might, the state’s travel bureau can’t beat the stats: Their state is frequently rated by national weather services as the worst state in 50, winter-wise.

Importance of efficiency

The state government has regulations and energy standards when it comes to building efficiency. They’re slowly trying to switch everything to high efficient systems. “The mechanical systems at Prairie Meadows—with gradually falling energy

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efficiency measurements—no longer made the cut,” says Reid Mathiason, project manager at Shakopee, Minnesota-based Associated Mechanical, the plumbing and mechanical contracting firm chosen to install new heating systems at the apartment complex. “Even though many were still operating, they had to go.” The state of Minnesota provides a high level of public and private support for energy efficient technologies. It offers utility incentives and energy efficiency programs that are accessible to a wide variety of commercial and industrial companies, including financial incentives for upgrades and system-wide improvements.

“The mechanical systems at Prairie Meadows— with gradually falling energy efficiency measurements—no longer made the cut. Even though many were still operating, they had to go.” – Reid Mathiason, Project Manager, Associated Mechanica

Comfort conversion

With efficiency being the No. 1 concern, Laars Mascot FT firetube boilers were selected for the retrofit project at Prairie Meadows. With an efficiency of 95 percent AFUE, input of 199 MBH 10:1 turndown and the capability of cascading up to 20 boilers for larger structures, and redundancy—the new boilers have given managers and residents new peace of

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mind during preparations for the inevitability of winter woes. Associated Mechanical began their work in July, with work that kept them busy at Prairie Meadows through September. In preparation for the work to begin, demo contractors gutted the mechanical room in each building, including final eviction of the old cast iron boilers. Associated had a three-man crew installing the boilers. While two technicians finished up one mechanical room, the third began preparations at the next. One facet of the demolition caught the eye of a technician or two: gradual deterioration of pipes, exhaust flues and heat exchangers, caused by acidic condensate. It’s a tough challenge for on/off boilers, combined with record-setting winter temperatures. Thanks to careful maintenance, this challenge was kept in check, though eventually the old systems would surely succumb to the effects of condensate. But what was once a challenge is now an advantage. The new, modulating-condensing systems welcome the presence


of condensate. The boilers and the PVC flues are built to take the presence of acidic condensate in stride. In fact, the boilers gain in operational efficiency by stripping BTUs from the fluid before the exhaust process is completed. Nick Kruse, inside sales at St. Paul, Minnesota-based Michel Sales Agency explains that the new boilers are wall-hung, which also saved space in the tight basement mechanical rooms. Piping was designed in a primary secondary fashion. “Each apartment building now has two to three of the Mascot boilers,” says Larry Sundberg, technical training and field support at Michel Sales. “The system was designed with a lead-lag configuration with equal runtime for greater efficiency and reliability.” Boiler operation is now controlled by outdoor reset, built into each boiler’s circuitry. “This alone brought a whole new level of

comfort for residents of the apartment complex,” Sundberg says. “Before, residents had one- or two-zone systems that simply operated by an ‘on’ or ‘off’ function. Essentially, it was either hot or cold. Now, with gradual, seamless boiler modulation, and with operation tied to outdoor conditions, residents are finding out firsthand what hydronic comfort truly means—with warmth that’s easily controlled.” Laars Mascots were chosen for this job because it had standard features that weren’t even options with other brands—like integral circulating pumps. “With circulating pumps built into the boilers, we didn’t have to supply one for each system at an additional cost to us or added work," says Mike Jackson, Associated Mechanical jobsite superintendent. "So those advantages helped as system selections were made, as well.” MH

Rachel Ruhl is a writer and account manager for Common Ground, a Manheim, Pennsylvania-based trade communications firm focused on the plumbing and mechanical, HVAC, geothermal and radiant heat industries. She can be reached at rachelr@seekcg.com

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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

For the Craft Brewing Professional

New England Made Inside the wonderful world of the Lord Hobo Brewing Company

Photography by @josephwymanphoto

Daniel Lanigan, Founder and CEO


insights

Book Rec

The Happiness Advantage:

How a Positive Brain Fuels Success in Work and Life By Shawn Achor The smart money is on that if you work hard you will be more successful. Work more successful, you’ll be happy. Not so fast people. Recent studies show that this formula is actually backward: Happiness fuels success, not the other way around. That’s Shawn Achor’s story and intends on continually backing it up. In The Happiness Advantage, Achor shows that when you’re positive, your brain becomes more engaged, creative, motivated, energetic, resilient and productive at work. The discovery has been repeatedly borne out by rigorous research in psychology and neuroscience, management studies, and the bottom lines of organizations around the globe. Achor spent over a decade living, researching and lecturing at Harvard University, drawing on his own research—including one of the largest studies of happiness and potential at Harvard and others at companies like UBS and KPMG—to fix this broken formula. Using stories and case studies from his work with thousands of Fortune 500 executives in 42 countries, Achor explains how you can reprogram your brain to become more positive in order to gain a competitive edge at work. A must-read for every craft beer enthusiasts, The Happiness Advantage isn’t only about how to become happier at work—it shows how to reap the benefits of a happier and more positive mind-set to achieve the extraordinary in your work and life.

Beer bound

Survey shows rise in non-traditional drinking venues Brewpubs. Tasting rooms. Taprooms. Depending on what you call them, the popularity of these non-traditional drinking venues is on the rise with younger consumers, according to the "Nielsen CGA On Premise User Survey (Fall 2018)." The survey shows that younger craft beer drinkers are seeking out third-space drinking occasions, with 23 percent of millennials saying they visited a taproom or a brewpub, while 13 percent cite eating and drinking at a “groceraunt” and 14 percent meeting at an arcade bar. And it's not just millennials, as 15 percent of all U.S. legal-drinking age consumers say they have made a trip to a brewery taproom in the last three months of 2018.

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CBAM-MAG.COM

Human touch Survey outlines importance of customer-centric customer service

If you're looking to connect with your customers in today's increasingly growing tech landscape, try being a little more human. Sounds crazy, right? Interestingly, according to The Northridge Group's "State of Customer Service Experience 2018," 69 percent of today's consumers admit that navigating automated systems is hard, while 62 percent say they have to make multiple contacts to get what they need. The report, which queried 1,000 consumers age 18 and older in the United States, broke down all the ways consumers perceive the customer experience and how they like doing it. Here's a look the preferred channels of communications for today's customer demographics:

Millennial 44% Digital 34% Phone 20% Email

Boomer 22% Digital 55% Phone 23% Email

Generation X 35% Digital 41% Phone 22% Email

Silent 18% Digital 52% Phone 28% Email


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New England Made Inside the wonderful world of the Lord Hobo Brewing Company With its unique ability to bring people of all kinds together, beer is the unifying factor we need today. Who couldn’t get behind that line of thinking? Just ask Daniel Lanigan, the founder of the Lord Hobo Brewing Company (LHBCo). From the lords that only enjoy the finer things in life, to the hobos who work hard to earn their small pleasures, Lanigan believes that great beer is an accessible luxury. Lanigan is a craft beer veteran. After building a deep connection to argu-ably some of the best beer bars in the country including but not limited to, the Moan & Dove in Amherst, the Dirty Truth in Northampton, and Lord Hobo Craft Beer bar in Cambridge Massachusetts), Lanigan set out to redefine craft style New England beers.

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CBAM-MAG.COM

Photography by @splfilms

By Michael J. Pallerino


There is a ton of noise in the industry. Cutting through that chatter with a unique perspective, top tier culture centric partners and creative talent is what sets us apart.

Enter Lord Hobo, the hop-focused brewery Lanigan founded in 2015. Its flagship beer, Boomsauce, became an iconic offering for craft beer fans everywhere. Today, it has expanded its core portfolio offerings which previously included the classic line up of: Glorious, Galaxy Pale; Steal this Can, a West Coast Style IPA; Consolation Prize, a Double IPA; and Hobo Life a Session IPA to include various styles and experimental options for all palates. The Taproom, in Woburn has 40 taps, of which at least 50% of those are LHBCo brewed products. And as the Lord Hobo legend grows, so does it distribution, as the demand for its New England style taste is gaining national interest. The brand also is eying building satellite breweries in the United States and abroad. CBAM sat down with Andréa (Drea) Hudson, Director of Brand Marketing, to get her thoughts on what makes the Lord Hobo one of craft beer's fastest growing brands.

Photography by @srirachow

Give us a snapshot of today's craft brew market from your perspective. What’s likely to happen next? Given the explosive and well deserved growth of the craft beer industry, what happens next is determined by the brands that choose to dominate the industry by innovating, differentiating and staying focused on their communities. From our perspective, when we started on this journey four years ago, we had one goal in mind—to produce world class beers that were accessible to all. Now that we've expanded our distribution to 14 markets domestically and are beginning to export, we are well on our way. What's next for us is strategic expansion, continuing to invest in our team and our quality control, taproom focus and making sure that we're always taking care of our key partners, from distributor to fans and everything else in between.

What trends are defining the space? Trends are an interesting topic. Some may say style, others may say packaging. In our opinion, it's a combination of understanding the consumers

appetite for new portfolio options versus focus on flagship and branding. Style-wise, the New England IPA earned it's definition last year, along with the Hazy IPA, which as you know, we take great pride in being pioneers of that style. We see trends that lean into Sour, Gose and Session, which we currently have on tap at our HQ for R&D purposes. We're always keeping our eyes and ears out for what's coming next.

What is the Lord Hobo story from a brand perspective? We're grateful everyday to be one of the Top 100 largest breweries by volume as of 2017 and Top 5 by volume in Massachusetts in such a short amount of time. We know that this only happens when your partners, distributors and fans also understand your vision. Our founder and CEO, Daniel Lanigan, is a seasoned craft beer veteran in this industry and knows his stuff when it comes to beer. When we started to craft the story of Lord Hobo, we wanted to connect a few elements. It's important for us, that our fans know that we are serious about beer being one of the most affordable luxury items in the world. With that, it's also imperative that our story of Lords and Hobos alike, we all deserve to drink like royalty resonates. Beer has been a connector of all kinds of people for centuries and we firmly believe that we are bridging the cultural gap with our beers and branding by bringing people together who may not come

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cover story

your brand is built on releasing premium products, where quality comes before quantity and maintaining relevancy in key territories is always top of mind. There is a ton of noise in the industry. Cutting through that chatter with a unique perspective, top tier culture, centric partners and creative talent is what sets us apart. So the biggest challenge is, and always will be continuing to follow the vision that has been set forth, while being able to pivot as needed without diluting the brand that you've been building.

What is the secret to creating a branding story that consumers can buy in to? Back to the authenticity answer. It's less about fans buying into your story and more about crafting a story that's relatable and easy to remember. There are times where people are so focused on getting consumers to "buy in" to something that it comes off as fake. Count us out of that.

Walk us through your branding strategy.

The Lord Hobo team includes: Daniel Lanigan Founder & CEO

Our branding strategy is simple. Keep it authentic.

Andrew Bousquet VP of Business Development

What's the biggest issue today related to the marketing/sales side of the craft beer business today?

Andréa (Drea) Hudson Director of Brand Marketing

It's easy to release a bunch of mediocre beers to get fans excited about something new, which seems to be a trend for some. The challenge is when

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Lords of the Ring...

CRAFT BRAND AND MARKETING

Rob Day Director of Product Marketing Chuck MacSteven Lead Graphic Designer

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CBAM-MAG.COM

What is the one thing that every craft beer brand should be doing in the way of marketing? Deciding “why” they are doing what they're doing versus “what” they are doing. Marketing is not a one-way conversation, it's a twoway street, once you know your why, the rest comes easily.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead? Large scale partnerships and collaborations with brands that you'd least expect to see a craft beer working with. This industry

Photography by @beersandcameras

together otherwise. We hold beer to the highest regard, and brew a premium product with ingredients that we can stand behind.


is so fresh, we're excited to shift the paradigm when it comes to those who should be drinking craft beer, when really craft beer is for everyone. The industry has been pretty one note for awhile, we're going to change that—one marketing campaign at a time.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Locking down our influencer marketing strategy.

Sitting down with...

Andréa (Drea) Hudson, Director of Brand Marketing

How does your taproom space integrate into your branding/marketing strategies? Our Taproom is our home. It's the heartbeat of our brand and when we had to renovate last year. Our job in marketing was to bring that heartbeat to people at external events since they weren't able to come here. Now that we have the Taproom, we have infinite opportunities to connect with our fans, be strategic about beer releases, programming and perks for fans. The Taproom will be a huge driver in our future success, and we're looking forward to integrating it as much as we can into our global marketing plans. What’s the most rewarding part of your job? The trust that my team has in me to lead with creativity. What was the best advice you ever received? If it doesn’t inspire you, motivate you or elevate you, it’s not for you.

Photography by @beersandcameras

Does music and/or other arts play a role in your overall brand strategies? Yes, 100 percent. Beer is our core product, but when we talk about our mantra of connectedness we think bigger than beer. We think about the other components that have similar effects bringing people together. The pillars for our brand are music, art, style and adventure. Everything we do on the marketing side of the house, should connect to one or all of these pillars in some way shape or form. On the music side, we work with our venue partners and support emerging musicians. On the art side, if you ever come to an LHBCo produced experience, there's likely a pop up art element featuring a local art partner. We also have a quarterly artist in residency program where we invite local artists to display their art in our Taproom and take no commissions for any art sold. When it comes style, we can wear beer well. Merchandise can be fashionable and partnering with other style brands are important. The adventurer exists in all of us. With partners like Parlor Skis, we lean heavily into the Vagabond Royalty side of our brand, which is all about going your on path and owning your adventure, whatever that may be.

What’s the best thing a customer ever said to you? There’s something about Lord Hobo that’s different, it definitely has a vibe that stands out from other breweries. What is your favorite brand story? It’s unreal to be outside of our home territory, like Colorado at GABF and have fans come up to you complimenting your content strategy, cohesion of packaging design and relating to the voice of our brand. Every time it happens, it does two things for me. First, it reminds me that we are in the middle of building something much bigger than we even know, no matter how many metrics we have. Second, we’ve got some kick ass work ahead of us.

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business

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By Eric Balinski

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We must change now!

The environment, what we must do and why it matters to craft brewers Few days go by without hearing about climate change and the impending demise of our plant. As one congresswoman recently predicted, the world will end in 12 years if we don’t do something now. As a person who has worked on pioneering “Save the Planet” stuff over the past 30 years, I am both pleased and disturbed by what I hear, read and see. In the mid-’80s, my work at GE was to promote a more effective and smarter use of the world resources. We developed a 3,000-square-foot research home to showcase the latest ideas and new products that could improve the world. Back then, we understood the world had limited resources and it was in people’s best interest to be prudent about how we produce, use and dispose of them. Our work led to the practice of certified pre-owned cars. We introduced the idea to every American and Japanese car company that automobiles had life after the original buyer if their value in terms of quality and reliability remained after the first buyer sold the car.

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business

Many people in the craft-made products industry also feel strongly about saving the planet. Their ethos as a craft maker is attuned to making the world better. This has led them to take steps in their facilities to lower energy consumption, improve water conservation and reduce waste. Bravo. Nonetheless, this will not save the planet. Yes, it is wonderful that attention is being given to our planet and climate. But don’t be fooled. Even with all the effort by people in the United States, most of what we’re doing will not stem the tide of climate change. The data tells us this. And this disturbs to me. A lot has been made out of how nations banded together in the Paris Climate Accord to help our planet. Yet, recently, our country walked out of it, drawing scorn at home and abroad.

But if you look at the exact data the Paris Climate Accord was based upon, as well as the pledge commitments countries made, we are in trouble. My analysis in Table 1, the “Paris Accord — CO2 Emissions Data & Forecast,” reflects the CO2 emission numbers that the Paris Accord was based on in 2015. The main CO2 emitting countries and the rest or the world (the other 191 countries) are in groupings to make it easier to see reality. China is by far the largest CO2 emitter. On the right side of the chart (see "Paris Accord — CO2 Emissions Data & Forecast") show that economist and scientist predictions for 2X and 3X C02 emission increase for China and India. One key goal of the Paris Accord was to hold the rise in global average temperature below 2 degrees Celsius. Countries

If you’re a craft producer working to improve the planet, keep doing it. It will likely lower you operating costs, build your community image, and reduce your footprint.

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were considered either as developed (e.g., the United States) or developing (e.g., China). Every country’s actual CO2 reduction amount varied and based on a volunteer pledge. A total of 196 countries committed to the climate deal in 2015. At least 55 nations—between them accounting for at least 55 percent of the world's total greenhouse gas emissions—needed to formally approve the pact before it went into effect. I hypothesized that the U.S., the European Union, Russia and the entire rest of world would reduce CO 2 emissions even more significantly then the Paris Accord was seeking, by 50 percent. In other words, the more likely scenario is less reductions. Meanwhile, China and India as developing nations were predicted in the next decade to increase CO2 emissions by two or three times.

Why we are in trouble

than China and produces less CO2 as measure by GDP. The very act of buying American made not Chinese made is saving the planet. But nobody says this. Why? There are stories about the money the Chinese are spending to go green. Chinese leaders make all sorts of claims to the media, and the media happily reports them as fact, even swooning over China’s efforts. Here again, actual current data suggests Table 1 is likely correct. The chart (see "Best and Worst Performing Countries") show the CO2 emission numbers of the best and worst CO2 emitting countries in 2017, released in a June 2018 report. Can anyone explain why the media is demonizing America, while the U.S. is the best at improving? And with all the loud climate change voices in the EU, it actually increased CO2 by more than the U.S. decreased it? Given China increased CO2 emission by more than three times what the U.S. reduced it by, why does media and global leaders give them a pass? And Canada, which has an economy 14 times smaller than the U.S,. at only $1.53 trillion, increased its CO2 output by about 40 percent of what the U.S. decreased ours by?

Many people in the craft-made products industry also feel strongly about saving the planet. Their ethos as a craft maker is attuned to making the world a better.

My analysis shows why the world is in trouble. Without significant and immediate improvement by China and India, whatever every other country does, including the United States, total CO2 emissions will increase and are currently increasing. This was first red flag two years ago. The other was the world condemning the United States while staying silent about China’s and India’s a forecasted increases. In fact, many are defending China from criticisms. They say things like, “China is a developing country, and their CO2 emissions are lower than the U.S. on a per capita basis.” Ask yourself this: Why does the second largest economy need such an unfair advantage? If you looked at U.S. GDP output, roughly $21.5 trillion compared to China’s $12.8 trillion, you could conclude that the U.S. is more efficient in its production

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business

What this means to you What are the implications for wine, beer and spirit producers? Any agricultural based product will be subject to global climate change, some crops more than others. Whether it’s extreme heat or cold, or a shortage of rain or irrigation water for these crops, weather pattern changes will play a role no doubt. Searching stories in the wine, beer and spirits industries, you will find acknowledgement of this, but more likely one will also finds criticism of America, with little written about China and India who are

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and will have the most impact on climate. That’s an enigma to me. If you’re a craft producer working to improve the planet, keep doing it. It will likely lower you operating costs, build your community image and reduce your footprint. Frankly though, it’s not enough to keep the planet from being destroyed. It’s time to change the conversation. Time to ask better questions, such as why are world leaders, scientists and the media ignoring the most dramatic threat to the planet? Time to ask your local congressperson why he or she is so quiet on this? It’s time to hold the biggest polluters accountable. The climate change hypocrisy irks me, too. When someone points at another person claiming to do no wrong, it is to hide that person’s own misdealing. More than 25 years ago, I testified on Capitol Hill about how our government should take a leadership role in making the planet better. It met with ho-hum receptivity. Today, a lot politicians make it look like they are doing something, but data suggests otherwise. If we want to save this planet, it must start with the truth about what’s going on. Reality is CO2 emissions are increasing, even from countries that are the loudest proponents of reducing emissions. That means we’re in a sinking boat, with a few bailing water, while the boat’s holes pour in water three to four times faster than their bailing. As Zen Buddhist Gido Shoseki said, “Truth only reveals itself when one gives up all preconceived ideas.” Eric Balinski is the owner of Synection, LLC, which is a strategy and growth consultancy firm. For more information, visit: synection.com.

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social media

By Dalana Morse

Why your business needs a social media marketing plan 184

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Social media is the talk of the marketing town, and that’s not changing anytime soon. Almost every business is jumping on the bandwagon and scrambling to boost their social presence. But why is there so much buzz around the topic?

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Traditionally, the social arena has something of a reputation for being, at best, awash with videos of cute cats or amusing babies, or at worst a playground for fake news pushers and unethical scammers. While there's an element of truth in both these stereotypes, a quick look at the traffic numbers shows why social media attracts so much marketing attention: • Facebook has more than a billion daily users, out of a total of 1.8 billion active members • WhatsApp and YouTube claim a billion active users each • Tumblr and Instagram both report close to half a billion regular users • There are 150 million Pinterest users, of whom 87 percent have made a purchase prompted by marketing activity on the platform • Even Twitter, often identified as the platform most struggling to gain traction, boasts more than 300 million active users

that your brand needs more social media exposure, following these guidelines will help you reap the benefits while avoiding the dangers.

Define your aims Embarking on social media marketing simply because it's the flavor of the month is a recipe for failure. Playing the social game requires commitment, the ability to adapt quickly and a clear vision of the end you're working toward. Without a defined aim, social media activities can quickly become unfocused, draining resources that could be better employed elsewhere.

Find your market The different social media platforms have distinct demographics and require tailored approaches. Trying to cover every base is likely to result in spreading your efforts too thinly. It's far better to determine which platform most of your target market can Jan-Feb-2019.pdf 1 1/17/19 10:19 AM

A properly executed social media marketing campaign can have remarkably effective results and provide a solid branding foundation for future promotion to build upon. C

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While these statistics may be astonishing, they don’t even take into consideration the smaller players with more tightly focused user demographics. No matter how you look at it, there’s a massive market full of untapped potential out there. So, if you're not already in the game, what are you waiting for? Word of mouth is a key factor in any social marketing campaign. You must leverage the ability of users to share content and spread a carefully crafted message. Done well, this can provide huge benefits and wide brand exposure for relatively little cost. Careful planning is essential. If you've decided CY

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social media

be found on, and devote your resources to a tightly focused campaign that plays to that platform's strengths. Wider campaigns targeting other platforms can come later, once the social marketing concept has proved its worth.

Develop material in advance

Playing the social game requires commitment, the ability to adapt quickly and a clear vision of the end you’re working toward.

Unlike a one-shot advertising campaign, social media marketing requires a long-term outlook. It's essential to have plenty of content in reserve so that you're never short of material. If your campaign loses momentum because the content well has run dry, any results gained during your first flush of enthusiasm can easily be lost, and bringing a dormant account back to life can be even more difficult than starting afresh.

Measure your results The success of social media marketing is by nature harder to measure than that of other, more direct types of promotion. Concepts such as brand visibility, authority, and reputation are rather

nebulous, but this doesn't mean you should conduct your campaigns in the dark. While the ultimate goal will probably be to improve your business's bottom line, you need to establish ways of measuring results along the way. To start with, choose as many metrics to monitor as you can think of—followers, shares, likes, referrals or raw traffic numbers. Over time, you can refine your measurements as you begin to determine which metrics correlate most closely with profit.

Plan to win the game A properly executed social media marketing campaign can have remarkably effective results and provide a solid branding foundation for future promotion to build upon. However, a half-baked strategy can easily prove worse than no activity at all. Make sure you enter into the game with a clear plan of action, and you'll be halfway toward success right from the start.

Dalana Morse is the founder of DAM Media and Design, a boutique design and digital marketing firm located in Fort Worth, Texas. Dalana is a seasoned professional with a diverse background in marketing, web and media design, digital and social media marketing, and search engine optimization. Having served in marketing leadership roles for close to a decade, her experience spans both B2B and B2C industries including multifamily and single family real estate, electrical and utility technologies, and visual branding agencies. For more information, visit dalanamorse.com or dammediaanddesign.com

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CIRCLE NO. 62


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Outback Steakhouse #1812

Lexington, KY

$2,000,000.00

6,586

New Construction

Q2 2019

IHOP

Indian Trail, NC

$600,000.00

4,236

Remodel

Q2 2019

BurgerFi

Montgomery, AL

$500,000.00

3,200

Renovation

Q2 2019

Marco's Pizza

Jacksonville, FL

$208,000.00

1,555

New Construction

Q2 2019

Honda Carland

Roswell, GA

$10,000,000.00

43,418

New Construction

Q2 2019

Racetrac #2550

Clarksville, TN

$1,600,000.00

6,081

New Construction

Q2 2019

Marshall's

Camden, SC

$1,500,000.00

22,380

Renovation

Q2 2019

Wawa #5353

Miramar, FL

$1,100,000.00

6,119

New Construction

Q2 2019

Judson Mill Redevelopment

Greenville, SC

$100,000,000.00

356,000

New Construction/Renovation

Q3 2019

One East Church Street Redevelopment

Murfreesboro, TN

$70,000,000.00

200,000

New Construction/Remodel

Q3 2019

Cambria Petersburg - Ramada Inn Redevelopment

Petersburg, VA

$25,000,000.00

125,000

New Construction/Remodel

Q2 2019

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE:

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY: Embassy Suites

Asheville, NC

$20,000,000.00

254,860

New Construction

Q2 2019

St. Vincent's Guest House

New Orleans, LA

$5,500,000.00

54,440

New Construction/Renovation

Q3 2019

Holiday Inn Express

Bristol, TN

$5,000,000.00

44,719

New Construction

Q3 2019

East Forsyth High School

Gainesville, GA

$83,000,000.00

431,366

New Construction

Q2 2019

The University of Tennessee Lupton Library Classroom Renovation

Chattanooga, TN

$24,700,000.00

40,000

Renovation

Q2 2019

Elon University - Virginia Hall Renovation

Elon, NC

$6,000,000.00

17,400

Renovation

Q2 2019

Judicial Center Expansion and Renovation

Spotsylvania, VA

$6,319,000.00

32,860

Addition/Renovation

Q2 2019

Wilson County Maintenance Assembly Office

Wilson, NC

$1,593,156.00

5,096

New Construction

Q2 2019

UNC Hospitals Hillsborough Hospital 2nd Bed Tower Wing

Hillsborough, NC

$76,000,000.00

46,000

Addition/Renovation

Q2 2019

Outpatient Diagnostic Center Renovation at Plantation View Medical Offices

Destrehan, LA

$1,300,000.00

10,226

Renovation

Q2 2019

Heartland Dental

Myrtle Beach, SC

$400,000.00

4,280

Remodel

Q2 2019

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

188

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


Our Best Lead Management Solution The result of more than 40 years of construction data expertise, Lead Manager+ delivers the best projects and the most up-to-date project information—so you can find and win more work. + Find the best projects for your business with custom views, filters, and searches + Get up-to-date project information to create the best possible bid + Grow your network by connecting with key players + Communicate effectively with instant access to actionable information + Intuitive and Easy-to-Use Interface + Search and See Results in Seconds + Easily Export and Download Documents or Search Results + Robust and Detailed Contact Information, Including Emails and LinkedIn Information + Organize Search Results Into Folders

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1-800-652-0008 www.cdcnews.com/LeadManagerPlus CIRCLE NO. 64


AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Ad Art/Genesis Light Solutions.............................. 15, 78.................11, 37

L2M Architects...................................................... 39.......................20

Arcvision Incorporation......................................... 21.......................13

Lakeview Construction, Inc.................................... 9.........................7

Automated Cutting Technologies, Inc..................... 47.......................24

Laticrete................................................................ 5.........................3

Beam Team Construction...................................... 35.......................18

Lido Lighting......................................................... 87.......................42

Boelter................................................................. 173......................59 Bostik................................................................... 31.......................17 Buildings NY........................................................ 170......................58 Capacity Builders.............................................. CVR2-1....................1

LS Architecture...................................................... 8.........................5 Metropolitan Ceramics......................................... 185......................61 Mike Levin........................................................... 163......................55 Mitsubishi Electric................................................ 71.......................34

Cawley................................................................ 169......................57 Ceso..................................................................... 53.......................26 Combination Door Company................................. 67.......................32 Commerical Construction & Renovation People............................................132-133..................46

NAC Products...................................................... 145......................48 National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association................ 27.......................15 Navien.................................................................. 17.......................12 Nvironment........................................................... 61.......................30

Commerical Construction & Renovation Retreats.............................................. 78.......................39

Permit.com........................................................... 96.......................56

Connect Source Consulting Group......................... 77.......................39

Philadelphia Sign................................................... 3.........................2

Construction Data Co. (CDC)................................ 189......................64

Phoenix Drone Pros............................................. 151......................50

CONSTRUCT-ED.................................................... 96.......................45

Poma Retail Development, Inc.............................. 153......................51

Construction One.................................................. 29.......................16

Porcelanosa.......................................................... 73.......................35

Controlled Power.................................................. 14.......................10

Prime Retail Services............................................ 41.......................21

Coverings............................................................ 161......................53 DAM Media and Design....................................... 183......................60 Dynamic Air Quality Solutions............................... 85.......................41 Egan Sign............................................................. 37.......................19 EMG..................................................................... 45.......................23 Federal Heath....................................................... 83.......................40 Federated Service Solutions.................................. 93.......................44 Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber....................... 57.......................28 Fisher Architecture................................................ 55.......................27 Georgia Printco.................................................... 187......................62

Projectmates........................................................ 43.......................22 Rockerz, Inc........................................................... 7.........................4 Saninc.................................................................. 49.......................25 Schimenti......................................................... 8, CVR4.................6, 66 Seven Multi-Site Solutions.................................... 63.......................31 ShopTalk 360....................................................... 163......................54 Signage Solutions................................................ 139......................47 UHC Construction Services................................... 25.......................14 Warner Bros........................................................ CVR3.....................65

GSB, Inc. Architects & Planners............................. 59.......................29

Westwood Contractors, Inc................................... 13........................9

idX Corporation..................................................... 69.......................33

Window Film Depot...........................................146-147..................49

ISA International.................................................. 157......................52

Wolverine Building Group...................................... 89.......................43

Jesco Lighting Group............................................ 11........................8

ZipWall................................................................. 75.......................36

190

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


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JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

191


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Tidying up the clutter W ith the start of the New Year, it’s better to be busy than not to be busy. But just as the New Year starts, a new holiday season is here, and you ask yourself, “Where did all the time go?” And there’s this: Year after year, your office starts to accumulate more stuff than it can handle. This year, I decided to clear out everything in my office that I didn’t need. I even decided to employ the same practice to the rest of the house. We have been in this house for 15 years and, quite frankly, there’s a lot of stuff.

To be honest, No. 6 has been very tough to complete, as I recently received several boxes of items from my mother and uncle that belonged to my father, who passed away in 1978 in a plane crash coming to see me play hockey my freshman year against my rival prep school. That day is etched in my memory forever. I cannot get rid of these items today, but down the road they’ll have to go or I will give them to my son for safe keeping.

With the start of the New Year, it’s better to be busy than not to be busy. But just as the New Year starts, a new holiday season is here, and you ask yourself, “Where did all the time go?”

It’s really tough to let go of things like pictures, awards and all sort of items you didn’t know you still had. In her book, “How to Clean Out Sentimental Clutter,” Mary Kondo offers seven ways to do this effectively: 1. Focus on not want to chuck, but what to keep. 2. Ask yourself of each object, does it spark joy in your heart? 3. Make sure you are properly committed to having a tidy out. 4. Never leave stuff in boxes at your house or parents house. 5. Make a plan for taking care of precious items from your children’s lives. 6. Say farewell to precious items that belonged from your grand parents or parents who have passed. 7. Tidy photographs together as a family. Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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Everything else, in the mean time, adios. I have completed my office clean up and man does it feel good to be clutter free after 20-plus years of publishing. Even my wife said, “Wow, I have never seen your office this empty.” Just like a commercial construction/ renovation project, we plan to stick to the declutter parameters and finish the rest of the house, and then celebrate like you do with the grand opening of a new location. We hope to see many of you at our monthly CCRP Receptions, Women’s Retreat in early August and Commercial Retreat end of September and, of course, at our 10th Annual January 2020 Summit. Here’s to being clutter free, prosperous, safe travels and healthy in the rest of 2019. Keep the Faith. CCR

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2019


™ and © 2018, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

CIRCLE NO. 65


From SoHo to Rodeo. We’re expanding to the West Coast Bringing decades of experience building high profile retail and office environments for the world’s largest brands. We’re ready to build for you. Tom Fenton, Business Development Manager (914) 244-9100 x 322 / tfenton@schimenti.com

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: President’s Message....................... pg 3

Milestone Memberships................... pg 6

Member Directory......................... pg 4-5 RCA 29th Annual Conference Highlights................... 7

WINTER EDITION • 2019

NEWSLETTER

If You’re Concerned About Cloud Security, You’re Concerned About the Wrong Thing There is another, more significant issue you should think about By Gene Marks, The Marks Group I am going to be talking about a lot of technologies that impact the retail contracting and construction industries in my session at the RCA Annual Conference in March. You will hear my recommendations about the latest trends in customer relationship management, marketing automation, collaboration, human resources, social media, financial, estimating. and Gene Marks other applications that you will need to consider investing in over the next few years to keep your company growing and profitable. I will also be sharing thoughts on a few technologies that are coming down the pike that you will want to follow closely as they mature. (Hint: convenience store customers are about to go through a major overhaul!) But here’s the thing. All of these applications may have different uses, but they all have something in common. They are all cloud based. They all require the internet in some way or form. They are all accessed online. They all charge monthly fees. Sure, there are a few non-cloud technologies still around and I’ll be sure to mention them. But the forces of nature (and the tech industry) are against them. Accept this as fact: software makers earn more money from cloud-based applications. They get a consistent revenue stream and that impacts their valuation for investors and bankers. They can provide support faster and with less resources. They can more easily integrate their products with others. They can offer their solutions on just about any platform. They can deliver upgrades with one click. Oh, and they get a consistent revenue stream— did I mention that? Right, I did. All of these things benefit the software makers. But they also benefit you. If you are like many of my clients, you probably still have concerns about the cloud, right? And I bet your biggest concern is security, right? If that is the case, your concern is mis-directed.

Security is an issue, of course. Every day we hear of companies and governments being hacked and data being breached. During my session, I am going to discuss some of the biggest security issues you need to be aware of—malware, ransomware, hardware breaches, etc.—and how to protect your data. So yes, these are serious issues. But believe me, the largest cloudbased providers, from Microsoft to Amazon to Google, are spending hundreds of millions of dollars fighting these attacks with the best people and tools

RCA’s mission is to promote professionalism and integrity in retail construction through industry leadership in education, information exchange, and jobsite safety.


NEWSLETTER Accept this as fact: software makers earn more money from cloud-based applications

available. They have to: their entire business models depend on it. Sure, there will be breaches in the future. But you should know that your data is probably more secure in those companies’ hands than on your own server. No offense, but your IT person probably didn’t go to M.I.T., right? You can rest assured that there is an entire army of M.I.T. grads working at Microsoft right now. The security risks are much lower than the benefits you will realize being on the cloud. So, if it’s not security, what should you be most concerned about when choosing a cloud-based application? Something bigger: pricing. In January, Netflix, a cloud-based provider of streaming video, announced a price increase. That same week, Google announced a 20% increase on its G Suite business apps. These companies all had good reasons for increasing their prices. Let’s face it, making House of Cards isn’t cheap. But do their customers really have a choice? Not really. And neither do you. And that is the issue you should be concerned about. What if you have invested in a CRM, financial, or collaboration system for your company

and the provider just raises their prices 20% this year? And another 20% next year? What if they double their monthly fees? What is your recourse? What are you doing to do? Pull out and migrate to another system? That’s costly and disruptive, and chances are you will just have to accept the rate increase. When you move to a cloud-based application—and again, you’re not going to have much choice—you are giving up control over its costs. What can you do about this? Not a lot. You can try to negotiate with the cloud service provider, but unless you’re a Fortune 500 company, your position is not that strong. You can ask for assurances, but you and I both know that a vendor’s assurance plus $3.00 will buy you a cup of coffee at Starbucks. What you need to do is prepare. If the cloud application cost is significant, then you need to have budgeted cushions for a potential increase. You should consult with an information technology expert about a Plan B, e.g., migrating data out of the system and into another. You should not just be caught with your pants down. You should think about these possibilities in advance. The cloud-based applications that I will be discussing in our session are powerful and will help your people be more productive and your company become more profitable. But there are risks. Do not get obsessed with security, because that is not the biggest risk. The biggest risk is your control over its costs.

Gene Marks is a featured speaker at the RCA’s 2019 Annual Conference. For the past 12 years, Gene has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Guardian, Inc. Magazine, Forbes Magazine, and Entrepreneur Magazine. Gene is a small business owner and certified public accountant.

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WINTER EDITION • 2019


ADVISORY BOARD

President’s Message Rick Winkel, CEO, Winkel Construction, Inc.,

I am amazed at how fast this year has passed while serving as the RCA’s President. I want to tell everyone, “thank you” for giving me the opportunity to serve as President of this great organization. I also want to specifically thank the Executive Committee, Board of Directors, and Advisory Board for all their dedication and commitment to leading the Retail Contractors Association and supporting me Rick Winkel throughout the year. Lastly, a special thank you to Carol Montoya and her team at Potomac Management Resources, because without them we could not achieve all that we do. As the organization continues to move forward, I am confident it will continue on the path that the Board has established with the Strategic Plan. Our new leadership was elected at the winter Board meeting. Elected officers for next year are: • President: Steve Bachman, President/CEO, Retail Construction Services, Inc. • Vice President: Ray Catlin, Executive Vice President, Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. • Secretary/Treasurer: Eric Handley, Vice President, William A Randolph, Inc. We also have new additions to the Board of Directors. Join me in welcoming these newly elected board members: • Eric Berg, Senior Vice President, Gray • Randy Danielson, President of Retail Construction, Tri-North Builders • Carolyn Shames, President/CEO, Shames Construction The board along with its new members and new officers are poised to make 2019 another great year for the RCA. I also want to express my gratitude again to Mike Wolf and the entire committee that has worked so hard on the Superintendent Training Program. Several of Winkel Construction’s superintendents have attended this course and we have seen an improvement in their handling of projects. Their feedback noted how beneficial the program was to them. If you have yet to send people to this course, I truly believe you will find it to be well worth it. The Certified Retail Superintendent Training is another great benefit of being an RCA member. Our Annual Conference is going to be in Dallas again this year in conjunction with SPECs. I encourage everyone to attend the conference along with the association’s reception and golf outing. I hope to see you there!

Rick

— rickw@winkelconstruction.com

If you have any feedback or ideas for the organization, please contact me. We are always looking for ways to continue strengthening the organization: rickw@winkel-construction.com.

Chuck Barnes - Spinoso Real Estate Group

Jeffrey D. Mahler - L2M, Inc.

Ken Christopher - LBrands

Jason Miller - JCPenney Company

Mike Clancy - FMI

Steven R. Olson, AIA - CESO, Inc.

Craig Hale, AIA -

Kristen Roodvoets - SmileDirectClub

HFA - Harrison French Associates

Brad Sanders - CBRE | Skye Group

COMMITTEE CHAIRS EDUCATION/CAREER DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Mike Wolff

SCHOLARSHIP & STUDENT OUTREACH

MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS

Justin Elder 952-345-6069 justin@elderjones.com

909-949-0380 mike@timberwolff.com

Jack Grothe 909-993-9332 jackG@JGConstruction.com

Mike McBride 817-302-2050 mikem@westwoodcontractors.com

MEMBERSHIP

SPONSORSHIP/MEMBER BENEFITS

Hunter Weekes 864-233-0061 hweekes@weekesconstruction.com

Phil Eckinger 330-453-2566 phil@eckinger.com

MILITARY SERVICE INITIATIVE

STRATEGIC PLAN

Jay Dorsey 281-485-4700 J.Dorsey@triadrc.com

Eric Handley 847-856-0123 eric.handley@warandolph.com

SAFETY

TECHNOLOGY

David Martin 920-490-3104 david@hjmartin.com

Robert Moore 714-491-1317 RAMoore@gray.com

OFFICERS President - Rick Winkel

Secretary/Treasurer - Ray Catlin

Vice President - Steve Bachman

Immediate Past President - Brad Bogart

Winkel Construction, Inc.

Retail Construction Services, Inc.

Schimenti Construction Company Bogart Construction, Inc.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2021 Jay Dorsey

2020 Mike Wolff Timberwolff Construction, Inc.

2021 Phil Eckinger

2019 Ray Catlin

2021 Jack Grothe

2019 Eric Handley

2021 David Martin

2020 Steve Bachman

2021 Mike McBride

2020 Brad Bogart

2021 Hunter Weekes

2020 Justin Elder

Triad Retail Construction, Inc. Eckinger Construction Co. JG Construction H.J. Martin & Son, Inc. Westwood Contractors Weekes Construction, Inc.

Schimenti Construction Company William A. Randolph, Inc. Retail Construction Services, Inc. Bogart Construction, Inc. Elder-Jones, Inc.

2020 Robert Moore Gray

2020 Rick Winkel

Winkel Construction, Inc.

PAST PRESIDENTS David Weekes 1990-1992 W. L. Winkel 1993 Robert D. Benda 1994 John S. Elder 1995 Ronald M. Martinez 1996 Jack E. Sims 1997 Michael H. Ratner 1998 Barry Shames 1999 Win Johnson 2000 Dean Olivieri 2001

Thomas Eckinger 2002 James Healy 2003 Robert D. Benda 2004-2006 K. Eugene Colley 2006-2008 Matthew Schimenti 2008-2012 Art Rectenwald 2012-2014 Mike Wolff 2014-2016 Robert Moore 2016-2017 Brad Bogart 2017-2018

2019 • WINTER EDITION

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NEWSLETTER

RCA Membership

RCA members must meet and maintain a series of qualifications and are approved by the Board of Directors for membership. They have been in the retail construction business as general contractors for at least five years; agree to comply with the Association’s Code of Ethics and Bylaws; are properly insured and bonded; are licensed in the states in which they do business; and have submitted letters of recommendation.

COMPANY CONTACT Acme Enterprises, Inc. Robert Russell All-Rite Construction Co., Inc. Warren Zysman Atlas Building Group Brian Boettler BALI Construction Kevin Balestrieri Bogart Construction, Inc. Brad Bogart Buildrite Construction Corp. Bryan Alexander Harry Burdg Burdg, Dunham and Associates Comet Construction Bernard Keith Danzansky Commercial Contractors, Inc. Kenneth Sharkey Commonwealth Building, Inc. Frank Trainor Construction One, Inc. Bill Moberger David A. Nice Builders Brian Bacon De Jager Construction, Inc. Dan De Jager Desco Professional Builders, Inc. Bob Anderson Diamond Contractors Lori Perry DLP Construction Dennis Pigg, Jr. E.C. Provini, Co., Inc. Joseph Lembo Eckinger Construction Company Philip Eckinger EDC Christopher Johnson ELAN General Contracting Inc. Adrian Johnson Elder-Jones, Inc. Justin Elder Encore Construction, Inc. Joe McCafferty Engineered Structures, Inc. Mike Magill Fi Companies Kevin Bakalian Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Greg Freeh Fred Olivieri Construction Company Dean Olivieri Frontier Building Corp. Andrew Goggin Fulcrum Construction, LLC Willy Rosner Go Green Construction, Inc. Anthony Winkco Gray Robert Moore H.J. Martin & Sons, Inc. David Martin Hanna Design Group Jason Mick Harmon Construction, Inc. William Harmon Hays Construction Company, Inc. Roy Hays Healy Construction Services, Inc. James Healy Herman/Stewart Construction Terry Varner Howard Immel Inc. Pete Smits International Contractors, Inc. Bruce Bronge J. G. Construction Jack Grothe James Agresta Carpentry Inc. James Agresta KBE Building Corporation Michael Kolakowski Kerricook Construction, Inc. Ann Smith Lakeview Construction, Inc. Kent Moon M. Cary, Inc. Robert Epstein Management Resources Systems, Inc. Doug Marion Marco Contractors, Inc. Martin Smith Jane Feigenbaum Metropolitan Contracting Co., Ltd. Montgomery Development Carolina Corp. John Fugo National Building Contractors William Corcoran National Contractors, Inc. Michael Dudley Pinnacle Commercial Development, Inc. Dennis Rome Donald Bloom Prime Retail Services, Inc. PWI Construction, Inc. Jeff Price R.E. Crawford Construction LLC Jeffrey T. Smith Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc. Art Rectenwald Retail Construction Services, Inc. Stephen Bachman Retail Contractors of Puerto Rico Sean Pfent Rockford Construction Co. Thomas McGovern Royal Seal Construction, Inc. Gene Colley Russco, Inc. Matthew Pichette Sachse Construction and Development Corp. Jeff Katkowsky Scheiner Commercial Group, Inc. Joe Scheiner

PHONE STATE EMAIL MEMBER SINCE 586-771-4800 MI rrussell@acme-enterprises.com 2009 973-340-3100 NJ warren@all-riteconstruction.com 1993 636-368-5234 MO bboettler@abgbuilds.com 2017 925-478-8182 CA kevin@bali-construction.com 2017 949-453-1400 CA brad@bogartconstruction.com 2008 770-971-0787 GA bryan@buildriteconstruction.com 2013 816-583-2123 MO harry@burdg-dunham.com 2016 561-672-8310 FL barney@danzansky.com 2016 616-842-4540 MI ken.t.sharkey@teamcci.net 1990 617-770-0050 MA frankt@combuild.com 1992 614-235-0057 OH wmoberger@constructionone.com 2015 757-566-3032 VA bbacon@davidnicebuilders.com 2011 616-530-0060 MI dandj@dejagerconstruction.com 1990 860-870-7070 CT banderson@descopro.com 1995 816-650-9200 MO loriperry@diamondcontractors.org 2015 770-887-3573 GA dpigg@dlpconstruction.com 2008 732-739-8884 NJ jlembo@eprovini.com 1992 330-453-2566 OH phil@eckinger.com 1994 804-897-0900 VA cjohnson@edcweb.com 1998 619-284-4174 CA ajohnson@elangc.com 2010 952-345-6069 MN justin@elderjones.com 1990 410-573-5050 MD joe@encoreconstruction.net 2018 208-362-3040 ID mikemagill@esiconstruction.com 2016 732-727-8100 NJ kbakalian@ficompanies.com 2017 440-716-4000 OH gfreeh@fortneyweygandt.com 2013 330-494-1007 OH dean@fredolivieri.com 1992 305-692-9992 FL agoggin@fdllc.com 2018 770-612-8005 GA wrosner@fulcrumconstruction.com 2014 412-367-5870 PA anthony@ggc-pgh.com 2017 714-491-1317 CA ramoore@gray.com 2005 920-494-3461 WI david@hjmartin.com 2016 847-719-0370 IL jmick@hannadesigngroup.com 2016 812-346-2048 IN bill.harmon@harmonconstruction.com 2017 303-794-5469 CO r.hays@haysco.biz 2002 708-396-0440 IL jhealy@healyconstructionservices.com 1996 301-731-5555 MD tvarner@herman-stewart.com 1995 920-468-8208 WI psmits@immel-builds.com 2018 630-834-8043 IL bbronge@iciinc.com 1995 909-993-9332 CA JackG@jgconstruction.com 1998 201-498-1477 NJ jim.agresta@jacarpentryinc.com 2013 860-284-7110 CT mkolakowski@kbebuilding.com 1998 440-647-4200 OH ann@kerricook.com 2012 262-857-3336 WI kent@lvconstruction.com 1998 631-501-0024 NY repstein@mcaryinc.com 2014 336-861-1960 NC dmarion@mrs1977.com 1992 724-741-0300 PA marty@marcocontractors.com 1994 210-829-5542 TX jfeigenbaum@metcontracting.com 1995 919-969-7301 NC jfugo@montgomerydevelopment.com 1999 651-288-1900 MN bill@nbcconstruction.us 2013 952-881-6123 MN mdudley@ncigc.com 2018 732-528-0080 NJ dennis@pinnaclecommercial.us 2012 866-504-3511 GA dbloom@primeretailservices.com 2014 480-461-0777 AZ price@pwiconstruction.com 2003 941-907-0010 FL jeffs@recrawford.com 2011 724-772-8282 PA art@rectenwald.com 1996 651-704-9000 MN sbachman@retailconstruction.com 1998 586-725-4400 MI spfent@rcofusa.com 1996 616-285-6933 MI info@rockfordconstruction.com 2014 817-491-6400 TX gene@royalseal.com 1994 508-674-5280 MA mattp@russcoinc.com 1995 248-647-4200 MI jkatkowsky@sachseconstruction.com 2009 719-487-1600 CO joe@scheinercg.com 2012 (Continued on page 5)

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WINTER EDITION • 2019


Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Shames Construction Co., Ltd. Singleton Construction, LLC Solex Contracting Southwestern Services Sullivan Construction Company Taylor Brothers Construction Company, Inc. TDS Construction, Inc. Thomas-Grace Construction, Inc. Timberwolff Construction, Inc. TJU Construction, Inc. Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Trainor Commercial Construction, Inc. Travisano Construction, LLC Tri-North Builders, Inc. Triad Retail Construction Warwick Construction, Inc. Weekes Construction, Inc. Westwood Contractors, Inc. William A. Randolph, Inc. Winkel Construction, Inc. Wolverine Building Group Woods Construction, Inc.

Matthew Schimenti Carolyn Shames Denise Doczy-Delong Gerald Allen John S. Lee, Amanda Sullivan Jeff Chandler Robert Baker Don Harvieux Mike Wolff Tim Uhler Aaron Rectenwald John Taylor Peter J. Travisano Randy Danielson Jay Dorsey Walt Watzinger Hunter Weekes Mike McBride Tony Riccardi Rick Winkel Michael Houseman John Bodary

914-244-9100 925-606-3000 740-756-7331 951-308-1706 817-921-2466 954-484-3200 812-379-9547 941-795-6100 651-342-1298 909-949-0380 530-823-7200 724-452-8801 415-259-0200 412-321-1234 608-271-8717 281-485-4700 832-448-7000 864-233-0061 817-302-2050 847-856-0123 352-860-0500 616-949-3360 586-939-9991

NY CA OH CA TX FL IN FL MN CA CA PA CA PA WI TX TX SC TX IL FL MI MI

mschimenti@schimenti.com 1994 cshames@shames.com 1994 denisedelong@singletoncontruction.net 2012 jerry@solexcontracting.com 2015 JLee@southwesternservices.com 2017 amanda@buildwithsullivan.com 2012 Jeff.Chandler@TBCCI.com 2014 inbox@tdsconstruction.com 1994 don.harvieux@thomas-grace.com 2012 mike@timberwolff.com 2008 tim@tjuconstruction.com 2016 arectenwald@trcgc.net 2010 john.taylor@trainorconstruction.com 2012 pj@travisanocontruction.com 2015 rdanielson@tri-north.com 2015 j.dorsey@triadrc.com 2013 walt@warwickconstruction.com 2008 hweekes@weekesconstruction.com 1990 mikem@westwoodcontractors.com 1990 tony.riccardi@warandolph.com 2011 rickw@winkel-construction.com 1990 mhouseman@wolvgroup.com 2012 jbodary@woodsconstruction.com 1996

Visit retailcontractors.org to view the profile of each RCA member company. Click on “Find a Contractor” on the home page to search the member list. Please notify the RCA Office (800-847-5085 or info@retailcontractors.org) of any changes to your contact information.

RCA Members Pre-Show Discount Expires Feb.14

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2019 • WINTER EDITION

5


NEWSLETTER

Milestone Memberships

Congratulations to our members celebrating milestone membership anniversaries! We appreciate your ongoing support of the RCA!

25 Years

20 Years

5 Years

Eckinger Construction Company

Montgomery Development Carolina Corp.

Fulcrum Construction, LLC

10 Years

Rockford Construction Co.

Marco Contractors, Inc. Royal Seal Construction, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. TDS Construction, Inc.

Acme Enterprises, Inc. Sachse Construction and Development Corp.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

P E O P L E

Don’t miss our CCRP events March 20th (Wednesday) Dallas, TX April 9th (Tuesday) Atlanta, GA May 9th (Thursday) Minneapolis, MN

If you would like to sponsor a CCRP event, please contact David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com 6

WINTER EDITION • 2019

Prime Retail Services, Inc.

Taylor Brothers Construction Company, Inc.

DESIGNED TO RUN CONSTRUCTION Procore’s universal platform connects your team, applications, and devices in one centralized hub. From bidding to closeout, collaborate in real time with all your teams, on any device. With Procore, do more than run great projects, run a great business.

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Friday, March 1, 2019

6:00pm–8:00pm: Welcome Reception

Saturday, March 2, 2019

8:00am–3:00pm: Annual Conference, featuring: • Tech 2019 - The Latest Technologies, Trends, Services and Tools Every Business Needs to Know | Gene Marks, columnist, author, and small business owner • To All the Economists I've Loved Before | Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group, Inc. • Addressing the Labor Shortage: What Members are Doing to Recruit and Retain Their Workforce | Randy Danielson, President, Retail Construction, Tri-North Builders; Kristen Roodvoets, Construction Project Manager, SmileDirectClub; Ray Catlin, Executive Vice President, Schimenti Construction Company (moderator) • Retail of the Future | Sarah Wicker Kimes, Director, Americas, Portland Design

Sarah Wicker Kimes

4:00pm–5:30pm: Owner’s Event 7:00pm–9:00pm: Casino Night & BBQ at Cowboys Golf Clubnt RCA Member companies get one free conference registration and can register additional attendees for a nominal fee. Retailers and architects can attend at no charge.

Sunday, March 3, 2019

8:00 am – 1:00pm: Golf Tournament at Cowboys Golf Club Registration and full agenda: retailcontractors.org.

Thank You to Our Underwriters Platinum Commercial Contractors, Inc. Gold Timberwolff Construction, Inc. Retail Construction Services, Inc. Bogart Construction, Inc. Management Resource Systems, Inc. Schimenti Construction Company Gray Silver Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Commonwealth Building, Inc.

Anirban Basu

We’re We’re Commitment to adjust to the demands of jobs. Commitment toyour adjust to Not the other way around. the demands of your jobs.

Lion Tamers Lion Tamers Proactive support, consistency, trademark Proactiveand support, transparency. consistency, and trademark

Not the other way around. transparency. Access to everything on site at any hour, even at 3am. Access to everything on site at any hour, even at 3am.

Meet us at SPECS • Booth #617 Meet us at SPECS • Booth #617

800-915-9002 800-915-9002 cmi-usa.com cmi-usa.com

2019 • WINTER EDITION

7


NEWSLETTER

RCA Sustaining Sponsors PLATINUM

GOLD

SILVER

8

WINTER EDITION • 2019

2800 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 210, Alexandria, VA 22314 800.847.5085 • www.retailcontractors.org

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR-JF19