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CCR RETREAT TALK: EXECUTIVES BREAK DOWN 2015

Patrick Stringer Senior Manager of Global Store Development Under Armour

Limitless Why Under Armour knows no bounds

Exclusive Inside: Why you should care about PM & scheduling See our Fixtures & Architecture Firms lists CK: What makes Jack in the Box tick

Check out our

Kitchens

Magazine and Supplement inside

Official magazine of

January/February 2015 • www.ccr-mag.com


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January/February • 2015 Vol. 14, No.1

22 FEATURES

22 Limitless  Why Under Armour knows no bounds 94  Luck be a lady  Casinos place their bets on waterjet-fabricated floor designs 110 The ‘talk’ of the town  Preparing for the next Sandy 116 That one thing  Why you should care about project management and scheduling

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110

To access the online digital version of this issue, and past issues, use this passphrase at www.ccr-mag.com: uslax22 Cover Photo by: Mike Levin

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Architecture

Engineering

Development Services

www.greenbergfarrow.com

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January/February • 2015 Vol. 14, No.1 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Scottsdale, Ariz. 32  2014 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat – Charlotte, N.C.

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

18

36

54  Design this Guide highlights industry’s leading architectural firms 68  Meet the top guns Annual fixture manufactures listing highlights best of the best

SPECIAL SECTION

Commerical Kitchens 80  West Coast cool  A look at what makes Jack in the Box tick 88 Built to inspire  Renovated kitchen helps ease burden of families at NYC’s Hope Lodge Federal Construction 98  Preparing for the next Sandy  How distributed renewable energy can help

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104 Miles to go...  Inside the R&D Tax Credit

DEPARTMENTS 6

Editor’s Note

12 Industry News 118 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 120 Calendar 120 Product Showcase 123 Ad Index 124 Publisher’s Note

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

Millennial Nation

I

f you’re waiting for the Millennial Nation to come, you might be too late. They’re already here. Depending on which study you read in whatever market, the Millennials are changing the game plans for all of us.

In the travel segment, by 2020 or sooner, studies show that Millennials might dominate the demographic. That means hoteliers must make a concertize effort to understand everything and anything about how this group operates. Products. Services. Expectations. Everything is in play. According to numbers by The Center for Generational Kinetics, a consulting firm that focuses on issues of Millennial consumers, it appears that by 2017 Millennials will indeed outspend Baby Boomers on hotels. Think about that for a minute. Are you prepared for that kind of impact? Some call this a defining moment in just who has all the discretionary income to spend.

A recent study by MMGY Global shows that Millennials already are more likely to take vacations than those in older generations. Its research shows that 24 percent of Millennials plan to take more overnight leisure trips this year than in the previous 12 months. As I write this column, my oldest son and his girlfriend are on their way to a resort in the Dominican Republic with several other couples. It was a trip he planned after he scored a promotion at work. College educated. Professionally motivated and brimming with a desire to see what is around him, Andrew is the new generation. His is a demographic that we must embrace now, not only on how and where they spend their money, but how and why they will

A recent study by MMGY Global shows that Millennials already are more likely to take vacations than those in older generations. be changing the face of everything moving forward. And my other son, Alec, is a junior in college with visions of seeing the world. They are living– and reshaping – the new American Dream. We spent a good portion of our last Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat in Charlotte talking about the new generational workforce. Many of the companies in attendance are embracing how to groom this group into their futures. They will be the winners. The big question is – will you? It is a wise move to take a good, hard look at the myriad studies (like the ones mentioned above) on this growing revolution. Read about what other companies are doing, and see if you can start putting yourself through the paces. In an industry struggling to find replacements for the huge defection of talent it lost during the most recent recession, turning your wheels in this direction is a move you must make now. You’ll be glad you did. CCR Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

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F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 678.765.6550 • Fax 678.765.6551

EDITORIAL EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com SCC MISSION Preserve 3.12:Eagle qrt pg FINAL

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SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com 678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 CCRP MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Kristen Corson • kristenc@ccr-people.com 770.990.7702 Building REI’s new flagship store in the landmark Puck Building, New York City, required great efforts to preserve and honor the historic building elements while meeting the needs of a modern retailer. Our experience and commitment helped create a unique blend of the historic and the new.

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EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS CLAY ADDISON Director of Construction and Purchasing Belk AARON ANCELLO TD Bank Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes STEPHEN GALLANT Vice President Facilities Development Jos. A. Bank Clothiers BROOKS HERMAN Project Manager of Construction Academy Sports + Outdoors BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target BRYAN NOVAK Sr. Director of Engin eering, Estimating, Quality Assurance Wal-Mart Stores DAVID OSHINSKI Director of Construction Home Depot JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury JANIS WILLIAMS Director of Store Facilities Tuesday Morning STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods

RESTAURANTS MIKE HUDSON Director of Construction CEC Entertainment GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Pie Five Pizza DAVID SHOTWELL Director of Construction Corporate Facilities Biscuitville RON BIDINOST Senior Director of Franchise Operations & Administration Marie Callenders Restaurant & Bakery LLC

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development JOHN LAPINS Vice President, Architecture & Construction Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. DENNIS MCCARTY Vice President, Technical Services, Construction InterContinental Hotels Group, the Americas GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership RICHARD SENECHAL Executive Vice President, Facilities Loews Hotels ROBERT RAUCH President R.A. Rauch & Assoc. Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations & Project Management Interserv Hospitality Solutions PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M

MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT

Senior Vice President, DTZ STEVE JONES

Managing Director Jones Lang LaSalle TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS JOHN MIOLOGOS

Executive VP, Architecture & Engineering WD Partners NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS DON HASULAK

Managing Director Big Red Rooster

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GEORGE SCHMIDT Associate Vice President Larson Binkley

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015

JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Herschman Architects STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group GINA NODA Executive Director of Business Development/Marketing Sargenti Architects

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA MIKE AUTENRIETH Academic Director Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management The International Culinary School at The Art Institute International Minnesot DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Did you

know

In its latest Hotel Horizon report, PKF Hospitality Research predicts that all segments of the lodging industry will see strong performance over the next three years, with overall occupancy expected to reach record levels in 2017. Through 2017, average daily rate is expected to rise by an average of 5.4 percent and net operating income is expected to grow 11.8 percent annually.

One of the things I’m most proud of is the success we’ve had at Bi-Lo Holdings in adapting our stores to the neighborhoods they serve. From our product offerings to our community involvement activities, we make a conscious effort to become locally relevant to customers, which I believe will lead to organic growth. – Randall Onstead, CEO of Bi-Lo Holdings, on the importance adaptability plays in the changing grocery business

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ial c r e m m Co Generalng i Contract Firm

INDUSTRY NEWS

Millennial madness Study shows group growing in travel stature

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eeting the expectations of the millennial generation will be even more critical to hoteliers over the next five years, as the segment edges closer to surpassing the older generations in travel spending and volume, experts said. According to research conducted

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by MMGY Global, millennials already are more likely to take vacations than those in older generations. The study shows that 24 percent of millennials are planning to take more overnight leisure trips in the coming year than in the previous 12 months. The travel patterns of Millennials will continue to shape strategies of hotel companies in the coming years.

The amount, in trillions, that U.S. construction will reach in 2015, according to FMI’s annual “U.S. Markets Construction Overview.” In addition, when the final numbers are tallied, FMI predicts that 2014 will end with approximately 7 percent growth in construction put in place. The report consists of three sections: a synopsis of the key energy market trends impacting the construction industry, industry sector challenges and a detailed economic forecast.

CIRCLE NO. 10

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Retail Architects

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CIRCLE NO. 11


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail Bass Pro Shops Bass Pro Shops is in the process of transforming a 32-story glass-andsteel pyramid in Memphis, Tenn., into a 535,000-square-foot sporting retail hub. Originally built as an arena, the pyramid failed in its mission to become the building that defined the city. Plans call for a 100-room hotel, shooting and archery ranges, and a bowling alley that will seem as if it’s underwater. IKEA IKEA will open as many as 10 smaller-format stores in Canada next year. The new 37,000-square-foot stores will be about a tenth of the size of the cavernous spaces IKEA is known for and will largely act as pickup spots for e-commerce orders. Zara Spain’s Inditex will open at least 12 new Zara stores in the United States this year, adding to the 52 outlets it already operates

here. Plans call for two more New York City stores, including a 4,400-square-meter SoHo flagship and a 2,800-square-meter store in the World Trade Center. Tanger Outlets Tanger Outlets Memphis is expected to be open in Southaven, Miss., in time for the 2015 holiday shopping season. Tanger has partnered with Poag Shopping Centers to develop the 324,000-square-foot project, whose tenants have not been announced. Arby’s Arby’s has seen sales increases of 18 percent to 20 percent at stores that have implemented the chain’s remodeling plans. The new look includes a bolder red outside, and wood paneling and warm lighting inside.

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Restaurants Schlotzsky’s Schlotzsky’s plans to expand throughout the greater Las Vegas area. The bakery-cafe brand currently has three restaurants in Nevada, and plans to add at least six signed franchise deals in Las Vegas by the end of the year. Dunkin’ Donuts Dunkin’ Donuts plans to make its debut in the Bay Area in 2016 and eventually open dozens of locations in the region. Two franchisees plan to open a combined 39 Dunkin’ Donuts locations, with 13 targeted in the San Jose area, and the other 26 planned for San Francisco and surrounding cities. The franchisees both plan to launch their first stores in 2016. Dunkin’ also has signed multiunit development agreements with two franchise groups in Colorado, which plan to open two restaurants in the Western Slope region and two in Pueblo, Colo., respectively. In addition, Dunkin’ has reached an agreement with an Arizona francisee to open six additional eateries in the Phoenix region. Burger 21 Burger 21 has signed a franchise agreement to develop its first restaurant in Chicagoland, marking the brand’s entry into Illinois. Additionally, the company signed a franchise deal for the development of one restaurant in Dallas. Alimentation Couche-Tard Canadian convenience store retailer Alimentation Couche-Tard will acquire the North Carolina-based Pantry chain, which operates Kangaroo Express stores. The deal, expected to close in the first half of 2015, will give Couche-Tard about 7,800 stores in North America. Wahlburgers Wahlburgers – the burger chain made famous by A&E, and owned by Mark, Donnie, and owner/ chef Paul, is planning an ambitious expansion that will add 27 more location to its roster. At least seven are planned for New York City. Rockin’ & Roastin’ Aerosmith drummer and coffee entrepreneur Joey Kramer will open his first Rockin’ & Roastin’ coffee shop. The Massachusetts restaurant will be an extension of the coffee brand Kramer started in 2012, which sells bagged coffee in more than 1,000 East Coast grocery stores.

Hospitality AC Hotels AC Hotels has opened its first U.S. property, the 220-room AC Hotel Bourbon/French Quarter Area in New Orleans, a move that introduces the brand’s European aesthetics to the U.S. market. Marriott International plans to open 50 more AC Hotels properties across the United States, with the company focusing on new construction projects in urban centers. Creek Casino The Creek Casino Montgomery is set to undergo a $65 million renovation to add a 119-room hotel, event center and salon. The Poarch Band of Creek Indians runs the casino in Montgomery, Ala. The final phase of renovations is set for early 2016. Value Place Value Place is looking to open 15 new extended-stay properties in Chicago’s metro area over the next five years through a new development contract it signed with Holladay Properties. Work on the first hotel is expected to begin this year.

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Nobu The second Nobu hotel in the United States is scheduled to open within the Eden Roc Miami Beach by the end of next year. The hotel is branded around Japanese chef and restaurateur Nobu Matsuhisa. ©2015 System Sensor. All Rights Reserved.

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Touchdown CCRP reception returns to Scottsdale

A

rizona has it all. Great weather. Great sites. And great food. That’s why the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) reception headed back to Scottsdale to host another round of the industry’s biggest and best networking reception. This time, the gang hit Brio Bravo (www.bravoitalian.com), which offers some of the best Italian/Tuscany cuisine in the “West’s most Western town.” If you want in on the CCRP networking party, contact Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristen@ccr-people.com today.

2.

1. 1. John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; Gina Noda, Sargenti Architects; Anthony Maldonado, Gap; Kelli Buhay, Retail Maintenance Specialists; Terry Pratt, PREIT

2. Kent Moon, Lakeview Construction; Sophia Moraitis, S. Moraitis & Associates; Anthony Amunategui, CDO Group; Shelby Roehre, Marco Contractors, Sean Smith, Cornell Cookson

REGISTERED COMPANIES: ACS Architects Advance Sign Group Architectural Design Guild ArcVision Arlon Assa Abloy BCT Architects Belk Bogart Construction C2C Surveys Capacity Builders CDO Group Chain Store Maintenance, Inc. Construction One Cooper Carry Cornell Storefront Systems Crossville, Inc. Fi Companies Fulcrum Construction

Fun Brands Gap Inc. GPD Group Grand Entrance Gray Guggenheim Partners H&M Herschman Architects Hilton Worldwide Horizon Retail Construction ImageOne Inside Edge Irvine Co Jayefff Construction JCP Jones Lang LaSalle Kingsmen Projects L2M Lakeview Construction

Little Macerich Marco Contractors Martin Architectural Group Mats Inc. McGraw-Hill MLE Inc Moda 4 Design Office Depot Pantera Global Technology Pattison Sign Permit.com Play Network Porcelanosa USA PREIT ProCoat RCA RE-AL Rectenwald Brothers Construction

Retail Construction Services Retail Maintenance Specialists S. Moraitis & Associates Sargenti Architects SGA Design Group Signet Jewelers Southwest Signs Starbucks Storefloors Target The Dietz Partnership The Home Depot The Little Gym The McIntosh Group Timberwolff Construction Wendy’s

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: Construction One, Inc. Don Skorupski, Business Development 101 E Town St, Suite 401 Columbus, OH 43215 Ph: 480-528-1145 donskorupski@gmail.com

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Pantera Global Technology DeWayne Adamson - President 25763 N 116th Street Scottsdale, AZ 85255 Ph: 480-433-3480 dewayne.adamson@panteraGT.com

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015

Retail Contractors Association Carol Montoya, CAE, Executive Director 400 North Washington Street, Suite 300 Alexandria, VA 22314 Ph: 703-683-5637 • Fax: 703-683-0018 www.retailcontractors.org


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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1.

2.

4.

8.

12.

3.

5.

6.

9.

10.

11.

14.

13.

1. DeWayne Adamson, Pantera Global Technology; Cherisse Regnart, Re-Al; Art Rectenwald, Rectenwald Brothers Construction; Nicole Mikula, ImageOne Industries 2. Jeff Roark, Little; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors; Steve Jones, Jones Lang LaSalle; Theresa Ragan, McGraw Hill; David Oshinski, The Home Depot; Sherry Roe, McGraw Hill 3. Kim Bowen, Starbucks; Tom Bowen, Irvine Company 4. Brad Gaskins, The McIntosh Group; Jeff Schnepp, Porcelanosa USA Bill Hellmann, Permit.com 5. Chuck Dietz, The Dietz Partnership; Karen MacCanell, The McIntosh Group; Dan Zoller, Jayeff Construction, Kim Gammons, Pantera Global Technology; Jack Zoller, Jayeff Construction 6. Kent Swank, The Home Depot, Marnie Phelps, SGA Design Group; Daryl Bray, SGA Design Group 7. Andy Wasserstrom, Advance Sign Group, Bob Meza, Target: Amy Fonzi, Fi Companies

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7.

8. T obias Collie, Fun Brands; Faith Hoople, Fulcrum Construction; Anthony Amunategui, CDO Group 9. S haron Bachman, Retail Construction Services, Inc., Mike Glaser, Signet Jewelers, John Moran, Pattison Sign Group; Steve Bachman, Retail Construction Services, Inc. 10. J ohn Stallman, Lakeview Construction; Carol Montoya, Retail Contractors Association 11. K elly Weiss, Horizon Retail Construction, Stephen Hekman, Kingsmen Projects; Byron Edgmon, Jones Lang LaSalle; John Walton, ACS Architects 12. J eff Mahler, L2M; Drew Romanic, Martin Architectural Group, Mark Herbkersman, BCT Architects; Danny Stone, Bogart Construction 13. J erry Rectenwald, Rectenwald Brothers Construction; Stacey Zatek, Marco Contractors; Don Skorupski, Construction One 14. J erry Zemanski, MLE Inc; Kevin Rourke, Arlon; Karen Nettleton, Fun Brands; David Fields, Southwest Signs; Sara Brindley, MLE Inc; Jen MacCarthy, Grand Entrance, Frayne Abernathy with Grand Entrance

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Marlboro, New Jersey

Howell Commons, New Jersey

Linden Shopping Center

Linden Shopping Center, New Jersey • Demising of existing 120,000sf Kmart into a mulit-tenant space

1701 W. Edgar Road, Linden, New Jersey Linden Shopping Center Demising of existing 120,000sf Kmart into a multi-tenant space 1701 W. Edgar Road, Linden, New Jersey Demising of existing 120,000sf Kmart into a multi-tenant space BEFORE

BEFORE BEFORE

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W

hat’s in a name? It’s an interesting question to ask Under Armour founder Kevin Plank, who started his company in a row house in Georgetown with about $15,000, some locally purchased fabric and a plan to change the face of the athletic apparel industry. Plank’s plan worked, and then some. Today, the Under Armour Why Under Armour name is on pace to reach $3 billion in sales, with plans of tripling knows no bounds in size – a vision few who know By Michael J. Pallerino Plank would bet against.

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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LIMITLESS When he was getting started, Plank bantered about a few different names for the company. Heart – as in, you wear your heart on your sleeve – was the first. But after a friend’s company helped him negotiate the patent and trademark process, it didn’t go through. Next up was Body Armor. But after a couple of weeks of working through the process, several body shops in New Jersey and some ballistic vest manufacturers begged to differ with his quest. After Plank’s younger brother inadvertently asked him how his fledgling company, “Under Armor” was doing, the name stuck in his head. He filed the paperwork, sent it to the patent and trademark office, and the Under Armour brand was born. To note, skeptical of the whole internet thing, Plank added the “U” in Armour so that it would have a little play when customers dialed the 888 number. The rest, as we all know, is history, and then some. The former University of Maryland football player who had noticed that compression shorts stayed dry during practice was on his way to creating a brand that consumers just cannot get enough of. Today, along with creating a billion-dollar sports apparel and equipment corporation, Plank is setting his sights on the retail arena. We sat down with Patrick Stringer, senior manager of global store development, to see how the future of retail continues to evolve for the Under Armour brand.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list in 2015?

My focus right now is on our continued growth in North America and the list of projects we’ve approved. I want to make sure we continue to hit our dates and open stores successfully. We have a heavy workload for the year for both our Brand House (specialty) and Factory House (outlet) store models, including our largest store to date on Michigan Avenue in Chicago. Beyond the typical store list, there are some opportunities with our internal processes that we’re looking to clean up and, in some cases, create.

Describe a typical day.

It doesn’t feel like there’s a typical day in our business, but each day I’m working on some phase of the project life-cycle, whether

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


It’s a classic American success story, taking an idea and a need, and not only creating a product, but a major brand and essentially a new industry in performance apparel.

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LIMITLESS

it be preparing budgets for potential new locations, working with our design team and architects to prepare for upcoming locations or managing the construction process for our on-going projects.

Define some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

Real estate has been a big opportunity for us. We’ve done a very good job of finding the right size footprint in high traffic locations for both our Factory House and Brand House concepts. We are continuing to rollout our Brand House concept throughout many top-tier malls and street locations in our major markets.

What does today’s retail marketplace look like?

There is obviously a lot of talk about the decline of brick and mortar, but because I might be biased, I don’t think it’s true. To me, it seems people feel that way because of the decline in more traditional retailers, but it’s helped pave the way for others to take their place. With e-commerce, there is certainly a convenience factor, but that desire to touch and feel materials will always keep consumers coming back to stores. That’s the reason so many online retailers

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


are starting to open showrooms and open brick and mortar locations.

strong leadership internally that’s setting a clear vision to be executed.

What’s driving you and your competitors?

Tell us about your growth strategy.

Customers who come into our stores are looking for more than just a place to buy shirts and shoes. What we’ve focused on recently, especially with the younger athletes, is to create an environment where they can feel like a part of the brand. We want to give them an experience to remember by coming to an Under Armour store. We have to give our customers a reason to want to come back, because there are a lot of different avenues to get our product or our competitor’s product.

Are you optimistic about what you see out there today?

Fortunately, we haven’t had any reason to not be optimistic. We have a very strong brand that’s providing lots of opportunities to continue to open new doors in great locations. We also have

We’ve been very focused on the strategy and markets we’re entering and there is a very specific plan in place for the next few years. Every potential opportunity we review is not only going to be profitable, but also create more brand awareness.

What is your growth plan?

Our Brand House business will continue to grow in a strategic mix of top-tier malls, street and high street locations. We continue to grow our door count in the Factory House business, but a lot of our opportunities are with our current fleet. Stores that we opened or already upsized as recently as a year ago are already undersized. Over half of the Factory House projects we’re working on this year are upsizes to our existing fleet, whether they are new locations within the same centers or expanding in place.

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LIMITLESS

Our design, visual and merchant teams have done a great job at knowing who our customers are and why they love our brand.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


What markets are you targeting?

As part of our on-going real estate strategy, we’ve been able to determine a few key markets. There are many cities or regions that we have determined to be solid performers for our brand, but we’ve also focused on markets domestically that we feel are going to have a very positive impact on our business internationally.

What’s driving the growth?

With the design and success of our new Brand House concept and the strength of our brand, we have had very positive reactions and demand from developers. All of our locations are driven by customer demand, but the developers are able to get us the right size in the best location for us to reach those customers.

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CIRCLE NO. 19

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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LIMITLESS Is there a refresh strategy in place?

We have a refresh and rollback strategy in place. With the high amount of upsizes we are currently working on, it’s allowing us to reach a large portion of our fleet. Beyond ensuring that the stores are looking and functioning up to our brand standard, we’re also focused on upgrading or adding to in-store systems like EAS, security cameras and energy management.

How many upsizes are you targeting?

We are going to complete around 20.

What are some of the adjustments you’re making?

We have had a lot of new initiatives and growth drivers within the company that we relate to our store design, so we need to update our existing fleet to stay on brand. Our footwear business is a major focus for our brand, so we need to make sure we’re giving it the proper floor place and location within the store.

What is today’s customer looking for?

It depends on the market, as the outlet shopper is mainly looking for a great deal, but the specialty customer wants more of a personal experience. Either customer is expecting an authentic brand experience. It’s too easy to shop online now, so we need to give them a reason to not only come into our locations, but we also want them to keep coming back.

How do you incorporate that into your store design strategy? Our design, visual and merchant teams have done a great job at knowing who our customers are and why they love our brand. Again, it’s all about providing an authentic experience. We have a great design in that it doesn’t overshadow or take away from what the customer is really there for, which is our product. The authenticity can be in the materials we choose, the propping and display or the product itself.

Walk us through your construction strategy.

Over the past few years, with the help of our field team, we’ve been able to create some

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LIMITLESS

I think any construction strategy should begin with the team you have in place, and we’ve been very successful and fortunate in surrounding ourselves with a great team.

valuable processes for our Factory House business that make the build-out of our stores very precise. We have taken out all of the outliers that could hold up a project, and ensured that we have accurate plans, timely deliveries and clear completion dates. With the growth of our Brand House concept, which has more complexity in terms of design and details, we need to make sure we’re taking what we know and have learned in the Factory House, and use that to be successful with our Brand House. The same processes and principles of construction are in each concept, so it’s a matter of execution. I think any construction strategy should begin with the team you have in place, and we’ve been very successful and fortunate in surrounding ourselves with a great team. All of our “vendors” are true partners to us and feel the same sense of pride in the brand that we do internally.

Talk about sustainability.

We are always conscious of building on a sustainable platform, but we’ve gone

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015

away from seeking industry certifications. We continue to build our stores using LED lighting, exposed concrete floors, FSC certified woods and an EMS (Lightstat) system that helps control our usage of lighting, heating and cooling.

What trends are you seeing?

LED lighting is not only in retail, but all industries. But what I think has helped us to be more efficient is the use of our Lightstat system, which helps monitor and control the use of our lighting and mechanical systems. I think it’ll not only allow for a more efficient system, but the amount of detail in which you can monitor your systems will allow for longer life spans for the units we’re installing.

What makes the Under Armour so unique?

It’s a classic American success story, taking an idea and a need, and not only creating a product, but a major brand and essentially a new industry in performance apparel.


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1-866-628-9196 • info@carneycontracting.com CIRCLE NO. 21


LIMITLESS What should people expect from the brand?

Authenticity and a full brand experience – I think those are the reasons they’re coming in. It’s our responsibility to make sure we’re creating that experience.

What should the industry know about you?

Something we always talk about in the Retail Store Development team is how well we work together as a team. We surround ourselves with a great group of partners. And it doesn’t hurt that we have a great leader who allows every one of us to run the business. CCR

Customers who come into our stores are looking for more than just a place to buy shirts and shoes. We want to give them an experience to remember by coming to an Under Armour store.

Get to know ... » Patrick Stringer What’s the most rewarding part of your job? To see how excited our store team is when they get to walk into this great new store. It’s being able to say you played a role in creating that store and those experiences. It’s very rewarding. What are the three strongest traits any leader should have? Trust in your team and allowing them to make decisions; the ability to set a clear vision; and respect from your peers.

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 enior Manager of Global Store Development S Under Armour

What was the best advice you ever received? Focus on your strengths, not your weaknesses. Surround yourself with people who are able to make up for those areas where you aren’t as strong. What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? Just a firm handshake and a “great job.” The best compliments can be the reactions from people who had no idea you were even involved in the project. What is the true key to success for any manager? To have the ability to make a good informed decision, whether it is in your best interest or not.

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Discover more about one of the most unique installation systems to add to your arsenal: www.bostik-us.com Discover more about one of the most unique installation systems to add to your arsenal: www.bostik-us.com CIRCLE NO. 22

T2145-01.16.15 T2145-01.16.15

Projects Projects


2014

Future workforce, project pipelines dominate industry conversations

I

These are better days

n an industry on the rebound, one of the most pressing issues facing commercial construction executives across the board is finding the right person for the job, so to speak.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Clay Addison

Kelli Buhay

Sue Burke

Darrel Chaney

Brad Gaskins

Pete Giger

John Griffiths

Rick Hall

Carl Hren

Kevin Little

Susan Lloyd

Jose Luis

John Monteith

Chris Pierce

Jeff Roark

Dir of Construction Belk

Dir of Bus Development Retail Maintenance Specialists

Construction Consultant Prime Retail Construction

Director, Project Management Hilton

Principal The McIntosh Group

Director - Construction Operations Campus Crest

Special Projects Manager Sports Authority

President The Beam Team

Facilities Engineering Grifols

Vice President Construction & Capital Assets Concord Hospitality

PM Estimator Family Dollar

National Strategic Accounts Tecta America

VP Real Estate Development Family Dollar

President Design Team Sign

Ron Stupi President QPM

Prinipal/Partner Little

Mike Wendel

Snr Construction Manager Cici’s Piizza

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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THESE ARE BETTER DAYS When the slumping economy threw the commercial construction industry into a tailspin, it suffered a huge defection in talent in a number of key areas, from project managers to various skilled labor positions. That void has changed the way companies approach their hiring practices, especially as construction pipelines continue to move forward in a revived economy. This conversation took center stage in the second half of the roundtable discussions during the 2014 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat, held at the Aloft Hotel in downtown Charlotte this past October. The three-day event also featured a series of networking opportunities, including a NASCAR ride along at Charlotte Motor Speedway. Following is the final installment of our Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat coverage and Friday morning open forum. For more information on our CCR Retreats and events, visit us at www.ccr-mag.com.

CCR: How are you handling the entitled project managers that you’re hiring today?

Campus Crest’s John Griffiths: I’ve spent the last two years interviewing between 150 and 300 APMs, and between 75 and 150 project managers. When you hire an APM – assistant project manager – you lay out the path for them of what it’s going to take to become a project manager or a senior project manager. And they understand that when you hire them, that it’s a year and a half before they can even be considered a project manager. That it’s going to be a lot of work and long hours, and that they’re going to have to learn all of these skills. They know that they’re going to have to perfect what they spent 20 minutes on in college getting to what you think is proficient. And so you hire them, and you hire them at a decent starting rate. I think there’s a bunch of people in this room who might be offering that person a PM job because they need bodies. A lot of that probably starts here. We can solve this problem and make sure we understand what the value of their skill set is so that they don’t climb too fast and they’re not unhirable later on. It’s an interesting problem that we’ve faced.

We’re at $10 million in business right now, and our goal is to double our business. It’s all about continuing to build relationships.

– Retail Maintenance Specialist’s Kelli Buhay

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015

QPM’s Ron Stupi: We have a few things. One started just a few years ago. We have a pretty strict hiring process. Not that it’s good, bad or indifferent in terms of the elements to it, but we have a process and we adhere to it every single time. There’s a round robin interview and there’s some skills testing, so it kind of hits from all angles. It helps ferret out a lot of the people who interviewed really well, but are maybe lacking skills, or people who have skills, but may not have interviewed really well. So, I think we attract, through that process, a well-rounded individual. During that process, we set expectations very clearly. We say, “Look, this is what you’re going to make. If you are driven 100 percent by your salary versus culture and variety, we are not the company for you.” We set that expectation very clearly. By the same token, assuming they come on, we do a couple of things. Everybody gets assigned a mentor – somebody who is one or two levels up, depending on who he is and what his role is. They’re the safe zone. This new hire can say, “What am I doing right? What am I doing wrong? Why am I not getting recognized or why am I getting recognized?” Unfortunately, I would


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THESE ARE BETTER DAYS

It’s about having a process and sticking to it, and having clear expectations about what you’re going to experience when you come to work for us. We’d rather continue to fight and find the right people than hire a warm buddy that kind of fits. – QPM’s Ron Stupi

suspect many of the service providers in this room are in the same boat – we can charge what we can charge. So we don’t have the ability to overpay very often, because it’s not a sustainable business model. We’ve lost more people to customers than our competitors, vendors, retailers or hospitality folks who say, “Hey, come work for me and I’ll pay you more than you’re making for the private vendor.” We’re somewhat limited by our ability to do so. But I think it’s about having a process to follow, setting expectations and having a mentor for good feedback. It’s about having a process and sticking to it, and having clear expectations about what you’re going to experience when you come to work for us. We’d rather continue to fight and find the right people than hire a warm body that kind of fits our need for the moment. The Beam Team’s Rick Hall: We have 10 or 12 project managers who work for us. Our goal is to create something more than just a job. Everybody wants to be a part of something bigger, so we work to get everyone involved. Even the younger managers take an active role and give feedback. We let them be a part of the answer and solution. It’s not about giving them orders and telling them how to do their jobs. We want them to participate in the development of the project and company. This strategy works. We have little management turnover. QPI’s Stupi: I think this may be a generational thing. The more seasoned employees have a tendency to put down their heads and do a good job, knowing that they’ll get recognized at some point. Whereas, you see a lot of the more junior employees seeking constant feedback. Like Rick said, they want to be a part of something. So, whether it’s good, bad or indifferent, doing a review of how they are doing is the right thing. But it has to be monthly or every other month. Tell them what and how they are doing. Give them feedback. They have a real hunger to learn, at least the good ones do, but they want your feedback. They want to participate and feel like they’re making a difference.

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Prime Retail Construction’s Darrel Chaney: I’ll add another twist to it. In our company, after the interview process and all the expectations have been discussed, we send them up to meet our president and CEO, Donald Bloom. He sits down with them and helps them understand how much they matter to our organization. Forty-five percent of the people who leave their company, leave because they don’t think they matter. So we try to help them understand that they do matter, no matter where they are on the pay scale or where they start with us, we remind them that they have an opportunity to grow, get promoted and move up. In whatever position they’re hired at, they know that we can’t succeed without people like them. You can look at any business or any sports team – you can’t win without that guy in the middle. You just can’t. I worked at a real estate company where we had high-end and low-end producers, but it was the people in the middle that we could count on every day to make a sale or two. Those were the people who helped pay the bills. They mattered, and they would leave if they didn’t think so. I think that strategy works, at least it does in our company’s culture. Family Dollar’s Jose Luis: If your employees are working for you solely for the money, and that’s all they’re interested in, they should find another place to work. Nonetheless, you still need to pay people based on the value they add. You have to understand what the market is and what value each person can add to your organization. That’s what is most important to you and your customers. As we have been saying at Family Dollar, it’s important to listen to what your employees are saying in an exit interview. It’s not about checking a box. You have to really pay attention to what your people are saying. What do they care about? It is important to let them participate in their own destiny. I was a real estate lawyer for Family Dollar before moving to our construction group.. I walked into this role without any preconceived notions of how things should be. I wanted to learn how

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THESE ARE BETTER DAYS things would work most efficiently for this team and the business overall. We set up meetings where everyone brought up topics they wanted to discuss or get solutions to. It was a free-for-all. Whatever it was, we put it on the list and went through it. We set the agenda for a one-hour meeting. What we could finish, we did, and then the rest was held for the next meeting. Family Dollar’s Susan Lloyd: When you’re dealing with the people, no matter whether they are at the junior or senior level, you have to understand what makes them tick. If you don’t take the time to understand that, it won’t work. Every person has to be dealt with differently. For example, if you tell me I do a good job, great. If you don’t, I’m okay with that. But there are other people who have to have

You can look at any business or any sports team – you can’t win without that guy in the middle. You just can’t. – Prime Retail Construction’s Darrel Chaney

that constant reinforcement. And as a manager, you might have to change your management style to accommodate those you supervise. That’s across the board. My boss, for example, has four people he supervises that are all different. He doesn’t treat us all the same, but we don’t all need to be treated the same. To keep people, you have to understand that dynamic and how they work as a team. And even within that team, you have to keep everybody happy. Jose does a good job with this. He knows that it is not all about being down in the ditches working. He likes to make sure the group has fun, too. Family Dollar’s Luis: Additionally, I think you have to admit when you’re wrong. We were talking earlier about taking responsibility for things. There are countless times when Susan’s boss would

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THESE ARE BETTER DAYS

We’re taking on more of the IT functions. So, for us, it’s going to be how to you streamline the process and improve our management of those projects. – Grifols’ Kevin Little

come in and say, “Jose, let’s work around this.” And I’ll say, “You know what, I see that point. I agree.” It’s recognizing that and saying, “You know what, it could be done differently. If that’s how it would work more efficiently, let’s do that.” We can’t have preconceived notions and we must be open to changing things – not being rigid in our own ideas. I think that adds a huge amount of value. I think people look at that. And when they look at – going back to what you were saying – the actual work that you’re doing. At Family Dollar, there is a ton of work to do. There are plans and strategies and things that are always coming up. Retail is constantly changing, and there are different opportunities, not just for the cash, but also for the experience. Retail Maintenance Specialist’s Kelli Buhay: So basically, what I got out of this is it’s really about making people feel like they make a difference and they’re part of the family. Family Dollar’s Luis: It’s not making them feel like they’re making a difference – it’s helping them realize how they are making a difference. That’s the biggest takeaway from this. It has to be real. It has to be genuine. It’s not just about making somebody

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feel a particular way, it’s actually doing something so that they are making a difference.

CCR: What kind of trends are you seeing out there?

Belk’s Clay Addison: Belk has never really been a trendsetter. We tend to be more conservative with our designs. This year we are experimenting with all LEDs in one store. I think this is a good idea since LEDs are the way of the future. We are also continuing to expand on our omni-channel experience for our customers. Recently, we have been doing more takeover of empty space within an existing mall. We’ll move our men’s and kids business out of the main store and into the smaller space within the mall. We do this to expand our business, but it also helps keep the competition out. In the past, we would make long range plans for larger quantities of fixtures in the hopes of getting better pricing for bidding larger quantities. Since our work load has slowed down, we are now doing more negotiating with our existing vendors to try and maintain our current pricing on smaller quantities. Some vendors are okay with this concept and some are not. We continue to see better pricing on construction projects that bid in the spring and open the following spring. This schedule means

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THESE ARE BETTER DAYS the contractors will have work through the winter months when they are normally slow. Little’s Jeff Roark: Just to add to Clay’s comments regarding omni-channel, to Belk’s credit, they have made investments in experimenting with how to attract Millennial customers. They did a test concept called Belle & Ty last year via a pop-up store in Pineville, N.C., during the holidays just to study Millennials, including how to integrate technology and social media into the store environment. They confirmed that Millennials like to travel in groups to the mall and try on outfits for critique by the group. So, Belk provided a photo station in the store where an associate could take photographs of the customer in their new outfit and post them to Instagram, and also to a large display screen in the store. Belk learned a lot from this test store in terms of how to deal with its Millennial customers, and they’re doing things like that and spending money just to learn more. It really wasn’t about sales dollars – it was just to learn how to attract younger customers into their stores, and to that degree, they were successful.

As we gear up to build more, we’re going to be looking for more resources and contractors that we trust. We are looking for good partners. For us, trust is the key. – Cici’s Pizza’s Mike Wendel

Cici’s Pizza’s Mike Wendel: We have a re-imaging program. We are a heavily franchised company, and as such, we can’t always tell a franchisee you have to re-image your store at a certain point in time. They have deadlines in their franchise agreement when they have to do that. We our finding, as the economy improves a bit, that franchisees are more willing to re-image their stores when they’re not required to, which is a good thing. The new look will help increase sales, so they are wanting to re-image now. That’s a good thing for us. Another trend is the general movement of dining as a necessity, not just an experience. People don’t want to spend a long time sitting and eating dinner, but they still want quality and to do it quickly. That’s why you see concepts Five Guys, Chipotle and Moe’s getting so popular. People want to go in and get good food quickly. We are looking at that with our test store in Dallas, which is in a community called The Colony. Right now, we’re approaching the pizza concept differently. We have a restaurant where the guest walks to a table where the cooks are. The first thing the cook asks is, “Would you like a pizza made to order rather than the buffet?” We typically offer our pizza buffet style. So, the guest has an option right off the bat to get a 9-inch pizza made to order at a different price point. If they don’t, the buffet is right next-door. It’s not as

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


E

E AG S IM ERT P EX

TH

800.953.3744

www.designteam.net www/designteamsigncompany.com CIRCLE NO. 27


THESE ARE BETTER DAYS

Today, we’re starting to see double the stores that are new builds from what 2007 and 2008. I see a lot of promising things for the next two to three years out. I see still a lot of remodels. – Design Team Sign’s Chris Pierce

long as the buffet in a traditional Cici’s, but the buffet is still there. We offer a lot of different ala cart items that they can order at that restaurant. That’s just one of our tests. Eventually, we will have a second prototype that incorporates a lot of those elements, maybe not all of them. I see two prototypes down the road – one being the traditional buffet prototype and the other being a quick-serve application. And in the demographics of the market, we’ll take whichever restaurant worked better. We also are leaning toward smaller restaurants. Traditionally, Cici’s has been about 4,000 square feet, almost all of them. Now, we’re targeting more in the area of 2,800- to 3,200-square-foot range. Rather than 160 seats, we’re looking at 90-120. There are several reasons for this. Most times, you can go by a Cici’s with 160 seats and it won’t look full. So we’re paying for real estate that we’re not using. That’s why we’re downsizing the restaurant – to make it more affordable. And we’re really focusing on more corporate development. Currently, less than 5 percent of our stores are corporate stores, but we’re targeting corporate growth in 2015 and 2016 to build a substantial number of corporate restaurants.

CCR: What types of opportunities do you see in 2015?

Cici’s Pizza’s Wendel: Because we haven’t really built any new stores in a while, our contractor base has kind of dwindled. Like every end user, we’ve had a preferred list of contractors, but some of them have gone away. As we gear up to build more, we’re going to be looking for more resources and contractors that we trust. We are looking for good partners. For us, trust is the key. We’re also trying to develop systems for the franchise community to help them take care of their stores: give them resources that we can refer them to for ongoing maintenance, whether it’s HVAC maintenance, whether it’s help with the re-images. QPI’s Stupi: For us, 2015 is no different from whether you’re selling project management services, contracting services, etc.,

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you want to be able to say yes to more of your customers, help them more with their needs. The way we’re going to try to accomplish that is by trying to bring a focus of scalable expertise. Lots of people provide the services we provide, so we want to be able to provide that as a scalable, consistent result for those customers, but at the same time provide expertise and guidance along the way. So, it’s with more resources and a little more scale, but a very consistent result. I think we would all be happy in our lives, regardless of our business, if we knew we were going to get the same results every time in the expectations that we have. That would make all of our lives infinitely better, right? Because we spend a lot of our time running around checking on this, checking on that, we’re behind, or whatever the case may be. So I think we need to have kind of a laser focus on scaled consistency with some expertise to it. Hilton’s Sue Burke: In 2015, Hilton is going to continue to move forward with guest room, public space and meeting room renovations. Hilton is focused on getting the products up to the standards we have set and where we need to be in the market place. We are still pushing forward to get the owned asset completed but it takes time. It’s a yearly push, as we have a lot of hotels to get completed and they are all on the CapEx five-year plan. Design Team Sign’s Chris Pierce: We probably had 750 projects this year (2014), and we are looking at probably 850 (in 2015). I think what you all spoke about on the clean, fresh, new approach is one of the things we’re seeing. What I’ve noticed over the last 10 years or so is that a lot of restaurant chains are remodeling. It used to be that they’d do it every 10-12 years. Now it has been cut down to probably seven. They’re really consistently remodeling and changing things up, some of them are even quicker than that. Some are doing the interiors in four years. The biggest thing I’ve seen in the last year (2014), and looking forward to this (2015) is new store growth. Some 65-70 percent of

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


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CIRCLE NO. 28


THESE ARE BETTER DAYS our restaurant business has been in remodeling. But in 2015, we will see a lot on the books. Hardees has 140 new projects on the books and Arby’s has 60. When we came out of the recession in 2007 and 2008, all those chains went down to five to eight new stores for those years. They are just barely starting to grow them now. Today, we’re starting to see double the stores that are new builds from what 2007 and 2008. I see a lot of promising things for the next two to three years out. I see still a lot of remodels. Campus Crest’s Griffiths: In 2015, there will be more value engineering and companies working closely with their subcontractor base. You will see more streamlining of the processes to make sure everything is poised for 2017 through 2020. We have a big growth spurt planned. So, it’s making sure we’re going back to the basics, getting all our processes right, and being prepared to come out of the chute in a big way. We want to put some growth on the table.

out and pull it out on their phone. I can see somebody add something live. It really, truly has been something. Little’s Roark: As I mentioned earlier regarding online retailing, we’re continuing to see the convergence of online retailing and instore, brick-and-mortar retailing. For example, it’s been interesting to see what some online retailers are doing with gaming technology, which is all about virtual reality. Previously, most of the retailers’ online sites basically served as catalogs – just 2D pages on the internet. You simply picked out what you wanted and ordered it, so the integration of 3D applications has been a significant change. With virtual reality and gaming technology, there will be more interactive-type experiences both online and in-store. There is one home center retailer that is already using a large scale, 3D simulation within its stores. You can go in a room, pick out your bathroom fixtures, your paint colors and flooring materials, your light fixtures, whatever. You can put it all together into a virtual simulation to see exactly what your new bathroom is going to look and feel like, and then quickly change doors, colors, light fixtures, hardware, etc. But what if you could do that while sitting at home in your pajamas at 2:00 AM? Maybe you start the process at home, and then finish it in the store with more detailed advice and cost options from the sales associate. So again, there’s this convergence of online retailing and brick-and-mortar retailing, and it’s not just coming – it’s here.

We want to help execute the merger of digital and brickand-mortar retailing. That’s where we see a lot of the change happening.

– The Beam Team’s Rick Hall

Prime Retail Construction’s Chaney: Being on the construction side, we’re excited about everything that you’re excited about. We’re looking forward to continued growth in 2015, too. One of major focuses is going to be interviewing project managers. Our goal is to continue to matter as a company. We’re looking forward to seeing what opportunities are out there.

Concord Hotel’s Cal Hren: For us, 2015 will be one of the biggest years in development that we have ever had. Piling on what you are hearing here, the trick is going to be to find the right people, expand our project management department, do a larger volume of work, and maintain the excellence that we’ve be able to deliver in the past. But it’s definitely going to take finding the right leaders. That will be the key, but it also is what makes what we do so enjoyable.

Belk’s Addison: We have a couple projects that are going out to bid for 2015. Hopefully, we will get them approved, and then get more in 2016. We are also focusing on improving our IT capabilities. I’m looking for us to improve on our change management, too. We plan to make a lot of changes. It’s nothing for us to have 12 to 15 different revisions on a project with major revisions. So, hopefully we’ll improve on that over this year and try to cut that down. We also will try to get our arms around the cost management of those changes. We’re starting to use Google docs, which is an online sharing document. It’s free and has been very useful and productive for us. It’s a great process. We use it for our punch lists. Our architects and engineers, and internal teams create a punch list out, and then our contractors just have to read it. Anybody with a Gmail account can go

The McIntosh Group’s Brad Gaskins: What we’re going to focus on in 2015 is continuing to find ways to add more value to services for our clients. Add more value at less cost, and find ways they can do things with less effort and less money. One of the things we’re looking at – and that we’re hearing from some of our clients – is turnkey services. From an ADA standpoint, we go out and we work together with the contractors on barrier removal plans. It’s not just us doing it; it’s a team approach. The customer or client doesn’t have to worry about the identification of the issues; it’s all done. The Beam Team’s Hall: We’re really all over the online retail to brick-and-mortar, an omni-channel trend that Jeff was talking about. I’ve attended many seminars and done a lot of reading on this. We are very fortunate that we’ve been able to do business with one of

50

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


For all your retail construction, fixture installation, and merchandising needs, choose nothing less than Gold Standard service. Prime Retail Services 866.504.3511

Prime Retail Canada 905.827.2662

www.primeretailservices.com

www.primeretail.ca CIRCLE NO. 29


THESE ARE BETTER DAYS

In 2015, there will be more value engineering and companies working closely with their subcontractor base. You will see more streamlining of the processes to make sure everything is poised for 2017 through 2020. – Campus Crest’s John Griffiths

the largest electronic retailers in the country, so we’ve seen a lot of this taking place already. There’s this beacon technology that is coming out. It’s getting widespread acceptance. The whole omni-channel experience is going to happen, and retail stores are going to change. We think this is going to be our best avenue going forward, and we want to be the experts in that category. We want to help execute the merger of digital and brick-andmortar retailing. That’s where we see a lot of the change happening. So, we’ve got to be able to handle TVs and all of these electronics. We have to be able to make sure we can install these things properly so they do what they need to do. We also are trying to bring on at least two major customers every year. We have a very rigid, on boarding process, so we’ll be looking to do that for 2015. Grifols’ Kevin Little: Our industry is kind of closed and real competitive, so our plan for 2015 has not been communicated within the company. Our group will be tasked with managing the contractors as a partnership: the vendors and the electronic side. We’re taking on more of the IT functions. So, for us, it’s going to be how to you streamline the process and improve our management of those projects. Tecta America’s John Monteith: We’ve always been about investing in our people, as we grow our business. As the economy started to shift, not only were we investing in our people, but we were also focusing on organic and acquisition growth. Now that the economy is growing again, we have aligned ourselves into markets that brings us closer to our clients, allowing us to service them better while covering more geography. Another really big thing for our company is our safety record. We put a lot of time and effort into this. Every year, for the last number of years, we have continually lowered EMR. We’re at 0.54 now, which is the best in the industry. This investment is not only best for our employees, but for our customers as well.

52

Family Dollar’s Luis: This year at Family Dollar, we’re opening approximately 375 new stores, relocating and expanding 150 more, and completing 600 renovations. In addition to that, we’re adding LED lights in our stores, particularly because of California. So, we’re testing that right now and looking to see what it’s going to look like across the chain. We’re also looking at our flooring. Right now, our new stores that are ground up are going to polished concrete. There’s a question as to whether we should go to polished concrete or burnished floors. How many times are we going to go over the polish to get that right shine? So we’re looking at that. We’re also looking at strategic prototypes in landscaping plans. We’re focused on what our landscape and our buildings look like in the Northeast compared to the Southwest, or the Southeast,like Florida, compared to the Southeast, like Georgia. Your vegetation and requirements could be very different in each of those areas. We’re also looking at things from a jurisdiction-specific perspective. So, what is a building going to look like per the local codes in Miami, as opposed to Atlanta or California? So you start looking at those specific jurisdictions and try to narrow down the strategy so that you have a plan you can move forward with. The last thing is team member engagement. You have to make sure your people have the opportunities they need, and they see the benefit they can get from Family Dollar.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015

Retail Maintenance Specialist’s Buhay: I’m in the process of rebuilding our website, which will now have a portal so that our customers can login to review project status and to approve projects on the fly. We have the ability to build reports based on our client’s needs, by spend, trade, per store, region, etc. That’s something that will be incorporated into our onboarding process. We’ve also hired two new project managers to pick up the drive for the projects that we have on going and for the new clientele brought aboard; 2015 will represent growth. We’re at $10 million in business right now, and our goal is to double our business. It’s all about continuing to build relationships. CCR


CIRCLE NO. 30


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Design this Guide highlights industry’s leading architectural/design firms

E

verything starts with the design. If you’re looking for what architectural firms are leading the way, check out our annual Architecture/Design Firms report. This annual guide showcases the leading firms in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. Our exclusive survey provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If you’re not on the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version of this report, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

STANTEC ARCHITECTURE, INC.......... $52,367,706 LITTLE............................................. $26,300,000 GREENBERG FARROW...................... $24,800,000 WD PARTNERS................................. $24,573,000 RSP ARCHITECTS............................. $23,500,000 FRCH DESIGN WORLDWIDE.............. $23,040,000 DLR GROUP..................................... $22,000,000 HFA.................................................. $21,600,000

RESTAURANT

RETAIL

Top Ten Totals

TRICARICO ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN PC................................ $15,250,000

VOA ASSOCIATES, INC...................... $21,846,118 LEO A DALY...................................... $17,139,951 STONEHILL & TAYLOR...................... $12,977,206 REBEL DESIGN + GROUP................. $11,275,733 KNA DESIGN.................................... $8,500,000 PERKINS EASTMAN.......................... $8,250,000

GREENBERG FARROW....................... $9,800,000 CHIPMAN DESIGN ARCHITECTURE..... $9,250,000 INTERPLAN LLC................................ $6,230,000 REBEL DESIGN + GROUP.................. $5,637,868 LEO A DALY....................................... $5,482,359 STANTEC ARCHITECTURE, INC........... $4,682,922 FRCH DESIGN WORLDWIDE............... $2,430,000

TOTAL BILLINGS

HOSPITALITY 54

HKS INC........................................... $57,350,000

CORE STATES GROUP....................... $12,000,000

C.M. ARCHITECTURE, P.A. (CMA)........ $3,848,338

BERGMANN ASSOCAITES................. $14,146,000

HBA/HIRSCH BEDNER ASSOCIATES...... $125,000,000

WD PARTNERS.................................. $22,931,000

STANTEC ARCHITECTURE, INC.......... $382,177,634 HKS INC........................................... $292,800,000 PERKINS EASTMAN.......................... $165,000,000 LEO A DALY...................................... $147,692,003 DLR GROUP..................................... $130,800,000 HBA/HIRSCH BEDNER ASSOCIATES...... $125,000,000 VOA ASSOCIATES, INC...................... $70,471,350 RSP ARCHITECTS............................. $63,000,000

DLR GROUP..................................... $5,500,000

LITTLE............................................. $61,000,000

FRCH DESIGN WORLDWIDE.............. $5,330,000

BERGMANN ASSOCAITES................. $59,725,000

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Adache Group Architects Arcsine Fort Lauderdale, FL George Fletcher, President/CEO 954-525-8133 FAX 954-728-8159 www.adache.com gfletcher@adache.com Year Established: 1969, No. of Employees: 25, Retail Billings: $ 165,000, Hospitality Billings: $4,350,000, Restaurant Billings: $246,000, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $4,761,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 5, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Galleria Mall, Margaritaville, Turnberry Associates, Chase Enterprises

AECOM Cincinnati, OH Beth Myers Graham, Vice President 513-651-3440 FAX 877-660-7727 www.aecom.com beth.myers-graham@aecom.com, Year Established: 1904, No. of Employees: 90,000, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $58,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1,000+ Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: N/A

api(+) Tampa, FL Juan Romero, President & CEO 813-281-9299 FAX 813-281-9292 www.apiplus.com jlauer@apiplus.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 27, Retail Billings: $3,960,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $440,000, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $4,400,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: N/A, Specialize In: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Fresh Thyme Farmers Market, Earl of Sandwich, Luxottica

Oakland, CA Adam Winig, Principal 510-444-2410 www.arcsine.com design@arcsine.com Year Established: 2003, No. of Employees: 11, Retail Billings: $100,000, Hospitality Billings: $600,000, Restaurant Billings: $400,000, Other Billings: $100,000, Total Billings: $1,200,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 7, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Starwood, Hilton

Barrett Design Studio Jackson, MS Celia Barrett, Principal/CEO 601-354-0066 www.barrettdesignstudio.com celiabarrettdesign@comcast.net Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 6, Retail Billings: $11,000, Hospitality Billings: $108,000, Restaurant Billings: $10,000, Other Billings: $170,000, Total Billings: $299,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 6, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants , Leading Clients: N/A

BBS Architects, Landscape Architects & Engineers Patchogue, NY 11772 Kevin Walsh, Associate 631-475-0348 www.bbsarch.com info@bbsarch.com Year Established: 1975, No. of Employees: 55, Retail Billings: $300,000, Hospitality Billings: $200,000, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Education Billings: $7,070,000, Total Billings: $7,570,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 30, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Municipal, Leading Clients: Hyatt Place Riverhead, The Diocese of Rockville Centre, Riverhead Central School District

Bergman Associates Rochester, NY

Architectural Design Group Vince Press, Manager -

St. Louis, MO Sam Estes, Vice President 314-644-1234 FAX 314-644-4373 www.adg-stl.com sestes@adg-stl.com Year Established: 1981, No. of Employees: 20, Retail Billings: $2,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Other Billings: $100,000, Total Billings: $2,300,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 125, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Leading Clients: PetSmart, Kenneth Cole, Office Depot, Shoe Carnival, Mattress Firm

PR & Media Relations 585-232-5135 www.bergmannpc.com vpress@bergmannpc.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 395, Retail Billings: $14,146,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $45,579,000, Total Billings: $59,725,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1,420, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Adv Manuf, Energy, EMS, Medical Office, Leading Clients: TD Bank, Wal-Mart, Wegmans, Sunoco, Autozone, Xerox

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

55


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Big Red Rooster CESO, Inc. Columbus, OH Aaron Spiess, President, Co-CEO 614-255-0200 FAX 614-255-0205 www.bigredrooster.com aspiess@bigredrooster.com Year Established: 2002, No. of Employees: 150, Total Billings: $24,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/13: 700+, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants Leading Clients: American Express, T-Mobile, FedEx, Home Depot

BKA Architects, Inc. Brockton, MA David Seibert, President 508-583-5603 FAX 508-584-2914 www.bkaarchitects.com dseibert@bkaarchs.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 46, Retail Billings: $4,910,317, Hospitality Billings: $65,307, Restaurant Billings: $294,619, Other Billings: $49,103, Total Billings: $6,984,803, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 281, Specialize In: Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Dealerships, Leading Clients: Chipotle Mexican Grill, Lululemon Athletica, Reebok, Rockport, Adidas, Talbots, CVS Pharmacy

Callison Seattle, WA Tracy Schneider, PR Manager 206-623-4646 FAX 206-623-4625 www.callison.com tracy.schneider@callison.com Year Established: 1975, No. of Employees: 1000+, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: N/A, Specialize In: N/A, Leading Clients: N/A

CASCO Diversified Corp. St. Louis, MO Daniel Birke, Sr. Vice President 314-821-1100 www.cascocorp.com casco-mo@cascocorp.com Year Established: 1959, No. of Employees: 130, Retail Billings: $12,100,000, Hospitality Billings: $400,000, Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Other Billings: $100,000, Total Billings: $12,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 500, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: Pirch, Bass Pro Shops, Kohl’s, Burlington, Silverleaf Resorts

56

Akron, OH Steven R. Olson, Vice President 330-933-8820 www.cesoinc.com olson@cesoinc.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 128, Retail Billings: $5,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000, Restaurant Billings: $1,500,000, Other Billings: $12,500,000, Total Billings: $20,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 300, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants , Leading Clients: Bloomin Brands, Speedway, Love’s, Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club, Kohl’s, Tim Hortons

Chipman Design Architecture Des Plaines, IL Kate Kerin, Director of Marketing Chipman & Corporate Affairs Design 847-298-6900 Architecture www.chipman-design.com kkerin@chipman-design.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 117, Retail Billings: $5,550,000, Hospitality Billings: $1,200,000, Restaurant Billings: $9,250,000, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $16,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 650, Specialize In: BigBox/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Sustainable Design, 3D Photo-Accurate Renderings, Animations, Immerse Project Walk-Throughs, Leading Clients: Ulta Beauty, Gap Inc., Banana Republic, Chik-fil-A, Wal-Mart, Noodles & Co., Red Robin Gourmet Burgers, Lexus, Athleta, Dunham’s Sports, Skechers, Westfield, Sbarro Pizza, Brunswick Bowling & Billiards, Pizza Cucinova, Centerplate, Saks Fifth Avenue, Blackhawks Flagships

Chute Gerdeman, Inc. Columbus, OH Amanda Seevers, Sr. Manager Account Services 614-469-1001 FAX 614-469-1002 www.chutegerdeman.com aseevers@chutegerdeman.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 66, Retail Billings: $7,912,938, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $787,468, Other Billings: $1,321,137, Total Billings: $10,021,545, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 162, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants , Leading Clients: Verizon Wireless, American Family Insurance, Whole Foods, HMS Host

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Project: Wilde Lake Town Center Developer: Kimco Realty

20+ Years Serving Retailers and Retail Developers

CONTACT US

CORPORATE OFFICE

OHIO OFFICE

410-863-1302 info@L2M.com www.L2M.com

811 Cromwell Park Drive Suite 113 Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061

2360 West Dorothy Lane Suite 104 Dayton, Ohio 45439

CIRCLE NO. 31


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS C.M. Architecture, P.A. (CMA) Minneapolis, MN Philip Foster, Vice President 612-547-1300 FAX 612-547-1301 www.cmarch.com pfoster@cmarch.com Year Established: 1977, No. of Employees: 67, Retail Billings: $9,289,223, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $3,848,338, Other Billings: $957,864, Total Billings: $14,095,425, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 889, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Religious, Industrial, Manufacturing, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Gander Mountain, Wal-Mart, Jimmy John’s, Skechers, The Art of Shaving, Hot Topic, Best Buy, Advance Auto

Core States Group Duluth, GA Kevin Behnke, Director of Business Development 678-314-5189 www.core-eng.com kbehnke@core-eng.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 235, Retail Billings: $8,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $1,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $12,000,000, Other Billings: $4,000,000, Total Billings: $25,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 650, Specialize In: Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Energy, Leading Clients: Bloom Energy, McDonald’s, Chase Bank, Citi Bank, Charlotte Russe, Pilot, Corner Bakery Café, TD Bank

Cowan & Associates Worthington, OH Peter McIntosh, Marketing Director 614-436-0100 www.cowanandassociates.com pmcintosh@cowanandassociates.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 17, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $1,857,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 109, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

CREATE Architecture Planning & Design PLLC New York, NY Frankie J. Campione, Principal 212-297-0880 www.createworldwide.com info@createapd.com Year Established: 1996, No. of Employees: 15, Retail Billings: $ 70%, Hospitality Billings: $ 5%, Restaurant Billings: $ 5%, Other Billings: $ 20%, Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 50, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Master Planning, Leading Clients: N/A

58

Croft & Associates Kennesaw, GA Mark Jackson, Principal/Vice President 770-529-7714 FAX 770-529-7716 www.croftandassociates.com mjackson@croftandassociates.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: 24, Retail Billings: $38,186, Hospitality Billings: $271,170, Restaurant Billings: $89,657, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $4,392,138, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 51, Specialize In: Restaurants, Education, Mission Critical, Religious, Mixed-Use, Leading Clients: N/A

Daroff Design, Inc. Philadelphia, PA Cassandra McFarlane, Marketing & Business Development 215-636-9900 FAX 215-636-9627 www.daroffdesign.com cassandram@daroffdesign.com Year Established: 1973, No. of Employees: 30, Retail Billings: $249,425.10, Hospitality Billings: $1,095,989.70, Restaurant Billings: $84,919.57, Other Billings: $1,083,326.12, Total Billings: $2,513,660.49, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 4, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Aviation, Multi-Family, Work Place, Leading Clients: Comcast, NBC Universal, MGM Resorts, Darden Restaurants, GSA, OTG, Philadelphia International Airport

DDG Baltimore, MD Valerie Cataffa, Vice President & Director of Operations 410-962-0505 FAX 410-783-0816 www.ddg-usa.com info@ddg-usa.com Year Established: 1976, No. of Employees: 60, Retail Billings: $ 65%, Hospitality Billings: $ 5%, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ 30%, Total Billings: $7,757,683, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 41, Specialize In: Shopping Centers, Hotels, Mixed Use, Planning, Graphics, Residential, Leading Clients: IBC Theaters, National Harbor, Station Park, Westgate City Center, Easton Town Center

Degen & Degen Architecture and Interior Design Seattle, WA Melissa Walling, Marketing Director 206-623-6368 www.ddseattle.com melissa@ddseattle.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 20, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in 2014: $2,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 13, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


DLR Group Chicago, IL Corey Wieseman, Principal 312-382-9980 www.dlrgroup.com cwieseman@dlrgroup.com Year Established: 1966, No. of Employees: 600, Retail Billings: $22,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $5,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $103,300,000, Total Billings: $130,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 300, Specialize In: Casinos, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Workplace, Sports, Civic, Justice, Leading Clients: N/A

Earl Swensson Associates Nashville, TN Sandra Dickerson, Director of Communications & Marketing 615-329-9445 www.esarch.com sandyd@esarch.com Year Established: 1961, No. of Employees: N/A, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: N/A, Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education, Leading Clients: N/A

FHA Architects Omaha, NE Harlan Faust, President 402-895-0878 www.fhaarchitects.com nharris@fhaarchitects.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 17, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $2,000,000, Other Billings: $400,000, Total Billings: $2,400,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 110, Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants , Leading Clients: Chipotle Mexican Grill, Noodles & Co., Sweetgreen, Blaze Pizza, Vera Whole Health, Suji Cuisine, Hand & Stone, Dogtopia

FRCH Design Worldwide Cincinnati, OH Jim Harkin, VP Architect 513-241-3000 FAX 513-241-5015 www.frch.com jharkin@frch.com Year Established: 1968, No. of Employees: 200, Retail Billings: $23,040,000, Hospitality Billings: $5,330,000, Restaurant Billings: $2,430,000, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $30,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 2000, Specialize In: BigBox/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: General Growth Properties, Macerich, The Cordish Company, Gilmcher, CBL, DDR, Premium Outlets/Simon, Macy’s, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Liverpool

GreenbergFarrow Atlanta, GA Hughes Thompson, Principal 404-601-4000 Toll Free 877-686-1033 FAX 404-601-3990 www.greenbergfarrow.com hthompson@greenbergfarrow.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 215, Retail Billings: $24,800,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $9,800,000, Other Billings: $1,700,000, Total Billings: $36,300,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 525, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, High-Rise Residential, Mixed-Use, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, IKEA, Meijer, Whole Foods Market, Limited Brands, Michaels, Texas Roadhouse, Starbucks, Chipotle, Panda Express, Wendy’s, Murphy Oil, Clean Energy

GSB, Inc. Oklahoma City, OK Ronald G. Smith, President 405-848-9549 FAX 405-848-9783 www.gsb-inc.com rsmith@gsb-inc.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 31, Retail Billings: $495,000, Hospitality Billings: $4,199,000, Restaurant Billings: $1,095,350, Other Billings: $3,730,650, Total Billings: $9,520,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 24, Specialize In: Casinos, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Entertainment, Leading Clients: Disney, Lake Nona, DPR Corporation, Cedar Fair Entertainment, Black Palm Development Corp.

Guy Payne & Associates Cordova, TN Guy Payne, Owner/Principal Architect 901-756-1878 FAX 901-756-1879 www.guypayneassocarchitects.com paynevol@bellsouth.net Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 5, Retail Billings: $100,000, Hospitality Billings: $75,000, Restaurant Billings: $150,000, Other Billings: $25,000, Total Billings: $350,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 125, Specialize In: Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Popeyes, Burger King, Firehouse Subs, McDonald’s

HBA/Hirsch Bedner Associates Santa Monica, CA Rene Gross Kaerskov, CEO 310-829-9087 www.hba.com Year Established: 1965, No. of Employees: 1700, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $125,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $125,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 150, Specialize In: Casinos, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

59


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Herschman Architects, Inc. Cleveland, OH Fred Margulies, Director of Retail Architecture 216-223-3200 FAX 216-223-3210 www.herschmanarchitects.com mailbox@herschmanarchitects.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 75, Retail Billings: $11,290,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $142,000, Other Billings: $909,000, Total Billings: $12,341,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 304, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Dicks Sporting Goods, HHGregg, Z Gallerie, CBL Properties, Simon, DOR Corp, Kimco, Woodmont, Paragon

HFA Bentonville, AR Larry, Lott, President/COO 479-273-7780 www.hfa-ae.com larry.lott@hfa-ae.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 155, Retail Billings: $21,600,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $21,600,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 370, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Academy Sports, Stripes, Sam’s Club

Hixson Architecture, Engineering, Interiors Cincinnati, OH Bruce Mirrieless, Sr. Vice President & Project Manager 513-241-1230 FAX 513-241-1287 www.hixson-inc.com bmirrielees@hixson-inc.com Year Established: 1948, No. of Employees: 130, Retail Billings: $1,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $1,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 10, Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Leading Clients: Bloomingdales, Macy’s

HKS, Inc. Dallas, TX Julie Wellik, Communications Manger 214-969-5599 www.hksinc.com jwellik@hksinc.com Year Established: 1939, No. of Employees: 1,100, Retail Billings: $N/A, Hospitality Billings: $57,350,000, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $235,450,000, Total Billings: $292,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 225, Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Sports, Convention Centers, Interiors Commercial Office, Aviation, Government, Urban Design, Arts/Entertainment, Leading Clients: Hines, KDC, Four Seasons, Marriott, Omni Hotels, Disney Development Co.

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Interbrand Design Forum Dayton, OH Scott Smith, Chief Marketing Officer 937-439-4400 FAX 937-439-4340 www.interbranddesignforum.com retail@interbranddesignforum.com Year Established: 1978, No. of Employees: 150, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: N/A, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Nissan, HHGregg, Starbucks, Haagen-Dazs, Emma & Roe, Ashley Furniture, Honda /Acura

Interplan LLC Orlando, FL Patrick Ringlever, Business Development Manager 407-645-5008 FAX 407-629-9124 www.interplanllc.com pringlever@interplanllc.com Year Established: 1972, No. of Employees: 105, Retail Billings: $3,610,000, Hospitality Billings: $70,000, Restaurant Billings: $6,230,000, Other Billings: $390,000, Total Billings: $10,300,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 800, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Banks, C-Store, Leading Clients: N/A

Jencen Architecture Cleveland, OH Juleen Russell, Architect/Business Development 216-781-0131 FAX 216-781-0134 www.jencen.com jrussell@jencen.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 24, Retail Billings: $3,731,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $369,000, Total Billings: $4,100,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 268, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Salons, Dog Daycare, Commercial Development/ Retail, Leading Clients: Kay Jewelers, Papyrus, Jared the Galleria of Jewelers, Urban Brands

Kenneth Park Architects, PLLC New York, NY Amie Bentley, Associate/Director of Business Development 212-599.0044 FAX 212-599-0066 www.kennethpark.com abentley@kennethpark.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 65, Retail Billings: $10,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $250,000, Restaurant Billings: $150,000, Other Billings: $200,000, Total Billings: $10,600,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 250, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Corporate Interior, Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


CIRCLE NO. 32


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS KNA Design

Los Angeles, CA Essie Qu, Business Development Manager 323-944-0100 x-13 FAX 323-944-0105 www.knadesign.com essie@knadesign.com Year Established: 2004, No. of Employees: 40, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $8,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Residential Billings: $1,500,000, Total Billings in: $10,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 30, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, High End Residential Leading Clients: MGM, Marriott, Disney, Fairmont, Caesars

Kuhlmann Design Group, Inc.

St. Louis, MO Darrell L. Abernathy, Vice President 314-434-8898 FAX 314-434-8280 www.kdginc.com dla@kdginc.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 54, Retail Billings: $1,814,000, Hospitality Billings: $1,438,000, Restaurant Billings: $967,000, Other Billings: $2,784,000, Total Billings: $7,003,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 182, Specialize In: Grocery, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants , Leading Clients: Regency Centers, Seneca, The Coffee Bean & Teal Leaf Co., Nekter, Edwards Group, DESCO, Schnucks Market Inc., Isle of Capri Casinos, Hard Rock International, Cold Lake First Nation

L2M Architects Glen Burnie, MD Jeffrey Mahler, Vice President 410-863-1302 FAX 410-863-1308 www.l2m.com jmahler@l2m.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 18, Retail Billings: $2,200,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $800,000, Other Billings: $600,000, Total Billings: $3,600,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 280, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants , Leading Clients: Au Bon Pain, Advance Auto Parts, Dunkin Donuts, Hair Cuttery, Panera Bread, Payless, Roy Rogers, Kimco Realty, Federal Realty

Lami Grubb Architects, L.P. Pittsburgh, PA Paulette Burns, Principal 412-243-3430 www.lamigrubb.com pauletteb@lamigrubb.com Year Established: 1993, No. of Employees: 42, Retail Billings: $4,200,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $500,000, Other Billings: $2,500,000, Total Billings: $7,200,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 600, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Airport Retail & Restaurant , Leading Clients: Aeropostale, Airmall, Marshall Retail Group, APW Brands, Bluemercury, Faber, Hoeiji Branded Foods, In Motion, Rue 21, Brahmin, Tumi, Sound Balance, Villa Join the Movement

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Larson Binkley, Inc. Kansas City, MO Christopher Larson, President 816-997-9601 FAX 816-997-9602 www.larsonbinkley.com chris.larson@larsonbinkley.com Year Established: 1988, No. of Employees: 35, Retail Billings: $3,493,275, Hospitality Billings: $475,810, Restaurant Billings: $164,585, Other Billings: $606,950, Total Billings: $4,740,620, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 451, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Sustainability, Leading Clients: Aritzia, At Home, Associated Bank, Cantina Laredo, Capital Grille, Bonefish Grill, Discount Tire, Bath & Body Works, Alamo Drafthouse, Bass Pro, Kohl’s, Victoria’s Secret, PINK

Leo A Daly Omaha, NE Peggy Porter, Corporate Director of Marketing 402-391-8111 FAX 402-391-8564 www.leoadaly.com plporter@leoadaly.com Year Established: 1915, No. of Employees: 700, Retail Billings: $2,813,139, Hospitality Billings: $17,139,951, Restaurant Billings: $5,482,359, Other Billings: $122,256,544, Total Billings: $147,692,003, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 224, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: The Toro Corporation, Yahoo!

Little

Charlotte, NC Bruce A Barteldt Jr, Global Practice Leader-Retail 704-525-6350 FAX 704-561-8700 www.littleonline.com bbarteldt@littleonline.com Year Established: 1964, No. of Employees: 300, Retail Billings: $26,300,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Other Billings: $34,500,000, Total Billings: $61,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 850 , Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Banks/Financial, Office, Public Sector, Leading Clients: Bank of America, BB&T, Bealls Department Stores, Belk, Capital One, Concentra, CVS Caremark, Food Lion, JCPenney, Lucky Brand Jeans, Publix, Smart & Final, The Fresh Market, Wells Fargo, Whole Foods

LJA

Fargo, ND Todd Jelinski, Architect 701-293-1353 FAX 701-293-1350 www.lja-1.com tjelinski@lja-1.com Year Established: 1954, No. of Employees: 56, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $3,000,000, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $2,000,000, Total Billings: $5,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: N/A, Specialize In: Hotels, Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Mannik & Smith Group, Inc.

Columbus, OH Steven C. Hermiller, Vice President 614-441-4222 FAX 888-488-7340 www.manniksmithgroup.com shermiller@manniksmithgroup.com Year Established: 1955, No. of Employees: 245, Retail Billings: $2,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000, Restaurant Billings: $500,000, Other Billings: $27,000,000, Total Billings: $30,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 545, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Transportation, Energy, Educational, Public Facilities/Government, Industrial, Urban Revitalization, Waste Management, Leading Clients: WND

Mayse & Associates, Inc.

Dallas, TX David Goldston, Partner/VP of Marketing 972-386-0338 FAX 972-386-0578 www.mayseassociates.com dgoldston@mayseassociates.com Year Established: 1983, No. of Employees: 15, Retail Billings: $41,728, Hospitality Billings: $1,252,187, Restaurant Billings: $1,671,157, Other Billings: $503,849, Total Billings: $3,468,921, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 58, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Healthcare, Restaurants, Government, Leading Clients: N/A

MBH Architects

MBH Architects, Marketing Manager Rachel Babner Alameda, CA 510-865-8663 www.mbharch.com rachelb@mbharch.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 140, Retail Billings: $19,659,000 Hospitality Billings: $292,000,000 Restaurant Billings: $1,301,000 Other Billings: $2,624, Total Billings: $28,876,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 904, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants , Leading Clients: Apple, Starbucks, Tesla, Men’s Wearhouse

Michael Brady, Inc.

Knoxville, TN Louis Cortina, President 865-584-0999 FAX 865-584-5213 www.michaelbradyinc.com louisc@mbiarch.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 75, Retail Billings: $1,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $350,000, Restaurant Billings: $600,000, Other Billings: $7,500,000, Total Billings: $9,450,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 200+, Specialize In: Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Churches, Schools, Industrial, Leading Clients: N/A

Moda 4 Design

Dayton, OH Matt Bruggeman, Director 888-686-6324 www.moda4.com mbruggeman@moda4.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: 10, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $2,200,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 82, Specialize In: Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Pet Smart, Estee Lauder, Planet Fitness, Tilted Kilt, Sky Zone, World of Beer

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Montroy Andersen DeMarco New York, NY Jason Gottlieb, Marketing Director 212-481-5900 www.madgi.com gottlieb@madgi.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 40, Retail Billings: $140,000, Hospitality Billings: $200,000, Restaurant Billings: $80,000, Other Billings: $3,655,000, Total Billings: $4,075,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 24, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family , Leading Clients: Camper, U.S. Polo Association, CBRE, Lavazza, BR Guest Hospitality

MulvannyG2 Architecture Bellevue, WA Molly Kemper, Marketing Director 425-463-2000 FAX 425-463-2002 www.mulvannyg2.com media@mulvannyg2.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 300, Retail Billings: $47,435,000, Hospitality Billings: $2,516,000, Restaurant Billings: $850,000, Other Billings: $6,257,000, Total Billings: $57,058,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 1,464, Specialize In: Big-Box/ Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: GGP, Costco Wholesale, Nordstrom Rack, Homestreet Bank, UNIQLO, Moncler, Anthropologie

Natalie Sheedy Interiors, Inc. Chicago, IL Natalie Sheedy, President 773-276-2900 FAX 773-276-2904 www.natalliesheedy.com nws@nataliesheedy.com Year Established: 2007, No. of Employees: 2, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $260,000, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $260,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 7, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Ultima Hospitality, Marcus Resorts, Columbus Hospitality, Olympia Hotels

Perkins Eastman

New York , NY Tracey Colabella, Director of Marketing 212-353-7200 FAX 212-353-7676 www.perkinseastman.com info@perkinseastman.com Year Established: 1981, No. of Employees: 900, Retail Billings: $4,950,000, Hospitality Billings: $8,250,000, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $151,800,000, Total Billings: $165,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 260, Specialize In: Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Education, Residential, Senior Living, Science & Technology, Office, Corporate Interiors, Broadcast, Courts, Cultural, Mixed-Use, Leading Clients: Avalon Bay, Forest City Enterprises, Forest City Ratner, Foulger-Pratt, George Comfort & Sons, LCOR, PN Hoffman, The Rockefeller Group, Toll Brothers, Urban Atlantic, Vornado, W.R. Berkley, Hilton Hotels Corporation, The RitzCarlton Hotel Company, Starwood Hotels & Resorts

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


ARCHITECTURE ARCHITECTURE

MASTER PLANNING MASTER PLANNING

INTERIOR DESIGN INTERIOR DESIGN

ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHICS

PLACEMAKING PLACEMAKING

EXPERIENCE STRATEGY EXPERIENCE STRATEGY JAME S L . HARKIN, AIA, L E E D AP

C I N C I N N A T I | N E W YOR K | L OS ANG ELES C I N C I N N A T I | N E W YOR K | L OS ANG ELES

PRINCIPAL JH ARKIN@F RCH .COM JAME S L . HARKIN, 51 3.362 .1382 PRINCIPAL JH ARKIN@F RCH .COM WWW.F RC H.C OM 51 3.362 .1382

WWW.F RC H.C OM CIRCLE NO. 34

AIA, L E E D AP


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS PFVS Architecture

Atlanta, GA 30327 Greg Portman, President 404-503-5000 FAX 404-503-5050 www.pfvs.com gportman@pfvs.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 35, Retail Billings: $118,000, Hospitality Billings: $5,043,730, Restaurant Billings: $219,808, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $5,381,538, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 14, Specialize In: Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Office Buildings, Mixed-Use, Leading Clients: White Lodging Services Inc., Concord Hospitality Group

Rebel Design & Group

Marina Del Rey, CA Douglas DeBoer, Founder/CEO 800-92-REBEL (73235) www.rebeldesign.com douglas@rebeldesign.com Year Established: 1985, No. of Employees: 75, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $11,275,733, Restaurant Billings: $5,637,868, Other Billings: $1,879,288, Total Billings: $18,792,889, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 21, Specialize In: Casino, Hotels, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Retail, Living , Leading Clients: All major hotel brands, Privately owned hotels, Restaurants, Night Clubs, Ships, Aircraft

RSP Architects

Minneapolis, MN Jackie Peacha, Creative Director 612-677-7100 FAX 612-677-7499 www.rsparch.com jackie.peacha@rsparch.com Year Established: 1978, No. of Employees: 267, Retail Billings: $23,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $1,500,000, Restaurant Billings: $2,000,000, Other Billings: $36,000,000, Total Billings: $63,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 672, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Distribution Centers, Warehouses, Leading Clients: Target Stores, Walgreens, Pet Smart, Maurices, Sprouts, Simon Properties, Madison Marquette, General Growth, Buffalo Wild Wings, Select Comfort

SAJO

Ville Mont-Royal, QC Canada Leo Clavel, Executive Director of Design & Build Systems 514-385-0333 x-471 www.sajo.com lclavel@sajo.com Year Established: 1977, No. of Employees: 190, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 200, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Retail, Leading Clients: N/A

Sargenti Architects

Paramus, NJ Gina Noda, Executive Director of Business Development 973-253-9393 www.sargarch.com gnoda@sargarch.com Year Established: 2000, No. of Employees: 100, Retail Billings: $13,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $1,000,000, Total Billings: $14,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/13: 1,500, Specialize In: Big-box/Dept, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Corporate Interiors, Leading Clients: Saks Fifth Avenue, LBrands, BCBG, Guess, Lane Bryant, Michael Kors, Gap, Tumi, Foot Locker, Five Below, Steve Madden, Pet Valu, Spencer Gifts, and many others.

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SGA Design Group

Tulsa, OK Chris Goble, President/CEO 918-587-8600 FAX 918-587-8601 www.sgadesigngroup.com chrisg@sgadesigngroup.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 81, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings in: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: N/A, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Restaurants, Senior Living, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Kohl’s, Lowes, Cabela’s, Sports Authority, Hobby Lobby, Dollar Tree, Best Buy, Casey’s General Store, Bridgestone Firestone, Baby & Co.

Smallwood Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates, Inc.

Atlanta, GA Gil Garrison, Principal 404-233-5453 FAX 404-264-0929 www.srssa.com tmarino@srssa.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 123, Retail Billings: $2,391,617, Hospitality Billings: $4,913,157, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $13,786,201, Total Billings: $21,090,975, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 24, Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education, Mixed-Use, Residential, Office, Government, Corporate, Military, Leading Clients: N/A

Stantec Architecture Inc.

Boulder, CO Mary Jepsen, Marketing & Business Development Lead, Commercial 303-447-8202 FAX 303-625-0397 www.stantec.com mary.jepsen@stantec.com Year Established: 1954, No. of Employees: 15,000+, Retail Billings: $52,367,706, Hospitality Billings: $1,116,090, Restaurant Billings: $4,682,922, Other Billings: $324,010,915, Total Billings: $382,177,634, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 2,093, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Casinos, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Airports, Attractions, Arts & Entertainment, Automotive, Community/Institutional, Justice, Mixed-Use, Office, Research/Labs, Transit, Warehouse/Light Industrial, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Kohl’s, Shape Properties, Target, JPMorgan Chase, Walgreens, McDonald’s, Auto Nation, Chevron, Walt Disney, Imagineering, Wells Fargo, Victoria’s Secret, Red Robin, Gourmet Burgers, Host Hotels & Resorts, Value Retail, Safeway, TD Bank

Stonehill & Taylor

New York, NY Grace Oakley, Marketing & Communications 212-226-8898 www.stonehilltaylor.com goakley@stonehilltaylor.com Year Established: 1986, No. of Employees: 75, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $12,977,206, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $12,977,206, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 40, Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Hyatt, Hilton, Marriott

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Create. Enhance. Sustain.

INFORMATION Beth Myers Graham beth.myers-graham@aecom.com 513.608.7989

At AECOM, we seek a balance between art and technology, form and function, beauty and purpose, vision and result. AECOM’s architects, engineers, and scientists have helped shape the world around us – from high-rise buildings that form city skylines, to educational, cultural, healthcare, and retail facilities that enable our way of life and future.

Services

With over 20 years of experience serving retail clients, AECOM ranked #1 in Design in ENR’s 2014 Top Design Firms list.

AECOM assists clients in creating distinctive environments where architecture, engineering, landscape, and culture combine for an unforgettable experience. AECOM and URS are now one, and provide services across the globe with 100,000 employees in 150 countries. CIRCLE NO. 35

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Architectural/Engineering Interior Design Civil Engineering Geotechnical and Seismic Engineering Due Diligence Comprehensive Permitting - Environmental/ Construction Sustainability and Energy ADA Surveys Property/Building Assessments Construction Administration Program Management/Construction Management Construction Cost Consultancy Real Estate Strategy

www.aecom.com


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Studio3877

Washington, DC David Shove-Brown, Partner 202-350-4244 FAX 202-350-4245 www.studio3877.com dsb@studio3877.com Year Established: 2010, No. of Employees: 10, Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $534,228.85, Restaurant Billings: $189,533.89, Other Billings: $278,228.16, Total Billings: $1,001,990.90, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 40, Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants , Leading Clients: Marriott, AppleREIT, Baywood

The McIntosh Group

Tulsa, OK Karen MacCannell, Director of Business Development 918-585-8555 www.themcintoshgroup.com info@themcintoshgroup.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 23, Retail Billings: $2,040,448, Hospitality Billings: $122,800, Restaurant Billings: $1,167,982, Other Billings: $7,324, Total Billings: $3,338,555, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 608, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, ADA Consulting, Market Planning, Leading Clients: Wendy’s, Pizza Hut, Hyatt, CBRE/Regions Bank, Quick Trip

Thomas Hamilton & Associates P.C.

Richmond, VA Doreen Louderback, Director of Marketing 804-266-4853 FAX 804-266-5203 www.thomashamiltonassociates.com doreen@thomashamiltonassociates.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 14, Retail Billings: $N/A, Hospitality Billings: $1,656,056, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $1,656,056, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 48, Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Marriott, Hilton

Torres Architects

Torrance, CA Denise Torres, Director of Projects 310-320-6285 FAX 310-320-6670 www.tarci.com denise@tarci.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 8, Retail Billings: $100,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $600,000, Other Billings: $ N/A, Total Billings: $700,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 150, Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Blaze Pizza, PLS Financial, Tavistock, FreeBirds

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Tricarico Architecture and Design PC Wayne, NJ Jennifer Sussman, Business Marketing & Development 973-692-0222 FAX 973-692-0223 www.tricarico.com jennifers@tricarico.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 120, Retail Billings: $15,250,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $250,000, Total Billings: $15,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 720, Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Drug Stores, Education, Automotive, Leading Clients: Coach, Footlocker, Valentino, Men’s Wearhouse

VOA Associates Incorporated Chicago, IL Kevin Krejca, Marketing Communications Manager 312-453-7618 FAX 312-554-1412 www.voa.com kkrejca@voa.com Year Established: 1969, No. of Employees: 334, Retail Billings: $2,932,994.50, Hospitality Billings: $21,846,118, Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $45,692,237.50, Total Billings: $70,471,350, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 180, Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Cultural, Themed-Entertainment, Leading Clients: Blue Cross Blue Shield, Volkswagen, Miller Coors, IBM, Sprint, ABN AMRO, Harley Davidson, Marriott, Starwood, InterContinental, Hilton, Hyatt, Westin, Choice Hotels, Topshop

WD Partners Dublin, OH Nikki Yoder, Manager of Marketing 614-634-7269 FAX 614-634-7777 www.wdpartners.com nikki.yoder@wdpartners.com Year Established: 1968, No. of Employees: 375, Retail Billings: $24,573,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A, Restaurant Billings: $22,931,000, Other Billings: $3,796,000, Total Billings: $51,300,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/14: 2740, Specialize In: Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Financial, Automotive, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Aramark, Tim Hortons, Soctts, Electrolux, Gatorade, Whole Foods, Home Depot

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Omni Nashville Hote

CIRCLE NO. 36


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES

Meet the top guns Annual fixture manufactures listing highlights best of the best

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hen it comes to fixtures, we know who’s who across the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. Our annual listing of the leading fixture manufacturers provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If you want to be included on next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version of this report, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. Abet, Inc. R. Murphy, Marketing Communications Director 60 W. Sheffield Ave. Englewood, NJ 07631 Ph: 800-228-2238 Fax: 201-541-0781 www.abetlaminati.com sales@abetlaminati.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Metal, Veneers, Wallcoverings, High Pressure Laminates MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Alpha Display Co., Inc. Ralph Maccarino, President 2470 Rowe St. Bronx, NY 10461 Ph: 718-892-1555 Fax: 718-823-1677 www.alphadisplay.com info@alphadisplay.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Metal, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

Allen Cabinetry & The CounterTop Shop Matt Schag, President 154 Distl Ave. Mansfield, OH 44902 Ph: 419-526-6505 Fax: 419-526-1009 www.allencabinetry.com sales@allencabinetry.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Architectural Millwork, Furniture/Upholstery, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

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American Time Ronda Anderson, Marketing Manager 140 3rd St. South Dassel, MN 55325 Ph: 320-275-1802 Fax: 320-275-2603 www.atsclock.com randerson@atsclock.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wall Clocks MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Manufacturing

Astek Wallcovering, Inc. Jeff Dey, Director of Business Development 15924 Arminta St. Van Nuys, CA 91406 Ph: 818-901-9786 Fax: 818-901-9891 www.astekwallcovering.com jeff@astekwallcovering.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wallcoverings MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

ATS, Inc. Mike Omann, Business Development 725 Opportunity Dr. St. Cloud, MN 56301 Ph: 320-255-7420 Fax: 320-223-7618 www.atsinc.com mikeom@atsinc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Logistics/Transportation MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Baywood Interior Millwork Bishop Fixture & Millwork

John D. Lassel, Director of Operations 55 Hollinger Crescent Kitchener, ON Canada N2K 2Y8 Ph: 519-748-9577 Fax: 519-748-6563 www.baywoodinteriors.com johnl@baywoodinteriors.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

M.K. Nelson, Director Sales & Marketing 101 Eagle Dr. Balsam Lake, WI 54810 Ph: 715-485-9312 ext 3127 Fax: 715-485-3316 www.bishopfixtures.com mknelson@bishopfixtures.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/ Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

B Free Hanger Design & Display Ltd Brentano, Inc.

Bert Spitz, President 450 7th Avenue, Ste. 1308 New York, NY 10123 Ph: 855-714-2428 www.bfreehangers.com bert@bfreehangers.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Garment Racks, Garment Hangers, Mannequins MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Interior Design, Residential & Commercial

Kate Tucker, PR & Marketing 260 Holbrook Dr. Wheeling, IL 60090 Ph: 847-657-8481 www.brentanofabrics.com ktucker@brentanofabrics.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Fabric MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Cabinotch

Beam Team Mike Lee, Director Rick Hall, President 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 Ph: 770-442-2534 x-1319 www.thebeamteam.com rickhall@thebeamteam.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Installation Services MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants

232 Calhoun Rd. Owensboro, KY 42301 Ph: 434-203-3280 Fax: 336-605-6969 www.cabinotch.us mlee@cfpwood.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets

Cara Green Jessica McNaughton, President

Better Life Technology 109A Brewer Ln. Bill Rothe, Vice President 9736 Legler Rd. Lenexa, KS 66219 Ph: 913-984-0403 x-346 Fax: 913-894-0439 www.bltllc.com brothe@bltllc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Flooring MARKETS SERVED: Retail

Carrboro, NC 27510 Ph: 919-929-3009 Fax: 919-238-4545 www.caragreen.com info@caragreen.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Architectural Millwork, Furniture/Upholstery, Solid Surface Materials MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Chicago Booth Manufacturing D|Fab David Bochniak, President 5000 West Roosevelt Rd. Chicago, IL 60644 Ph: 773-378-8400 Fax: 773-378-8221 www.chicagobooth.com sales@chicagobooth.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Architectural Millwork, Furniture/Upholstery MARKETS SERVED: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Columbia Forest Products Richard Poindexter, Specialty Products Manager 7900 Triad Center Dr., Ste. #200 Greensboro, NC 27409 Ph: 800-637-1609 Fax: 336-605-6969 www.columbiaforestproducts.com rpoindexter@cfpwood.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Display Cases, End Caps, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, POP, Shelving, Furniture/ Upholstery, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Wood, Hardwood, Plywood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Combination Door Company Dan Schmidt, President/CEO PO Box 1076 Fond Du Lac, WI 54936 Ph: 920-922-2050 Fax: 920-922-2917 www.combinationdoor.com doors@combinationdoor.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Fitting Room Doors, Commercial Doors MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

CRL-U.S. Aluminum Andrew Haring, VP of Marketing 2503 E. Vernon Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90058 Ph: 800-421-6144 Fax: 323-581-6522 www.crlaurence.com andrew_haring@crlaurence.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Display Cases, Metal, Transaction & Hospitality Hardware, Entrances, Storefronts, Curtain Walls, Commercial Hardware MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

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Tony Camilletti, Executive Vice President 1100 E. Mandoline Ave. Madison Heights, MI 48071 Ph: 800-968-9440 Fax: 248-597-0989 www.dfabdesign.com tcamilletti@dfabdesign.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Architectural Alternatives, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Wood, Architectural Alternatives, Decorative Ceiling Structures MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Dakota Systems Mfg. Edward Owsinski, President 345 Eastern Parkway Farmingdale, NY 11735 Ph: 631-249-5811 Fax: 631-249-5819 www.dakotamfg.com info@dakotamfg.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cable & Rod System, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Perimeter Wall Systems, Fitting Room Systems MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Other

DAVACO Paul Hamer, EVP Business Development 6688 N. Central Expwy., Ste. 1400 Dallas, TX 75206 Ph: 214-373-4700 www.davacoinc.com info@davacoinc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Installation, Turnkey Fixture Management Programs MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

DGS Retail Jon Nedland, VP Sales & Marketing 1201 Kirk St. Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 Ph: 847-350-3028 Fax: 849-595-7036 www.dgsretail.com jonnedland@dgsretail.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Store Decor MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


The Big Picture

An NTMA contractor has the training, skill, and experience to understand that their job is a part of the big picture– bringing your job to a successful completion. Call to find one near you.

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association www.NTMA.com 800.323.9736

Photo: Alan Montgomery

CIRCLE NO. 37


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Envirawood Brad Beardsley, General Manager 2015 Woodlands Way Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Ph: 954-428-4951 Fax: 954-419-9649 www.envirawood.com brad@envirawood.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Veneers, PVC Sheets MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Exclusive Retail Interiors Joseph Demeri, CEO 998C Old Country Rd., Ste. 318 Plainview, NY 11803 Ph: 516-513-1255 www.exclusiveretail.net info@exclusiveretail.net FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/ Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

F.C. Dadson Larry Myer, VP of Business Development N 1043 Craftsmen Dr. Greenville, WI 54942 Ph: 920-757-1486 Fax: 920-757-1492 www.fcdadson.com larrym@fcdadson.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Rid Racks/ Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, POP, Shelving MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Futrus Mark Allen, Managing Director 154 Distl Ave. Mansfield, OH 44902 Ph: 877-388-7871 Fax: 419-526-1009 www.futrus.com info@futrus.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Furniture/Upholstery MARKETS SERVED: Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education

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Gondola Train

Brad Walsh, Vice President 135 Tennyson St. Potosi, WI 53820 Ph: 608-763-4216 Fax: 608-763-4255 www.gondolatrain.com gondola@gondolatrain.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Anything that needs to be moved

Granger Contracting Company, Inc. and N-STORE Services, LLC.

Kevin Zigrang, Director of Business Development 600 Trade Center Blvd. Chesterfield, MO 63005 Ph: 636.778.2630 Fax: 636.778.2630 www.gnhservices.com kevin@gnhservices.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Store Fixture Installation MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls

idX Corporation

Lin Courtois, Sr. Director of Marketing 3451 Rider Trail South Earth City, MO 63045 Ph: 314-801-6304 Fax: 314-739-4129 www.idxcorporation.com lin.courtois@idxcorporation.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood, Décor & Graphics MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

King Retail Solutions Lindsey Muth, Director of Marketing 3850 West 1st Ave. Eugene, OR 97402 Ph: 800-533-2796 www.kingrs.com business.relationships@kingrs.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Wallcoverings, Wood, Interiors, Fixtures, Displays, Signage MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Convenience, Grocery

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Kingsmen Projects US

Stephen Hekman, Vice President 1824 Monrovia Ave. #D Costa Mesa, CA 92626 Ph: 619-719-8950 Fax: 714-434-0919 www.kingsmen-int.com stephenheckman@kingsmenprojects-us.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate

Ladder Industries

Tim Gonzalez, General Manager 1040 S Camino Oro Goodyear, AZ 85338 Ph: 800-360-6789 Fax: 623-932-5804 www.ladderindustries.com info@ladderindustries.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Ladders MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Education, Shopping Malls

Madix, Inc.

John Clontz, Director of Marketing & e-Business 500 Airport Rd. Terrell, TX 75160 Ph: 214-515-5400 Fax: 214-515-5474 www.madixinc.com jclontz@madixinc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Shopping Malls

Mobile Fixture

Danny Koontz, VP Business Development 11220 Threadstone Ln. Knoxville, TN 37932 Ph: 865-693-3677 Fax: 865-693-3157 www.mobilefixture.com danny.koontz@mobilefixture.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Display Cases, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Cooking Equipment MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

O’Keefe, Inc.

Jeff Humphrey, VP of Sales 611 Highland Dr. River Falls, WI 54022 Ph: 715-425-8981 Fax: 715-425-8986 www.okeefewood.com jhumphrey@okeefewood.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Slatwall, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Pacific Fixture Co., Inc.

Keith Stark, President 12860 San Fernando Rd., #B Sylmar, CA 91342 Ph: 818-362.2130 Fax: 818-367-8968 www.pacificfixture.com keith@pacificfixture.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Islands/Back Islands, Architectural Millwork, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail

Panel Processing, Inc. Tonya Spens, National Marketing Manager 120 North Industrial Hwy. Alpena, MI 49707 Ph: 989-356-9007 • Fax: 989-356-9000 www.panel.com solutions@panel.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Kiosks, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Veneers MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Porcelanosa USA Andrew Pennington, National Sales Director 600 Rt. 17 North Ramsey, NJ 07446 Ph: 201-995-1310 Fax: 866-571-6756 www.porcelanosa-usa.com apennington@porcelanosa-usa.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Krion Solid Surface MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Prime Retail Services, Inc. Donald Bloom, President & CEO 3617 Southland Dr., Ste. A Flowery Branch, GA 30542 Ph: 866-504-3511 • Fax: 866-584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com dbloom@primeretailservices.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Installation Services MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants

Redman Corporation/China

RE DMAN

R

Jason Lu, Chairman & CEO 9999 Jingang Ave., Zhangjiagang • Jiangsu, China 215618 Ph: +86-512-5816 5899 Fax: +86-512-5816 5801 www.redmandisplay.com jason@redman.cn FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, End Caps, Garment Racks, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Metal, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Rigidized Metals Corporation

Beth Neel, Sr. Marketing Specialist 658 Ohio Street Buffalo, NY 14203 Ph: 716-849-4782 Fax: 716-849-0401 www.rigidized.com bethneel@rigidized.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Metal MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Elevators, Restroom Partitions

SAJO Rocco Raco, Director Marketing & Business Development 1320 Blvd. Graham Ville Mt-Royal QC, Canada H3P 3C8 Ph: 877-901-7256 Fax: 514-385-1843 www.sajo.com rocco@sajo.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Gondolas, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Veneers, Wire, Wood, Glass MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Salsbury Industries - Lockers.com Mark Eu, Director of Marketing 1010 E. 62nd Street Los Angeles, CA 90001 Ph: 800-LOCKERS Fax: 323-846-6800 www.lockers.com meu@mailboxes.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Metal, Shelving, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Shaw PPC Design Tom Smith, President 44311 Grand River Ave. Novi, MI 48375 Ph: 248-348-7755 Fax: 248-348-7708 www.shawppcdesign.com tsmith@shawppcdesign.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Wood, Graphics, Signage MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

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Showbest Fixture Corp. Jim Shubert, President 4112 Sarellen Rd. Henrico, VA 23231 Ph: 804-222-5535 Fax: 804-222-7220 www.showbest.com sales@showbest.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Slatwall, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

Stevens Industries, Inc. 704 W. Main Street Teutopolis, IL 62467 Ph: 217-857-7100 Fax: 217-857-7101 www.stevensind.com amandae@stevensind.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, Shelving, Slatwall, Wallcoverings, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Sustain-Ability Solutions Brad Egan, Marketing Communications Manager 391 E. Las Colinas Blvd., #130407 Irving, TX 75039 Ph: 888-657-7582 www.sasconserve.com info@sasgreen.net FIXTURE MATERIALS: Plumbing Fixtures MARKETS SERVED: Hospitality, Education, Multi-Family Housing

The Bernard Group Kent Hensley, Marketing Manager 102 Jonathan Blvd. N. Chaska, MN 55318 Ph: 952-934-1900 www.thebernardgroup.com kent.hensley@thebernhardgroup.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, End Caps, Gondolas, Kiosks, Metal, POP, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Corporate

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Dad, Congratulations on Scorpio’s 25 years, I am so proud of you and I can’t thank you enough for all you have done for me. I would never be where I am today if it wasn’t for you!!! Love your lots. Your Daughter — Gina Noda, Executive Director of Business Development, Sargenti Architects Congratulations on Scorpios 25th year of operations. Scorpio has been a large contributor to the successful growth of Zumiez brick and mortar stores for the past 15 years. It’s nice to look back at our accomplishments and the teams we’ve been a part of. Looking back 16 years when I was working as one of Zumiez Inc. out of house architects, remembering the constant calling from Gina with her South Jersey accent. I’m not sure if it was her persistence or the simple fact that I was frightened of her that I finally gave Scorpio a shot. I’m glad I did! Scorpio’s performance, quality and integrity have them apart from their competitors. (I’m not scared of Gina any more.) Thanks for all your hard work and dedication through the years. I look forward to many more years of success with Scorpio being on our team.

There are a handful of people, who we meet along our path, that have a notable impact on the direction of our lives and you Steve, are one of those people in my life. I think it was my first week after joining your company that you and I drove to Rye, New York, for the Melville Corporation annual meeting. I was certain at the time, that I was still going to become an attorney and that this retail construction gig was just a “detour” in my life. I remember sitting at a small table with you in the hotel lobby, having a conversation about the future and goals, when you said, “you never know... you may change your mind about becoming an attorney and decide retail construction is your thing...” I laughed then... and wouldn’t you know it... you were right! It is clear that our paths crossed for a reason and I am happy they did. I appreciate the time we spent working together , way back when your company was just a “baby” and I thank you Steve, for inspiring me at the beginning of my career, by sharing your knowledge, your energy and your positive motivation! Congratulations on your 25th year in business! – Peace

Greg Kimmel Director of Construction, Zumiez Inc.

Kelly Radford, VP Construction & Store Planning, NY & Company

Congratulations Steve on your 25th Anniversary of Scorpio Construction. If it wasn’t for yours & Tony’s mentoring I would have never been able to become a successful business woman in a man’s field. Thank you for impressing upon me the motivation and drive necessary to never give up. I have never forgotten anything you taught me and have always appreciated you. Much love always.

Congratulations on Scorpio’s 25th Year of Operations! Could it be that over 20 years ago we were walking sites in NJ? I remember commenting that day on your passion for the business, teamwork and integrity – all of which you and your team have continued to dedicate to all of us crazy retailers. I do appreciate your commitment throughout the years and highly respect the valuable time we have spent together in this business. I look forward to many more years of success with Scorpio and I wish you all the best!

Amanda Gagnon, President – Abaco Corp.

Kim Bennett, Director of Construction Skechers USA

Congratulations on 25 years. Your not only an incredible mentor, but your also an incredible father. Without your guidance along the way, it would not have been possible to reach my goals. Wishing you continued success with Scorpio Construction inc.

Steve installed a confidence in me when I had very little experience, and taught me many skills, which have made me successful in this industry. I watched him do the same with many others. I wouldn’t be where I’m at today, if he hadn’t been a mentor early in my career. I’d like to congratulate him on 25 successful years in Retail Construction!

Damien Romeo President / Retail Maintenance Specialists & Construction LLC.

ANNIVERSAY

Kevin Piraino Shawmut Design & Construction

Scorpio Construction, Inc. 349 Main Street • West Creek, NJ 08092 • Phone: (609) 296-0308 Contact: Stephen J. Romeo • www.scorpio1.net CIRCLE NO. 38


SPECIAL REPORT

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Cindy Heigl, Business Development 9104 Elkmont Way Elk Grove, CA 95624 Ph: 574-225-2004 Fax: 916-714-2512 www.universalcustomdisplay.com cindy@universalcustomdisplay.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Shopping Malls

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Cynthia Hirsch, Marketing & Graphics Manager 305 Henry Street Lindenhurst, NY 11757 Ph: 631-482-3030 Fax: 631-321-1058 www.visualciti.com • info@visualciti.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Display Cases, Metal, POP, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Education, Shopping Malls

VT IndustriesArchitectural Wood Doors

1000 Industrial Holstein, IA 51025 Ph: 712-369-8902 www.vtindustries.com • jvaughan@vtindustries.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Architectural Millwork, Veneers, Wood, Doors MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Wabash Valley Manufacturing

Dan DeNoble, VP Sales & Marketing P.O. Box 5-505 E. Main St. Silver Lake, IN 46982 Ph: 260-352-2102 Fax: 260-352-2160 www.wabashvalley.com • ddenoble@wabashvalley.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Furniture, Outdoor Furniture MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls Warner Bros. Studio Facilities Vember Stuart-Lilley, Account Manager 4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, CA 91522 Ph: 818-954-4430 Fax: 818-954-2806 www.wbsf.com • vember.stuart-lilley@warnerbros.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Metal, Architectural Millwork, POP, Furniture/Upholstery, Wallcoverings, Complete Sign Packages MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Entertainment

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Wildeck, Inc. Paul Mihelich, Director of Sales 405 Commerce St. Waukesha, WI 53186 Ph: 800-325-6939 Fax: 262-549-3466 www.wildeck.com info@wildeck.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Mezzanines, Freight Lifts, Safety Products MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Education, Manufacturing, Distribution

Wilsonart Nikki Parrotte, PR Agency, Sr. Acct. Executive 105 Oronoco St., Ste. 101 Alexandria, VA 22314 Ph: 703-894-5460 www.wilsonart.com nikki.parrotte@padillacrt.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Islands/Back Islands, Shelving, Any Countertops (Wilsonart Laminate, Solid Surface, Quartz) MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Wind Mill Slatwall Products Mark Radtke, Executive Vice President 200 Balsam Rd. Sheboygan Falls, WI 53085 Ph: 800-548-7528 Fax: 920-467-9301 www.windmillslatwall.com markradtke@windmillslatwall.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: End Caps, Gondolas, POP, Slatwall, Veneers, Wallcoverings MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Shopping Malls

Yunker Industries Nadine Seitz, Marketing Manager 200 E. Sheridan Springs Rd. Lake Geneva, WI 53147 Ph: 262-249-5220 Fax: 262-249-5230 www.yunker.com nseitz@yunker.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Kiosks, Metal POP, Wallcoverings, Wire MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, CS Store, Grocery

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


LATE WINTER 2015

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Eric Kerley Director of Architecture Jack in the Box

West Coast

cool

A look at what makes Jack in the Box tick A special supplement to:

Also Inside: Renovated kitchen helps cancer patient families cope Photography by The Right Light photography


West Coast

By Michael J. Pallerino

cool

A look at what makes Jack in the Box tick

R

obert O. Peterson already had owned several successful restaurants when he opened his first Topsy’s Drive-In on El Cajon Boulevard in San Diego in 1941. Peterson eventually would rename his restaurant Oscar’s, his middle name. Defined by its circus-like décor, Oscar’s featured drawings of a starry-eyed clown (remember that imagery). In 1947, Peterson obtained the rights for the intercom concept from George Manos, who owned a restaurant in Anchorage, Alaska called Chatter Box. Manos’ innovative dining establishment was one of the first known location to use the intercom concept for drive up windows. A few years later, Peterson moved the Chatter Box concept to San Diego and converted his El Cajon Boulevard location into Jack in the Box, a hamburger stand focused on drive-thru service. While the drive-thru concept was not new, Jack in the Box offered a two-way intercom system – one of the first major chains to use an intercom and the first to make drive-thru service the focus of the operation. One of its defining beacons was a giant clown located on the roof, and a smaller clown head that sat atop the intercom. The sign read: “Pull forward, Jack will speak to you.”

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WEST COAST COOL

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Today, the publicly traded company (NASDAQ: JACK) is one of the nation’s largest hamburger chains, with more than 2,200 restaurants in 21 states and Guam. Additionally, through a wholly owned subsidiary, the company operates and franchises Qdoba Mexican Grill, a leader in fast-casual dining, with more than 600 restaurants in 47 states, the District of Columbia and Canada. Commercial Kitchens sat down with Eric Kerley, director of architecture for Jack in the Box, to see what the iconic fast food restaurant is up to in 2015.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now? There are a number of programs that have been more or less figured out for us. Now, they have to be communicated to the field. That is often the hardest part in the process.

Are you optimistic about what you see out there today?

Yes. It has been really tough for a lot of people for the past several years, but the contractors that we partner with are starting to get busy again. That’s a good sign.

What does Jack in Box’s growth plan look like?

We expect to open 10-15 restaurants system-wide in fiscal 2015. In the long term – 2016-2018 – we expect our system new unit growth to be approximately 1 to 2 percent per year.

What about your refresh strategy?

We want to identify the specific needs for each individual location and address them. The scope will vary depending on the need. We’re not going to roll out a “look,” but we will ensure that everything has a fresh coat of paint and that each site is well maintained. I suspect that every company location will be touched with some type of improvement within the next calendar year. A lot of people have spent a lot of hours driving restaurants, and a lot more hours will be spent crunching numbers to determine the best approach for each and every one. We’re not really in a place where we think a uniform one-size-fits-all, solution or strategy is right for us, and we want to make sure that if we’re going to invest in a facility that the investment matches the need.

What’s driving your growth?

We’re not necessarily thinking of growth as just new restaurants. We have a lot of room to grow our sales in our existing locations. What’s a typical day like for you?

There really is no such thing as a typical day. Every day brings its share of new challenges. I usually have a general feel for what the themes of the day are going to be. And sometimes I’m actually right. I generally get into the office early and dispatch as many emails as I possibly can before meetings start to pop up. We have become much better in recent years about limiting the number of meetings we have, which is good. I recognize that it’s unrealistic to think they could be eliminated entirely.   

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

It would be improving our existing restaurants. One of the key advantages of working for a mature brand like Jack in the Box is that we have a lot of great locations. We are trying to identify solutions to get the most out of each of them.

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It is the identification of opportunities. We’re not necessarily thinking of growth as just new restaurants. We have a lot of room to grow our sales in our existing locations. When we see something that has demonstrated potential, we’re on it.

What are some of the adjustments you’re making? Designing a flexible scope that can be adjusted based on specific needs, rather than rolling out a one-size-fits-all solution.

What are some of the more important lessons you’ve learned over the past two years?

Facility improvement projects cannot be successful without buyin, cooperation and the support of everyone in the organization. A remodel without operational and marketing improvements, and support doesn’t get it done. I was sitting in a meeting recently with some Jack in the Box franchisees. One of them was exchanging texts with his wife during a break.  She had gone into a competitor’s restaurant down the street from their house that had just completed a remodel. After standing at the front counter for five minutes waiting to be noticed by the restaurant crew, she concluded that the remodel was nice, but she wouldn’t go back. That pretty much says it all, a

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


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WEST COAST COOL

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

One of the key advantages of working for a mature brand like Jack in the Box is that we have a lot of great locations. We are trying to identify solutions to get the most out of each of them. remodel or other facility improvement essentially buys you one new customer visit. Everything after that comes down to food and service.

Walk us through your construction strategy.

Our goal always has been to build an outstanding cost-efficient building on a great piece of property as quickly as reasonably possible.

Give us a rundown of your kitchen operation. How is it organized?

We have more than 60 years worth of buildings in our system, so there is not a single solution. In a general sense, we are trying to move everything in a straight line toward the drive thru window.

Are they all uniformed, as far as equipment, materials, size, etc.? I’m not sure if two are the same.

How do you select the equipment you use?

What are you doing on the sustainability side?

Things have changed a lot over the last few years. We’re currently looking at opportunities with lighting.

What new products are making headway today?

There are a lot of new lighting products on the market today. There are so many new great products out there, which really help create opportunities that didn’t exist a few years ago. LED lighting and the lower cost of LED lighting have completely changed the way we look at things. In the past, we were totally boxed in by what we could afford and energy code constraints. Today, we can decrease energy consumption, maintenance costs, and provide more and better illumination for our restaurants. It changes everything.

What trends are you seeing?

We’re focusing on doing the basics right. I don’t see that trend ever changing.

Equipment is selected based on our operational needs. There are numerous factors that are weighed once the equipment has been determined to satisfy the primary need.

Tell us what makes Jack in the Box so unique?

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

What should customers expect to see from the brand in 2015?

I think construction is being asked to do more than at anytime in the past. We have gotten very lean over the past decade, and this has caused us on the construction side to not only do more, but to know more, too. By necessity, construction has had to put in systems and processes to optimize resources. Not to be trite, but doing more, and more complex with less.

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We offer a great menu with everything served all day.

The changes we are making in design and construction in the next year will be largely invisible to our guests. They will be evolutionary, not revolutionary. We will be looking to reduce costs and improve processes. We will be focusing on doing the essentials better. CK

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


40 A R C H I T E C T U R E E N G I N E E R I N G INTERIOR DESIGN STORE PLANNING

CLEVELAND

TUCSON

LOS ANGELES CIRCLE NO.40

www.herschmanarchitects.com


WEST COAST COOL

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Get to know ... » Eric Kerley Director of Architecture, Jack in the Box What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

It’s all about solving problems for the people who work in our restaurants. Ultimately, the employees in our restaurants make our brand. It is extremely rewarding to make their lives better by improving their work environment.

What was the best advice you ever received?

Don’t be an architect. I didn’t listen, but it still is pretty good advice.

What are the three strongest traits any leader should have? Vision, patience and really strong communication skills. Bear in mind, I’m not sure I’m that good at any of these. But, it’s what I try to work on.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? Are you interested in more work?

What is the true key to success for any manager? Great people working for you.

We know only one way to do things – the right way

What’s your favorite vacation spot? To be totally honest, our headquarters is in San Diego. While I suppose a change of scenery is nice, the impulse to get out of the cold doesn’t really exist here. My backyard is nice. I will say that it did rain recently, which was kind of hard on me.

What book are you reading now?

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CIRCLE NO. 41 15TWE8044-CCR-Ad.indd 1

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CIRCLE NO. 42


Built to

inspire

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F

acing cancer is hard. And having to travel out of town for treatment can make it even harder. For many, treat-

ment at New York City’s medical centers provides the greatest hope, but requires patients to be far from home, adding the additional burden of travel and lodging expenses.

Located just minutes away from some of the nation’s most reputable cancer centers, Hope Lodge, at The American Cancer Society’s Jerome L. Greene Family Center in New York City, offers lodging at no cost for cancer patients and their caregivers being treated in Manhattan. During its seven years of operation, Hope Lodge New York has hosted more than 11,500 people from around the world. Offering 60 private guest rooms, it helps ease the emotional and financial hardships faced by many cancer patients. Along with the its Manhattan location, Hope Lodge operates in 32 other cities across the United States. The aim was to transform Hope Lodge’s old, communal kitchen into a highly functional, yet cheerful space with a design standard reflecting the caliber of projects found elsewhere in Manhattan accommodations. While kitchens can be highly complex, time consuming and expensive to renovate, the project team aimed to complete the makeover in just three weeks in By Guillaume Gentet order to be minimally disruptive to on-going operations. As a non-profit organization, Hope Lodge relies on the generosity of a group of regular volunteers as well as donations of time and money to operate. That meant spending the American Cancer Society’s money on a kitchen renovation was out of the question. For the project to go ahead, it was important to initially diagram out all of the costly pieces, and secure sponsorships and donations. The team was fortunate to be able to call on the assistance of many friends and colleagues in the industry. For example, Hope Lodge has a standing relationship with Whirpool, which agreed to donate all appliances. In addition, ceramic supplier Imagine Tile provided tiling for the floor and backsplash, while the Italian luxury kitchen cabinetry brand, Effeti USA, created custom cabinetry. Effeti crafts all of its cabinetry in Florence, Italy, so another principal limitation was the September 2014 completion schedule. Italian culture sees manufacturing capabilities shut down for the month of August, so the process had to be planned out ahead. Discussions, programming and planning begun well in advance. Those discussions included the overall design strategy, and the selection of appliances and cabinetry.

Renovated kitchen helps ease burden of families at NYC’s Hope Lodge

Photography by Austin Collins

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BUILT TO INSPIRE

A place of comfort

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Used primarily as a gathering space for patients, caregivers and volunteers, the Charles Lafitte Foundation kitchen plays an integral role in Hope Lodge’s mission to encourage guests to interact with one another in a comfortable and inviting environment. In 2011, interior designer, author and television personality Nate Berkus renovated the lounge area adjacent to the kitchen, but the kitchen remained untouched. Lacking adequate storage, counter and refrigeration space, the old kitchen was unable to support the expanding roster of events and gatherings being held over the course of the year. This included the weekly “Tea Time,” where guests, residents and volunteers socialize and enjoy a spread of desserts and snacks. The plan was to create an exciting design for the guests and volunteers with the functionality of a commercial kitchen. The former kitchen and the limited workspace reached its capacity at around 30-50 people. The new kitchen had to be able to support events with 150-plus people. Given the time constraints, the design was built strategically around the existing infrastructure of the prior kitchen. The new sink and dishwashers would be placed where the former ones were; the same was true for the new range hood and stove-top. The design concept doubled refrigeration capacity, while overall cooking and warming capacity was increased five-fold by adding new warming drawers. This meant removing two, small non-load-bearing walls and adding some additional power, other than this the kitchen’s footprint would remain the same. The former island was to be replaced with a higher and wider, two-tiered unit to expand preparation and serving space and added extra storage. It was important to blend the design, making it seamless with the rest of the communal area that Berkus already had designed. We didn’t want everything to feel disconnected, so the team borrowed some of the colors of the upholstery; the pale grays from the sofas, and put them on the walls. The color palette called for shades of pink, white and grey – nodding to the signature color of Breast Cancer Awareness. The final design features pale pink Effeti cabinets, white Caesarstone countertops, and porcelain flooring from our collection with Imagine Tile. The pattern is a large-scale basket weave in steely gray, which lends a modern sensibility to a traditional motif. Stainless steel

appliances donated by Whirlpool and a new wall-mounted television highlighting Hope Lodge news and announcements, infuses the space with environmentally friendly materials and high-tech products. Hope Lodge New York prides itself on being an environmentally friendly building, so there was a conscious decisions to choose materials not only for aesthetics, but also with sustainability in mind. That meant cabinets and tiles fabricated from sustainable materials as well as the use of no or low-VOC paints, sealants and adhesives. It also was important to mitigate the propagation of dust and dirt during installation by sealing off the area while under construction. To reduce waste, the team annotated all removed components of the existing kitchen, so they were able to donate most of the former appliances and cabinetry to Habitat for Humanity, a nonprofit organization that builds affordable housing in partnership with people in need. Taking into account time limitations, every effort was made to pass on any scheduling issues or potential conflicts. This involved taking the time to understand when people would be on-site and when deliveries were happening. The team worked to get as many of the pieces of the remodel on-site sooner than they were needed, which turned out to be a tremendous aid to the process. In midtown Manhattan, a delivery scheduled for 8 a.m. may not show up until late in the afternoon, or even the following day, so planning ahead was key. Murphy’s Law comes into full effect when working in Manhattan. That is, things that can go wrong, often do, so count on it and plan for it. Working side-by-side toward a common goal, the team of contractors included JER Developers, Jack Berth & Sons, Ed Carmona Building Services, Elegante Stone, Trieste Corp. and Art KT Construction Corp. Each new member who joined was encouraged by the commitments of others. Demolition began on September 2 and Hope Lodge New York celebrated the project’s completion September 30, with an opening reveal party for residents, guests and volunteers. Even more remarkable is that all the materials and labor were provided pro bono, a cumulative total that is approximated at $150,000 fair market value. Ultimately, the greatest highlight was seeing the smiles on the faces of the volunteers, staff and guests of Hope Lodge at the unveiling and in the weeks after. The response has been very humbling and life affirming. CCR

Guillaume Gentet is an award-winning, French-born décorateur ensemblier.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


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You can make a big difference when people listen. Talk to us at www.nora.com/us/ntx19 CIRCLE NO. 43


Advertorial

Cicero’s Completes Renovation of Chicago’s Omni 676 Restaurant

R

enovating a restaurant is like updating old recipes: Some just need a dash of salt, while others require a complete overhaul. For the renovation of the 676 Restaurant & Bar, a sophisticated American bistro located on the fourth floor of the Omni Hotel in Chicago, that recipe was already a long-time customer favorite that just needed a few new ingredients to bring out its full flavor. Cicero’s Development Corp. completed renovation of the 676 Restaurant & Bar in 2014, creating an upscale, but comfortable environment for hotel guests to enjoy as they gaze upon the dazzling Chicago skyline. In addition, Cicero’s renovated or reconfigured six meeting rooms inside the hotel, plus remodeled several public spaces and two ballrooms. Extensive work was conducted in the transformation of an administrative office into a first-class meeting room, including the redesign of HVAC and electrical systems, while new granite tops, custom doors, dimming lights, and custom millwork were installed in all meeting rooms. No detail was overlooked in the pursuit of excellence.

setting, Cicero’s made an elaborate update in furniture, artwork and lighting fixtures, establishing a clean, totally contemporary look perfect for any occasion. Besides providing high-quality workmanship, Cicero’s takes pride in its ability to conduct extensive renovation work without disrupting hotel operations, said Sam Cicero, Jr., the firm’s president: “In spite of an aggressive schedule, the areas surrounding the work-in-progress were fully functioning. Our goal is to not compromise the high-end hotel guest experience with noise or mess. Of course, this requires a

Restaurant Makeover

Over the course of the three-week remodeling, Cicero’s worked to give the space a style that communicates Omni’s quality and commitment to hotel patrons. The team began by refinishing the restaurant’s inlaid wood floors, bringing them to a gleaming shine. This was followed by installing new millwork to enhance the 676’s custom murals featuring one-of-a-kind photos of Pine Street (now Michigan Avenue) in the year 1875. Cicero’s carpenters also refurbished existing millwork on the 50-foot 676 Lounge bar, which is popular with guests for a midday meal, an after-work cocktail, or a long, fun night out with friends. Next, Cicero’s replaced all existing carpeting, window treatments and wall coverings with stylish new patterns. Ceilings were painted a crisp white. Finally, to complement the ambiance of the casual

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high level of flexibility and scheduling coordination, something that isn’t always easy with more than twenty workers on-site at any given time. As far as we are aware, guest complaints and inconvenience at the Omni were non-existent, even during heavy demolition work. With the front desk of the hotel being right in the middle of all of the construction, this is something we are quite proud of.”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


CIRCLE NO. 44


Luck be a lady Casinos place their bets on waterjet-fabricated floor designs

By Ron Treister

Update on waterjet

I

t’s no accident that some of the most elegant and luxurious lobbies are found in world-class casinos. “Casinos should seduce us with a sense of magnificence,” says Roger Thomas, who designed the Bellagio in Las Vegas.

There’s even research to prove that people relax and spend more when welcomed by opulent settings. “People tend to take on the characteristics of a room,” Thomas says. “They feel glamorous in a glamorous space and rich in a rich space.” In their quest to create magnificent lobby floors, casino architects are turning to waterjet-fabricated medallions and whole-floor designs. “Waterjet technology fuels the imagination of the designer, because your options are virtually unlimited,” says Jim Belilove, CEO of Creative Edge Master Shop. “It allows you to cut intricate shapes in multiple colors and multiple materials, including durable stone and marble. If you can imagine it, you can create it.”

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Belilove should know. Creative Edge, which he founded in 1986 in Fairfield, Iowa, pioneered the use of waterjet technology for architectural functions. Their reputation spread and – spinning the wheel forward 25 years –their award-winning creations grace the floors of five-star hotels, embassies, convention centers, airports, villas, palaces, luxury private residences – and casino lobbies – worldwide.

A tour of luxurious casino floors Waterjet work can be seen as spectacular visuals in casino lobbies across the country, with each unique design fabricated using state-of-the-art waterjet technology.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015

Waterjet technology forces 50,000 pounds of water pressure through 1/8-inch tubes, before it emerges from a tiny head of sapphire, ruby or diamond as a micro-cutting tool. The water is mixed with an abrasive, usually powdered garnet. “The tiny stream of water looks harmless, but it could cut off your hand,” Jim Belilove, CEO of Creative Edge Master Shop. “When we started back in the ’80s, waterjet technology was being used for cutting windshields, metals and food: frozen pizza, olives, and green beans. It occurred to us that this could be a great thing for architectural finish material.” Indeed, the high-pressure water cuts through the most brittle of floor materials – such as glass, stone, ceramic tile, marble, travertine, limestone and granite in slabs up to 3 inches thick – as precisely as a laser. And because the heat is carried off by water, waterjet can slice stainless steel, aluminum, copper and bronze without warping, burning or oxidation. “By pushing the envelope Creative Edge spearheaded the use of inlaid stone and metals in floors,” Belilove says, reflecting on 25 years of waterjet design, fabrication and innovation. “Yet it was the waterjet technology that made it possible to create such grand and elaborate floors for casino lobbies.”


CIRCLE NO. 45


LUCK BE A LADY Caesar’s Palace Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas

This elegant natural marble floor was Creative Edge’s first casino commission. Fabricated in 1992, to this day it remains an enduring icon of grace and beauty. “A beautifully crafted marble floor will last as long as the building, making it a sound investment in art and durability,” Belilove says.

The Rivers Casino, Pittsburgh

Located in Pittsburgh’s newly revived riverfront, this 2009 showpiece features an undulating glass façade that takes advantage of panoramic river views, the downtown skyline and natural light. In their quest to The theme of water and light is continued in the create magnificent contemporary interior design. Creative Edge’s designer Annie Aalto created a freeform, whole-floor design featuring flowing lobby floors, ribbons of flamboyant Red Onyx and Indus Gold natural marcasino architects ble that dance beneath a light-pulsating chandelier called The are turning to Drum. The result is a warm, playful and celebratory effect.

waterjet-fabricated medallions and whole-floor designs.

Binion’s Horseshoe Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas

Commissioned to design the floors of the card rooms that host the yearly World Series of Poker, Creative Edge fabricated the series’ emblem in three different materials: granite, brass and quartz. “Waterjet’s cutting precision allows brass to be inlaid into granite and quartz,” Belilove says. “Multiple materials can be combined in an artistic design.”

The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, Las Vegas

®

This dazzling new installation features a geometric design of interlocking rings in 10,000 square-feet of brilliant, durable and cost-effective terrazzo floors. “Casino floors have to be unique and visually pleasing, but they also have to be extremely durable and easy to maintain as there is such a high volume of pedestrian traffic,” says Mark Balogh, president of ArCon, the firm that designed the floor. “Finding the right materials that set a casino floor apart from the competition, maintaining design integrity and being practical and cost effective are key.”

Rancho Graton, Sonoma County, California

Twenty-eight giant hibiscus flowers realized in brightly colored terrazzo sets a lively theme for this Native American casino’s floor. “We’ve found that waterjet technology is equally useful in creating designs in terrazzo,” Belilove says. “Using waterjet to fabricate the metal forms and patterns for use in the terrazzo tile industry has opened up a new level of creativity in terrazzo flooring.”

New York New York Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas

The waterjet process is equally at home fabricating medallions and whole-floor designs in resilient materials. For the New York New York Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, luxury vinyl was incorporated in a series of colorful medallions to direct visitors to the roller coaster. The result is a highly detailed and colorful signage emblem that entices children and adults alike to follow the arrows. Says Belilove: “Today, with thousands of colors and dozens of resilient flooring materials available – from VCT to luxury vinyl to rubber to cork – there is literally nothing to limit a designer’s vision.” CCR Ron Treister is president of Communicators International, a Jensen Beach, Fla.-based marketing firm. He can be reached at rlt@communicatorsintl.com. CIRCLE NO. 46

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


LATE WINTER 2014

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N

amed after the poetic designation for America popularized in the song Hail Columbia, Columbia County, Pa., was established in 1813. At the heart of the

county is its historic Courthouse, a brick and brownstone Romanesque Revival structure originally constructed in 1848.

By Richard Phelps

Proud of its history, county officials were not as proud of the aging infrastructure, and outdated and inefficient systems of its seven county-owned buildings, which included the courthouse, prison, county annex and 911 center. Not only were there comfort and safety issues with the facilities, but there also was a lot of wasted energy and excessive utility bills eating away at its ever-shrinking operating budget. With its milestone bicentennial anniversary looming, county officials were keen to modernize their landmark buildings – to make them more efficient, safe, and reduce and stabilize their energy and operating costs. They especially wanted the courthouse to be the showpiece – perfectly preserved historical integrity blended with all the latest sustainability, and efficiency bells and whistles. Unfortunately, for many local governments such as Columbia County, funding for such major facility infrastructure upgrades is scarce these days. Resources are tight, taxpayers are overburdened and budgets are stretched to the max. The challenge was how to find a way to finance this critical renovation and energy makeover project without having to provide capital upfront, increasing owning and operating expenses, or raising local taxes. Fortunately for Columbia County, there were options.

Turning wasted energy into financing

Understanding the myriad obstacles facing the public sector and government entities, ABM Building & Energy Solutions created a unique energy improvement and financing option for Columbia County. Called the Bundled Energy Solutions (BES) program, the creative energy retrofit package allowed Columbia County to leverage future guaranteed energy cost savings to fund technical infrastructure improvements and systems upgrades. There was

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • THE MAKEOVER

“I originally voted against the project because I thought it was too good to be true. But now after seeing the results, I completely support the program and have been recommending it to other counties as well.” – Chris Young, Columbia County Commissioner

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no upfront capital required, zero impact to the existing operating budget, and no added burden to taxpayers. A typical BES program includes a comprehensive suite of high-efficiency conservation, facility modernization and HVAC services. The process also includes an assessment and analysis of the buildings’ infrastructure needs. This approach is ideal for local governments desperate for capital because it packages the equipment, installation, and ongoing maintenance costs into a single turnkey project that produces guaranteed energy savings and operating cost relief.

Adding a modern twist on historic buildings

Intrigued by this option, Columbia County partnered with ABM to perform the needed upgrades. ABM was able to tailor a solution that included significant technical renovations to all seven of the county’s facilities. The crown jewel was the courthouse – the key focus of the project. Because

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015

the facility is on the historical register, it was critical to preserve the original profile of the building while transforming it into the modern, ultra-efficient facility the county was expecting. All renovations had to be approved by the historical society first. Major improvements included: • Replacing the roof to enhance building value, energy efficiency and occupant comfort. • Replacing the costly electric panel heating with a high-efficiency boiler, installing new piping and building a new boiler room in the attic. • Upgrading to high-efficiency lighting and a centralized automated control system to reduce energy and maintenance costs, while improving lighting quality and safety. • R e-commissioning the HVAC equipment to near-new condition for maximum performance and efficiency.


CIRCLE NO. 48


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • THE MAKEOVER

Transforming wasted energy into guaranteed energy savings and using it to overcome financial challenges and improve the community is a great legacy for Columbia County. Back-up generator to meet emergency electrical needs

The Columbia County prison also was a major energy offender and needed several building envelope upgrades to become more efficient including: • Replacing two 200-gallon hot water tanks with five instantaneous hot water boilers and on-demand system provides continuous hot water access to prisoners while saving money, energy and water. • Exchanging existing inefficient HVAC system with an energy recovery ventilation unit that pre-cools and dehumidifies in warmer seasons and pre-heats and humidifies in cooler seasons – reducing total HVAC equipment capacity, improving indoor air quality, and reducing energy costs and heating and cooling loads. • Upgrading to high-efficiency, networked lighting and wireless control system to automate and control light levels in different areas, track and monitor energy use and reduce maintenance. • Installing low-flow toilets and fixtures to reduce water consumption. • Replacing residential washers and dryers with a high efficiency commercial laundry system with ozone for cleaning prisoners clothing. • Replacing the roof to enhance building value and energy efficiency. All of the county’s buildings received new building automation control systems to more efficiently manage and control HVAC equipment, provide building scheduling and detailed energy consumption modeling, and increase productivity and operational efficiency. They all also received high-efficiency lighting upgrades and retro-commissioning of their existing HVAC systems to optimize cost and maintenance savings, and energy efficiency and performance. ABM identified additional funding that enabled the county to address IT needs and resurface several parking lots as well.

Project extension granted

The project also received an unexpected boost. Previously, the county had received a $300,000 grant from the State of Pennsylvania originally intended to help install a solar photovoltaic system. But with the economic downturn, it just hadn’t been able to utilize the grant and the funds were about to evaporate.

Because of the energy enhancements, the county was able to get the grant amended to extend its BES project. With the reallocated dollars, it was able to include several more capital-intensive HVAC replacements that would have otherwise not been done for years and would have only been completed at the expense of taxpayers. Columbia County’s BES project is guaranteed to save Columbia County $4.9 million in energy and operating costs over the next 15 years. On track to meet this number, its recently completed first year energy audit shows Columbia County exceeded its guaranteed energy savings target by more than $33,000. This money was able to be funneled back into the operating budget and will provide critical funding for other future improvement projects. County officials couldn’t be more pleased. “I originally voted against the project because I thought it was too good to be true,” says Chris Young, Columbia County Commissioner. “But now after seeing the results, I completely support the program and have been recommending it to other counties as well.” Other benefits include: • Reduced electricity use by 34.3 percent • Increased occupant comfort within the buildings • Reduced and stabilized energy and operational costs • Decreased equipment downtime and repair costs • Reduced environmental impact • Minimized budget and taxpayer burden Columbia County’s BES solution also is positively affecting the environment through conservation. For example, the results of its energy retrofit solution can be equated to: • Saving millions of kilowatt hours • Eliminating thousands of tons of CO2 emissions • Taking thousands of cars of the road • Preserving thousands of acres of forest • Powering thousands of houses without additional power plants Transforming wasted energy into guaranteed energy savings and using it to overcome financial challenges and improve the community is a great legacy for Columbia County. The benefits will continue to reap energy and operational savings, as well as comfort, health and safety benefits for years to come. The solution will continue to pay for itself with guaranteed energy savings into the future, funding even more improvements. CCR

Richard Phelps is a GM of facilities services for ABM. You can reach him at atrichard.phelps@abm.com or 866-678-0783.

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Miles to go… Inside the R&D Tax Credit By Charles R. Goulding, Jennifer Pariante & Jacob Goldman

T

he Highway Trust Fund, funded by a tax on the volume of gas consumed, recently faced imminent depletion and was expected to exhaust its resources last August. That’s why President Obama repeatedly urged Congress to pass legislation for increased infrastructure funding. Without congressional action, the Federal Highway Administration wouldn’t be able to maintain its same-day payments to reimburse states for infrastructure projects. Last August, Congress agreed to provide $11 billion to prevent a 28 percent reduction in federal highway and mass transit spending. The Senate passed a House-written bill to boost federal gas and diesel fuel taxes for keeping the federal Highway Trust Fund solvent through this May. One silver lining in the oil price plunge is that increased gasoline sales will return a modest amount of capital back into the Highway Trust Fund. Government contractors that use the following innovations may be eligible for substantial federal and state R&D tax credits.

The Research & Development Tax Credit

Enacted in 1981, this allows a credit of up to 13 percent of eligible spending for new and improved products and processes. Qualified research must meet the following criteria: • New or improved products, processes or software • Technological in nature • Elimination of uncertainty • Process of experimentation Eligible costs include employee wages, cost of supplies, cost of testing, contract research expenses and costs associated with developing a patent. Last December, President Obama signed the bill extending the credit.

The Infrastructure Gap

The World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report for 2012-2013 ranked U.S. infrastructure fell to 14th in the world. The change can be explained by the country’s aging infrastructure. The estimated infrastructure needs predominantly will be generated by surface transportation systems, such as roads and bridges, as shown in the “Who Needs Them” chart on page 106. In addition to threatening safety and well being, degrading infrastructure generates unquestionable inefficiencies and, consequently,

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higher costs to businesses and households. The result is higher prices for national and imported goods, fewer jobs and lower incomes. This would have major impacts on productivity, competitiveness, innovation and consumer spending. From a macroeconomic perspective, it’s safe to say the infrastructure gap would severely compromise long-term economic development.

Surface Transportation

The condition of surface transportation infrastructure is key to economic vitality. The country’s investment in roads is far behind many other countries, as portrayed in the “Cumulative Infrastructure Needs by System” chart on page 106. Productivity losses, higher operating costs for vehicles, decreased reliability, and bigger expenses with environmental and safety concerns are just a few examples of how deficient surface infrastructure impact a country’s economic performance.

University Infrastructure Research

In response to the previously mentioned critical scenario, a growing number of universities and research centers are engaging in infrastructure R&D. Their efforts speak to the importance of this line of research and set the basis for innovation from the private sector. Universities such as Columbia, Harvard and MIT, among others, are researching and developing methods, processes and tools to improve America’s infrastructure.

Innovation in Surface Transportation Infrastructure

The following sections present innovative solutions that promote efficiencies, reduce risks, accelerate delivery schedules, and cut costs of infrastructure projects involving bridges and highways.

Bridges

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Accelerated Bridge Construction (ABC) program uses innovative technologies to reduce the time of bridge planning and construction efforts. With new methods, designs and materials, the initiative aims to construct safer and more cost-effective bridges. Technologies include: 1. P  refabricated Bridge Elements and Systems (PBES) are structural components of a bridge built offsite or adjacent to the alignment. PBES reduces onsite construction time and mobility impact time.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


CIRCLE NO. 50


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • MILES TO GO...

Source: The Economist, America’s crumbling infrastructure: Bridging the gap, June 28, 2014

Source: American Society of Civil Engineers, Failure to Act Report, 2013

2. Slide-In Bridge Construction is a cost-effective technique for deploying PBES or quickly replacing an existing bridge. A new bridge is built on temporary supports parallel to an existing bridge. Once construction is complete, the road is closed and the existing bridge structure is demolished or slid out of the way. The new bridge is slid into place, tied into the approaches and paved within 48 to 72 hours. 3. Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil – Integrated Bridge System (GRS-IBS) is a construction method combining closely spaced geosynthetic reinforcement and granular soils into a new composite material. The method is used to construct abutments and approach embankments that are less likely to settle and create a bump at the end of the bridge. The GRS-IBS is easy to build and maintain and 25 percent to 60 percent more cost-effective than conventional construction methods. These innovative methods enhance motorist and worker safety throughout bridge construction, lessen the environmental footprint involved, and constitute an alternative for climate-controlled and environmentally sensitive areas. The preservation of existing bridges also is an important innovation field. The FHWA recently published a Bridge Preservation Guide that urges state DOTs to strategically manage their bridge assets in order to maximize their lifespans. The accurate monitoring of bridges’ conditions is crucial to preservation. To this end, innovative, sensor-enabled systems can provide objective, actionable information to support decisions involving structural maintenance, repair or replacement.

Highways

The U.S. highway system is faced with daunting challenges – accommodating more traffic and higher loadings; reducing traffic disruptions during construction; meeting more stringent environmental, community and safety requirements; and continuing pressure to reduce costs.

These challenges require a continued commitment to innovation. Examples include simple, yet ingenious solutions, such as glowing lines, which consists in using luminous paint that glows for up to 10 hours through the night enhancing safety in remote, non-illuminated roads. Paint also can be used to warn drivers about the condition of road surface. Temperature sensitive paint can feature snowflake symbols when it drops bellow freezing. The use of sensor-enabled systems also is a promising field for highway innovation. Interactive lighting systems can save power by detecting cars as they approach and switching on the lights up the road. Highway weather sensors provide highly accurate, real-time information on pavement temperature, amount of chemical, and surface friction or grip, enabling informed decision-making and enhanced safety for drivers. Sensors can also be used to monitor surface quality, detecting anomalies, such as potholes and speed bumps. Cutting-edge technologies also have enabled faster, more accurate and efficient highway projects. For example, three-dimensional (3D) modeling provides geospatial visualization of intricate design, offering 3D viewing from multiple perspectives. It further enables the running of simulations prior to construction aimed at detecting potential flaws. When it comes to increasing road durability, it’s critical to avoid the premature cracking and crumbling of pavement. Innovative intelligent compaction (IC) rollers have contributed to improving the quality, uniformity and long-lasting performance of pavements. Such rollers are equipped with control systems that collect, process and analyze compaction data in real time, allowing operators to monitor and perform eventual corrections to the compaction process. In comparison with traditional static rollers, IC ones can compact greater amounts of pavement with fewer passes and in shorter periods of time, yielding cost and fuel savings. CCR

The condition of surface transportation infrastructure is key to economic vitality.

Charles R. Goulding, attorney/CPA, is president of R&D Tax Savers, an interdisciplinary tax and engineering firm. Jennifer Pariante is an analyst with R&D Tax Savers, while Jacob Goldman is the senior tax/engineering consultant.

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CIRCLE NO. 52


Preparing for the next Sandy I n the wake of Hurricane Sandy, more than 7.9 million homes and business were left without power, some having to wait months for it to be restored. These businesses were inoperable without electricity, affecting not only the business owners and employees, but also customers rallying for supplies after the storm. This sent a larger shockwave throughout the country, as the storm highlighted our dependence on the central grid. Businesses and customers alike realized that even in dire circumstances, the power needed to run their businesses was a necessity. The solution lies in on-site renewable energy systems, also known as distributed renewable energy (DRE). These on-site systems utilize solar, wind or hybrid

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How distributed renewable energy can help avoid disaster

components to produce power on the roof or in the parking lot of a building, and can be designed for on or off-grid use. Distributed renewable energy has caught the attention of many commercial building owners, as storm threats and the falling costs of the technology demonstrate that the benefits distributed renewable energy extend beyond the environment.

By Ryan Gilchrist

Since 1985, there has been a tenfold increase in the number of weather-related power outages. This number is expected to rise as weather patterns become harder to predict and more violent. While the environmental benefits of renewable energy are

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015

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PREPARING FOR THE NEXT SANDY more widely known, the systems now are being increasingly sought after for reliability and resiliency, meaning that the building’s energy is fully functional even when the surrounding power grid is down. When on-site generation is paired with a battery storage system, the system has the ability to keep the critical load supplied even during power failures. The idea of having a guaranteed, reliable power source during natural disasters and power failures is very attractive to business owners, and DRE systems provide a secure solution. When this idea is paired with policy incentives and competitive financing options, there should never be a reason to experience the kind of chaos after Sandy again. For example, Whole Foods Market has been credited as one of the greenest companies in America. Although the company has a green history, they recently set ambitious renewable energy targets, even for a sustainable company. These long-term goals call for a large push in energy use reduction and on-site generation, with their new Brooklyn, N.Y., flagship location leading the way. The store has two EV charging stations, 19 LED off-grid streetlights, a 324 kW solar array, able to supply up to 30 percent of the stores total energy use. There also is a 157 kW CHP system, designed to keep the store functioning in the event of a utility grid failure. The system harnesses the electricity production’s exhaust heat, and recycles it into the chiller machine, providing free cooling and heating in the store. In an area hit hard by the effects of Sandy, the push for an expansive on-site energy system was as much about sustainability and cost savings, as it was about the energy security it offered. While the system doesn’t completely power the store, it produces enough electricity to allow it to stay open during grid disruptions. By being able to produce accessible electricity during times of utility power failure, the Brooklyn store has assumed the role as community shelter for the surrounding neighborhood. Whole Foods Market continuously strives to be more than simply a grocery store. Businesses and commercial buildings also are examining ways to increase their energy security. The NYC Development Corp. is encouraging more businesses to think ahead to the next storm with RISE: NYC, a competition

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PREPARING FOR THE NEXT SANDY created in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. RISE is identifying new technologies to make New York businesses more resilient to the effects of future storms and climate change. The competition will offer up to $30 million in funds for suitable ideas. In 2013, Siemens released a report from their Infrastructure and Cities committee that talked about the importance of resilient infrastructure, with special attention given to the NYC metropolitan area. “We can’t prevent natural disasters, but with our knowledge and our technologies we can better protect our infrastructures,” says Ronald Busch, CEO of Siemens’ infrastructure and Cities Sector. “Resilient infrastructure in not an option but a must.” The report highlighted that repairing infrastructure without considering resiliency measures is extremely cost-intensive. But development into resilient solutions not only protects against future damage, but often is more cost-efficient, energy-efficient and reliable. With the frequency of natural disasters expected to keep increasing, the need for investment in resilient infrastructure is more important than ever.

Cost and Policy

similar financial agreements, nearly any commercial energy consumer now is able to get the financing needed for the desired system. Many companies involved in renewable energy technology also are pushing for the support of policy to bolster the DRE market, such as a restructured production tax credit for renewable energies. This would provide an incentive by compensating companies for the development of RET. Lowering the cost of development; such policies incite rapid growth and expansion in the industry. Between 2007 and 2012, wind capacity more than tripled to $18 billion annually with help from a PTC for wind energy. Policies such as PTC, PPA and feed-in tariffs help commercial clients make easier decisions about RET by eliminating most of, if not all of the financial risk.

The market for distributed renewable energy has been growing rapidly in recent years due to lower costs in the technology paired with rising costs in traditional fossil fuels.

The market for distributed renewable energy has been growing rapidly in recent years due to lower costs in the technology paired with rising costs in traditional fossil fuels. Last year marked the fourth straight year that renewables outpaced fossil fuels in terms of net investment in power capacity additions, with more than $249.9 billion invested. As the market and surrounding industry for DRE expands, economies of scale have begun to form around them. The decrease in cost, paired with aggressive policy incentives and financing options has spurred a strong interest from commercial clients looking for a high ROI. The most credited finance method for the growth of DRE is the power purchasing agreement (PPA). These contracts allow clients to receive a solar PV system at little to no cost, other than offering the available space to the developer. The client receives a low, fixed-rate for the electricity, while the developer then sells any excess electricity back into the grid. Both residential and commercial clients use this model to secure long-term, low-rate electricity. One of the most ambitious national renewable energy goals has been set by Wal-Mart. The retailer has set a long-term goal to have its day-to-day operations powered 100 percent by renewable energy. To reach this goal, the company has turned to PPAs and on-site energy generation. With more than 180 renewable energy projects, providing over 1.1 billion kWh of renewable electricity annually, Wal-Mart is the largest provider of on-site electricity in the nation. In the past, such a feat would not be fiscally possible, but with the help of PPAs and

Investment

The customer base of the 21st century is much more aware of the world around them, and care about how different companies act within that world. Consumers and building tenants are becoming more sustainability-minded and demand this same awareness from the companies they endorse. A company’s practices and mission statement have become almost as important as the products or services the company offers. Many businesses are looking to the future, and have set renewable energy targets, LEED building goals and other sustainability objectives. For example, Hilton Worldwide recently has taken steps toward a greener corporate image at their Fort Lauderdale location. The hotel conglomerate installed six vertical-axis wind turbines, offsetting its carbon consumption by 70,000 pounds a year. While the system is able to supply 10 percent of the hotel’s annual electricity, the visible wind turbines have already stirred up quite a bit of media coverage, displaying the sustainable practices of Hilton to the world. This may be worth far more than the energy savings or upfront cost, as public opinion usually is something that cannot be bought. Twenty-four companies from the Fortune 100 list have set specific renewable energy targets – these could be targets for percent of renewable energy generated, capacity (MW) or even level of investment into renewable energy operations. As companies set a variety of efficiency targets and make their internal operations sustainable, renewable energy is one of the most visible ways for a company to demonstrate their commitment. In 2013, the world’s installed renewable energy capacity increased by 8 percent, making up more than 56 percent of net energy additions. The growth spurt in the DRE market, surged by the addition of commercial clients, has turned renewable energy into one of the most viable options for the future. CCR

Ryan Gilchrist leads UGE’s Enterprise Division, delivering clean energy solutions for commercial clients. He can be reached at ryan.gilchrist@urbangreenenergy.com.

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2015

Schedule: Orlando, FL February 26th Dallas, TX March 12th Atlanta, GA April 23rd Minneapolis, MN May 7th Los Angeles, CA June 18th Boston, MA July 9th Pittsburgh, PA July 30th San Francisco August 20th New York City, NY September 10th Phoenix, AZ December 3rd For information about membership or events, contact Kristen Corson, kristenc@ccr-people.com • 770.990.7702 For information about co-sponsoring an event, contact David Corson, davidc@ccr-mag.com • 678.765.6550

www.ccr-people.com www.ccr-mag.com CIRCLE NO. 55


That

Why you should care about project management and scheduling

one thing

By Michael McCullen

M

ega-sized commercial construction firms steadily improved and systemized their processes and tools over the last 10 years. As a result, they not only survived the recent recession, but came out stronger on the other side. The rapid adoption of construction project scheduling systems is one key investment that has helped them become more profitable and grow even larger as they continue to focus on efficiency and on-time performance.

The attention to proper project scheduling also helped the larger firms meet the demands of their clients, building investors and owners. Those clients also are recognizing the benefits of detailed project scheduling, and are asking for baselines long before ground is broken and regular progress updates throughout the process. With the right tools in place, large construction firms effectively can compete for these clients’ business and keep them happy throughout the project. But small- to mid-sized firms have been a bit slower to make the investment even though the potential payoffs are clear – increased profits, reduced exposure to risk, enhanced competitiveness and improved customer satisfaction. The reasons most often cited are the anticipated cost and time commitment needed to purchase and learn the new system. There’s also the question of migrating legacy files. And, of course, there’s plenty of fear of the unknown. In short, the payoff has not been worth the perceived costs to these business owners. That would be a fair assessment but the game has changed. As the saying goes, “What got you here, isn’t going to get you there.” Business is more competitive than ever. Bids are a lot more demanding and margins tighter. And that means that back-of-the-napkin planning doesn’t cut it anymore. Business owners must allocate their resources as efficiently as possible to avoid costly delays or excessive overtime pay. Your business must adapt and evolve. Learning new tools that will help your team build successful projects is time and money well spent, whether your firm does whitebox build-outs or full-scale commercial construction jobs.

fair profit and just breaking even (or worse). String together enough losing projects, and your company isn’t likely to be around for long. Margins especially are tight for remodeling and smaller jobs. Builders must manage expenses carefully, including staff and subcontractor time, materials and equipment. The savings from having resources in place when they’re needed, and not before, only can be realized through proper project scheduling.

Reduced exposure to risk mitigation

Project delivery failure carries very significant business risks. Late or sub-par delivery could result in everything from loss of reputation or a key customer to missing a market-entry window or incurring contractual penalties. The right project management platform, with executive-level dashboards, gives project managers and senior management the ability to see into the future and positively affect project outcomes through effective monitoring and decision-making based on performance to date and expected performance. This is the essence of early risk detection and good forward planning. Good project scheduling and management also can show the impact of an owner’s requested changes and help determine the cost and time implications of the altered plans. Detailed change orders then can be created for the owner to approve. And, in the unfortunate event that the project ever does end in litigation over billings or delays, proper project scheduling it’s the only sure-fire way to prove

Consider how your firm could benefit from proper project scheduling:

Increased profitability

For construction firms, projects are their product. How well they manage those projects can mean the difference between making a

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


that you did not cause plan disruptions. That could mean hundreds of thousands – or even millions – of dollars in settlements.

Boosted competitiveness

Venture capital is funding start-ups and investing in challengers, sharpening your competition. High-performance companies need expert project managers and effective project management strategies if they are to succeed. The old adage, “what gets measured gets improved,” is true for construction project scheduling and management. Quick analysis of current and past jobs can show areas of systemic inefficiency, which can be addressed and fixed for good. And because data is no longer kept in silos as people work independently, the data in the project management system can be counted on to be the “one version of the truth” everyone follows. No more hiding performance or delivery problems. Having the right data from past jobs also can ensure you bid more effectively for the next job, so you can submit a competitive quote that still leaves plenty of room for profit.

Greater customer satisfaction

Many owners are demanding more sophisticated project schedules. They have a keen interest in seeing the project completed on-time and as-planned. Most sophisticated project scheduling systems can produce quick reports with a couple of mouse clicks that will satisfy even the most demanding owner.

Sounds good, right? Making the commitment to proper project scheduling, though, does require some careful planning and executive sponsorship to ensure the plan gets fully implemented. But that management support should be easier when the business case is this clear and the proper tools are relatively affordable. Be sure to review both systems and processes in your planning – one won’t work without the other. Look for easy-to-use, well-documented software that fits your industry, size and client requirements. Focus your search on systems that offer easy-to-read dashboards and good reporting functionality. Then, provide training on both as needed. Once established, your team will wonder how they ever functioned without it. Finally, start now. Another project done without a clear project management strategy is another lost opportunity to build a better business. In the 21st century, it is the organizations that invest properly in people, products and processes that will win the best jobs, grow their business and build a legacy that will stretch well into the next century. CCR

Be sure to review both systems and processes in your planning – one won’t work without the other.

Michael McCullen is executive chairman of Asta Development, developers of the construction scheduling software Asta Powerproject.

CIRCLE NO. 56

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data for Southeast

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects scheduled in the Southeast. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

CONTRACTING METHOD

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE: Starbucks at Firestone Development

Birmingham

-

-

Renovation

Q2 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Burger King

Hazel Green

$250,000

-

New Construction

Late Q1 or Q2 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

Pyro's Fire Fresh Pizza

Olive Branch

-

-

New Construction

Q2 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

Mei Wei at Twickenham Square

Huntsville

-

-

Renovation

Q2 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Whole Foods Market at Shops at Merchants Walk

Hunstville

$3,500,000

42,000

Renovation

Q1 2016

GC Bids (BIO)

Gap at Tanger Outlets Memphis

Southhaven

$300,000

-

Renovation

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

O'Reilly Auto Parts No. 6

Hunstville

$500,000

6,500

New Construction

Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

Wal-Mart No. 2720-218 Remodel

Madison

$500,000

205,343

Renovation

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO)

Riverfront Development

Northport

$70,000,000

19.3 AC

New Construction

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Pickens Lane Estates Apartments Rehabilitation

Pickens

-

24 units

Renovation

Q2 or Q3 2015

Developer to Subcontract

Aldridge Gardens Expansion

Hoover

$6,000,000

30 AC

Addition

2016

GC Bids (BIO)

Midtown Hattiesburg Master Plan

Hattiesburg

-

-

New Construction

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

South Main Street Mixed Use Development Phase I

Memphis

-

5,000

Renovation

Q2 or Q3 2015

GC to Subcontract

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

Centennial Plaza

Gulfport

-

-

Renovation

Q2 or Q3 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Beachview Condominium Exterior Renovations

Gulf Shores

-

-

Renovation

Q2 2015

Open GC Bids

Byram Town Center Development Phase II

Byram

-

26 AC

New Construction

Q2 or Q3 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Hotel

Tuscaloosa

$32,000,000

2.02 AC

New Construction

2016

GC Bids (BIO)

Homes2 Suites

Olive Branch

-

-

New Construction

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Bass Fishing Hall of Fame

Cullman

$17,000,000

10 stories

New Construction

2016 or 2017

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Arkabutla Lake Nature Center

Hernando

$6,000,000

-

New Construction

2016

Open GC Bids

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION: Alabama Waldorf School Relocation

Birmingham

$975,000

12,000

Renovation

Q4 2015 or Q1 2016

Southern Hall & Bolton Hall Renovation

Hattiesburg

-

-

Alteration

Q2 or Q3 2015

Competitive Public Bids

Miles College North Campus Phase I

Fairfield

$30,600,000

-

New Construction

Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

The Victorian House Renovation

Blue Mountain

$200,000

-

Renovation

Q3 or Q4 2015

GC Bids (BIO) or Neg GC Contract

Dudy Noble Field-Polk-Dement Stadium Addition & Renovation

Mississippi State

$40,000,000

-

Addition

Q3 or Q4 2015

Competitive Public Bids

Gravity Sanitary Sewer Line & Manhole Rehabilitation

Leighton

$350,000

-

Alteration

Q2 or Q3 2015

Competitive Public Bids

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

118

Bridge Repairs

Meadville

-

9 EA

Alteration

Q2 or Q3 2015

Competitive Public Bids

Demonstration Park Landscape

Birmingham

-

-

Alteration

Q2 or Q3 2015

Competitive Public Bids

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


CIRCLE NO. 57


CALENDAR

CALENDAR • MARCH - APRIL

MARCH 12TH, 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation People Dallas, TX www.ccr-people.com

SAVE YOUR SPOT TODAY Women’s Retreat 2015: August 6th-9th, location TBD

APRIL 23, 2015

PRODUCT SHOWCASE

Commercial Construction & Renovation People Atlanta, GA www.ccr-people.com

Dakota Systems Manufacturing

Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat 2015: October 1st-4th, Location TBD

Metropolitan Ceramics® Canton, OH

Farmingdale, NY

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Green Perimeter Wall Systems

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Drywall, Finished Panels, Mirrors, Cabinets From design to fast, easy installation — Dakota designs and manufactures products that work.

Recessed Standards, custom metal work, post and panel - Fitting room systems, floor fixtures and cash & wrap desks - A sustainable resource manufacturer, our products are green. We Stand Behind Your Products With Ours

Use METRO® PAVERS for demanding commercial applications from heavy industrial to car dealerships. METRO® PAVERS are the one tile that can take the punishment and provide decades of uncompromised service.

877.9.DAKOTA (932.5682)

1-800-325-3945

www.dakotamfg.com

www.metroceramics.com

CIRCLE NO. 58

CIRCLE NO. 59

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Advertiser Page

Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page

Reader Service No.

1212 Flooring Solutions...............................87................... 41

Interplan......................................................61................... 32

AdArt / Genesis Lighting Solutions................9..................... 7

ISA.............................................................121.................. 60

AECOM........................................................67................... 35

Kenneth Park...............................................15................... 11

Allied Business Services, LLC.....................103.................. 49 American Louver Company.........................113.................. 54 Arriscraft.....................................................99................... 47 The Beam Team...........................................41................... 24 Bostik..........................................................35................... 22 Carney Contracting Services........................33................... 21

King Retail Solutions....................................11.................... 8 L2M Architects.............................................57................... 31 Lakeview.....................................................31................... 20 Little............................................................45................... 26 The McIntosh Group.....................................43................... 25

Chouinard Construction...............................14................... 10

Metropolitan Ceramics................................120.................. 59

Cicero’s Development Corp..........................93................... 44

NAC.............................................................29................... 19

Columbia Forest Products...........................117.................. 56

Newton........................................................13.................... 9

Commercial Construction & Renovation People..................................115.................. 55

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association.......73................... 37

Component Hardware..................................83................... 39 Construction Data Co. (CDC).......................119.................. 57 Construction One..........................................5..................... 3

Nora............................................................91................... 43 Paint Folks...................................................87................... 42 Prime Retail Services...................................51................... 29

Controlled Power Company..........................16................... 12

Quality Project Management........................39................... 23

Coverings...................................................111.................. 53

Retail Maintenance Specialists.....................53................... 30

Create Architecture Planning & Design.........63................... 33

Rockerz, Inc..................................................7..................... 4

Dakota........................................................120.................. 58

Salsbury.......................................................8..................... 5

Design Team................................................47................... 27

Schimenti Construction..........................8, Cover 4.............6, 62

Exclusive Retail Interiors..............................19................... 14

Scorpio Construction, Inc.............................77................... 38

Federated Services Solutions......................101.................. 48 FRCH Design Worldwide...............................65................... 34 Georgia Printco...........................................105.................. 50 Gerard Construction Corp.............................21................... 15 GlobalShop.................................................107.................. 51 GreenbergFarrow..........................................3..................... 2

SGA Design Group.......................................96................... 46 Snowjax.......................................................27................... 17 Superbrightleds.com....................................25................... 16 System Sensor.........................................17, 29..............13, 18 Tecta America..............................................49................... 28

HFA ............................................................108.................. 52

Timberwolff Construction, Inc................Cover 2, 1............... 1

HKS Hospitality Group..................................69................... 36

Warner Bros.............................................Cover 3............... 61

Herschman Architects..................................85................... 40

WD Partners................................................95................... 45

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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AD INDEX

CCR • AD INDEX


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

“Thank You” for your military service...

I

come from a patriotic family and honor anyone who serves

In our family, all of the boys had to do their time in the scrap yard, so when I turned 16 and received my driver’s license, in the military. My grandfather was a Lieutenant Colonel it was time to put on the hard hat and grab who served for General Patton in WW II as a re-construction the acetylene torch and work in the summer heat outside of Philadelphia. engineer. He rebuilt the bridges the allied forces bombed to There were no ifs, ands or buts for me. You rose at the crack of dawn and put in a stop Hitler’s supply lines in Germany and Europe, bombings that hard day’s work. That was the norm. Being entitled was not in our vocabulary, as it is in ultimately helped end that front of the world war. today’s nanny society. Many employees who worked for my grandfather’s firm were – and still – are military veterans. They are already trained to take orders, do their best and get the mission or job accomplished. Defeat is not an option. Hiring military personnel was discussed at our October 2014 Commercial Retreat as a strategic course of action to help find qualified people to fill open positions. There are plenty of veterans available for hire, as our government continues to downsize our military forces. So, if you’re looking to hire for your firm, look to the veteran forces to fill the spot. If given a chance to perform, I’m confident they will prove their worth – just like they did when they served our great country. If I could go back in time and change decisions made in the past, instead of attending The Peddie School, I would have chosen The Valley Forge Military Academy, and then complete the ROTC (The Reserve Officers’ Training Corps) program at University of Denver and then on to serve our country, just as many of my family did before me. Upon returning to the states, he went to work for my great With all the chaos in the world today, our military is the only thing grandfather’s construction/recycling company called Mayor Pollock that keeps us safe from the evil that’s present. I pray they’ll be safe and Steel, which started in 1888 and still is in business today. continue to make the USA a place where we can all live life to the fullest. After the war, they received a contract from the military to The next time you see a military person, go up and shake recycle all the steel used in the tanks, jeeps, etc., for future use in their hand and say “thank you” for their service. Each of them is a construction projects so sustainability was in effect way back when. national treasure. We still have the Super 8 movies for those of you who know what With that thought, I wish each of you good health, prosperity they are that are simply amazing to watch. and safe travels the rest of 2015. CCR

With all the chaos in the world today, our military is the only thing that keeps us safe from the evil that’s present.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2015


Turning imagination into reality.

Retail. Hospitality. Restaurant. Entertainment. Exhibits. Environments. SIGNS & GRAPHICS • INTERIOR IDENTIFICATION PACKAGES • DIGITAL & FLATBED PRINTING HAND-PAINTED MURALS • FABRICATED SURFACES / ARCHITECTURAL ORNAMENTATION PLASTER & FIBERGLASS FABRICATION • METAL FABRICATION • CUSTOM CABINET & FURNITURE SHOP DRAPERY • UPHOLSTERY • DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SERVICES Vember.Stuart-Lilley@warnerbros.com • 818.954.4430 www.WarnerBrosDesignStudio.com CIRCLE NO. 61


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Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR Jan Feb 2015  

CCR Jan Feb 2015