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NEW TOPIC SECTIONS: WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION, MULTI-HOUSING, HEALTHCARE

Dedrick Kirkem, facilities manager, John Varvatos

The Father of Cool How John Varvatos continues to change the men’s fashion game

Exclusive Inside: The Skilled Labor Shortage: Cause and Solutions

See our Architecture/Design firm & Fixture surveys

Official magazine of

Finding code compliant solutions for existing buildings

January/February 2018 • www.ccr-mag.com

Check out also inside:


CIRCLE NO. 1


January/February • 2018 Vol. 17, No.1

36

24

56

FEATURES

24 The Father of Cool  How John Varvatos continues to change the men’s fashion game 36  Forging ahead  Construction execs say the upward trend will continue 2018

56  The Skilled Labor Shortage: Cause and Solutions  Why the ongoing labor shortage in the skilled trades has far-reaching effects on our economy 90  Gauged is the Rage  An interview with Martin Howard 126  Code Warriors  Finding code compliant solutions for existing buildings

Cover and feature photos by: Jean Philippe Boucicaut

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January/February • 2018 Vol. 17, No.1

SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 20  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Scottsdale

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

58  Leading Architect/Design Firms 80  Leading Fixture Firms

DEPARTMENTS

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 156 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 158 Ad Index 160 Publisher’s Note

139

20 SPECIAL SECTION

Commercial Kitchens 93  Burning it up  How good food and philanthropy continue to drive the Firehouse Subs brand 104 Capturing the past  Historic Livermore winery building lives on in a 3D point cloud Women in Construction 108 Good culture attracts women employees 110 Let’s make 2018 the ‘Year of Women’ in Construction Federal Construction 113 In (or out) of hot water  At Marriott KC Airport, it’s digital mixing to the rescue 118 Weather beating  How one contractor facedoff against a record-breaking rainy season Healthcare 122 Built to plan  MEP contractor’s technology precisely places plumbing/HVAC systems in hospital

93

Multi-Housing 132 Welcome to Cellars  San Antonio welcomes the first residential tower of its kind along the iconic Riverwalk 136 Conversations with...  Barbara Anne Spignardo, Shapiro, Lifschitz & Schram Craft Brand and Marketing 139 Hitting its stride  Inside Evil Horse Brewing’s mission to share its beer with the world 146 The Power of Space, Branding of Place  With first impressions, you only get one chance 148 ‘Unseen Is Unsold’  A look at the art of craft beer artwork 152 Tap Handles  Why you need them and how to design the perfect one

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CIRCLE NO. 3


EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

Just the same

A

new year, a new set of to-do lists, a new way of approaching the same old things you always face, but with a fresh outlook and renewed sense of purpose. Sounds good, right?

Sure it does, but in the end, when it comes to some things, it’s always the same. Take the labor pool. Over the past few years, the resurgence in the commercial construction industry has been spread across every sector. The work is there – new builds, renovations. You name it. But a few years ago, when we started hearing the upturn in the economy was starting to push things in the right direction, an interesting question started popping up, “Where are all the workers?”

The recession (you know, the one we don’t like to think about anymore) gutted a lot of the human resources it takes to keep the wheels spinning in the commercial construction arena (and scores of others). According to a survey by the Associated General Contractors of America, some 70 percent of U.S. construction firms are reporting issues finding qualified workers. And if that’s not enough, the US. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the nation’s need for workers in the skilled trades is increasing much faster than the growth of employment overall. It looks as if it’s going to get worse before it gets better (if you’re in to the whole cliché thing). According to AIA’s Consensus Construction Forecast Panel for nonresidential buildings construction, spending is expected to grow 3.6 percent But a few years ago, in 2018. The translation on our when we started end: Commercial construction hearing the upturn spending is expected to post a in the economy 4.0 percent increase. was starting to The labor shortage has push things in the been well-document for too long right direction, an in the general construction seginteresting question ment, impacting skilled trades started popping up, such as plumbing, HVAC and “Where are all electrical work real hard. the workers?” What are you doing? What can you do? It’s time to change the conversation (See “The Skilled Labor Shortage: Cause and Solutions” on page 56). Thought leaders like TV personality Mike Rowe, the former host of “Dirty Jobs,” is appealing to Congressional panels asking that we implement more training programs and scholarship opportunities. But it will take much more. That’s where you come in. So, what are you doing? What steps have you taken? We’d love to hear how you’re making a difference. Send me a note at mikep@ccr-mag.com and we’ll turn your action plan into a “Perspective” piece in the magazine. It’s time for action, not just the same old conversation of what’s wrong. I look forward to hearing from you.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

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CIRCLE NO. 7


EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury JENNIFER GRIESER Sr. Store and Corporate Facilities Manager Tuesday Morning LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design MICHAEL TIERNEY VP of Construction & Planning

Cumberland Farms

HEALTHCARE BROOKS HERMAN Senior Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

10

RESTAURANTS RON BIDINOST Vice President of Operations Bubbakoo’s Burritos Corporation GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Uncle Julio’s Corp. DAVID SHOTWELL Construction Manager, Flynn Restaurant Group

HOSPITALITY

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT. NCIDQ, CDP

Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield STEVE JONES

International Director JLL

JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

JOHN LAPINS Partner, Geolo Capital

JIM SHEUCHENKO

GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations and Project Management Interserv Hospitality ISYOL E. CABRERA Manager, Design & Plan Review, Food & Beverage. Architecture + Design Team IHG

President Property Management Advisors LLC

CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President EMG

CONSULTANT GINA NODA President Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Onyx Creative STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group BRIAN HAGEMEIER, P.E., LEED AP Program Manager GPD GROUP STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail Target Stores Target will expand its smaller-format store concept into new markets this year as part of a push to grow the concept from 59 to 130 locations over the next two years. The retailer will open a 54,700-squarefoot store in Dallas and two smaller locations in the Massachusetts towns of Burlington and Cambridge. Gander Outdoors Gander Outdoors plans to open scores of new stores in Minnesota and several other states. The new stores will trade the big-box feel of the former Gander Mountain stores for spaces split into departments based on different outdoor activities. Roots Toronto-based fashion retailer Roots will add up to 10 new stores in Canada and 14 in the U.S. by the end of 2019. The retailer, which also has 138 partner-operated locations in Asia, sees brick-and-mortar stores as a key part of its growth plans. Lands’ End Lands’ End plans to open up to 50 new stores over the next five years.

Dave & Buster’s Dave & Buster’s will open two restaurants in Northwest Arkansas in early 2018 designed with a new reduced-size layout. The company may open as many as 40 of the 15,000- to 20,000-square-foot units in the long-term. Everlane Online fashion retailer Everlane plans to open its first two brick-andmortar stores in New York City and San Francisco. The shops will give the brand a way to win over new customers and give existing shoppers a place to see and touch the pieces before buying. Kroger Kroger Co. is considering a deal to allow Ace Hardware to open in-store shops. Ace Hardware already operates in-store shops at other retail locations, including Benjamin Moore stores, and a deal with Kroger would mark the hardware retailer’s largest partnership. Marsh/Needler’s Fresh Markets Fourteen former Marsh stores in Ohio have been rebranded as Needler’s Fresh Markets. The stores, which were acquired by supermarket operator Generative Growth following Marsh’s bankruptcy filing, will offer local produce and foods prepared in the stores under its new Needler’s banner.

Restaurants Golden Corral Golden Corral has remodeled a Greensboro, N.C., restaurant with a new, smaller footprint that it says will cut labor costs by 3 percent. The new prototype creates efficiencies in the kitchen and a more spacious, homey feel in the dining room.

Rise Biscuits & Doughnuts North Carolina-based Rise Biscuits & Doughnuts is hoping to expand to around 1,000 locations across the U.S. with the help franchise development group Fransmart. The chain plans to add as many as six new locations during the first quarter.

In-N-Out Burger In-N-Out Burger will open the first of 50 planned eateries in Colorado, and build a Colorado Springs facility to make and distribute beef patties for restaurants within 350 miles. The chain followed a similar plan when it opened its first Texas eateries in 2011.

Rhubarb London-based contract catering firm Rhubarb will open two restaurants and a top-floor event space in New York City’s Hudson Yards development, the massive mixed-use project that will include 4,000 residences.

Pizza Inn Rave Restaurant Group has created a Pizza Inn buffet concept for nontraditional locations, including airports, convenience stores and entertainment venues. The Pizza Inn Express kiosks will take up between 50 and 100 square feet.

Tartine Bakery San Francisco-based Tartine Bakery opened its first overseas location in Seoul right before the start of the Winter Olympics. The brand plans to open up to four more bakeries in Korea within the next 12 to 18 months.

Patina Restaurant Group Patina Restaurant Group will roll out four new eateries at Disney Springs, a development near Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida, with a ‘30s and ‘40s waterfront theme.

MOD Pizza MOD Pizza has landed $33 million in new funding and secured a $40 million credit line to help fund the chain’s 2018 growth plans. In 2017, the chain opened 110 units, bringing the total locations to over 300 outlets in the U.S. and U.K.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


AroundtheIndustry

(continued)

Hospitality Marriott Marriott’s future smart hotel rooms will be personalized according to the needs of each guest and have high-tech amenities, such as voice-activated technology. Another tech-related advance created by Marriott’s partnership with Samsung and Legrand is the ability to prompt a virtual assistant to adjust in-room temperature or turn on a light. AccorHotels/MGallery AccorHotels’ MGallery brand is planning 32 openings during the next five years. Recent MGallery properties include The Retreat Palm Dubai, the Victory House London Leicester Square and the Tarcin Forest Resort & Spa. Graduate Hotels Since opening its first property near the University of Georgia in 2014, Graduate Hotels has grown to 10 properties, all in college towns. The company plans to open 25 more properties through 2020. Rosewood/KHOS Rosewood has introduced a new brand, KHOS, with the goal of appealing to business travelers.

CIRCLE NO. 9

Aman Aman is increasing its presence in major cities such as New York, Tokyo and Shanghai. The company plans to add approximately 15 hotels to its portfolio in coming years. Moxy Hotel Marriott has announced the launch of its latest Moxy property, the 170-room Moxy Denver/Cherry Creek. The hotel is the first newbuild development under the Moxy banner, and the first hotel in Colorado to be managed by Chattanooga, Tennessee-based Vision Hospitality Group. Higgins Hotel The National WWII Museum officially began construction on the attached Higgins Hotel & Conference Center. The 230-room hotel, scheduled for completion in 2019, will operate as part of the exclusive Curio Collection by Hilton. As the first Curio hotel in Louisiana, the property will support the museum’s expanding educational programs, while offering guests full-service hotel accommodations and a way to maximize their time at the Museum.

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JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

What they're saying ...

“It's becoming less apparel and more dining, more entertainment, more service, more fitness, wellness – the types of categories that are more popular.” – CBL Properties CEO Stephen Lebovitz on how malls are changing up tenant mixes with a focus on experiences

500

Did you

know

Some eateries are experimenting with nonprofit models that give guests a chance to contribute to their communities. For example, A Place at the Table in Raleigh, North Carolina, depends on customers with the means to pick up the tab for those who can’t pay for their meals, while Houston’s OKRA Charity Saloon enables customers to vote for which charities to support.

The number of stores that China-based retailer Miniso plans to add over the next three years. The growth will start between this year and 2019, growing from 18 to 100 stores. By comparison, other dollar store chains in Canada together operate fewer than 500 locations – Dollar Tree has 226 stores; Dollar Store with More, 125; Great Canadian Dollar Store, 99; and Buck or Two, 47.

We don’t strive to be bigger. We strive to deliver the best quality and service in the industry. Our specialized project management teams are highly effective in maintaining affordable budgets, meeting tight deadlines, and delivering quality construction turnovers on time, every time. From coast to coast, Alaska to Puerto Rico, Hunter Building Corporation has you completely covered on your next construction project! We offer a multitude of services nationwide ranging from tenant improvements, build-outs, remodels, ground-up construction, and project management. Hunter Building Corporation takes pride in the fact that many of our clients have been repeat customers for many years.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


Boom, boom go the numbers W

75

ith the numbers trending upward over the past few years, 2018 could post another strong performance for the retail, hospitality, restaurant and federal sectors. For example, a Commerce Department report shows that construction spending soared to a record $1.257 trillion in November, while the Labor Department reported 210,000 more positions in 2017, a 35 percent increase over the previous year. There also is renewed optimism in the office market, which has seen little action since the

recession, according to an Associated General Contractors of America's survey. Transportation, retail, warehouse and lodging were also strong in the survey. The biggest industry concern remains the severe shortage of labor, which is really being seen in the ever-booming residential housing market. As Commercial Construction & Renovation went to press, the most recent employment report (December) showed the biggest monthly rise in residential construction jobs of 2017.

The percent of construction firms that plan to expand their payrolls in 2018 as contractors are optimistic that economic conditions will remain strong, according to the “Expecting Growth to Continue: The 2018 Construction Industry Hiring and Business Outlook” survey by the Associated General Contractors of America and Sage Construction and Real Estate. Still, many firms say they remain worried about workforce shortages and infrastructure funding. The net positive reading for all types of construction is 44 percent, the highest yet recorded in the association’s Outlook survey series.

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JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

What they're saying ... “

It will be important to make our guests feel engaged with the hotel and make a personal connection to the hotel because the cost of doing that is far less than being part of a loyalty program or buying a guest. We want them to return and recommend the hotel through personal or social media connections, highlighting our hotel as a place to stay.

– Steve Shern, area managing director for Thompson Hotels and GM of the Thompson Chicago, on the strategy to entice today's business travels and corporate guests

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Malls 3.0

C

raft brewers. Children's theaters. Gyms. Walk-in medical clinics. If you're looking for any of these places, stop by your local mall. Say what? That's right, mall operators continue to seek out the aforementioned nontraditional tenants to fill the void left by department store closures. And, as apparel-type stores in malls are closing, food and entertainment businesses are taking their place. Led by U.S. retail landlords such as Simon Property Group, General Growth Properties, Macerich and Taubman, the new look of today's malls is changing. Since 2014, 90 regional malls have spent more than $8 billion on property renovations. This year, this type of spending and modifications are expected to increase. As the trend continues, one analyst expects the malls to be a new destination for today's consumers. Dana Telsey, CEO of Telsey Advisory Group, said in a CNBC interview that online retailers are testing physical in small ways. "I think you're going to see more services coming to shopping centers." Let the pivoting continue...

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

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CIRCLE NO. 14


INDUSTRY EVENTS

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Scottsdale hotspot plays host to CCRP Nation

cottsdale knows. If you’re looking for a hip and stylish place to hang out, head to the Salt Lounge. When it’s not serving as one of the area’s pre- and post-movie hangouts, select groups are privy to take advantage of the atmosphere. So, when the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) group traveled back to Arizona, they headed for the Lounge. If you’re looking to increase your networking quotas for 2018, CCRP is for you. For more information, connect with Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com. Make plans to join us at CCRP July 27th, 2017 in Denver, CO

Thank You to Ou CCRP New York Sponsors: Thank YouOur to Our Thank You to ThankThank You toYou OurtoCCRP York Our New CCRP New York CCRP New York Sponsors: CCRP New York Thank You to Our Thank You to Our Sponsors: Sponsors: Thank You to Our Thank YouThank to Our Sponsors: You toNew Our CCRP York CCRP New York CCRP Scottsdale, AZ ThankCCRP You Our Thankto You to Our New York CCRP New York Make plans to join us at Sponsors: CCRP Boston Thank You to Our Sponsors: CCRP New York Sponsors: CCRP October 12th, 2017 in Philade Sponsors: Sponsors: Sponsors: YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: hank You toNew OurTHANK CCRP York Sponsors: Make plans to join us at CCRP New York Sponsors: Make plans to join us CCRP at joinOctober Make plans to us at 12th, 2017 in Philade Sponsors: CCRP October 12th, 201712th, in Philadelphia CCRP October 2017 in Philadelphia Retail Contractors Association Pantera Global Technology Carol Montoya, CAE Make plans to join us at Dewayne Adamson, President Executive Director 10411 Corporate Dr. #208 CCRP July 27th, COPrairie, WI 53158 2800 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 210 2017 in Denver, Pleasant Alexandria, VA 22314 Ph: 877.219.9777 Ph: 703-683-5637 dewayne.adamson@gmail.com carol@retailcontractors.org www.panteratools.com www.retailconstractors.org

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2. 1: Scott Kerman, Mitsubishi Jet Towels; Andy Wasserstrom, Advance Sign Group 2: Janine Buettner, ArcVision; Jeffrey Sabaj, Hanna Design Group; Greg Mooney, ArcVision 3: Dan De Jager & Matt Becker with De Jager Construction, Inc.; Steve Bachman, Sharon Bachman, Nate Bachman & Ross Stecklein with Retail Construction Services

REGISTERED COMPANIES: 555 International 92nd Street Cafe ACS Advance Sign Group Allegion Arby’s Restauran Group Architectural Design Guild ArcVision Assa Abloy Big Red Rooster Bogart Construction Buckle Capacity Builders CDO Group Ceso, Inc. Chain Store Maintenance Coast 2 Coast ColeMax LLC Command Center Construction One Cornell Storefront Systems

4: Jose Vallanueva, Lorens Industries; Val Valenzuela, Assa Abloy; Keith Glassman, Glassman Planning Associates; David Glassman, Glassman Planning Associates; Josh Smith, Architectural Design Guild; Jan McKenzie, ASSA ABLOY; Jeff Roark, Little; Faith Hoople, Fulcrum Construction; Sam Estes, Architectural Design Guild 5: Chris Varney, EMG Corp; Lynelle Grimes, Fitch; Jade Nunes, Fitch; Blake Brosa, EMG Corp 6: Danny Stone, Bogart Construction; Sarah Brindley, 555; Brad Downs, Warwick Construction

Cyntergy De Jager Construction Inc Dental Care Alliance EBI Consulting EMG EMG Corp EMW Lighting Executive Consultants LLC Federal Heath Fitch Flatiron Group Fortney Weygandt Fulcrum Construction Glassman Planning Associates Inc Greater Oklahoma City Chamber Grimaldi’s Pizzeria Hanna Design Group Hatt Management

Heights Venture Architecture +Design Henderson Engineers ICI ICON ImageOne Industries Impact Specialties JCPenney JG Construction JLL KDS Construction Services Kingsmen Inter Kohl’s L2M Lakeview Construction L-Brands Little Loren Industries LSI Industries Martin Architectural Massage Envy

7: Sean McGinnis, Sargenti Architects; Rob Sargenti, Sargenti Architects; Walt Watzinger, Warwick Construction 8: Lisa Ploss, ProCoat; Tony Poma - Poma Retail; Stacy Peterson, EBI Consulting; Steve Heckman, Kingsman; Kelli Buhay, Retail Maintenance Specialist; Jeff Ryan. City Lighting Consultant; Roy Hasson, Permit Advisors; Ken Christopher, LBrands; Gina Noda, Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC; Ron Gladney, TJX; Val Valenzuela, Assa Abloy; Joe Rotondo, Schimenti Construction; Jan McKenzie, Assa Abloy; Jen Davis. Impact Specialties; John Cox, TJX

MBH Architects Menemsha Solutions Mitsubishi Jet Towel Mungsube Nordstrom Rack North American Signs Oklahoma City Chamber Pacificore Construction Pantera Global Technology Petsense Poma Retail Principal LED ProCoat Products RCA Rectenwald Brothers Construction Retail AMP Retail Construction Services Retail Maintenance Specialists Rockerz

Royal Seal Construction Sargenti Architects Schimenti Construction SMA Law Starbucks State Permits Storefloors Target Taylor Bros. Construction Co The Little Gym The McIntosh Group Thoms Grace Construction Timberwolff Construction TJX Tricarico USGN Inc Wallace Engineering Warby Parker Warwick Construction Weber Jewelers Weekes Construction

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

2.

1.

4.

3.

5.

6.

7.

9.

10.

11.

12.

14.

15.

8.

13.

1: Jeff Mahler, L2M; Bill Contz, Retired NFL Player for the Cleveland Browns & New Orleans Saints; Don Skorupski, Construction One 2: John Czepiel, Tricarico; Jennifer Sussman, Tricarico; Jim Nutley, Starbucks; Sophia Moraitus, SMA Law; Anthony Amunategui, CDO Group 3: Eric West, Allegion; Van Farrell, ACS; Joel Ilten, Allegion 4: Matt Frank, Fortney & Weygandt; Craig Marten, Dental Care Alliance, Craig Murray, Dental Care Alliance, Mitch Lapin, Fortney & Weygandt 5: Jason Kraus, Kohl’s Department Stores; Brad Bogart, Bogart Construction 6: John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; Tracy Anderson, Grimaldi’s Pizzeria 7: Win Rice, Wallace Engineering; Marnie Phelps, Cyntergy 8: Nicole Mikula, ImageOne Industries; Amanda Cash, Pantera Global Technology; Stacy Peterson, EBI Consulting; Jen Davis, Impact Specialties; Kim Curtiss, Nordstrom Rack; Melanie Gifford, Sargenti Architects

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9: John Stallman, Lakeview Construction; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors; Vaun Podlogar, State Permits; Kent Moon, Lakeview Construction 10: Jon Glanz, Munsgube; Nan Richardson, ACS; Wally Clark, JG Construction; Mike Schmitt, JG Construction 11: Mark Yager, Capacity Builders; Don Hasulak, Flatiron Group; Gina Noda, Connect Source Consulting Group; Keith Heinemann, Big Red Rooster 12: Darcy Shumacher, Wallace Engineering, Art Rectenwald, Rectenwald Brothers Construction; Tammy Fate, Oklahoma City Chamber 13: Judy & Fred Weber, Weber Jewelers with David Corson, CCR 14: Chandler Weekes, Weekes Construction; Hunter Weekes, Weekes Construction; Jack Grothe, JG Construction 15: Dwight Enget, Command Center; Paul Alarico, Retail AMP

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


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CIRCLE NO. 15


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


How John Varvatos continues to change the men’s fashion game

J

By Michael J. Pallerino

ohn Varvatos was a shy kid. It is only somewhat ironic that the teenager who worked an after-school retail job in Dearborn, Michigan would go on to be one of the premiere names in the menswear fashion game.

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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THE FATHER OF COOL

What makes us so unique is that John Varvatos has created a brand that covers innovative casual wear along with upstanding business attire.

With a brand defined by its rock ‘n’ roll-spirited leather jackets, strong suiting, and bold and slightly rebellious footwear, the John Varvatos brand continues to be the essence of cool. Varvatos cut his teeth at Ralph Lauren (a brand he once said wasn’t exactly his personal style), Calvin Klein (where he helped launch its first men’s collection), and stints at London Fog, Ralph Lauren again (created the Polo Jeans Co.) and Nautica. In 1999, he set out on his own, showing his first men’s collection and opening the John Varvatos New York flagship store in 2000. It wasn’t until his third collection, in the fall/winter 2001, that the Varvatos’ name attracted international acclaim. In a style critics cited as “masculine, but accessible,” the JV brand, under the umbrella of John Varvatos Enterprises Inc., is distributed in 10 freestanding John Varvatos boutiques across the country, as well as in high-end department stores all over the world. We sat down with facilities manager Dedrick Kirkem to get a glimpse into the John Varvatos brand.

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How does the store’s designs cater to how today’s consumers’ shop?

The design of the stores caters, in many ways, solely due to how JV fuses rock ‘n’ roll with fashion.

Walk us through how and why it is designed the way it is? The concept comes from the mind of John Varvatos himself.

What is JV doing to expand the brand?

We pride ourselves on our look, our clothing and our culture. We all work in such a fast pace way, that as a company, we basically can finish each other’s sentences. That’s a must these days, because that’s how a company keeps ahead of its competitors. The brand is in a “boutique” phase at the moment. I believe it will remain that way, which is what separates us from other menswear companies. Also, our “family culture” is another reason why our brand is so passionate about what we do. An example of what I’m referring to is

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


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CIRCLE NO. 16

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THE FATHER OF COOL

The goal is to keep our customers shopping longer than they most likely planned to do so, which is genius.

how closely the visual department, the facilities department, the A/P department and a couple of others have to do whenever there is a build-out or store expansion. Everyone pitches in from their respective roles and gets the job done. There are always obstacles involved, but somehow, we always come together and finish the job.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

Whenever construction takes place, there is a lot of “red tape” involved, and from many different departments within the company.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business today?

The biggest issue to me is D.O.B. status and the waiting game we play. From my perspective, I see a couple of other things trending on the construction side. For example, a lot of companies have expanded their specialties. I have noticed that a lot of design vendors are now involved with construction along with redesign. They have stepped into the world of reconstruction.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


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CIRCLE NO. 17

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THE FATHER OF COOL In addition, it seems that many companies have increased in pricing (depending upon the needs of the customer) in many different fields. It’s not easy to put the mind of JV into words, since he is so smart and passionate about the brand. All I can say is that I’m always in awe whenever I sit in a meeting with him. I truly believe that he has captured the imagination of our clients by dressing the stores the way he does. The goal is to keep our customers shopping longer than they most likely planned to do so, which is genius.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

Sustainability is easy if the brand/company you work for is streamlined. I have no issues in that area.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

I see us growing by leaps and bounds. Hopefully, that could mean future growth for me as well.

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JV creates an eclectic environment for people to shop in today. That’s one of the key components to his brand.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


$FRA-690_Commercial_ConstRenov_7x9.75_PA-BULLITT_Early2018.indd 1

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1/25/18 4:39 PM


THE FATHER OF COOL What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now?

The biggest item for me right now is the reconstruction development of two floors in our corporate headquarters.

What does your typical day look like?

Are you optimistic about what you see in the retail sector?

The retail sector is skeptical. It makes you think about your future.

What is the secret to creating a “must visit” retail store in today’s competitive landscape? This goes back to the question you asked earlier. JV creates an eclectic environment for people to shop in today. That’s one of the key components to his brand.

On a typical day for me is hectic. Today, we’re expanding from showroom restoration to floor expansion and build outs. I currently completed reconstruction of one of our floors at corporate, because we are about to sub-lease it to another firm. Also, while handling these tasks, along with all of those “everyday requests” throughout the company, I had to help with the preparation for Grammys weekend, which is huge for JV. His brand is fused with fashion with rock ‘n’ roll, so he dressed a lot of the performers for the show and red carpet. Every department in the company is involved, which makes it a “family affair.”

Tell us what makes the John Varvatos brand so unique? What makes us so unique is that John Varvatos has created a brand that covers innovative casual wear along with upstanding business attire. CCR

One-on-one with... Dedrick Kirkem, facilities manager, John Varvatos What was the best advice you ever received?

“Change the game, never let the game change me.”

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you?

“Thank you for your hard work, it really shows.”

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have. What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

The most rewarding part is knowing that it was done correctly and received positive feedback.

32

Calmness – It shows you handle under pressure well. Perseverance – It shows that you can lead in any environment. And dedication – This shows others who report to you how they should aspire to be.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

What is the true key to success for any manager?

I’d say to absorb as much information as you can, because we all learn something new every day. It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been in the business.

What book are you reading now?

Sun Tzu’s “The Art of War”

How do you like to spend your down time? I like to spend my down time with my family.


CIRCLE NO. 19


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Forging

ahead O

ver the past few years, the commercial construction has seen a steady increase in the number of new builds and renovation projects. This year should be no exception,

according to some of the industry’s leading executives in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors.

Construction execs say the upward trend will continue 2018 36

The executives converged on Biloxi, Mississippi, to participate in the Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat, held at the White House Hotel, Sept. 28-Oct. 1 last year. The weekend gathering included a series of networking opportunities and educational platforms, including the roundtable discussion and one-on-one meetings. Following is the final installment of our roundtable discussion, which can also be found online at www.ccr-mag.com.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


Colleen Biggs The Little Gym

Marilyn Brennan Egan Sign

Blake Brosa EMG

Anthony Byrd

Darrel Chaney Prime Retail Services

Grace Daly Shop Talk 360

Glenn Davis RPM Pizza/Dominos

Rick Erickson Allied Partners

George Farrelly Aaron’s Inc

Stephen Gallant Barteca Restaurant Group

Dave Garvey Grand Hinckley Casino

Steven Hackworth Steak n Shake

Tim Hill The Beam Team

Tom McBride TJM Consultants

Jeff Mobley Qualserv Solutions

Tim Olson Glab Maintenance

Steve Olson CESO, Inc.

Rebecca Suen Hilliker Corp

Bob Vacsulka National Pavement

Julia Versteegh Storefloors

Candace Wells RPM Pizza/Dominos

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

37


FORGING AHEAD CCR: What’s the biggest surprise or success you’ve seen in 2017?

Glenn Davis, RPM Pizza: While building pizza stores in the south, I’ve always been able to get away with one unisex bathroom in a 1,500- to 1,800-square-foot space. But Louisiana and Mississippi have changed their rules this year and started to implement the change. Basically, municipalities are adopting the IBC (International Building Code) and International Plumbing Code 2012 and 2015. The ruling requires two restrooms if your occupancy load is 15 or over 15. With Dominos and the new pizzas they’re opening where the lobbies are bigger, we are asking that there be some seating areas. Our occupancy levels are running 30 to 40, so I’ve been able to get away with one restroom and one drinking fountain, usually a low one for ADA. But now with those adoptions to that, it’s two restrooms and a high/low drinking fountain. Across the board, it’s starting to do that. In the four stores that I am building right now, three of them have two restrooms. The only reason the other doesn’t is because the city adopted an ordinance overriding it. They changed the occupancy load from 15 to 30. So, if you’re going to build something in a city where you used to build – or a place where you were able to get away with one restroom – you might want to look into this. We’re talking a $15,000 to $20,000 increase in cost just by adding one bathroom to go to men and women and not be unisex. I actually wrote a white paper on it and sent it to the Domino’s franchise association. They’re going to publish it. Across the board, Domino’s is typically smaller unit squarefootage-wise. Unless you take the 100 square feet out of your space, it has to go for that second bathroom. These are about like a small apartment. It completely put me in a spot, where I had to revamp and work my architect into the process.

CCR: Target was one of the stores that encountered concerns of transgender bathroom. Does that come up at all?

RPM Pizza’s Davis: No, because with a restaurant, you have a men’s and women’s room or it is just unisex. All the bathrooms are still one use, so one-person uses it a time. Because we don’t hit the occupancy level, we don’t have to go to two toilets and one sink until you get to 75 people. They look at it like it’s an occupancy load of greater than 15. Anything under 75 or between 15 and 75, you have to have a men’s and women’s room, unless you can prove more than 50 percent of your clientele is one sex or the other. If so, the rules change. How are you going to prove it unless it’s some sort of retail operation that’s women’s clothing or something? With that, you can prove you have more than 50 percent is one sex or the other, so you’re stuck with two restrooms.

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It just raised my budgets and changed all that. I had to revamp all my floor plans moving forward because in our stores, something moves one inch way or the other, it’s a big deal. That can take you in or out of ADA compliance. That was a big surprise. George Farrelley, Aaron’s Inc.: For us, a lot of our old buildings, except the ones in the C and D markets, don’t have two bathrooms. We have one. If we do have one, it’s a little room. Now that we’re doing 100 and 150 remodels, we’re looking at redoing tons of bathrooms, not only enlarging them, but we have to add stuff. We have a couple projects in Chicago where we’re trying to figure out how to add a second bathroom to a brick building where there is no room. On top of that, we have to have plumbing in the back of the house to clean out our dryers and run water through, so we need a drain. Right now, where we have a drain is where the bathroom’s going to be. Now we have to move all that plumbing from Area A to Area B. It’s causing our budgets to go from 60 to sometimes 80, because you have to blow out walls, build walls, make new walls. It’s surprising. In the past, it was okay, but now it can’t be unisex. It has to be male and female no matter what it is. On top of that, like Glenn said, there are the water fountains. We don’t have water fountains in three fourths of our stores. Now we have to put them in – high and low. Again, it’s a matter of trying to find where to put them. Where do we have the plumbing? It’s not exactly the easiest thing to do anymore. RPM Pizza’s Davis: The biggest thing is older bathrooms are 5 x 8. Now the requirement is you’re basically 8 feet square inside in order to meet the new ADA laws. Like I said, you’re 64 square feet where before you were 30 or 40 square feet. Now you’re building small apartments. It’s really changing everything across the board as they adopt the current IBC code.

CCR: Are there reasonable accommodations available?

Steve Olson, Ceso Inc.: Yes. We try to work with our clients to do due diligence discovery, because you’re right; it’s very much a problem when it becomes a surprise. It will crush your budgets. They give some latitude to a building official if you can provide the reasonable accommodation, but you don’t want to find that out later. You have to have those discussions earlier. RPM Pizza’s Davis: One of the things is that it normally only goes toward existing buildings and reasonable accommodations because ADA is the same way. If you can prove that making a chance to current ADA codes, then yes, but on new construction, you don’t have a choice.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


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FORGING AHEAD Ceso Inc.’s Olson: Absolutely. We all have to keep looking at our facilities as these ADA codes and others continue to react to the world we live in. Twenty to thirty years ago, you didn’t have the same earthquake resistance in building design that you need to have now. Look at the hurricane impacts in some of these communities with the recent storms. The facilities that were designed to handle the wind impact are not having the same problem as the others. We just have to ask those questions up front and start to redesign our budgets accordingly.

stalls and a second option with smaller restroom units with water closets and lavs all in one. Colleen Biggs, The Little Gym: You need to look into The MacIntosh Group. They were one of my major resources when ADA codes were changing. Brad Gaskins knows every ADA code. Whenever I had a question or ran into an issue when I was in the middle of building a store, I always called him. He has been a great resource for us.

CCR: Going back to our original question, what were some of the biggest successes and surprises you saw in 2017?

Jeff Mobley, Qualserv Solutions: One of our biggest successes this year, and looks good for next year, is the Nichiha exterior fiber cement panels that you’re seeing all over retail and food service. They’re made up of a lot of byproducts of the concrete and paper industries. Nichiha is probably similar to Hardie board, but it’s is a little more colorful. Based in Atlanta, they’re in the hotel business right now. That’s an area we’re going to get into. That’s another one of our successes. It takes a little bit of a different install for those five-story buildings using scaffolding versus lifts. RPM Pizza’s Davis: You have to. It only costs you a little more for the architect to do it, but it can save you a ton of money in the long run. Stephen Gallant, Barteca Restaurant Group: I wanted to address the question that was raised regarding transgendered people. We’re a larger restaurant footprint, so we have multiple water closets or urinals as a code requirement. Instead of providing two different restrooms, we are making changes to provide several smaller stalls with a separate handicap option as well. Everybody has their own stall to use and it takes up about the same footprint. There’s a higher cost up front, but it avoids any controversy about which restroom everyone is going to use.

CCR: Is that a stall with a door?

Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant: Yes. There’s a large shared sink area with separate

40

“The biggest successes for us has been increased consumer confidence. When consumer confidence is high and parents are spending money, they’re more apt to use their discretionary dollars for activities for their children. They also tend to spend for multiple activities for their children instead of just choosing one.” – Colleen Biggs, The Little Gym

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

The Little Gym’s Biggs: For us, because I’ve been doing this for so many years, we were blown away at the cost of construction – material and labor. Our stores have almost doubled in cost for us to build, and that’s huge. Where we could have gotten away with an amount per square foot in the past, it’s just astronomically high right now. It really makes my job difficult because I’m really trying to get the best value for the franchisees and have the elite preferred partners on board which is almost impossible now with increased costs. I mentioned this a couple years ago, and I don’t feel the market has eased up much at all. In addition to increased construction costs, permitting continues to be a challenge for us. Some days it’s a nightmare. I’m not a fan of working with the cities, but we are aware it’s unavoidable. RPM Pizza’s Davis: I used to always have problems with that, especially in New Orleans. Last year I went with a company called Permits Inc. – they do all my per-


CIRCLE NO. 22


FORGING AHEAD mitting now. They’re licensed in every state, even Indiana, where it’s very difficult to get permits. My architects work with them within the due diligence, and they start finding out what is going to be required. The architect sends everything over there. They file health, fire marshal, and building, whatever needs to be done. It costs me around $2,000 per store, $1,800 to $2,100 a store. That is inexpensive. It’s cheaper than what the architects were charging.

It used to be, “You want work; you can do it at this rate.” Now it’s, “You want to do this work? This is what my payment will be. You don’t want it, you wait.” Over the last four or five years, everything has gone up. Like I said, I keep track of this with new GCs every year. Here’s your cost. Before, it was $1 to install. Now I’m at $2, and it’s an easier job. That’s what it is with us.

Steven Hackworth, Steak ’n Shake: To carry your point further, it’s what the market bears. It’s also the labor industry. The Little Gym’s Biggs: Maybe next year I won’t have this same We were talking earlier about what the minimum wage is. It has issue. The biggest successes for us has been increased consumer gone up. Laborers now make more money, and there’s not enough confidence. When consumer confidence is high and parents are skilled craftsmen or superintendents to go around. Therefore, they spending money, they’re more apt to use their discretionary dollars can demand more money for their profession, and they get it. for activities for their children. They also tend to spend for multiple That leaves less qualified people to try to fill the slots. To try to activities for their children instead of just choosing one. When conget younger people to come into the construction trades right now is sumer confidence is high we experience increases in revenues for very tough. They all want to IT or something The Little Gym Franchise community. If the that they can do sitting inside of an air-confranchisees are happy we are happy. “My biggest surprise has to ditioned building. No one wants to get out do with construction costs. there to work in the sun anymore. CCR: Where do you think the

higher costs associated with general contracting is coming from? Do you think it has to do with the subcontractor base and the lack of boots on the ground?

Green building now has come closer in scale, so that it’s not as much of a premium. In the hotel business, we’re finding more and more green building opportunities.”

Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant: I agree. During the recession, general contractors were bidding with almost no or very little markup in order to retain their staff and stay in business. Contractors won The Little Gym’s Biggs: It could be. We projects with very low bids and paid for have tried to limit the number of contractors their staff to stay on through the recession. we use to assist in mitigating the cost. I – Rick Erickson, Allied Partners Many who did not bid aggressively closed know contractors are spread thin these days their doors. After the recession contractors with natural disasters, increased developreturned to biding 7-10 percent profit or ment and other factors, and our project more which is where I am seeing numbers costs are relatively lower so we aren’t come in currently. always the first project they are looking to Competitive subcontractor bids are jump on. hard to find in some regions. We’re doing Even contractors I’ve worked with for 13 projects in Colorado and competing for labor to 14 years we have experienced increased with 3,000-5,000 residential units being pricing per square feet. It all has to do with build downtown. I have been told that there minimum wage increases, increased develhas never been more construction underway opment, and material costs as I mentioned in Colorado than today which makes it a earlier. We’ve tried to combat rising costs by contractor’s market. negotiating on branded materials but it’s not As far as Barteca successes, they are mostly related to our moving the needle much. business model. Most of the people in this room know me as being a retailer, and then being a developer, and now being a restaurateur. Aarons Inc.’s Farrelley: I’ve been on board for the last five years, Retailers are still struggling and more and more developers are lookand I’ve seen the price increases. It’s got nothing to do with the deing for restaurants to fill out vacant retail spaces. Barteca has had sign change. We’ve actually lowered our design. To install the carpet success taking spaces in older or developing markets and creating and the fixtures are a lot easier. unique restaurants that thrive because of the value of the food, brand Four to five years ago, you weren’t building anything. There was and our people. nothing to be built. At that time, we were building. We were going hogwild building, because for us, the economy being bad helped. Our sales Rebecca Suen, Hilliker Corporation: The biggest surprise for were up, so we were building. Now everyone’s building. In Atlanta, you me was seeing how fast and how drastic the real estate market in can’t go down a street without see a new building being built. North St. Louis has changed within the year because of the new The supply and demand is just at the point where they can NGA facility. NGA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, has a charge it. You have three choices: You get it fixed, get it built or wait.

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FORGING AHEAD

$1.75 billion project developed in North St. Louis. It is in an area that certainly was not growing. It was dying frankly. There were a lot of old warehouses that had been sitting on the market for four or five years without any sort of activities. All of a sudden, because of the NGA relocation, which brought in over 3,000 employees, the warehouses started getting snatched up. Not only in just the North St. Louis County, but in the neighboring areas, too. People are not finding warehouse to buy. And there are a lot of buyers out there wanting to purchase a warehouse, but they can’t find anything. A warehouse a year ago in that area were probably going for $5 to $6 per square foot. Now it’s double or triple the lease rate. Everyone wants in there.

“The only caution is if you’re looking to build in a certain city, look in advance to see if they have a requirement to meet a LEED standard. In some cases, cities require you to meet a minimum LEED certification they’ve adopted at least several years ago. I think it’s still relevant, but it could increase your cost exponentially as well.”

for us. Fortunately, as we approached July, our work picked up, and we were able to hit record months all the way through October. Summer and fall months turned into an overwhelming amount of work, so much that at times we even had to turn away business. We had hoped our business would be more level, but we are more curious how the first half of the year could go so poor and the last half be so exceptional. Were budgets not getting approved in the beginning of the year causing everyone’s activity to be lower?

Blake Brosa, EMG: We’ve experienced the same type of cyclical delay in work releasing. I think a lot of it had to do with people being uncertain in which way to take the business – do we reinvest in remodels, omni-channel, new stores? So, we too expeQualserv Solutions’ Mobley: Is it that rienced that lull in the industry, not knowing county, or are there others, that are attractive? when they’re going to hit the gas pedal or shift into overdrive, and then record months – Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant Hilliker Corporation’s Suen: Are there soon followed during June, July, and August. different counties that are more attractive to be in? Certainly. North As we look into 2018, I think we’re going to see a familiar menSt. Louis County was more of a lower income area. It wasn’t a tality of fail big, fail fast. New concepts being tested in local markets, thriving environment by any means, but now people want to buy with rapid national expansion for concepts that prove successful. warehouses there. I personally had a listing around that area, a small When people figure out what their next move is to improve the office area listed and sold within a month. In the commercial world, customer experience, convenience, and differentiation – it is going to that’s quick. be all hands on deck. Tim Hill, The Beam Team: We had forecasted a great year for 2017. However, January through June were surprisingly low months

44

Bob Vacsulka, National Pavement: We saw the same thing with traditional customers who we get work with every year on capital

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 24


FORGING AHEAD projects. All the capital projects were released later. They were released more into May, when they traditionally would be released by April 1. So I concur, every month has been better and better. Rick Erickson, Allied Partners: My biggest surprise has to do with construction costs. Green building now has come closer in scale, so that it’s not as much of a premium. In the hotel business, we’re finding more and more green building opportunities. This isn’t LEED-certified. I’m a LEED AP, but I don’t believe in the point system. European has other certifications that are out there. I don’t think in today’s world you need a plaque on your wall. I think you just need to advertise that you’re green and

business has a philanthropy or cause you’re working with. They want to do business with businesses that pay attention to the environment and want to be part of the change. They are passionate about the materials you use within your facility. For some, it is a decision- maker over spending with you or another competitor. We have found these findings through focus groups. Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant: I agree, and I have always met the requirements to get LEED certification that were necessary as a result of a developers shopping center certification. I never felt the need to hire certified vendors, third-party vendors, to confirm I met a standard and to obtain a plaque. The Little Gym’s Biggs: We have our own program of being certified for a sustainable The Little Gym. We do those types of certificates so that the parents see what each Franchisee has put effort into from the facility standpoint. Seems there is whole different niche that care about what their children are playing on in our industry. Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant: We’re paying extra money to use materials that are recycled. The Little Gym’s Biggs: Yes. So you don’t need the plaque persa, but it’s nice to display. We have found promoting the efforts on social media at the local level is successful as well.

what you’re doing for green. We found in the hotel business that it attracts guests to your hotel if you promote when you do things that are visibly green. Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant: For 30 years I’ve built stores that are sustainable, but have never felt the need to seek out the lengthy approvals or costs to obtain third party certifications. I have felt that consumers care more if you are giving back to the environment by building sustainable locations than have a plaque on the wall showing it. Customers do care if you use recycled carpets, wood, lighting, fixtures and are conscious in decisions to build locations. The Little Gym’s Biggs: No, but Millennials care about that. People care if your

46

“By far for us, the biggest surprise was the hurricane coming through Florida. Not that we were surprised it came, but we had a lot of work going on down there, time specific, dates to end the projects, and a lot of people down there. Some wanted to evacuate, some wanted to stay to make sure they got the project done on time and all that.” – Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

Anthony Byrd: I want to share about my biggest success, which was to become Green Associate accredited. I had it as a goal to take the exam and pass it. I was just dreading it. But when I got accredited, it was a nice pat on the back. I didn’t get as much of a response from LinkedIn or any other places that it was even really acknowledged. So I have a question for the group – is LEED still relevant? I know we just talked about doing that, but personal growth, professional growth, because I’m considering getting LEED AP, I’m wondering is it worthwhile? Allied Partner’s Erickson: My personal opinion is it really isn’t. Knowing green development, and green attributes, and energy efficiency, and things like that is very important. But that certification, I think it’s been diluted.


CIRCLE NO. 25


FORGING AHEAD

“The delay in work from traditional customers that we had in the national space was a surprise. It lead to success in terms of us drilling down and getting into different customer verticals than we had worked in prior.” – National Pavement’s Vacsulka

CESO Inc.’s Olson: I would say that sustainable design, green design, has become a prerequisite. It’s almost an understanding that you have enough knowledge on the team that you’re going to do it that way. Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant: The caution is if you’re looking to build in a certain city, check in advance to see if they or the developer have a requirement to meet a LEED or any other standard. In some cases, cities or developers require you to meet a minimum certification they’ve adopted at least several years ago. I think it’s still relevant, but it could increase your cost exponentially.

We get them all up there. And once the storm hits, the power goes out in our office for a couple days. That was a surprise but, we got through that and got everyone back down to Florida. They rescheduled the projects with the clients and get it where everybody’s happy and satisfied with the time they’re going to be completed. That was quite a chore, so I’m proud of the people in our company who worked on all that and got it done. I would say 2018 is going to be basically more of the same, hopefully minus the hurricanes!. There will be spikes and downturns, and the amount of work and capital spend. You just have to be ready to manage those ups and downs. Aaron’s Inc.’s Farrelley: I’m kind of jumping off construction to talk signage. For me, it was a surprise of the code changes in cities. Doing 150 remodels and trying to change some of our signage, we saw a lot of code changes. With all the changes, it was hard to get permits for sign ads. In Chicago last year, it took me a year and three months to get a permit. We had an expeditor. It’s hard to get a sign. And our signs are not those huge Best Buy signs. My literal square footage on a sign is usually 120. They’re cloud signs, hand formed with a pillbox underneath that says, “Furniture, Computer, Appliances.” They’re LEDs now, but it’s just the fact of we had to jump through hoops.

Steak ’n Shake’s Hackworth: I’d like to add to that point. Look at states like California, where they have a new energy code, Title 24. Basically, it’s mandated anyway. You have to go by that if you’re going to get a building permit, or you’re not going to get a building permit. You’re not going to get a store there. Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services: By far for us, the biggest surprise was the hurricane coming through Florida. Not that we were surprised it came, but we had a lot of work going on down there, time specific, dates to end the projects, and a lot of people down there. Some wanted to evacuate, some wanted to stay to make sure they got the project done on time and all that. Logistically, I’m kind of proud of what we ended up doing. We did evacuate everybody and their families. At one end of our Headquarters building in Flowery Branch, GA, we have a chapel. We got in the chapel, and brought our people up, and put food in there and, of course, we had a number of restroom facilities and so forth. Then we opened it up to the public, too. Some of our crews brought families from some of the project area they were in and said, “If you need a place to go, come on up. You can stay in Georgia.”

48

Tim Olson, Glab Maintenance: We found the same thing with a signage job just outside of Chicago. Our client had to either reduce the size of a sign that has been there for years, or paint the whole side of their building a different color. Aaron’s Inc.’s Farrelley: We have to pay for a permit that takes a month and a half to get. They’re coming to me asking me to take my sign down, but yet talking about shrinking my sign. They make me pay $400 to $500 for a permit, and then want it smaller.” It’s frustrating how it works.

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FORGING AHEAD Candace Wells, RPM Pizza: That’s the same thing that we’ve dealt with in the past. We did a relocation of a store where the city would not allow the signage to have more than one color or logos. I feel these type of city standards can hurt a brand in that area. At the end of the day, people know the brand by the logo. Marilyn Brennan, Egan Sign: This is why people say they hate signs. I want to put that right out there because it’s complicated. There are lot of brands, a lot of different colors, different shapes, different sizes. Townships don’t always like this. There are increasingly more architectural control boards that have a plan for how they want signage to look. They want things to look like small towns and not like Times Square. They want uniformity, which is not great for anyone’s brand because your brand is your brand, and people recognize the logo and colors. Studies show that most people don’t read entire words. They identify Logos much easier.

personal to us, so getting proper signage and effective signage are two things that we believe in wholeheartedly, and we fight very strongly for our clients.

CCR: So it’s a partnership approach?

Egan Sign’s Brennan: Yes. It is about having in-house people, who are very consistent, call every day, and kind of don’t let them off the hook. I’ve had places rezoned. You have to talk to building planners sometimes, not just the sign permit coordinator in the township. You have to be creative. We are actually hiring another permit coordinator right now. That person will be critical in acquiring new business because that’s something you’re all struggling with. So being able to support that internally is really important. They need to have a strategic process, not just say you cannot have that sign. You have to go back again and ask about this. Ask about that other secondary road. You’re facing two roads, not one. It’s about really pushing for the most signage, because at the end of the day, it’s about your business, safety and decision-making. Julia Versteegh, Storefloors: One of the biggest things that I saw was there were quite a few retailers that went out of business. And it looks like the trend will continue. Look at the difference that Amazon is making all over the world. It’s huge. They’re now in grocery. They’re getting into retail, brick and mortar. How far will it go? Some of the companies who are failing, maybe they’re not doing so well online. Everyone has to have an Omni- channel system. You can’t just be good at retail sales anymore. It’s just surprising where we’re headed.

I’m a really big proponent on investigating the viability of variances. Egan recommends a lot of variances to our clients across the country. I was just out in Schaumburg, Ill representing our client for a variance. It was about pleading the request on behalf of their business, because at the end of the day, cities want your tax dollars. They want your business. You’re bringing revenue and jobs into those cities and towns. It’s about pleading your case for effective signage and working with various zoning entities. To do this effectively, we have in-house permit expeditors that strictly just deal with signage. I find that some people think that anyone could procure a sign permit, that is not the case. When you hire a subcontractor, code checkers, etc., they’re not really fighting for you. You need a partner. Your signage is very

50

Ceso Inc.’s Olson: I agree. I don’t think e-commerce is doing anything except causing traditional retail to reinvent itself. We are all social engines. We want to go out and be entertained, and retail has to react to that. It has to have a real purpose behind it, and has to have a social connection. I think that’s what’s causing the successful retailers to rethink their models. It has probably caused some to put their expansion plans on hold while they think about it. If they figure that out, they will be able to react quickly, because in six months, you have to go in and think about your plan again. You cannot go in with a three-year plan anymore. You’ve got to go in with a six-month plan and keep reevaluating. Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant: The companies that are failing today are just stagnant. They’re trying promotional gimmicks to draw consumers back in, and they’re not reinventing how they do business. They’re pulling people off the sales floor to save money. Customers today want face-to-face interaction, a higher degree of

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FORGING AHEAD customer service and answers to their questions. Retailers and developers who concentrate on wowing customers and providing some sort of entertainment value or other draws for families on site will succeed. Grace Daly, Shop Talk 360: Anthony Byrd and I came from Blockbuster Video, back in the early ’90s. When Blockbuster Video came out, everyone was like, “Oh, that’s the end of movie theaters.” No way. It made everyone up their game. Now you’ve got movie dining experiences. So what’s going to happen is this whole online shopping experience is going to continue to make true retailers, brick and mortar, up their game.

CCR: Amazon is creating partnerships with retailers. They just partnered with Kohl’s, where customers can return items.

“I’m really big on variances. I go for a lot of variances around the country. I was just out in Schaumburg, Ill. It was about pleading your business, because at the end of the day, they want your tax dollars. They want your business. You’re bringing revenue into those cities and towns.”

coming to brick and mortar right now, so I think there’s still a great value across all generations of the population who still want to go out and have that in-store experience. I honestly will not buy a pair of shoes – the Millennial generation here – unless I try them on. Also, keep in mind that this holiday season 68% of Millennials expressed that it is critical for an online retailer to also have a brick and mortar presence – another strong indicator of the relevance for brick and mortar retail and the convenience desired. However, retailers that have failed to compete and stay relevant with an online shopping experience/omni-channel presence are struggling right now. The people who have kept pace with the industry are going to be the top competitors for the foreseeable future, but those retailers that failed to invest and connect with their customers in a digital capacity are now lagging and will likely be gone in the next two to 5 years.

Dave Garvey, Grand Casino: The sheer number of restaurant choices that are out Storefloor’s Versteegh: Another surprise there is mind-boggling. Currently there are is how long it’s taking the brands to do a more restaurants & food destinations than – Marilyn Brennan, Egan Sign redesign. It seems like they should be quick, there have ever been. With that comes the but they take so long. With all the compefact that there are no workers to support all tition out there, there needs to be some of them. I don’t know if Amazon acquired speed in the process. them, but the available work force is light. Minimum wage won’t go up to $15 unEgan Sign’s Brennan: I want to add that til the year 2020. However, the food industry I am pleasantly surprised by the number is already paying $15, because we know if of companies out there that are looking for we can get this group to come in and work good partners. for us, then by 2020 they will already be at $18 or $20. But if we wait to raise that to National Pavement’s Vacsulka: The $15, they might be in a work place that’s delay in work from traditional customers already paying them $15-plus, thus making that we had in the national space was a it very hard to recruit them. surprise. It lead to success in terms of My biggest surprise is the number of us drilling down and getting into different new restaurants that are opening. Every customer verticals than we had worked segment of our industry is adding more in prior. venues, be it fast food, fast casual, or fine dining. However, the seat occupancy in most restaurants through-out the week is about 30-40 percent, and that CCR: Okay, it’s our lighting round. What is on your is with 80- 90 percent of them realized on the weekends. And those wish list item for 2018? choices will continue to grow. So we need to find people who are National Pavement’s Vacsulka: As we look to 2018 and what going to fill those positions. to expect, we are focused on hiring and adding to our capacity to continue to meet the demands of our customers. EMG’s Brosa: It’s certainly interesting to watch the different avenues Amazon is moving to brick and mortar via… Amazon Go, Glab Maintenance’s Olson: I would like it if people would Amazon Books, Whole Foods, Kohl’s partnership, etc. They’ve been focus on people more, instead of just numbers. We have analytics an online e-tailing giant, but are clearly finding it essential to have in all these sports, like baseball, and they crunch numbers that a physical presence. You see a lot of e-tailer companies that are affect situations. In business, many times these numbers are

52

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FORGING AHEAD Egan Sign’s Brennan: I want to have more continued growth in the industry with really valuable partners that have longevity. I want to be able to grow with them. Grand Casino’s Garvey: I would challenge all of you to be creative and look to the high schools and other youth organizations to groom future Chefs/Management in our industry. We currently actively support a group called ProStart, which helps get young people introduced to the hospitality business. Using our trained Chef’s and Management we mentor students in all aspects of the kitchen. This program has been phenomenal for not only getting high school students engaged in our industry, but for capturing them before they hit the work force and get led in another direction. Storefloors’ Versteegh: I would like to see the trend of economic growth and strong spending to continue.

people. The retail industry would benefit if it were more personalized. EMG’s Brosa: For me, it is to continue to grow and develop EMG’s leadership development program. We’ve identified our top 40 people across the organization, so how do we continue to let them excel in their current roles and develop them for future roles? Steak ’n Shake’s Hackworth: I would like to see us get to opening 50 stores a year. Barteca Restaurant Group’s Gallant: I wish there was a way for towns and cities to standardize their interpretation of national code related items so that we’re not dealing with different idiosyncrasies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The plan review process is our longest lead time because it is hard to predict how standard details that meet national codes in one jurisdiction will not be acceptable in other areas of the country. Anthony Byrd: I want to be successful in 2018 by accomplishing the goals I have established.

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“You see a lot of e-tailer companies that are coming to brick and mortar right now, so I think there’s still a great value across all generations of the population who still want to go out and have that in-store experience.” – Blake Brosa, EMG

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

The Beam Team’s Hill: There’s a lot of talk about growth, but we are interested in profitable growth, not just revenue for growth’s sake. Hilliker Corporation’s Suen: I want to be able to improve my follow-up system with my clients. The Little Gym’s Biggs: For me, it’s about world peace, quality, just to have a better world with acceptance, because we see so many children come in and out of The Little Gym in a week. This is their future, so it’s our responsibility to pave that way for them. National Pavement’s Vacsulka: I’d like to see everyone here to be successful and form strategic relationships that are mutually beneficial. Qualserv Solutions’ Mobley: My wish is that everybody has a great 2018, too. I want to see everybody be successful. RPM Pizza’s Wells: With having 191 stores, my wish for 2018 is RPM Pizza will hit the goal of 220 stores. We are the No. 1 pizza brand in the world so we need to step up our game and be the largest franchisee in the world. CCR


CIRCLE NO. 29


The Skilled Labor Shortage: and

Cause Solutions

By Brad Chartier

T

he labor shortage in general construction and such skilled trades

as plumbing, HVAC and electrical work has been well-documented throughout the country, with older generations of skilled tradesmen entering retirement much faster than they can be replaced.

Why the ongoing labor shortage in the skilled trades has far-reaching effects on our economy 56

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

According to a survey by the Associated General Contractors of America, some 70 percent of U.S. construction firms report difficulty finding qualified workers. And the US. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the nation’s need for workers in the skilled trades is increasing much faster than the growth of employment overall. Among those sounding the alarm is TV personality Mike Rowe, former host of “Dirty Jobs,” who has appeared before a Congressional panel to call attention to the “skills gap.” Rowe launched a nonprofit foundation – mikeroweWORKS – to challenge the idea that going to college for four years (and piling up substantial debt) is the only way to achieve career success. Today, his foundation channels scholarship funds to students pursuing a career in the skilled trades. Here, we’ll examine some of the causes contributing to the shortage of skilled labor, and some innovative initiatives by stakeholders seeking solutions.


Causes of the Labor Shortage Retirements – Baby-Boomer generation of skilled trade workers is approaching retirement (more than half are said to be 45 or older in 2012) and projections indicate there simply will not be enough new workers to fill these jobs.

Economic Pressure –The Great Recession of 2008 forced many contractors working in the skilled trades out of business and caused potentially hundreds of thousands of individual workers to leave the field.

High School Curriculum – Most U.S. high schools have eliminated shop classes and other vocational training opportunities, as budget cuts claimed a traditional pathway into a career in the trades.

College versus The Trades – In many cases, students are counseled that going to college (and often taking on thousands of dollars of debt) is the only way to become successful, despite the fact that there is a surplus of solid, good-paying career opportunities in the trades that do not require a bachelor’s degree.

Solutions to the labor shortage

Scholarship Opportunities

Businesses, professional organizations, educational institutions and legislators each have a role in working to close the skills gap. Here are some of the initiatives being undertaken to address the ongoing shortage of skilled workers in the trades.

Rowe has made it a personal mission to help get scholarships to students pursuing a career in the skilled trades; his list of 2017 recipients includes more than 240 students. Now more businesses are also getting into the act when it comes to scholarships. For example, Heritage recently established its own trade school scholarship program – awarding two $3,000 scholarships to students in New England pursuing a career in the HVAC, plumbing and electrical trades. “We are definitely feeling the effects of the (labor) shortage,” says Brad Chartier, GM at Heritage, a family-run business started by his father and uncle in 1986. The availability of qualified workers is something Heritage has confronted head on as the company has expanded its service area into nearby Massachusetts.

Changing the conversation

“You’ve got to make work cool again.” That’s part of the message Mike Rowe delivered to a Congressional panel discussing funding for career and technical education and the skilled trades. Rowe shared his belief that a combination of factors have left many young people with a negative image about hands-on, blue-collar work. Today’s students are given the idea that obtaining four-year college degree is the only path to success, despite the fact that there are millions of good job openings that do not require a degree. “You have to make (skilled trades work) aspirational,” Rowe says. “You have to change the image of the opportunity.”

Training Programs

More training programs are needed for the next generation of electricians, plumbers and HVAC technicians. In addition to technical/vocational schools, and community colleges, a growing number of businesses are establishing more formalized training programs. Heritage PHCE (a family-run trades contractor based in New Hampshire) has created a fully equipped on-site training center at its headquarters.

Family Businesses – Many trades contractors are family businesses, in which the next generation may not want to continue the tradition.

According to a survey by the Associated General Contractors of America, some 70 percent of U.S. construction firms report difficulty finding qualified workers.

A matter of ‘economic security’

Through its scholarship programs, Rowe’s foundation reports it has mobilized more than $3 million in education funds connecting students and trade schools. However, he believes there is still much work to be done. Rowe told Congress that failure to come to grips with the skills gap “poses a clear and present danger to our country’s overall economic security.” The shortage of skilled labor in key professions is an ongoing problem with far-reaching effects on our local and national economies. Reframing the discussion, creating more training opportunities to help workers acquire in-demand skills and expanding the availability of scholarship programs that support such efforts will be an important part of the solution. CCR

Brad Chartier runs Heritage PHCE, a family-owned plumbing, heating, cooling and electric company headquartered in Auburn, NH since 1986. He operates an in-house training center ensuring his team delivers a high-quality level service.

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

57


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Survey recognizes leading architectural firms

W

ho are the leading architectural firms in the retail, restaurant, hospitality & other commercial sectors? Our annual listing highlights who they are and what they do. The exclusive report provides the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If your company was not on the list, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

$44,000,000.00 $41,854,036.00 $15,840,467.00 $14,579,067.00 $14,190,764.00 $11,135,000.00 $9,090,000.00

MULTI-HOUSING

Stantec Architecture Inc................................... Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates, Inc................................. FRCH Design Worldwide................................... BCT Architects................................................. LEO A DALY...................................................... Rebel Design+Group........................................ LGA Partners, LP.............................................. Greenberg Farrow............................................ Onyx Creative.................................................. BBGM..............................................................

$22,633,748.00

Stantec Architecture Inc................................... Arcplus Group PLC........................................... FRCH Design Worldwide................................... LEO A DALY...................................................... GPD Group....................................................... Ware Malcomb................................................ Little................................................................ RSP Architects................................................. Greenberg Farrow............................................ Wilson Associates............................................

$929,450,179.00 $657,232,023.00 $202,288,908.00 $189,553,000.00 $96,800,000.00 $91,250,000.00 $81,106,234.00 $77,636,630.00 $62,700,000.00 $48,000,000.00

58

$7,454,000.00 $6,105,000.00 $5,500,000.00

$6,626,368.00 $5,506,915.00 $3,000,000.00 $2,148,000.00 $1,957,669.00 $1,510,000.00 $1,500,000.00 $1,229,946.00 $1,200,000.00

RESTAURANT

HOSPITALITY

Wilson Associates............................................ Arcplus Group PLC........................................... Stantec Architecture Inc................................... Rebel Design+Group........................................ FRCH Design Worldwide................................... LEO A DALY...................................................... DiLeonardo...................................................... Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates, Inc................................. GSB, Inc........................................................... LK Architecture................................................

Core States Group............................................ Chipman Design Architecture........................... Greenberg Farrow............................................ WD Partners.................................................... Arcplus Group PLC........................................... Interplan LLC................................................... Stantec Architecture Inc................................... GPD Group....................................................... LEO A DALY...................................................... FRCH Design Worldwide...................................

$17,578,210.00 $16,800,000.00 $14,400,000.00 $12,600,000.00 $11,958,296.00 $9,500,000.00 $8,113,165.00 $7,700,000.00 $5,452,199.00 $4,994,831.00

HEALTHCARE

$65,770,628.00 $62,822,385.00 $46,892,895.00 $43,900,000.00 $29,649,400.00 $28,250,000.00 $27,800,000.00 $24,110,000.00 $21,753,000.00 $21,510,000.00

Stantec Architecture Inc................................... LEO A DALY...................................................... FRCH Design Worldwide................................... The S/L/A/M Collaborative .............................. Little................................................................ GPD Group....................................................... Hobbs + Black Architects................................. Ware Malcomb................................................ Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber.................. LK Architecture................................................

$169,270,001.00 $28,040,000.00 $9,650,371.00 $7,975,321.57 $7,409,124.00 $3,400,000.00 $3,100,000.00 $2,800,000.00 $1,500,000.00 $1,500,000.00

FEDERAL

RETAIL

Arcplus Group PLC........................................... Stantec Architecture Inc................................... FRCH Design Worldwide................................... Greenberg Farrow............................................ RSP Architects................................................. HFA.................................................................. WD Partners.................................................... Little................................................................ MBH Architects................................................ Sargenti Architects..........................................

TOTAL BILLINGS

Top Ten Totals

Stantec Architecture Inc................................... LEO A DALY...................................................... FRCH Design Worldwide................................... GPD Group....................................................... Cyntergy.......................................................... LK Architecture................................................ Hobbs + Black Architects................................. CESO Inc.......................................................... C.M. Architecture, PA....................................... Ware Malcomb................................................

$43,518,166.00 $14,373,000.00 $12,342,722.00 $2,100,000.00 $1,780,000.00 $900,000.00 $508,000.00 $450,000.00 $117,000.00 $100,000.00

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


555 International

James Geier, President 4501 S. Western Blvd. Chicago, IL 60609 (773) 869-0555 • Fax: (773) 376-0555 www.555.com • jgeier@555.com Year Established: N/A, No. Of Employees: N/A Retail Billings: $2,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $2,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,000,000.00 Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A Total Billings: $6,000,000.00, Completed Projects in 2017: 40 Specialize in: Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Pro Sports Retail and Concessions, Leading Clients: N/A

api(+)

Juan Romero, President/CEO 2709 N. Rocky Point Dr., Suite 201 Tampa, FL 33607 (813) 281-9299 • Fax: (813) 281-9292 www.apiplus.com • jlauer@apiplus.com Year Established: 1990, No. Of Employees: 29 Retail Billings: $3,160,100.00, Hospitality Billings: $601,500.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,238,400.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $5,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 78 Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, MultiHousing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Walmart, Darden, Bloomin’ Brands, Planet Hollywood, The Fresh Market, Publix, Regency Centers

Architectural Design Guild

Sam Estes, Vice President 2710 Sutton Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63143 (314) 644-1234 • Fax: (314) 644-4373 www.adg-stl.com • setes@adg-stl.com Year Established: 1981, No. Of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: $2,900,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $300,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $200,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,400,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 220 Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Office Depot, Petsmart, Hertz, Floor & Décor, Shoe Carnival, AAA

Arcplus Group PLC

Jennifer Smith, Business Development, Marketing & Communications 60 Broad St., 39th Floor New York, NY 10004 (212) 213-1181 www.arcplus.com.cn • jsmith@wilsonassoc.com Year Established: 1952, No. Of Employees: 7700 Retail Billings: $65,770,628.00, Hospitality Billings: $41,854,036.00 Restaurant Billings: $11,958,296.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $537,649,063.00, Total Billings: $657,23,023.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 112 Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Office, Commercial Complex, Theater, Convention & Exhibition, Residential, Transportation, Sports, Cultural & Recreational Buildings, Etc., Leading Clients: Hilton, Disney, Six Flags

ArcVision, Inc

Greg Mooney, Director of Business Development 1950 Craig Rd. St. Louis, MO 63146 (800) 489-2233 • Fax: (314) 415-2300 www.arcv.com • gmooney@arcv.com Year Established: 1985, No. Of Employees: 100 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2017: 1100 Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, All Retail, Leading Clients: Arby’s, Sketchers

BBGM

Bill Pelham, Marketing Manager 1825 K St. NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20006 (202) 452-1644 • Fax: (202) 452-1647 www.bbgm.com • info@bbgm.com Year Established: 1987, No. Of Employees: 34 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $2,900,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $1,200,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,315,000.00, Total Billings: $5,415,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 4 Specialize in: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Workplace Interiors/Corporate Offices, Leading Clients: JLL, Donohoe, Clark Enterprises, Carr, Starr Capital, R.D. Olson

BCT Architects

Bryce Turner, President/CEO 100 N. Charles St. Baltimore, MD 21201 (410) 837-2727 www.bctarchitects.com • www.ddg-usa.com bryce@bctarchitects.com Year Established: 1969, No. Of Employees: 70 Retail Billings: $4,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $300,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $3,000,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,500,000.00, Total Billings: $9,300,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 30 Specialize in: Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Senior Housing, Office, Retail Leading Clients: Kimco, Federal Realty Investment Trust, RPAI, GGP

CASCO Diversified Corp

Daniel E Cutter, President 10877 Watson Rd. St. Louis, MO 63127 (314) 821-1100 • Fax: (314) 821-4162 www.cascocorp.com • info@cascocorp.com Year Established: 1959, No. Of Employees: 131 Retail Billings: $13,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $200,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,800,000.00, Total Billings: $15,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 900 Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Bed Bath & Beyond, Dollar Tree, O’Reilly Automotive, Children’s Learning Adventure

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

59


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS CESO Inc.

Steven R Olson, AIA, President 395 Springside Dr., Suite 202 Akron, OH 44333 (330) 933-8820 www.cesoinc.com • olson@cesoinc.com Year Established: 1987, No. Of Employees: 150 Retail Billings: $10,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $600,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $3,800,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $1,400,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $500,000.00, Federal Billings: $450,000.00 Other Billings: $9,400,000.00, Total Billings: $26,650,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 1,500, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Industrial/Warehouse, Leading Clients: KFC, Bloomin’ Brands, Speedway, Loves, Valvoline, Kohl’s, Signet Jewels, Burlington, Tractor Supply, Cracker Barrel

Chipman Design Architecture

Lauren Chipman, CEO 1350 E. Touhy Ave., First Floor East Des Plaines, IL 60018 (847) 298-6900 www.chipman-design.com • lchipman@chipman-design.com Year Established: 1979, No. Of Employees: 138 Retail Billings: $6,200,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $16,800,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $24,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 537, Specialize in: Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Sustainable Design, 3D Photo-Accurate Renderings, Virtual Reality and Immersive Project Walk Throughs, Leading Clients: Ulta Beauty, Gap Inc., Banana Republic, Old Navy, Chick-fil-A, Noodles & Company, Red Robin Gourmet Burgers and Red Robin Burger Works, Lexus, Houlihan’s, Athleta, Dunham’s Sports, Skechers, Westfield, Sbarro, Pizza Cucinova, Centerplate, Saks Fifth Avenue, Hilton Worldwide, Cambria Suites by Choice Hotels Wyndham Hotels and Resorts, InterContinental Hotel Group, Chicago Blackhawks.

C.M. Architecture, PA

Nicole Urista, Marketing Coordinator 800 Washington Ave. N, 208 Minneapolis, MN 55401 (612) 547-1300 www.cmarch.com • nurista@cmarch.com Year Established: 1977, No. Of Employees: 69 Retail Billings: $7,965,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $27,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,880,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $248,000.00, Federal Billings: $117,000.00 Other Billings: $969,000.00, Total Billings: $12,206,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 787, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Taco Bell, Torrid, Skechers, McDonalds, Gander Outdoors, Best Buy, Auntie Anne’s, Advance Auto, Jimmy John’s

Coast 2 Coast Survey Corp.

Tim West, Director, Multi-Site 7704 Basswood Dr. Chattanooga, TN 37416 (423) 296-9000 www.coast2coast.net • twest@coast2coast.net Year Established: 2000, No. Of Employees: 95 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $9,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 830 Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

60

Core States Group

Natalie Rodriguez, Marketing Manager 3039 Premiere Pkwy. , Suite 700 Duluth, GA 30097 (813) 319-8755 www.core-eng.com • nrodriguez@core-eng.com Year Established: 1999, No. Of Employees: 262 Retail Billings: $1,931,507.00, Hospitality Billings: $519,236.00 Restaurant Billings: $17,578,210.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $22,113,864.00, Total Billings: $42,142,817.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 3,151, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: CVS, TD Bank, JP Morgan Chase, Saks Fifth AvenueOff-Fifth, Wegmans, Flywheel Sports, Tuesday Morning, Fogo de Chao, Applebee’s, Darden, McDonald’s, Panera Bread, Hardee’s, Pilot-Flying J, 7-Eleven, Casey’s General Stores, BP and Others

CREATE Architecture Planning & Design, PLLC

Frankie J Campione, Principal 45 W. 34th St., Penthouse New York, NY 10001 (212) 297-0880 www.createworldwide.com • info@createapd.com Year Established: 1996, No. Of Employees: 14, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2017: 62 Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

Cutler Design Consulting Ltd.

Paula Funk, Office Administrator 403-134 Abbott St. Vancouver, BC V6B 2K4 Canada (604) 681-5050 www.cutlerdc.com • info@cutlerdc.com Year Established: 2009, No. Of Employees: 10, Retail Billings: $3,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $500,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A Total Billings: $3,500,000.00, Completed Projects in 2017: 40 Specialize in: Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants Leading Clients: Samsung, Ted Baker, Flight Centre

Cyntergy

Jim Turner, VP of Retail 810 S. Cincinnati Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 877-6000 • Fax: (918) 877-4000 www.cyntergy.com • jeturner@cyntergy.com Year Established: 1997, No. Of Employees: 115 Retail Billings: $8,900,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $820,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: $1,780,000.00 Other Billings: $4,000,000.00, Total Billings: $15,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 317, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Dollar General, AAFES, Slim Chickens, Arby’s

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


ARCHITECTURE ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT SERVICES LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

CIRCLE NO. 30

www.greenbergfarrow.com


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS D Squared Architects

Danny D Clark, Architect 832 Rider Rd. Dawsonville, GA 30534 (770) 654-8892 dsquaredarchitects@gmail.com Year Established: 2017, No. Of Employees: 3 Retail Billings: $250,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $15,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $40,000.00, Total Billings: $305,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 10, Specialize in: Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Petco/Banfield

Darkhorse Lightworks, LLC

Dawn Hollingsworth, Principal 14541 Sylvan St., Suite 105 Van Nuys, CA 91411 (818) 514-2272 www.darkhorselightworks.com • dawnh@darkhorselightworks.com Year Established: 2016, No. Of Employees: 1, Retail Billings: $20,880.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $15,040.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $158,360.00, Total Billings: $194,280.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 3, Specialize in: Casinos, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Museum, Commercial Leading Clients: Westfield

Degen & Degen Architecture and Interior Design

Melissa Walling, Principal-Marketing Director 1402 Third Ave. , Suite 1100 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 623-6368 • Fax: (206) 623-6548 www.ddseattle.com • melissa@ddseattle.com Year Established: 1994, No. Of Employees: 23 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $2,000,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $1,000,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 11, Specialize in: Multi-Housing, Hotels Leading Clients: N/A

DiLeonardo

Elizabeth Hernandez, Business Development Manager 2348 Post Rd. Warwick, RI 02886 (401) 732-2900 www.dileonardo.com • info@dileonardo.com Year Established: 1971, No. Of Employees: 100 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $9,090,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $505,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $505,000.00, Total Billings: $10,100,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: N/A, Specialize in: Casinos, MultiHousing, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: N/A

62

ESa (Earl Swensson Assoc) Sandy Dickerson, Director of Communications 1033 Demonbreun St., Suite 800 Nashville, TN 37203 (615) 329-9445 • Fax: (615) 329-0046 www.esarch.com • info@esarch.com Year Established: 1961, No. Of Employees: 185, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2017: 475, Specialize in: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: N/A

FHA Architects

Harlan Faust, President 14344 Y St., Suite 204 Omaha, NE 68137 (402) 895-0878 www.fhaarchitects.com fhainfo@fhaarchitects.com Year Established: 1984, No. Of Employees: 20, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: $3,100,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,100,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: N/A, Specialize in: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Sweetgreen, Chipotle, Snooze an AM Eatery, Peet’s, Tacodeli

Fisher Architecture LLC

Keith P Fisher, Principal 542 Riverside Dr. Salisbury, MD 21801 (410) 742-0238 • Fax: (888) 879-7149 www.fisherarchitecture.com • kfisher@fisherarchitecture.com Year Established: 2009, No. Of Employees: 11 Retail Billings: $200,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $550,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $150,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $100,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $100,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $200,000.00, Total Billings: $1,300,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 100, Specialize in: Healthcare, MultiHousing, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Hyatt, Cambria, Chevrolet, Toyota, Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Ford, Chrysler, Tapestry, Starbucks, Saladworks, Dairy Queen, Wawa, Hampton Inn, Jimmy Johns, Harley Davidson, Long & Foster, Comfort Inn, La Quinta

Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber

Jenny Waugh, Marketing Operations Director 1515 Arboretum Dr. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49546 (616) 575-3824 • Fax: (616) 464-3993 www.ftch.com • info@ftch.com Year Established: 1956, No. Of Employees: 415 Retail Billings: $5,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $1,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $1,500,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,000,000.00, Total Billings: $9,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 50, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: AMC, Hertz, Meijer

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


Architecture | Prototype Development | Sustainability

TIME FOR BUSINESS Let’s Open Doors Together.®

877.584.8600 | SGADesignGroup.com © 2018 SGA Design Group. All rights reserved.

CIRCLE NO. 31

CCR 01-02-18


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS FITCH

Lynelle Grimes, Director, Business Development 16435 N. Scottsdale Rd., Suite 195 Scottsdale, AZ 85254 (480) 998-4200 • Fax: (480) 998-7223 www.fitch.com • lynelle.grimes@fitch.com Year Established: 1972, No. Of Employees: 80+ Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2017: N/A Specialize in: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, National Roll-out, Leading Clients: T-Mobile, Sprouts, H&M

FRCH Design Worldwide

Emily Hamilton, Marketing Manager 311 Elm St. Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 241-3000 • Fax: (513) 241-5015 www.frch.com • tcuster@frch.com Year Established: 1968, No. Of Employees: 1100 Retail Billings: $46,892,895.00, Hospitality Billings: $14,190,764.00 Restaurant Billings: $4,994,831.00, Healthcare Billings: $9,650,371.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $5,506,915.00, Federal Billings: $12,342,722.00 Other Billings: $108,710,410.00, Total Billings: $202,288,908.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 4,000, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Corporate Office, Leading Clients: Simon/Premium Outlets, General Growth Properties, Westfield, Cordish Companies, Macy’s, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Saks, Target

GPD Group

Michael Morrison, Principal 520 S. Main St., Suite 2531 Akron, OH 44311 (330) 572-2100 www.gpdgroup.com • mmorrison@gpdgroup.com Year Established: 1961, No. Of Employees: N/A Retail Billings: $10,200,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $7,700,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $3,400,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $1,000,000.00, Federal Billings: $2,100,000.00 Other Billings: $71,900,000.00, Total Billings: $96,800,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 1,800+, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal Leading Clients: Racetrac, Starbucks, Yum Brands, Signet, PNC, Meijer

Greenberg Farrow

Hughes Thompson, Managing Principal 1430 W. Peachtree St. NW , Suite 200 Atlanta, GA 30309 (404) 601-4000 • Fax: (404) 601-3990 www.greenbergfarrow.com • hthompson@greenbergfarrow.com Year Established: 1974, No. Of Employees: 363 Retail Billings: $43,900,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $250,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $14,400,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $1,500,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $2,650,000.00, Total Billings: $62,700,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 1050, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, High-Rise Residential, Leading Clients: Murphy USA, Texas Roadhouse, L Brands, Home Depot, IKEA, Meijer, Whole Foods Market, Starbucks, Chipotle Mexican Grill, Panda Restaurant Group, Circle K, Wal-Mart, Sunoco/Strips, Aldi, Men’s Warehouse, Levi Strauss & Co., DSW, Michaels, Panera Bread, Ultra Steak, Mod Pizza, Big Lots, Speedway, Bed Bath and Beyond

64

Group 7 Design, Inc.

Luanne Perry, VP Design & Operations 83 Cedar St., Suite 100 Milford, MA 01757 (508) 458-4545 • Fax: (508) 458-4546 www.group7design.net • lperry@group7design.net Year Established: 2008, No. Of Employees: 6 Retail Billings: $350,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $120,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $95,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $375,000.00, Total Billings: $940,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 26, Specialize in: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Office, Commercial Buildings, Leading Clients: Talbots Inc, Seven Hills Foundation, Community Connections, Lifeworks

Gruskin Architecture + Design, P.C.

Kenneth A Gruskin, Principal 294 Morris Ave. Springfield, NJ 07081 (973) 376-4411 • Fax: (973) 376-8989 www.gruskingroup.com • kgruskin@gruskingroup.com Year Established: 1984, No. Of Employees: 42, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2017: 351, Specialize in: BigBox/Department, Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Banks, Corporate, Residential, Auto Experience, Environmental Branding, Leading Clients: Verizon, Colgate-Palmolive

GSB, Inc.

Ronald G Smith, AIA, NCARB, President 3555 NW 58th St., Suite 700W Oklahoma City, OK 73112 (405) 848-9549 • Fax: (405) 848-9783 www.gsb-inc.com • gsb@gsb-inc.com Year Established: 1979, No. Of Employees: 36 Retail Billings: $607,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $6,105,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $961,170.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $197,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,506,120.00, Total Billings: $9,376,290.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 38, Specialize in: Casinos, MultiHousing, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Entertainment Leading Clients: Disney, Marriott, Love’s

HFA

Larry Lott, AIA, President/COO 1705 S. Walton Blvd., Suite 3 Bentonville, AR 72712 (479) 273-7780 www.hfa-ae.com • info@hfa-ae.com Year Established: 1990, No. Of Employees: 215 Retail Billings: $28,250,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $215,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $28,465,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 400, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Fueling, Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Love’s, Chick-fil-A, Cumberland Farms

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 32


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Hixson Architecture, Engineering, Interiors

Scott Schroeder,Manager, Business Development 659 Van Meter St. Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 241-1230 • Fax: (513) 241-1287 www.hixson-inc.com • sschroeder@hixson-inc.com Year Established: 1947, No. Of Employees: 135 Retail Billings: $3,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $20,000,000.00, Total Billings: $23,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 11, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Leading Clients: Saks, Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s ,GGP, Lord & Taylor

Hobbs + Black Architects

Amanda Curran, Marketing Manager 100 N. State St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (734) 663-1489 • Fax: (734) 663-1770 www.hobbs-black.com • acurran@hobbs-black.com Year Established: 1965, No. Of Employees: 63 Retail Billings: $2,800,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $148,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $3,100,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $457,000.00, Federal Billings: $508,000.00 Other Billings: $3,600,000.00, Total Billings: $10,613,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 65, Specialize in: Casinos, Shopping Centers, Education, Senior Living, Office, Worship, Leading Clients: The Taubman Company, Granger Group, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Restoration Hardware, Tucson Medical Center, Macomb Community College

Hospitality Design Group

Robert L Herbage, AIA, Principal/Architect 4035 Naco Perrin Blvd., Suite 200D San Antonio, TX 78217 (210) 831-3580 • Fax: (210) 399-9063 www.hospitalitydesigngroup.com rherbage@hospitalitydesigngroup.com Year Established: 1984, No. Of Employees: 3, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: $200,000.00 Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $200,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 25, Specialize in: Restaurants Leading Clients: Taco Cabana, Fuddruckers, McDonalds, IHOP

Ideation Studio Inc.

Jennifer Nemec, Principal 1000 N. Halsted St. , Suite 205 Chicago, IL 60642 (312) 664-5388 www.ideationstudio.com • jnemec@ideationstudio.com Year Established: 2000, No. Of Employees: 10 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2017: 6, Specialize in: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, , Leading Clients: Subaru, Duty Free

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Interplan LLC

Patrick Ringlever, Business Development Manager 604 Courtland St., Suite 100 Orlando, FL 32804 (407) 645-5008 www.interplanllc.com • pringlever@interplanllc.com Year Established: 1972, No. Of Employees: 148 Retail Billings: $7,400,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $50,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $9,500,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,100,000.00, Total Billings: $18,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 970, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: N/A

ARCHITECTURE - ENGINEERING - INTERIOR DESIGN

J. Banks Design Group

Elizabeth Simpson, Marketing Director 35 N. Main St. Hilton Head Island, SC 29926 (843) 681-5122 www.jbanksdesign.com • elizabeth.simpson@jbanksdesign.com Year Established: 1986, No. Of Employees: 50, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: $3,177,876.00, Restaurant Billings: $4,132.60 Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: $834,749.38 Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: $87,348.97 Total Billings: $4,102,107.63, Completed Projects in 2017: 73 Specialize in: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Clubhouses, Resorts Leading Clients: Timbers Resorts and branded hotels(Marriott Courtyard, Hilton Garden Inn, Embassy Suites, TownePlace Suites, etc.)

Jacobs

Brad Simmons, FAIA, Vice President, Buildings & Infrastructure 1999 Bryan St., Suite 1200 Dallas, TX 75201 214-638-0145 • Fax: 214-638-0447 www.jacobs.com • brad.simmons@jacobs.com Year Established: 1947, No. Of Employees: N/A Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/17: N/A Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Mixed-Use, Transportation Facility Concessions and Banks, Salons, Post offices, Etc., Leading Clients: N/A

Jencen Architecture

Juleen Russell, Principal/Business Development 2850 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, OH 44115 (216) 781-0131 • Fax: (216) 781-0134 www.jencen.com • jrussell@jencen.com Year Established: 1971, No. Of Employees: 24 Retail Billings: $2,738,610.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $1,000,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $230,390.00, Total Billings: $3,969,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 176, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: Jared the Galleria of Jewelry, Alex and Ani, Refresh Dental, Precision Orthodontics, Kay Jewelers, Johnston & Murphy, Journeys

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS JGA, Inc.

Tara Liong, Marketing Manager 29110 Inkster Rd., Suite 200 Southfield, MI 48034 (248) 355-0890 www.jga.com • info@jga.com Year Established: 1971, No. Of Employees: 50 Retail Billings: $7,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $7,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 165, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: Whole Foods Market, Sundance, Soft Surroundings, Tappers, Allen Edmonds

JW Displays, Incorporated

Joel Warnick, President 450 State Road 13 N St. Johns, FL 32259 (888) 412-4009 www.jwdisplays.com • sales@jwdisplays.com Year Established: 2016, No. Of Employees: 5 Retail Billings: $100,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $50,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $50,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $50,000.00, Total Billings: $250,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 1,000, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: Coastal Healthcare, Southern Grocery

KPA

Amie Bentley, Associate Director of Business Development 360 Lexington Ave., 7th Floor New York, NY 10017 (212) 599-0044 • Fax: (212) 599-0066 www.kennethpark.com • abentley@kennethpark.com Year Established: 1989, No. Of Employees: 55 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2017: N/A Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Retail, Leading Clients: Westfield, Seritage Growth Properties, L3 Capital, Rouse Properties/Kushner Co.s, H&M, Columbia Sportswear, Lacoste, L’occitane

L2M Architects

Jeffrey Mahler, Vice President 811 Cromwell Park Dr., 113 Glen Burnie, MD 21061 (410) 863-1302 • Fax: (410) 863-1308 www.l2m.com • jmahler@l2m.com Year Established: 1994, No. Of Employees: 22 Retail Billings: $3,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $500,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,200,000.00, Total Billings: $5,200,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 250, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: Floor & Décor, Dejero, Hannaford, Dunkin, Hair Cuttery, Pivot Physiotherapy

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LEO A DALY

John McGauvran, Director of Marketing 8600 Indian Hills Dr. Omaha, NE 68114 (402) 390-4433 • Fax: (402) 391-8564 www.leoadaly.com • jtmcgauvran@leoadaly.com Year Established: 1915, No. Of Employees: 800 Retail Billings: $3,568,731.00, Hospitality Billings: $11,135,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $5,452,199.00, Healthcare Billings: $28,040,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $2,148,000.00, Federal Billings: $14,373,000.00, Other Billings: $124,836,070.00, Total Billings: $189,553,000.00, Completed Projects in 2017: 210, Specialize in: Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Leading Clients: Capitol One Bank, Royal Carribean Cruises Ltd., China Mobile, Dollar General, Marriott, Hilton

LGA Partners, LP

Paulette Burns, Partner 1425 Forbes Ave., Suite 400 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 243-3430 • Fax: (412) 224-4747 www.lga-partners.com • pauletteb@lga-partners.com Year Established: 1993, No. Of Employees: 45 Retail Billings: $3,800,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $79,100.00, Healthcare Billings: $185,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $1,510,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $2,880,000.00, Total Billings: $8,450,100.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 606, Specialize in: Healthcare, MultiHousing, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Airport, Retail Leading Clients: Aeropostale, Rue21, Bluemercury, Claire’s, Brahmin, FRAPORT USA, TUMI, NYDJ, Morphe

Lifescapes International, Inc.

Julie Brinkerhoff-Jacobs, President/CFO 4930 Campus Dr. Newport Beach, CA 92660 (949) 476-8888 www.lifescapesintl.com • julie@lifescapesintl.com Year Established: 1958, No. Of Employees: 35 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A, Completed Projects in 2017: 6 Specialize in: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Leading Clients: Burroughs & Chapin, Wynn Resorts Ltd., Hines, Triple Five, Ensemble Partners

Little

Bruce A Barteldt, Jr., AIA, Partner- Global Retail Practice Leader 5815 Westpark Dr. Charlotte, NC 28217 (704) 561-3461 • Fax: (704) 561-8700 www.littleonline.com • bbarteldt@littleonline.com Year Established: 1964, No. Of Employees: 395 Retail Billings: $24,110,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $427,110.00 Restaurant Billings: $10,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $7,409,124.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $49,150,000.00, Total Billings: $81,106,234.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 1032, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Banking/Financial Centers Leading Clients: Bank of America, Publix Supermarkets, CVS Caremark, BB&T, Belk, Smart & Final, Concentra, The Fresh Market, Whole Foods, Lucky Brand Jeans, Food Lion, Wells Fargo, Bealls Department Stores, Public Storage, Pandora Jewelry, Shinola, Wescom Bank, Chelsea Groton Bank, First Citizens Bank, Forest City, Marriott International

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


GSB, Inc. ArchItectS & PlAnnerS Turning Visions Into Reality Since 1979. Hospitality | CommerCial | entertainment CiviC | residential | eduCational | Community CIRCLE NO. 34

www.gsb-inc.com


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS LK Architecture

Dennis D Smith, AIA, President 345 Riverview , Suite 200 Wichita, KS 67203 (316) 268-0230 • Fax: (316) 268-0205 www.lk-architecture.com • dsmith@lk-architecture.com Year Established: 1967, No. Of Employees: 108 Retail Billings: $5,900,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $5,500,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,200,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $1,500,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: $900,000.00 Other Billings: $15,000,000.00, Total Billings: $30,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 40, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Federal Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Panera, Simon Property Group, Hilton, Marriott, Ascension, Arctic Senior Living

LSArchitecture, PLLC

Terri Lewis Stevens, Architect/ Principal P.O. Box 1287 Mandeville, LA 70470 (409) 299-0162 www.lsarchitecture.com lsainfo@lsarchitecture.com Year Established: 2004, No. Of Employees: 1-4 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2017: 10, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Smile Doctors Orthodontic, Tropical Smoothie Cafe

MatchLine Design Group

Lesley H Wyman, Principal/ Partner 10300 N. Central Expy., Suite 335 Dallas, TX 75231 (972) 707-0568 www.matchlinedesign.com • lesley@matchlinedesign.com Year Established: 2009, No. Of Employees: 8, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: $825,000.00, Restaurant Billings: N/A Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: $125,000.00 Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $950,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 27, Specialize in: Casinos, MultiHousing, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: O’Reilly Hospitality Management, Magnolia Lodging, Newcrest Image

Mayse & Associates, Inc.

David Goldston, Partner/ VP, Marketing 14850 Quorum Dr., Suite 201 Dallas, TX 75254 (972) 386-0338 • Fax: (972) 386-0578 www.mayseassociates.com • dgoldston@mayseassociates.com Year Established: 1983, No. Of Employees: 23 Retail Billings: $45,775.00, Hospitality Billings: $2,134,090.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,057,016.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $541,813.00, Total Billings: $4,778,694.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 112, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Industrial/Office, Leading Clients: N/A

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MBH Architects

Paula DeLiso, Vice President of Business Development 960 Atlantic Ave. Alameda, CA 94501 (510) 865-8663 • Fax: (510) 865-1611 www.mbharch.com • info@mbharch.com Year Established: 1989, No. Of Employees: 150 Retail Billings: $21,753,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $50,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $2,999,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $128,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $1,079,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $4,301,000.00, Total Billings: $30,310,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 1,100, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Work Space Leading Clients: Tesla, Yard-House, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, Levi’s, Williams-Sonoma, Target

MCX Interior

R. Shane McNamara, Co-Founder and Managing Principal 11 Broadway, Suite 615 New York, NY 10004 (310) 928-3988 www.mcxinterior.com • contact@mcxinterior.com Year Established: 2005, No. Of Employees: 50-100 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $13,000,000.00, Total Billings: $13,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 25, Specialize in: Corporate Interiors, Luxury Showrooms, Leading Clients: N/A

Michael Brady Inc.

Louis Cortina, President 299 N. Weisgarber Rd. Knoxville, TN 37919 (865) 584-0999 • Fax: (865) 584-0999 www.michaelbradyinc.com • louisc@mbiarch.com Year Established: 1990, No. Of Employees: 90 Retail Billings: $1,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $300,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $800,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $400,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $10,000,000.00, Total Billings: $13,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 100+, Specialize in: Healthcare, MultiHousing, Industrial, Leading Clients: Publix, Pilot, Regal Cinemas

MODA4 Design

Matt Bruggeman, Director 23 Wayne Ave. Dayton, OH 45402 (937) 818-7890 www.moda4.com • mbruggeman@moda4.com Year Established: 2007, No. Of Employees: 10 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,860,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 79, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, AdaptiveReuse, Mixed-Use, Entertainment, Leading Clients: Petsmart, Le Creuset, Benderson Dev., TJX, Floor & Décor, Hot Chicken Takeover, Sky Zone

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 35


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS MRP Design Group

Ken Dalton, President 3450 Acworth Due West Rd., Building 100, Suite 120 Kennesaw, GA 30144 (770) 917-9172 • Fax: (770) 917-9470 www.mrpdesign.com • kdalton@mrpdesign.com Year Established: 1989, No. Of Employees: 13 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2017: 127, Specialize in: Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Culver’s, Hilton, Zaxby’s, Yum Brands, Wendy’s

Nudell Architects

Wendi Nudell, Project Manager 31690 W. Twelve Mile Rd. Farmington Hills, MI 48334 (248) 324-8800 www.nudellarchitects.com • wnudell@jhn.com Year Established: 1976, No. Of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: $3,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $750,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $750,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $500,000.00, Total Billings: $5,000,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: N/A, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Federal, Leading Clients: N/A

Nvironment

Christopher Collins, AIA, NCARB, Principal 27 E. Russell St., Suite 300 Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 725-4644 www.nvironmentdesign.com • christopher@nvironmentdesign.com Year Established: 2008, No. Of Employees: 12 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $1,440,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,440,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 35, Specialize in: Restaurants Leading Clients: N/A

Onyx Creative

Fred Margulies, Director of Retail Architecture 25001 Emery Rd., #400 Cleveland, OH 44128 (216) 223-3200 • Fax: (216) 223-3210 www.onyxcreative.com • fmargulies@onyxcreative.com Year Established: 1974, No. Of Employees: 100 Retail Billings: $13,689,263.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $357,204.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $1,229,946.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,289,009.00, Total Billings: $16,565,422.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 719, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Dick’s Sporting Goods

72

P2 Interiors

Ponch Herrera, Owner 1801 Banks Rd. Margate, FL 33063 (954) 642-2255 • Fax: (954) 642-2255 www.p2interiors.com • info@p2interiors.com Year Established: 2007, No. Of Employees: 9 Retail Billings: $125,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $150,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $220,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $50,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $545,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 54, Specialize in: Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Corporate /Automotive Leading Clients: Oneblood /Ultimate Software

Paradigm Design Group

Lisa A Haude, President 9720 Cypresswood Dr., Suite 300 Houston, TX 77070 (713) 859-0279 www.paradigm-design.com • lisah@paradigm-design.com Year Established: 2002, No. Of Employees: 9 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $3,300,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,300,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 12, Specialize in: Hotels Leading Clients: Dimension Development Co., DiNapoli Capital Partners, Rockbridge (this is a very small sample of our clients)

PFI Displays, Inc.

Anthony R Tricomi, CEO 40 Industrial St. Rittman, OH 44270 (330) 925-9015 • Fax: (330) 925-8520 www.pfidisplays.com • artricomi@pfidisplays.com Year Established: 1970, No. Of Employees: 20 Retail Billings: $3,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $100,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $100,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,800,000.00, Total Billings: $5,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 30, Specialize in: Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: Macy’s, Bosch, Vecter

Pod Architecture + Design, Puc

Douglas Pierson, Partner 210A E. Main St. Carrboro, NC 27510 (919) 246-6466 www.podand.com • doug@podand.com Year Established: 2016, No. Of Employees: 6 Retail Billings: $373,600.95, Hospitality Billings: $74,156.66 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $447,757.61 Completed Projects in 2017: 2, Specialize in: Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Mixed Use Commercial, Adapting Re-Use, Leading Clients: Rabbit Hole Distilling, St. Francis School, Gill Holland, THB Group Entertainment

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


PRETENTIOUSNESS. THE DESIGNATED HITTER. BLOWN BUDGETS. BUSTED DIMENSIONS. AMBIGUITY. FINGER POINTING. AMBIVALENCE. DO-OVERS. PARTICIPATION TROPHIES. CHANGE ORDERS. FLOPPING.

INNOVATION. EXO-BOX CONTEMPLATION. LUMBAR PRESERVATION. WYSIWYGISM. DEPENDABILITY. FERVENCY. VERACITY. INCISIVENESS. MODERNISM. SOLUTIONISM. RESILIENCE. EFFICIENCY. ASSURANCE. REVENUE GENERATION. BENEFICIALNESS.

ARCHITECTURE | INTERIORS | PLANNING CIRCLE NO. 36


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS poole+drennan design studio

Damon Drennan, Principal 931 N. Edgefield Ave. Dallas, TX 75208 (888) 707-0104 • Fax: (214) 948-5530 www.pooledrennan.com • info@pooledrennan.com Year Established: 2010, No. Of Employees: 6 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $1,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $250,000.00, Total Billings: $1,250,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 40, Specialize in: Healthcare, Restaurants, Leading Clients: TGI Fridays, Jack in the Box, Qdoba, RA Sushi, Benihana

Puccini Group

Andrew Moss, Sr. Marketing Manager 433 California St., Suite 200 San Francisco, CA 94104 (415) 678-2714 www.puccinigroup.com • pstudio@puccinigroup.com Year Established: N/A, No. Of Employees: 30 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: $100,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,800,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,250,000.00, Total Billings: $3,150,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 13, Specialize in: Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Sheraton, Fairmont, Kimpton, Hyatt, Conrad, W, St. Regis, Kempinski

Raymond and Associates P.A. Architects

Alex Raymond, A.I.A., Architect P.O. Box 579 Palm Harbor, FL 34682 (727) 786-1937 • Fax: (727) 787-5205 www.rayarch.com • alex@rayarch.com Year Established: 1985, No. Of Employees: 3 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2017: 7, Specialize in: Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: Sarku Japan, Hart-Lyman Companies LLC.

RDH Interests, Inc.

Randall Huggins, President 2688 Berkley Ln. Frisco, TX 75034 (972) 267-5300 www.rdhinterests.com • info@rdhinterests.net Year Established: 2000, No. Of Employees: 12 Retail Billings: $77,800.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,639,200.00 Restaurant Billings: $145,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,862,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 7, Specialize in: Casinos, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: MGM Resorts International, Boyd Gaming Resorts & Casinos

74

Rebel Design+Group

Douglas DeBoer. Founder/CEO 2554 Lincoln Blvd., Suite 725 Marina Del Rey, CA 90292 (800) 92-REBEL www.rebeldesign.com • info@rebeldesign.com Year Established: 1985, No. Of Employees: 92 Retail Billings: $877,942.00, Hospitality Billings: $14,579,067.00 Restaurant Billings: $4,245,877.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $1,957,669.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,266,778.00, Total Billings: $22,927,333.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 13, Specialize in: Casinos, MultiHousing, Hotels, Restaurants, All Hospitality Venues, Leading Clients: Waldorf Astoria, 4 Seasons, Hyatt, W Hotels, Conrad, Private Label Hotels

RSP Architects

Jackie Peacha, Creative Director 1220 Marshall St. NE Minneapolis, MN 55413 (612) 677-7100 www.rsparch.com • communications@rsparch.com Year Established: 1978, No. Of Employees: 325 Retail Billings: $29,649,400.00, Hospitality Billings: $4,769,780.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,430,190.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $41,787,260.00, Total Billings: $77,636,630.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 279, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal Leading Clients: Target Corporation, Walgreens, PetSmart, Caribou Coffee, Landry’s

SAJO

Victor Khoueiry, Director 1320 Graham Mont-Royal, QC H3P 3C8 Canada (514) 385-0333 ext. 213 • Fax:(514) 385-1108 www.sajo.com • vkhoueiry@sajo.com Year Established: 1977, No. Of Employees: 160 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2017: 205, Specialize in: Specialty Stores, Retail Leading Clients: N/A

Sargenti Architects

Cynthia Hirsch, Business Development Manager 461 From Rd. Paramus, NJ 07652 (973) 253-9300 www.sargarch.com • chirsch@sagarch.com Year Established: 2007, No. Of Employees: 140 Retail Billings: $21,510,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $350,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $21,860,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 1300, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Leading Clients: H&M, Gap, Target

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 37


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Selser Schaefer Architects

Whitney Stauffer, Partner/ Business Development 2002 E. 6th St. Tulsa, OK 74104 (918) 587-2282 www.selserschaefer.com • wstauffer@selserschaefer.com Year Established: 1993, No. Of Employees: 36 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: N/A Completed Projects in 2017: 50, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Leading Clients: HEB Grocery Company, Treehouse, Equinox, Dollar General, Whataburger

SGA Design Group

Daryl Bray, COO 1437 S. Boulder , Suite 550 Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 587-8600 • Fax: (918) 587-8601 www.sgadesigngroup.com • darylb@sgadesigngroup.com Year Established: 1995, No. Of Employees: 90 Retail Billings: $19,000,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $5,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $178,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $252,000.00, Total Billings: $19,435,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 810, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Walmart, Target, Hobby Lobby, Best Buy, Burlington, BSRO, Aldi, Casey’s, Hanger Clinic

Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates, Inc.

Gil Garrison, AIA, CEO One Piedmont Center, Suite 303, 3585 Piedmont Road Atlanta, GA 30305 (404) 233-5453 • Fax: (404) 264-0929 www.srssa.com • info@srssa.com Year Established: 1979, No. Of Employees: 109 Retail Billings: $1,060,384.00, Hospitality Billings: $7,454,000.00 Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $6,626,368.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $7,898,097.00, Total Billings: $23,038,849.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 10, Specialize in: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Education, Mixed-Use, Office, Retail, Government, Industrial, Parking Decks, Performing Arts, Worship, Leading Clients: N/A

Stantec Architecture Inc.

Darren Burns, Vice President 1100-111 Dunsmuir St. Vancouver, BC V6B 6A3 (604) 696-8009 www.stantec.com • darren.burns@stantec.com Year Established: 1954, No. Of Employees: 22,000 Retail Billings: $62,822,385.00, Hospitality Billings: $15,840,467.00 Restaurant Billings: $8,113,165.00, Healthcare Billings: $169,270,001.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $22,633,748.00, Federal Billings: $43,518,166.00, Other Billings: $607,252,247.00 Total Billings: $929,450,179.00, Completed Projects in 2017: 3,285 Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Airports, Industrial Buildings, Justice and Civic, Entertainment, Leading Clients: AutoNation, CIBC, FedEx, JP Morgan Chase, Marriott, McDonald’s, Walmart, Walgreens

76

Studio Four Design

Stacy Cox, President 414 Clinch Ave. Knoxville, TN 37902 (865) 523-5001 • Fax: (865) 523-5003 www.studiofourdesign.com • scox@s4dinc.com Year Established: 2002, No. Of Employees: 16 Retail Billings: $172,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $83,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $86,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $183,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $94,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $1,550,000.00, Total Billings: $2,168,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 125, Specialize in: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Church, Industrial, Office/Corporate, Leading Clients: N/A

Studio 5 Partnership, Architects/Planners, llc

Allen Weltzman, Architect, Partner Emeritus 16-00 Route 208 S., Suite 305 Fair Lawn, NJ 07410 (201) 652-0555 • (201) 852-0002 www.studio5p.com • aweltzman@studio5p.com Year Established: 2005, No. Of Employees: 18 Retail Billings: $880,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $110,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: $440,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $990,000.00, Total Billings: $2,420,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 45, Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Multi-Housing, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Federal Leading Clients: Vomado, Urban Edge, Related, Madison International

Studio 11 Design

Kellie Sirna, Principal 5640 Milton St., #340 Dallas, TX 75206 (214) 206-1131 www.studio11design.com • kellie@studio11design.com Year Established: 2011, No. Of Employees: 30 Retail Billings: $392,580.00, Hospitality Billings: $3,227,880.00 Restaurant Billings: $654,300.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $87,240.00, Total Billings: $4,362,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 54, Specialize in: Hotels Leading Clients: Marriott, Hilton, Fairmont, Kimpton, IHG, Thompson, OMNI

Studio 3877

David Shove-Brown, Co-Founder & Principal Architect 3333 K Street NW, Ste. 60 Washington, DC 20007 (202) 350-4244 • Fax: (202) 350-4245 www.3877.design • dsb@studio3877.com Year Established: 2011, No. Of Employees: 18 Retail Billings: $51,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $1,560,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $292,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $34,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: $295,000.00, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $2,232,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 30 +/-, Specialize in: Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Health & Wellness, Residential Homes, Bar Design Leading Clients: Courtyard Marriott, Renaissance, Midici Pizza, Hilton Garden Inn, Hampton Inn, Residence Inn, The Smith

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 38


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Thomas Hamilton & Associates, P.C.

Doreen Louderback, Director of Marketing 5925 School Ave. Richmond, VA 23228 (804) 266-4853 • Fax: (804) 266-5203 www.thomashamiltonassociates.com doreen@thomashamiltonassociates.com Year Established: 1980, No. Of Employees: 14, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: $1,642,412.00, Restaurant Billings: N/A Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,642,412.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 46, Specialize in: Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Marriott, Hilton, ING

The McIntosh Group

Karen MacCannell, Sr. Associate 1850 S. Boulder Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 585-8555 ext. 320 www.mcintoshtransforms.com • karenm@mcintoshtransforms.com Year Established: 1998, No. Of Employees: 20, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $3,100,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 472, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, ADA Consulting, Leading Clients: Wendy’s, Pizza Hut, Massage Envy

The S/L/A/M Collaborative

Derek Czenczelewski Marketing & Business Development 80 Glastonbury Blvd. Glastonbury, CT 06033 (860) 657-8077 • Fax: (860) 657-3141 www.slamcoll.com • dczenczelewski@slamcoll.com Year Established: 1976, No. Of Employees: 190, Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: $7,975,321.57, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: $4,274,482.90 Total Billings: $12,249,804.47, Completed Projects in 2017: 25 Specialize in: Healthcare, Education, Corporate/Commercial Practice Leading Clients: The Hartford, Pfizer, Sanofi Pasteur, L’Oreal, TATA, BELIMO, United Technologies, ESPN, Medtronic, GE, Vistra Energy

Tricarico Architecture & Design

Jennifer Sussman, Marketing & Business Development 502 Valley Rd. Wayne, NJ 07470 (973) 692-0222 • Fax: (973) 692-0223 www.tricarico.com • jennifers@tricarico.com Year Established: 1987, No. Of Employees: 80, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A Total Billings: $11,696,427.00, Completed Projects in 2017: 500 Specialize in: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Automotive Leading Clients: BMW, Kate Spade, Foot Locker, Coach

Urban Architectural Group

John Urban, Principal 1242 Mann Dr. Matthews, NC 28105 (704)841-1899 • Fax: (704) 841-8440 www.urbanaia.com • johnurban@urbanaia.com Year Established: 1997, No. Of Employees: 7 Retail Billings: N/A, Hospitality Billings: N/A, Restaurant Billings: N/A, Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $1,500,000.00, Completed Projects in 2017: 121 Specialize in: Healthcare, Multi-Housing, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Aarons, Firenza Pizza

78

Valerio Architects, Inc.

Alicia Zaayer, Project Manager 5858 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 200 Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 954-8996 ext.122 • (323) 954-8965 www.valerioinc.com • azaayer@valerioinc.com Year Established: 1994, No. Of Employees: 45 Retail Billings: $3,284,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $4,000,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: N/A, Total Billings: $7,284,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 134, Specialize in: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Superdry, Bottega Veneta, Kiko Cosmetics, Fendi, Prada, Dolce & Gabbana, Barilla, Starbucks, Nespresso

Ware Malcomb

Maureen Bissonnette, Associate Principal, Marketing 10 Edelman Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 660-9128 • Fax: (949) 863-1581 Year Established: 1972, No. Of Employees: 427 Retail Billings: $8,500,000.00, Hospitality Billings: $700,000.00 Restaurant Billings: $1,650,000.00, Healthcare Billings: $2,800,000.00 Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: $100,000.00 Other Billings: $77,500,000.00, Total Billings: $91,250,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 2312, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Office, Industrial, Science & Technology, Auto, Renovation, Civil Engineering, Branding, LEED/WELL Design Leading Clients: Xfinity/Comcast, Charter Communications, Red Robin, Ericsson, Toyota, Experian, L’Oreal, Henkel, Honeywell, Medline

WD Partners

Molly Leonard, Sr. Manager, Marketing 7007 Discovery Blvd. Dublin, OH 43017 (330) 419-0181 www.wdpartners.com • molly.leonard@wdpartners.com Year Established: 1968, No. Of Employees: 328 Retail Billings: $27,800,000.00, Hospitality Billings: N/A Restaurant Billings: $12,600,000.00, Healthcare Billings: N/A Multi-Housing Billings: N/A, Federal Billings: N/A Other Billings: $6,100,000.00, Total Billings: $46,500,000.00 Completed Projects in 2017: 2500, Specialize in: Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Restaurants Leading Clients: Panera, Shake Shack, Whole Foods, Whole Foods 365, Home Depot, CVS, Samsung

Wilson Associates

Amanda Tower, Global Communications & Branding 3811 Turtle Creek Blvd., Suite 1600 Dallas, TX 75219 (214) 521-6753 • Fax: (214) 556-3993 www.wilsonassociates.com • wilsonworldwide@wilsonassoc.com Year Established: 1971, No. Of Employees: 290, Retail Billings: N/A Hospitality Billings: $44,000,000.00, Restaurant Billings: $1,000,000.00 Healthcare Billings: N/A, Multi-Housing Billings: N/A Federal Billings: N/A, Other Billings: $3,000,000.00 Total Billings: $48,000,000.00, Completed Projects in 2017: 38 Specialize in: Casinos, Multi-Housing, Hotels, Restaurants, Residential Leading Clients: Hilton, Ritz-Carlton, Montage, Marriott, Hard Rock, IHG, Lotte, Fairmont

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 39


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES

Fixture firms take center stage in annual listing

I

f you’re looking for the industry’s leading fixture firms, check out our annual listing, which highlights some of the industry’s leading companies. To help you find what you need, the listing provides the contact information and contact person at each of the reporting firms in the areas of retail, restaurant, hospitality and other commercial sectors. If you want to be a part of next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. 555

James Geier, President 4501 S. Western Blvd. Chicago, IL 60609 (773) 869-0555 • Fax: (773) 376-0555 www.555.com • info@555.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Garment Racks, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Wire, Wood, Lighting MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Pro Sports Retail and Concessions

American Tin Ceilings Roger Hawkins, Sales Director 1825 60th Place E. Bradenton, FL 34203 (888) 231-7500 www.americantinceilings.com • crystal@americantinceilings.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Tin MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Automated Cutting Technologies

Rodney Worley, President 1300 John C Watts Dr. Nicholasville, KY 40356 (859) 881-1228 • Fax: (859) 881-0671 www.actky.com • info@actky.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Federal, Multi-Housing

B Free Hanger Design & Display Ltd.

Bert Spitz, Owner 1410 Broadway, 24 Fl. New York City, NY 10018 (855) 714-2428 www.bfreehangers.com • bert@bfreehangers.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Custom Garment Hangers, Garment Racks, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Corporate, Commercial & Residential Interior Design

80

Banker Wire

Harrison Horan, Vice President 600 Perkins Dr. Mukwonago, WI 53149 (262) 363-6120 • Fax: (262) 363-9792 www.bankerwire.com • sales@bankerwire.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Metal, Wire MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Beam Team, Inc.

Tim Hill, Executive VP, Business Development 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 www.thebeamteam.com • timhill@thebeamteam.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, POP, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants

Bobrick Washroom Equipment, Inc.

David Leigh, Vice President, Marketing 6901 Tujunga Ave. North Hollywood, CA 91605-6213 (818) 982-9600 • Fax: (818) 503-9287 www.bobrick.com • info@bobrick.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Restroom Products MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal

C.R. Laurence Co., Inc. U.S. Aluminum

Andrew Haring/VP of Marketing 2503 E. Vernon Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90058 Ph: 800-421-6144 • Fax: 323-581-6522 www.crlaurence.com • andrew_haring@crlaurence.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Display Cases, Metal, Transaction & Hospitality Hardware, Entrances, Storefronts, Curtain Walls, Commercial Hardware MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 40


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Columbia Forest Products

Todd Vogelsinger, Marketing Director 7900 McCloud Dr., #200 Greensboro, NC 27409 (800) 637-1609 • Fax: (336) 605-6969 www.cfpwood.com • tvogelsinger@cfpwood.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Architectural Millwork, Veneers, Wood, Decorative Hardwood Panels MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Combination Door Company

Dan Schmidt, President/CEO 1000 Morris St. Fond du Lac, WI 54975 (920) 922-2050 • Fax: (920) 922-2917 www.combinationdoor.com • doors@combinationdoor.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Architectural Millwork, Fitting Room& Commercial Door MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Cosentino

Steve DeBerardino, Director, Corporate Accounts 355 Alhambra Circle, 10th Floor Coral Gables, FL 33134 281-202-3110 www.cosentino.com • steved@cosentino.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Shelving, Wallcoverings MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Duo-Gard Industries

Michael Arvidson, Executive Vice President 40442 Koppernick Rd. Canton, MI 48487 (734) 207-9700 • Fax: (734) 207-7995 www.duo-gard.com • info@duo-gard.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Kiosks, Daylighting Systems, Shelter Structures, Canopies/Walkways MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

East Coast Chair & Barstool

Ryan Mitchell, Marketing Manager 966 Perry Hwy. Mercer, PA 16137 (800) 986-5352 • Fax: (724) 748-6206 www.tableschairsbarstools.com • ryanm@ecchairandbarstool.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Furniture/Upholstery MARKETS SERVED: Hospitality, Restaurants

Econoco

Barry Rosenberg, CEO 300 Karin Ln. Hicksville, NY 11801 (800) 645-7032 Ext. 310 • Fax: (800) 505-8300 www.econoco.com • sales@econoco.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Metal, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Corporate, Shopping Malls

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Faubion Associates, Inc.

Leo Faubion, Owner 1000 Forest Ave. Dallas, TX 75215-0159 (214) 565-1000 • Fax: (214) 565-1015 www.faubionassoc.com • lfaubion@faubionassoc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate

Formica Corporation

Owen Serey PR/Communications Manager 10155 Reading Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45241 (800) FORMICA ® www.formica.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Laminate, Solid Surfacing, Recycled Leather Veneer, Metal Laminate, Solid Color Laminate MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Housing

Gleman and Sons, LLC

Ken Marsak, VP 110 Tech Dr. Sanford, FL 32771 (407) 969-9226 www.glemanandsons.com • ken@glemanandsons.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Reclaimed Barn-Wood/ Fixtures MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate

Gondola Train

Heidi Knapp, Sales & Marketing 135 Tennyson St. Potosi, WI 53820 (608) 763-4216 • Fax: (608) 763-4255 www.gondolatrain.com • gondola@gondolatrain.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Fixture Moving Systems MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

IceStone

Ashon McCollin, Marketing Manager 63 Flushing Ave., Bldg. 12 Brooklyn, NY 11205 (718) 624-4900 • Fax: (718) 624-4002 www.icestoneusa.com • amcollin@icestoneusa.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Islands/Back Islands, Countertops MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

idX Corporation

Lin Courtois, VP Marketing & Communications One Rider Trail Plaza Dr., Suite 400 Earth City, MO 63045 (314) 739-4120 • Fax: (314) 739-4129 www.idxcorporation.com • lin.courtois@idxcorporation.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Wood, Décor & Graphics MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Stadium, Finance/Banking, Automotive

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 41


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Innovations in Wallcoverings Madix, Inc.

Kate Tucker, Marketing Manager 150 Varick St. New York, NY 10013 (212) 807-6300 • Fax: (212) 807-1944 www.innovationsusa.com • marketing@innovationsusa.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wallcoverings MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate

JBI Interiors

Andy Braddy, EVP Sales & Business Dev. 2650 El Presidio St. Long Beach, CA 90810 (770) 329-6805 www.jbi-interiors.com • abraddy@jbinteriors.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Architectural Millwork, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

JW Displays, Incorporated

Joel Warnick, President 450 State Rd. 13 N. St. Johns, FL 32259 (888) 412-4009 www.jwdisplays.com • sales@jwdisplays.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Kiosks, POP, Wallcoverings, Retail Displays and Store Branding MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal

John Clontz, Director of Marketing & e-Business 500 Airport Rd. Terrell, TX 75160 (214) 515-5400 www.madixinc.com • jclontz@madixinc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Shopping Malls

Magnatag Visible Systems

Doug Weeks, Marketing Director 2031 O'Neil Rd. Macedon, NY 14502 (800) 624-4154 www.magnatag.com • sales@magnatag.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Display Cases, Kiosks, Wallcoverings, Visual Display MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal

Moen Inc.

Jason Reynolds, Director of Specialty Sales 25300 Al Moen Dr. North Olmsted, OH 44070 (440) 962-2000 www.pro.moen.com/commercial • jason.reynolds@fbgpg.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Plumbing Fixtures MARKETS SERVED: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Kaston Fixtures & N-Store Services, LLC & Design Group, LLC Granger Contracting Company, Inc. John Steger, President

8610 Directors Row Dallas, TX 75247 (866) 943-5334 • Fax: (972) 243-1545 www.kastongroup.com • john@kastongroup.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Metal, Perimeter, POP, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants

Kevin Zigrang, Director of Business Development 160 Chesterfield Industrial Blvd. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 579-1363 • Fax: (636) 778-2630 www.gnhservices.com • kevin@gnhservices.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Fixture Installation Services MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

KDM P.O.P. Solutions Group Pacific Fixture Co., Inc.

Samantha Sturk, Account Executive 10450 N. Medallion Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45241 (513) 914-4528 www.kdmpop.com • s.sturk@kdmpop.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, POP, Shelving, Wallcoverings, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Keith Stark, President 12860 San Fernando Rd., Unit B Sylmar, CA 91342 (818) 362-2130 • Fax: (818) 367-8968 www.pacificfixture.com • keith@pacificfixtures.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Islands/Back Islands, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail

Lozier Corporation PFI Displays, Inc.

Tracy Keith, Director of Marketing 6336 John J Pershing Dr. Omaha, NE 68110 (402) 457-8000 www.lozier.com • info@lozier.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/ Back Islands, Metal, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants

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Anthony R Triconi, CEO 40 Industrial St. Rittman, OH 44270 (330) 925-9015 • Fax: (330) 925-8520 www.pfidisplays.com • artriconi@pfidisplays.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Kiosks, Metal, POP, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 42


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Pioneer Millworks Redman Retail

Jered Slusser, Wood Design Expert 1180 Commercial Dr. Farmington, NY 14425 (800) 951-9663 www.pioneermillworks.com • info@pioneermillworks.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Architectural Millwork, Shelving, Slatwall, Wood, Reclaimed Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate

PixelFLEX

David Venus, Director of Marketing 700 Cowan Street Nashville, TN 37207 800-930-7954 www.pixelflexled.com • sales@pixel-flex.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: LD Video MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Sports Venues, News Studio, House of Worship, Concert Tours

Plymold

Ryan Dahnert, VP Sales & Marketing 14400 Southcross Dr. W. Burnsville, MN 55306 (800) 759-6653 www.plymold.com • dealersales@plymold.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Furniture/Upholstery MARKETS SERVED: Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Porcelanosa

David Carmona, National Sales Director 600 Route 17N Ramsey, NJ 07446 (301) 503-1348 www.porcelanosa-usa.com • dcarmona@porcelanosa-usa.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wallcoverings, Floor Coverings MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Prime Retail Services

Jeff Terry, Business Development Officer 3617 Southland Dr. Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866) 504-3511 • Fax: (866) 584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com • jterry@primeretailservices.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Installation MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal

Pure + Freeform

Farnaz Reneker, Brand Director 7561 9th St., Suite 200 Oakdale, MN 55128 P U R E+ F R E E F O R M (612) 208-8347 www.purefreeform.com • farnaz@purefreeform.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Metal MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Housing

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R ED MAN Jason Lu, Chairman & CEO 9 Qigan Road Zhangjiagang, China, 215600 86-512-5816 5899 • Fax: 86-512-5816 5818 www.redmandisplay.com • info@redman.cn FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Architectural Millwork, POP, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate SAJO Rocco Raco, Director, Marketing & Business Development 1320 Graham Mont-Royal, QC Canada H3P 3C8 (877) 901-7256 • Fax: (514) 385-1843 www.sajo.com • rocco@sajo.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood, Glass MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Corporate

SignResource Steve Morris, VP Sales- Western US 6135 District Blvd. Maywood, CA 90270 (832) 570-5572 www.signresource.com • smorris@signresource.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Signage MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate

Spacewall West Sue Waller, Sales/ Mkt. Mgr. 22527 SE 298th St. Black Diamond, WA 98010 (360) 885-1250 www.spacewallwest.com • swaller@spacewallwest.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Slatwall MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Shopping Malls

TC Millwork, Inc. Leo Couchara, Vice President Sales 3433 Marshall Ln. Bensalem, PA 19020 (215) 245-4210 • Fax: (215) 245-4729 www.tcmiller.com • l.couchara@tcmillwork.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood, Smartwall MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

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CIRCLE NO. 43


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Trial Design Inc.

John French, Director of Business Development 570 Boul Des Erables Valleyfield, QC Canada J6T 6G4 (450) 370-1377 Fax: (450) 370-1426 www.trial-design.com • jfrench@trial-design.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls

VARIDESK, LLC

1221 S. Belt Line, Suite 500 Coppell, TX 75019 (800) 207-2587 Fax: (972) 692-7839 www.varidesk.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Furniture/Upholstery MARKETS SERVED: Corporate, Federal

Visual Citi

Nadia Aminzada, Marketing Manager 305 Henry St. Lindenhurst, NY 11757 (631) 482-3030 Fax: (631) 321-1058 www.visualciti.com • naminzada@visualciti.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Display Cases, Metal, Architectural Millwork, POP, Shelving, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Visual Elements Showcase

Robert Turk, President 21 Regina Rd. Woodbridge, ON Canada L4L 8L9 (905) 761-5222 www.visual-elements.ca • robert.turk@visual-elements.ca FIXTURE MATERIALS: Display Cases, Garment Racks, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, POP, Shelving MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Corporate, Shopping Malls

Walker Zanger

DJ Intal, Marketing Manager 16719 Schoenborn St. North Hills, CA 91343 (818) 280-8300 walkerzanger.com • dintal@walkerzanger.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wallcoverings MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Housing

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Warner Bros. Design Studio Craig McNabb, VP Design Studio 4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, CA 91522 818-954-1815 • Fax: 818-954-2806 www.warnerbrosdesignstudio.com craig.mcnabb@warnerbros.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Furniture/Upholstery, Wallcoverings, All Custom Display Pieces MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Events & Attractions

Wilson Display

Elizabeth Wilson, V.P. Account Management 1645 Aimco Blvd. Mississauga, ON Canada L4W 1H8 (905) 625-9200 • Fax: (905) 625-3499 www.wilsondisplay.com • elizabeth.wilson@wilsondisplay.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal

Wilsonart

Customer Service 2501 Wilsonart Dr. Temple, TX 76504 (800) 433-3222 • Fax: (254) 207-3209 www.wilsonart.com • smartline@wilsonart.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Coordinated Surfaces: HPL, TFL, Edgeband, Cabinet Doors & Components MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing

Window Film Depot

Jeff Franson, President/CEO 4939 Lower Roswell Rd., Suite 100 Marietta, GA 30068 (866) 933-3456 • Fax: (770) 973-3986 www.windowfilmdepot.com • jeff@windowfilmdepot.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Window Film MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Multi-Housing, Any Commercial Properties

Yunker Industries

Nadine Seitz, Marketing Manager 310 O'Connor Dr. Elkhorn, WI 53121 (262) 741-5048 • Fax: (262) 723-3340 www.yunker.com • nseitz@yunker.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Kiosks, Metal, POP, Wallcoverings, Wire MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, C-Store Grocery

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


CIRCLE NO. 44


An interview with Martin Howard

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M

ore than three decades ago, the global ceramic tile industry underwent a major revolution relative to the commercial construction sector. It was no secret that ceramic tile was an ideal material for "wet areas" such as hotel guest baths and shopping mall public spaces, especially their highly trafficked floors and, just about any other area requiring a durable finish that was very easy to maintain. By Ron Treister Then, through-body porcelain tile was introduced. It quickly became the panacea. Being more molecularly compact than typical glazed ceramic tile, it offered the same durability and resistance to moisture, as did solid granite, at a lesser price-point. Over the years, the 12-inch x 12-inch format morphed into gargantuan sizes as large as 36 inches x 48 inches. And these sizable format porcelain floor tiles were no longer just "through-body" versions. Advanced inkjet printing processes were developed that actually gave both "looks" and textures, resulting in the final product being almost impossible to discern whether or not Mother Nature created it. Make no mistake – this printing procedure was no flimsy topcoat. Airports around the globe, for example, which have tens of thousands of people racing across their terminal floors pulling wheeled luggage on a daily basis, have been successful with their specification of HD printed, porcelain flooring. So what's next in the world of porcellanato? Over the last few years, a new phenomenon has appeared – now termed, "gauged porcelain panels." These are extremely large tile slabs, produced with fine porcelain clay, manufactured to minimal tile thickness without compromising the performance levels inherent to porcelain tile. Today, visionary architects & designers are specifying Martin Howard this material for myriad applications, including to perform as exterior cladding, to be installed directly over existing tile (which means the arduous, messy, time-consuming and disruptive process of removing ceramic or porcelain can be eliminated) and as monolithic-appearing wall applications. One of the few disadvantages of "regular" porcelain tile is weight. Gauged porcelain panels have become the ideal answer for many projects because when installed correctly, due to having much lighter weight, various structural components can be reduced – saving costs. With headquarters in Raleigh, North Carolina, and branches in Washington D.C.; Columbia, South Carolina; Birmingham, South Florida and Charlotte since 1920, David Allen Company is considered by many flooring professionals as being one of the top commercial tile installation firms in all of America. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with its executive VP Martin Howard (and current president of the National Tile Contractors Association), to discuss the great advantages offered by today's gauged porcelain panels.

Why has there been such a positive response since the advent of gauged porcelain panels within the commercial construction arena?

This newer product offering has been accepted in the marketplace because, in particular, architects and designers see the advantages offered by a large panel format that is much lighter in weight than other high-performance surfacing options. And due to their expansive size, there are less grout joints visible. That means a wall application, for example, can give the appearance of stone veneer at a lower price point, because single slab appearance is now possible.

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GAUGED IS THE RAGE Just how good is today's HD inkjet printing technology relative to porcelain tile performance standards?

It's so good that it's almost hard to believe. Almost any image can be printed on the face of the porcelain. And this includes the same visual appearance as offered by natural stone, in either slabs or cutto-size. Other looks such as polished or stained concrete, metallic and even grass cloth are being produced with great accuracy.

Since David Allen Company started working with gauged porcelain panels, what sort of projects have you worked on?

We've had six major projects involving commercial interiors, and one very demanding, and very gratifying, exterior cladding project. The

from natural stone. And, we were very pleased with Bosti-Set, as it requires only a single coat application for faster and easier installation than a conventional mortar. Once cured, it is easy to clean off tile surfaces before and after cure without the need for water or solvents.

You're working with new technologies. How does David Allen Company ensure that its installation contractors are up to date on how best to work with these newer materials?

We are blessed to be working with very professional, proactive material suppliers. Prior to major projects, there is a lot of training offered by these people to ours. Some actually spend an entire day on the jobsite with us to ensure that installation of their products is done in accordance with manufacturer recommendations, and that our crews understand the product and how to work with it. For example, Bostik sent a team of its people to the Miami Airport to be right there alongside our installers several times during installation.

What do you see as the future for gauged porcelain panels?

It has a tremendous upside. In particular, relative to exterior cladding. But there needs to be

We are blessed to be working with very professional, proactive material suppliers. Prior to major projects, there is a lot of training offered by these people to ours. interior project, which we recently completed at the American Airlines Flagship Club, located at Miami International Airport, consisted of approximately 7,000 square feet of Slimlite porcelain panels distributed by Daltile. These were installed directly to the walls of the club using Bostik's Bosti-Set thin panel adhesive.

Overall, how did that installation work out using the porcelain material?

The panels were very lifelike in appearance. It's doubtful anyone outside the tile and stone sector would think they weren't produced

much more research and training across the boards. Europe is much more advanced than the U.S. regarding cladding the exterior facades of buildings with porcelain tile. But, Europe also doesn't have to worry quite as much as we do about adverse weather events. For example, engineers and architects must be cognizant of "wind loads" and know how to apply materials in such a way that they will be able to withstand strong and potentially dangerous high levels. It's all about education. We believe the best tile contractor is one who is totally up to date on today's best and most current installation processes. Because gauged porcelain panels bring such great potential, we feel it is incumbent to always work with knowledgeable professionals, whether they're material suppliers or our installers. CCR

Ron Treister is President/Founder of Communicators International, Inc., a marketing communications firm headquartered in Jupiter, Fla. For three decades, his firm has worked with major accounts focusing on the commercial construction sector. He may be reached at: rlt@communicatorsintl.com

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LATE WINTER 2018

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Misty Cameron, Firehouse Subs’ manager of construction services Richard Elkins, Director of Construction Services

Burning

it up

How good food and philanthropy continue to drive the Firehouse Subs brand

Also Inside:

A special supplement to:

Historic Livermore winery building lives on in a 3D point cloud Photos by Sarah Hedden Photography


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Burning

it up

How good food and philanthropy continue to drive the Firehouse Subs brand

T

hey were a couple of second generation firefighters looking to supplement their incomes. But no matter what they did – rock ‘n’ roll, real estate, Christmas tree farming – it didn’t work. But Chris and Robin Sorensen are not the kind of people who take no for answer. So in 1994, they launched Firehouse Subs.

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BURNING IT UP

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

They were a couple of second generation firefighters looking to supplement their incomes. But no matter what they did – rock 'n' roll, real estate, Christmas tree farming – it didn't work. But Chris and Robin Sorensen are not the kind of people who take no for answer. So in 1994, they launched Firehouse Subs. The problem was that they had $100 in the bank and a seemingly insurmountable amount of credit card debt. No problem, right? Right. Fourteen years later, the vision that the Sorensens dreamed about is thriving – and then some. With more than 1,100 Firehouse Subs restaurants in 44 states, Puerto Rico, Canada and Mexico, the Jacksonville, Florida-based chain is one of the leaders of the fast-casual revolution. And, along with its varied assortment of hearty and flavorful food, the brand has donated more than $31 million to public safety organizations through its Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. We sat down with Misty Cameron, Firehouse Subs' Manager of Construction services, to get her take on where the brand is heading in 2018 – and beyond.

Give us a snapshot of the Firehouse Subs brand?

Firehouse Subs is a fast casual chain with a passion for hearty and flavorful food, heartfelt service and public safety. Founded by brothers and former firefighters Chris Sorensen and Robin Sorensen, Firehouse Subs is a brand built on decades of fire and police service, hot subs, steamed and piled high with the highest quality meats and cheeses and its commitment to saving lives through the establishment of the non-profit Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. The founders are the real deal, the food is their creation and the restaurant is built upon a family of franchise operators who share their same passion for generously serving food and community. Today, the brand operates more than 1,100 restaurants in 44 states, Puerto Rico, Canada and Mexico.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

We strive to create a restaurant experience that's welcoming to everyone. Our menu provides guests with a variety of

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customizable options – from steamed subs to freshly chopped salads, while our franchisees and crew members work hard to ensure each guest receives the highest quality service.

How does the design of your shops cater to what today's consumers are looking for?

Firehouse Subs has always employed a slow and steady approach to growth. Selecting the right franchisee, the right market and the right site are keys to our brand success.

Their needs have changed over the past several years. The need for convenience seems to be dominating the market. We're experiencing a higher percentage of traditional takeout and delivery, so we're adapting our operations to meet those needs. Partnering with third-party delivery services and creating designated locations inside the restaurant for "to-go" orders are just a few of the ways our brand is addressing this shift in consumer behavior.

Walk us through how and why it designed the way it is?

Our food prep line is linear in nature, so we wanted to use that to our advantage. Our menu boards are designed to run along the line, so new or returning guests can easily read it and make their decision while waiting in line to order.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

Our restaurants have always reflected our founders' family rich heritage of public service. Our newest prototype, released in 2015, is a nod to

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a fire station. Our typical restaurant space is linear, so with this design, our goal was to break it up by creating distinct areas within the restaurant – an entry area, which typically includes a brick arch or a bulkhead to tie in the fire station element, the dining room, which includes most of the seating and our prep line, and the bunk room, which includes our beverage area, restrooms and back of house.

What's the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

With the influx of construction opportunities across the country, the labor market has been stretched thin. All trades seem to be short on manpower, and thus the cost of labor has increased, thereby increasing the development costs for our franchisees.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

One way we are making our restaurants more sustainable is by making the move to LED lighting. We have a fairly simple list of finishes for our restaurants, and we also have one restaurant that is a Level 1 Certified Green Restaurant.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

As a brand, our goal is to serve hearty and flavorful food, and create a warm and inviting dining environment, while also giving back to the communities we serve. With that said, our greatest

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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS providing a quality brand experience – both for our guests and franchisees. It's a core component of our brand mission and a driving force behind our success.

What is your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

Firehouse Subs has always employed a slow and steady approach to growth. Selecting the right franchisee, the right market and the right site are keys to our brand success. Recently, we've set our sights on growth into international and non-traditional markets. In 2015, we opened our first restaurant in Ontario, Canada and have enjoyed steady expansion in that territory. Then, in 2017, we ventured into Mexico and the non-traditional marketplace, opening our first two airport locations in Jacksonville and Orlando, Florida. Simply put, we are growing in all directions and exploring several opportunities for continued expansion of our brand.

What trends are you seeing?

Trends currently dominating the market relate mostly to the off-premise dining experience. As mentioned before, with so many consumers ordering their meals "to go" or having them delivered, many restaurants, including our own, are adapting their facilities to address this shift in consumer behavior.

What is the secret to creating a "must visit" shopping environment in today's competitive landscape?

opportunities lie in educating those who have yet to experience Firehouse Subs – not only to introduce them to our food, but also to our culture of philanthropy. The heart of our brand is our non-profit, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation, which provides funding, life-saving equipment and resources to local first responders and public safety organizations nationwide. Our guests have a unique opportunity to give back to their communities with every purchase at our restaurants, and sharing that message with potential guests has become an immediate objective for our brand.

Are you optimistic about what you see today in the marketplace? We are very optimistic about the marketplace, especially as we explore opportunities for growth into more non-traditional markets. However, we're most optimistic about our ability to continue

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At Firehouse Subs, we believe this begins with serving a delicious product, prepared with only the highest quality ingredients, and providing each guest with excellent, friendly service any time they dine with us. In our restaurants, we strive to create a welcoming atmosphere and a quality dining experience, while also showcasing our commitment to serving local communities through our non-profit, Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation. Everything stems back to our founders and their passion for heartfelt service, hearty and flavorful food and public safety. It's what has set us apart since its beginnings in 1994, and what we believe continues to make us a favorite among consumers even now.


THE NATION’S NUMBER ONE OUTSOURCE CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT COMPANY Celebrating 20 years CDO the industry leader who specializes in partnering with companies when they are planning a multi-unit expansion and/or remodeling program. As CDO continues to grow nation-wide, so does our need for qualified project managers. With thousands of successfully executed projects and more starting everyday we are looking for the best project managers in the industry. If you fit that description send your resume to info@cdogroup.com.

Ph: 708-383-0586 CIRCLE NO. 47

www.cdogroup.com


BURNING IT UP

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

What is today's consumer looking for?

Today's consumer is constantly changing, so it's difficult to pinpoint just one thing. However, in the restaurant/foodservice space, consumers increasingly seem to be looking for convenience and customization. As mentioned previously, the shift to dine-out and delivery service continues to drive the marketplace.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Our biggest project for 2018 is designing the Firehouse Subs of the future. We are taking a deep dive into all aspects of our model, both from an operational perspective and a design/construction perspective, to produce a restaurant prototype that will keep us relevant for many more years to come.

Describe a typical day.

The great thing about a typical day is it is never typical. From initial franchisee plan reviews, to discussing potential finishes with our founders, each day is different. You never know what it may hold.

Tell us what makes your restaurants so unique?

Two things immediately come to mind – our unique steaming method and strong commitment to serving the local community. At Firehouse Subs, we steam our meats and cheeses – a process our founders incorporated when they opened the first restaurant in 1994. The steaming method helps to create a deliciously flavorful sub and has become a key differentiator for our brand. Additionally, our passion to serve the community, specifically local first responders, is another attribute that sets our brand apart. In 2005, Firehouse Subs Chris and Robin created Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation with the mission of providing funding, lifesaving equipment and educational opportunities to first responders and public safety organizations. Through the non-profit, the Foundation has granted more than $31 million to hometown heroes in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Canada. It is truly the heart of our brand, and one of its most unique elements. CK

One-on-One with... » Misty Cameron

Firehouse Subs’ Manager of Construction Services

What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

The most rewarding part of my job is working for a company that cares about others. I take great pride in knowing I’ve done my job to ensure brand standards are met and consider it a privilege to be a part of company that’s so committed to quality and excellent service.

What was the best advice you ever received?

The best advice I ever received was to always take a moment to think about what I am going to say and to consider my intended audience. It has proven to be helpful advice and assisted in making me a better communicator.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you?

I love to hear that I was helpful and made the process of constructing a restaurant a little easier.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why.

One of the first traits is confidence with humility. I have always learned more from confident bosses

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than from timid, uncertain ones. However, there is a way to portray self-assurance without being overbearing and egotistical. It’s a hard balance to find, but one of my best bosses has this balance and I have learned so much. Second, a leader has to be collaborative and empowering. In my experience, employees tend to take more ownership of a task when they’ve been invited to provide their input on how it should be completed. I believe great leaders are people who empower their team members and regularly encourage them to contribute. And lastly, great leaders are accountable. Taking responsibility for a team’s performance, or even your own, whether good or bad, is a quality I believe any strong leader should possess. Great leaders are problem solvers, but also able to celebrate individual and team successes.

What is the true key to success for any manager?

A successful manager has an even more successful team.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


~ Fogo de Chao Jacksonville, FL

Our architecture, interior design, engineering and general contracting team is

serving up hot designs to brands nationwide. www.core-eng.com

CIRCLE NO. 48


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past

Capturing the Historic Livermore winery building lives on in a 3D point cloud

By Jeff Winke

L

ivermore, California has a famous light – or more precisely – a lightbulb. For more than a century now the 4-watt light bulb, called the Centennial Light, has been burning since it was first clicked on in 1901. Housed in the Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department Station #6, it glows dimly, but still functions as a light bulb.

The Livermore community has other historical phenomena of note, including a historic building on the grounds of the Sycamore Grove Park. Predating Livermore's historic lightbulb by about 15 years, the Olivina Winery building was constructed in 1885, which established one of the oldest wineries in the Livermore Valley. The Mediterranean-like climate – hot during the day and cool at night – is ideal for cultivating wine grapes and olive trees. Olivina pursued both businesses, thus the name, Olivina, coming from "olives" and "vines." The Olivina winery building was unique because it is the first gravity fed winery in California. The founders cleverly built the four-story structure up against a hill so that freshly-harvested grapes could be loaded into the fourth-floor mashing room from up on top of the hill. Each floor below contributed to the wine-making process filtering out stems and reducing the pulp to liquid. The ground floor is where the juice was processed and loaded into kegs for final fermentation. The hill not only provided the elevation for accessing the fourth floor, but was carved into to create an earth-cooled storage warehouse for the kegs filled with fermenting wine. Olivina's wine production remained strong until the combination of fatal vineyard diseases, which were first occurring in Livermore vineyards just before the 20th Century and Prohibition ceased production for good in 1920. The winery remained vacant, once production stopped. "The building was fun to play in when we were kids," says Charles T. Crohare, master miller at Olivina LLC, and fourth-generation-son of one of the founders. "I remember climbing the redwood steps to the top floor and exploring the building, which was also a 'secret' makeout place for high-school kids, as evidenced by spray-painted hearts with the likes of ‘Johnny loves Susie’ there for all to know." Through years of dormancy and neglect, the building has been deteriorating. "In 1974, our family sold/donated 800 acres, including the winery building to create the Sycamore Grove Park," Crohare says. "We were happy to see the land conserved and protected." The Olivina land fits squarely into a South Livermore Development Plan that city, county, community leaders and area businesses have all contributed to. The plan calls for preserving open space,

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CAPTURING THE PAST

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Predating Livermore’s historic lightbulb by about 15 years, the Olivina Winery building was constructed in 1885.

controlling commercial and residential development, providing conservation easements, and ensuring that the land can be enjoyed by the community in perpetuity. "It's our understanding that the Olivina winery building is a future candidate for a historic restoration, museum or community center," says Ron Oberlander, senior director with Topcon Positioning Systems, which is headquartered in Livermore. "That's why we decided to donate our time, expertise and resources to create thorough architectural documentation of the structure." The project became a learning opportunity for a group of Topcon interns who were able to use the most current Topcon technology and software to perform a 3D point-cloud scan for historical preservation purposes. With 3D scanning technology, the intern team captured precise dimensions in a noninvasive manner – in other words, no one needed to pass beyond the safety fencing or go into the building.

Weeks earlier the ruin next door collapsed. The intern team felt good that the scans they were completing will keep the dimensional data of the historic winery building protected from any such events. The data set can be used for later analysis such as taking measurements, tracing over a building layout, and converting the building into a computer model. The intern team used a Topcon GLS2000 3D Laser Scanner to capture the old Olivina Winery building's structural dimensions. The eye-safe laser has a 1,640 foot (500 m) range, which meant it could safely be positioned outside the deteriorating building's cordoned off safety parameter. The device is said to provide survey-grade accuracy that reduces the number of scan settings and it features dual cameras designed to ensure the best definition. Thanks to newly launched software, the intern team was able to take the 3D point clouds of the Olivina winery building it had recorded with the laser scanner and share them on the web. The integrated web service provides high-resolution point clouds of the winery building, which provides accurate distances, area measurements, and cross-sections that can be viewed, shared, or edited on the web. The interns had a meaningful project to further their learning, the Livermore Heritage Guild, which is a significant historical resource in the community, and the Crohare family now have definitive documentation of the winery building, and the park service and community has valuable data for a time when any restoration might take place. A definite win for all involved. CK

Jeff Winke is a business and construction writer based in Milwaukee. He can be reached through jeff_winke@yahoo.com.

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Light is like a brick...

just as steel and stone give shape, light reveals form, scale and evokes an emotional response.

from concept through construction call us to ensure your lighting works for you www.darkhorselightworks.com 818-370-6411 info@darkhorselightworks.com

Exceptional Performance in Light Architectural Lighting Design Lighting Control Systems Design CIRCLE NO. 49


Good culture attracts women employees

C

ompany culture may seem like a fluffy human resources initiative, but the most successful companies carefully cultivate and nurture their cultures. Company culture

is the personality of a company, it’s uniqueness. Culture informs “how things get done.” It is the company’s operating norms and the living embodiment of the company values. By Michaelann Agoranos

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The construction industry has long had a patriarchal culture – a male dominated industry with mostly male leadership. Building strong company culture that embrace gender diversity, at all levels, is a business imperative for the construction industry. The construction industry is dominated by family owned businesses, many operating for multiple generations, which can strongly influence company culture. According to the FMI Corporation, the fact that most construction companies are family owned is a distinct advantage.


These companies have often built their company culture on the values that guide their families; values that are near and dear to their hearts, likely passed down through generations, ingrained in their behaviors, and informing the company operating principles. The challenge for a patriarchal culture like construction may be that these exact family values can make truly embracing gender diversity a very difficult shift. There are more women than ever in the workplace, so the values and culture must evolve to actively support both genders. Strong company culture can drive better company performance, but can just as easily paralyze decision-making, block change and demotivate employees. This may be entirely inadvertent, but companies must cultivate and nurture the company culture they desire; it must be intentional. For example, if there are no women in senior leadership, it is difficult for female employees to find role models to help chart their career paths. They may become discouraged with the perceived lack of career growth and leave the company. How important is company culture to employees in the construction industry? A 2017 article titled, “What People Want, Job Satisfaction Takes More Than Just a Paycheck,” published by Hays Recruiting, reports company culture is the main reason given by construction professionals for leaving a current role, with 47 percent of active job seekers in the industry saying it is the reason they are leaving their current role. Hays also found that people in the construction industry rate company values 20 percent more important for company culture than other professions. Construction professionals also rated working with the

right team and strong leadership higher than the average of other functions studied.

Your culture is part of your mission statement

Great company cultures are driven by a clear purpose or mission, one that inspires and motivates employees. Core values guide behavior and inform practices and principles of the company. For the company culture to be successful, the people in the company must really embrace these core values. All employees must feel they are valued and respected, have a voice, can make a difference, and have opportunity to grow. People stick with cultures they like and leave those they do not. Construction is an industry that can appeal to many, and is extremely gratifying in that there is a tangible product at the end of the project that effects people and changes the built environment we all live in. This aspect can make the industry attractive to new employees, but it is company culture that will ultimately entice them to stay. Companies that truly live their values and incorporate them into their daily operating practices often have strong reputations with employees, and clients as well. Building a company culture that truly embrace diversity, can mitigate the labor shortage by embracing the whole population as ideal potential employees. Are there women in or above middle management in your company? Do you offer benefits for families such as maternity and paternity leave? Are you actively developing the women and men in your company, mentoring, sponsoring? Are women actively recruited and developed for all positions, field and office? Does your company encourage

There are more women than ever in the workplace, so the values and culture must evolve to actively support both genders.

all employees to speak up about the kinds of projects they would like to work on? Reflecting on the answers to these questions can help improve the culture at your company. More can be done to make the construction industry more inclusive; a place where women, and all employees, thrive. Be sure you are cultivating an inclusive culture, that values diversity of all kinds. Leverage the strength of diversity to create an environment where all employees feel inspired and motivated by company’s mission and values. Don’t let company culture be the reason your employees look to leave your company. A strong company culture is everyone’s responsibility, not just that of HR. WC

Michaelann Agoranos is principal at Constructing Opportunity, a premier leadership skills and diversity awareness training company for the construction. With more than 25 years of industry experience, Agoranos led Leadership Development and skill-based training for the Restaurant Development function of the McDonald’s Corporation. Today, she is Chapter Secretary and board member for the Chicago Metro Chapter of National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC), Midwest Regional Block Kids Chairperson for NAWIC and a member of the Federation of Women Contractors (FWC).

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Let’s make 2018 the 'Year of Women' in Construction

T

he construction industry is facing an unprecedented labor shortage, and while women make up almost 50 percent of the overall workforce, they comprise less than 9 percent of the workforce. Less than 3 percent hold professional positions such as estimator, project manager or contract administrator. By Peggy Newquist

As women move into positions of authority, they, along with their male colleagues, must be advocates for change. 110

In practical terms, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that of the more than 800,000 people who identify as “construction managers,” less than 23,000 are women. While a meager number, it represents a tremendous growth opportunity for women with huge potential benefits for the industry. Research from "2015DDI" (Development Dimensions International) report supports the positive impact women have on business. Organizations – including construction companies – studied as a part of the research that had women in 30 percent or more of leadership roles were 12 times more likely to be in the top 20 percent of peers based on financial performance. Similar results were seen in a 2014 Forbes study, which found companies rated in the top 20 percent of financial performance. The companies had 27 percent women in leadership roles, while those in the bottom 20 percent had only 19 percent of women in leadership.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018

Additionally, the spotlight shines brighter than ever on challenges facing women in male-dominated industries, particularly tech and finance. This virtually ensures that construction will get its turn, spurring companies to enact policies that are implemented to protect all workers. Making construction attractive to women starts with parents, teachers and school administrators. Societal norms teach girls from a young age that construction is for men. Toys such as Tonka trucks and TV shows like “Bob the Builder” and “Handy Manny” portray men building things, while girls support and praise their efforts. Toy companies market construction toys to boys through advertising, packaging and toy placement in the stores. High school students, especially girls, are steered away from vocational training and into college. While there is much work to be done, the news is not all grim. The pay gap for women in construction is 94 percent, significantly better than the overall average of 82 percent. Between 2007 and 2016, women-owned construction firms grew 56 percent, with women now owning 13 percent of all U.S. construction firms.


CIRCLE NO. 50


In addition, many of the largest general contractors have launched women’s employee groups and support women’s events both monetarily and by sponsoring their employees to attend events. At my alma mater Purdue University, women make up 27 percent of the students in the Division of Construction Engineering and Management a huge improvement from the 10 percent of my day. And, most importantly, women are starting to move into decision-making roles within the industry. I’ve met more women project executives and vice presidents in the industry over the last 12 months than I’ve encountered the last 12 years combined. Consider the number of women featured in home improvement shows on television, many of whom are not just designing, but doing the hands-on renovation work. And in 2017, the “Girl in Hard Hat” emoji made its debut.

Be an advocate for change

As women move into positions of authority, they, along with their male colleagues, must be advocates for change. Research shows that companies that create metrics to track their workforce diversity, training programs and community outreach efforts are more successful in recruiting and retaining women. Both need to understand the importance of sponsorship within their companies. Many women understand the importance of having good mentors, but fail to grasp the need for sponsors within their own companies. Those who have the privilege of power must recognize the talented women within the rank and file. Get to know them. Advocate for them. High potential women

must be given high visibility assignments and the opportunity to interact with company leadership on a regular basis. Mentors and sponsors are crucial to career success. I'm just one example of this notion. Early in my career, I worked for several influential leaders. As a director, after my immediate supervisor was fired, I awaited my new office and VP title. Instead, my division president called me into her office and said I was getting the job. My new boss showed up Monday, and after introductions, invited me for a cup of coffee. He told me that he wouldn't be in the job for long and, that if I was interested, I could have the position.

And while both of these individuals offered to be my mentor, they had the power to be my sponsor. Twelve months later, when he left, the division president called to offer me the job. Her words are still with me today: “There are several qualified candidates for this job, but I believe, as a woman, that when a qualified woman is in the mix, it is my responsibility to promote her.” Over the years, she brought many women along with her as she rose in the company. Years later, when I had the chance to hire a new director, I remembered those words and was able to choose a qualified woman candidate. As the construction industry continues to boom, companies large and small must expand the definition of the successful construction professional. Tailoring recruiting and retention activities to attract the other 50 percent of the population is a good start. They must recognize that not just gender, but generational diversity is important. They must make a good work environment for everyone their goal. We can all make a difference, regardless of our current role. Speak up when you encounter sexism in the workplace. Pushback on the labels “not ready” or “not qualified.” Give women the credit they deserve. Be a mentor or, if you have the power, a sponsor. Nurture your relationships with professional women and whenever possible, “Lift them as you climb.” This is the year for women to embrace the construction industry as a viable career path and for our industry to recognize, to quote Warren Buffett, “Most of America’s prosperity was created using only about 50 percent of its talent – men. So, I am confident the country will prosper as more women excel in the workforce.” WC

Peggy Newquist is principal of Constructing Opportunity LLC, a premier leadership skills and diversity awareness training company for the construction industry. With 30 years of industry experience, Newquist has created Leadership Development Programs, mentoring programs and resource networks within the industry. Currently a member of the Purdue University, Construction Engineering Department Industry Advisory Committee, she holds several positions with NAWIC (National Association of Women in Construction), serving as a Director of the Board of the Chicago Metro chapter, a National Co-chair for the Professional Development & Education Committee, a Trustee and Regional Liaison for the NAWIC Education Foundation (NEF), and a member of the Federation of Women Contractors (FWC).

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


LATE WINTER 2018

ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

SUPPLEMENT

In (or out) of

hot water At Marriott KC Airport, it’s digital mixing to the rescue

Gregg Brinkerhoff, KC Airport Marriott Airport director of engineering, tests water temperature at a guest room sink fixture within the Kansas City Airport Marriott hotel.

A special supplement to:

ALSO:

How one contractor faced-off against a recordbreaking rainy season


In (or out) of

hot water At Marriott KC Airport, it’s digital mixing to the rescue

M

ost hotel managers have learned through experience that their toughest, crankiest customer is an unhappy guest midnight or 5 a.m. They’ve either just woken up and have to move out post-haste or, after a long day of travel, they need to turn in immediately. But the “hatchet’s in hand” if there’s insufficient pressure – or hot water – for a shower. Angry hotel guests, at the oddest hours, are known to make quite a ruckus if a hotel’s worst-case scenario coincides with a stressed-out business traveler. “It’s a situation we work very hard to avoid,” says Greg Brinkerhoff, director of engineering at the Marriott Kansas City Airport hotel. Brinkerhoff says late arrivers and early risers can push the limits of a hotel’s water heaters and plumbing systems. At his 384-room hotel, adjacent to a busy airport,

By John Vastyan

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there’s a steady flow of guests at all hours. “The highest demand for hot water comes between 5 a.m. and 6 a.m., and again between 10 p.m. and midnight. It wasn’t uncommon for hotel managers to get several calls a week from guests, displeased about the lack of hot water.” Unfortunately, the best Brinkerhoff could tell them at the time was that hot water “was on its way.”

Hot water woes

For more than two years, the hotel battled domestic hot water issues. As it turns out, a large hydronic valve was used for the original system. The misapplied valve had a 120-second response time and couldn’t actuate quickly to keep up with the changing water pressures present within the hotel. Because of the valve’s sluggish response time, every time something would go wrong with the pumps, heat exchangers or storage tanks, the entire domestic hot water system would require a time-consuming recalibration. “Maintenance was required routinely – a constant source of disruption for the engineering staff,” Brinkerhoff says. “More or less, when maintaining the domestic water system, we had to isolate the entire piped network, shutting it down completely. Whenever the hot water mixing valve opened or modulated, the entire system would flood with cold water.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


Ian Walters, project manager, Lexington Plumbing (left), and Jamie Shibel, outside sales for the manufacturer’s rep firm, Mack McClain and Associates, make adjustments to the mixing valve’s setpoint.

Instead of being able to run the hot water storage tanks at 150-degrees F, facility engineers had to turn the tanks down to produce storage temperatures of only 125-degress F. Also, the capacity of hot water storage plummeted.

Enough is enough

Last winter, facility managers and engineers came together and decided to replace the entire hot water system. Brinkerhoff was appointed to act as liaison between hotel ownership and the installing contractor. Having worked with him in the past, Brinkerhoff called on Ian Walters, project manager for Kansas City-based Lexington Plumbing, a mechanical contracting firm specializing in commercial and industrial work. Walters had a solution in mind shortly after speaking with Brinkerhoff about the hotel’s DHW issues. “Ian and I had this discussion about the hotel’s domestic water system, and that there are just so many dynamic changes with the pumps and water pressures,” Brinkerhoff says. “We knew what the hotel needed was a smarter, more responsive valve – especially considering that the guests in all 384 rooms had very different schedules.” Months earlier, Walters had learned about a digital mixing valve made by Powers, a Watts brand. “They make a smart delivery solution for mixing

domestic water in a hot water recirculation loop,” he says. “It’s called IntelliStation. Shortly after learning about them from our rep, we installed one at large hotel on the other side of town. There, we exceeded the expectations of facility managers – a strong confirmation that the technology worked well.” But Walters didn’t want Brinkerhoff to just take his word for it. He wanted to show him first-hand. “I went with Ian to another Marriott hotel that had similar hot water issues,” Brinkerhoff says. “They’d installed an IntelliStation digital mixing system there, and I was able to see it in operation and speak to facility managers who more than vouched for the system.” What he learned was that the hotel, which had experienced similar hot water issues, now had a fast-responding, safe and clean domestic hot water system that delivered hot water on demand. “After hearing maintenance managers validate the technology – testifying that it only took seconds for hot water to get to taps – I was sold,” Brinkerhoff says.

The right rep firm

Hotel guests at the KC Airport Marriott who get hot water fast today will likely never know that their comfort and convenience stems from a digital mixing valve presentation given just a few months earlier by Jamey Shibel, outside sales for manufacturer’s rep firm, Mack McClain & Associates, Olathe, Kansas.

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • IN (OR OUT) OF HOT WATER

“We presented the IntelliStation’s capabilities at Lexington Plumbing,” Shibel says. “Very shortly after that, we were writing up an order for one to serve as the focal point for a domestic water retrofit at another Marriott hotel in Kansas City – the one that Ian Walters took Greg Brinkerhoff to before work began at the airport hotel. It was the success of that installation that led to the opportunity with Greg.” Shibel says sizing and specifying a digital mixing station is relatively simple, with key parameters that include overall GPM, load of the building, pipe sizes, height of the structure, number of rooms, and fixtures, and size of utilities such as the laundry and kitchen facilities.

Digital mixing + recirculation

system, including point-of-use mixing valves at each fixture in the plumbing system. This ensures that hot water storage temperatures can be kept at levels lethal to pathogens, then mixed to safer temperature levels both at points of distribution, and use.

Ian Walters, project manager, Lexington Plumbing (left), and Jamie Shibel, outside sales for the manufacturer’s rep firm, Mack McClain and Associates, make adjustments to the mixing valve’s setpoint.

Designers of large plumbing systems are now discovering that a digital mixing system is the most effective way to deliver properly mixed water throughout a hot water recirculation loop. Digital water mixing represents a significant leap in the technology used to control hot water delivery. The approach incorporates a programmable valve or system to quickly process temperature, flow, and pressure data, which is obtained from the hot and cold water inlets, mixed outlet, and sensors on the mixed-water return. Highspeed, responsive electronic actuation modulates a simple valve that allows the setpoint to be electronically controlled and maintained. Digital mixing allows engineers or facility managers to select a desired hot water temperature and to control and monitor the entire water distribution system. For even greater control, these systems can be installed as part of an ASSE-compliant water distribution

Other key advantages to digital mixing include: • Supports energy conservation through more efficient water temperature management – and in turn reduces energy costs • Integrates with building automation systems to support integrated building management • S upports consistent delivery of hot water on demand wherever and whenever it is needed, in accordance with building codes

Most systems are also field-configurable without the need for a laptop or special software. Digital water mixing and recirculation can easily be integrated into a building automation system (BAS) to allow facility managers to remotely monitor and control water temperatures.

No mixed emotions here

Since the installation of digital mixing technology at the hotel, facility managers have yet to receive a hot water complaint – with hot water arriving at taps and showers quickly and at a safe, consistent temperature. Rather than experiencing the constant headache of boiler room problems and system troubleshooting, Brinkerhoff and his staff merely schedule routine maintenance checks on a six-month cycle. Varying pressures and temperature fluctuations throughout the hotel’s hot water system no longer pose a threat; they’re managed with ease. While 125-degrees F water is sent to guest rooms in an instant, a second hot water loop now runs 150-degrees F water to the kitchen and Legionella – According to the Centers for Disease Control, proper maintenance of laundry areas where higher temperatures water distribution systems is key to preventing illness from water-borne bacteria such are needed for cooking and cleaning. And, as Legionella. CDC statistics show that 8,000 to 18,000 people are hospitalized with water is safely generated and stored at a Legionnaires’ disease in the U.S. each year. Managers of commercial and institutional germ-scorching 175-degrees F. facilities know that selecting and controlling proper water temperature in their storFour months in with the new digital age and delivery systems plays an important part in preventing germ growth. mixing system, Brinkerhoff says guests are happy. “And when guests are happy, buildScalding – Uncontrolled and unmonitored water distribution systems can create ing owners are happy. There are no mixed high-temperature scalding hazards in bathtubs, sinks and showers. Digital mixing systems emotions or opinion on this investment.” FC make it easy to select and set safe water temperatures for large domestic water systems. Dan Vastyan is a regular contributor to Thermal Shock – The thermal shock of a rapid and uncomfortable change in showCommercial Construction & Renovation er water temperature can cause a fall or serious injury. With digital mixing, stable magazine. Common Ground is a marketing mixed water is delivered to ASSE-listed thermostatic point-of-use devices (shower or communications brokerage that covers the sink valves) to minimize this risk. commercial construction market.

Large domestic water systems risks

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SEARCH without the “noise”

The clear choice for finding the companies & products you need.

Search today! CCR.SearchTheBlueBook.info

CIRCLE NO. 51


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION

By Jason Peace

WEATHER BEATING

How one contractor facedoff against a record-breaking rainy season

W

hen you’re trying to build a new army logistics facility in the middle of one of Tacoma, Washington’s rainiest seasons on record, challenges fall in your lap as abundantly as the rain. Located strategically near the deep-water ports of Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia, the U.S. Army’s Fort Lewis and the U.S. Air Force’s McChord Air Force Base combine to make the fourth largest military base in the world. In 2015, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers awarded a $50 million contract to Carlsbad, California-based RQ Construction (RQC) – a contracting and design firm with expertise in Department of Defense projects – to complete the construction of a U.S. Army Logistics

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Facility. RQC hired a local construction company, Sessler Inc., for the on-the-ground work. As they approached sheathing installation, it didn’t take long for Sessler to realize construction may not be as streamlined as they thought. Not only did construction fall on the rainiest time of year; the Tacoma area received twice its average rainfall in October 2016.

Fighting Father Time and Mother Nature

“You can’t apply a fluid-applied membrane when the [sheathing] panels are wet,” says Sessler Project Manager Max Tooley. “That was our biggest issue, since it rains a lot at this time of year.”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


vative system was new to Tooley, but it promised three key benefits: It would stop weather from derailing progress, shorten the project timeline, and cut back on labor costs. That was enough to make him interested. Faster application of the liquid flashing contributes to significant time and labor savings, according to a time-motion study conducted by Home Innovation Research Labs. When the integrative system went up against a building wrap, it reduced installed man hours by 40 percent; by 25 percent against a fluid-applied membrane. Tooley weighed the evidence, researched the facts and proposed the system to RQC as a value-engineered alternative to the project’s original sheathing specification. “We were excited about using the DensElement Barrier System,” says RQC project manager Brent Swanson. “We thought it would help us to address concerns about the schedule and weather.” Sessler started drying in the building in August 2016, and with the green light from RQC, they used DensElement Barrier System. The project required 80,000 square feet of sheathing, and 45 cases, or 540 tubes, of liquid flashing.

A value-engineered solution refines an age-old process

Tooley observed that his installers mastered the new system with ease. “They were used to installing gypsum panels and had lots of

Facing the constraints of a tight deadline and Tacoma’s autumn deluge, Tooley was up against formidable time and weather. Eager for a new solution, he began to think outside of the box. After meeting with a Georgia-Pacific Building Envelope Manager, Tooley realized he may have found the progressive solution he needed – the DensElement Barrier System. What stood out to Tooley was its AquaKOR Technology, which integrates a water-resistive and air barrier (WRB-AB) directly into the gypsum core. Only the interfaces, fasteners, openings and penetrations need to be sealed. For that, installers use PROSOCO R-Guard FastFlash, which he was assured would play well with wet surfaces. This inno-

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experience working with caulks, sealers and other flashing materials,” he says. “With the DensElement™ Barrier System, it’s a simpler process with fewer steps.” His crew was already familiar with installing gypsum panels, and working with caulks and sealers. In the case of DensElement, however, there was an ease in the installation not seen in competing products. Because of the integrated WRB-AB – once the panels were in, so was the WRBAB. It refined a process Tooley had seen so many times before: two integral steps distilled down to one. While the DensElement Barrier System was designed to make the building impervious to the harsh Pacific Northwestern elements, it did the same for Tooley’s schedule. His crews were less dependent on weather conditions, and work could continue even when heavy rainfall would have otherwise halted the waterproofing process in the absence of DensElement. The liquid flashing bonded to damp substrates, and didn’t need a layer of fiberglass mesh tape. Dry-in work could continue

during inclement weather and contractors could begin interior work even while the building’s cladding was being installed.

Reflecting on progress

When the integrative system went up against a building wrap, it reduced installed man hours by 40 percent; by 25 percent against a fluid-applied membrane.

Looking back, Tooley is glad he found an alternative that equipped his crew to face the Fort Lewis project under formidable conditions. Thanks to his eye for innovation and RQC’s openness to try something new, the fourth-largest military base in the world got a little bit bigger. Had they proceeded with the materials in the original specification, they would have fallen behind schedule, held captive by the harsh, unpredictable Washington weather. Instead, what could have become a project roadblock became a mere inconvenience, and overall, they came out on top. “Being able to install in less time with half as many employees creates substantial savings,” Tooley says. “The DensElement Barrier System made a huge difference on this project. We are recommending the system on other projects because of its performance.” FC

Jason Peace is the Senior Director of Marketing and Product Management at Georgia-Pacific Gypsum. With over 19 years of experience at GP, his extensive background includes the conceptualization and launch of DensElement™ Barrier System, the latest innovation in the Georgia-Pacific Gypsum portfolio of Dens® fiberglass mat gypsum panels. In most of Peace’s roles, much of his focus has been on new product development, process engineering, and driving market advantage through strategic positioning for the future.

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CIRCLE NO. 52


Built to plan

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MEP contractor's technology precisely places plumbing/ HVAC systems in hospital

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By Jeff Winke

he Denver suburb of Northglenn sold 5.7 acres of vacant

land to SCL Health Community Hospitals for the construction of a 60,000-square-foot community-based hospital and medical office facility. The location is less than a half mile from I-25. The Northglenn SCL Health Community Hospital follows the new healthcare model, which favors smaller, more accessible hospitals located within neighborhoods. Yet, the three-story new hospital will provide many of the same services found in larger traditional hospitals, such as an emergency room, inpatient beds, and laboratory and imaging services.

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AMI Mechanical Inc., based in Thornton, Colorado, is responsible for the fabrication and installation of all the mechanical systems in this small building with its 218 foot by 88-foot structure footprint. All the systems were fabricated in house in a clean, controlled environment, which made for a cleaner, safer worksite. This was an approximate $5 million project. Since 1991, AMI Mechanical has established itself in the Rocky Mountain Region and handles projects ranging in size from $200,000 to $25 million, with a yearly volume of $70 million. In addition to their management, engineering and administrative staff, AMI Mechanical employs more than 275 skilled and experienced field trades workers. A crew of 20 or so worked on the SCL Hospital's

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“This will be fun to visit Northglenn sometime in the future just to see it fully functioning.” – Sean Lauck, BIM manager, AMI Mechanical

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plumbing and waste piping system and eight to 10 were assigned to the project's HVAC duct installation crew. "The structure is tilt-up construction so once the concrete side forms were tied in place and we received the green light to go, things moved fast," says Sean Lauck, BIM manager for AMI Mechanical. "We had plenty to do on our end, but we needed to coordinate with the various other contractors to make sure the interior construction went smoothly." Hospitals require a lot of water, power, and proper air circulation for exam rooms and operating theaters, as well as X-ray facilities. It can be a more complicated build than a hotel or apartment building with similar number of rooms because of the critical need for environmental control and


the sophisticated technology that can be used in the rooms. "We're dealing with a four to 4 1/2-foot ceiling cavity that can be packed with cables, piping, lighting fixture housing, air circulation systems and structural I-beams, so we need to know where everything goes precisely," Lauck says. "There was no room for missteps or errors." Until the roof was built and enclosed the building, weather also became a challenge. There were bitter cold days and snowstorms. The snow and ice delayed AMI Mechanical until the decks were cleared. AMI Mechanical created a 3D BIM (Building Information Modeling) digital model, which represents the physical, technical, and functional characteristics of the Northglenn SCL Health Community Hospital building. The model included 3D coordinates and vector information that represent the geometry of the building and its components. The 3D digital model also details the entire network of piping and ductwork to be installed, as well as the structural elements, HVAC hanger anchor inserts, and penetration points on each deck where piping must travel through. "For each of the three decks, we're placing 3,000 to 4,000 hangers alone, which translates to a large amount of data," Lauck says. "And each hanger needs to be anchored at its correct point, which is where our total station and layout navigator instruments play critical roles." Lauck worked with GeoShack in Commerce City, Colorado to select the best technology for the project. GeoShack helped in selecting the best technology for the Northglenn SCL Health facility project and provided start-up assistance, training, and on-call troubleshooting help. Through GeoShack, AMI Mechanical acquired a Topcon PS-103 robotic total station, to help ensure accurate placement of piping and ductwork hangers. It also acquired a Topcon LN-100 Layout Navigator, which uses MAGNET Layout software. The

The Northglenn SCL Health Community Hospital follows the new healthcare model, which favors smaller, more accessible hospitals located within neighborhoods. challenge the LN-100 addresses is the construction coordination, which was essential for the Northglenn site. To help keep the project on track, Lauck was able to mount the tool on a structural column so that there was less floor vibration than a floor tripod. "Knowing what work has been completed during the project and working from the same design plan throughout is critical to maintain schedule and avoid costly collisions on this hospital project," Lauck says. Lauck was able to pair up the robotic total station and layout navigator with any brand of data collector. The instruments are not restricted to their own brand of data collectors, which provides the contractor with flexibility should there ever be a need

and the only option is a competitive brand data collector. "Being able to access and apply the BIM 3D model made it possible to deliver the quality results we had planned," Lauck says. "Since we needed to coordinate our efforts with other contractors on the site, the technology allowed us to work faster and better-essentially accelerate our work flow when necessary to fit the needs of the other contractors." The Northglenn SCL Health Community Hospital facility was completed on schedule. "This will be fun to visit Northglenn sometime in the future just to see it fully functioning," Lauck says. "I'll feel good knowing we've done a good job and everything in the building's mechanicals is in place‌ exactly where it needs to be." HC

Jeff Winke is a business and construction writer based in Milwaukee, Wis. He can be reached through jeff_winke@yahoo.com.

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Finding code compliant solutions for existing buildings

Code

By Rob Neale

The International Existing Building Code provides owners and investors prescriptive and performance options to modernize older buildings.

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uildings erected before contemporary safety codes

It is equally important to note that the International Fire Code includes a chapter for existed create a special challenge for today’s owners, retroactive fire safety improvements in existing buildings that may not be planned for renovacontractors and government officials. If an owner elects tion. The fire code requirement are intended to address known safety hazards such as open to modernize or otherwise alter a legacy building, the challenge spaces among multiple stories that could act as a chimney for fire and smoke travel. to meet current codes can be huge if not impossible. If jurisdictions have not adopted the IEBC, building owners and contractors would Often, these structures include archaic building materials, fire be well served to encourage local governments to do so. The IEBC protection and structural deficiencies, antiquated and unsafe mehelps the designer and code official agree upon the nature of the work that eventually affects the bottom line. chanical and electrical systems and inadequate means of egress. Table 1 identifies four key terms that frame the scope of work The International Existing Building Code (IEBC), published by the and how the code is applied. While these definitions may seem painInternational Code Council, provides the design and permitting team fully obvious, a clear understanding of the range at the project outset another alternative to up-to-date safety standards, while encouragwill help avoid later controversy. ing modernization or adaptive reuse to keep buildings and facilities When selecting how to approach code compliance the IEBC economically viable. Communities that adopt and employ the IEBC offers three approaches – chosen by the permit applicant – for provide the owner a broader array of design construction solutions.

ICC connection to local government

The International Code Council (ICC) is a U.S.-based non-profit association that promulgates the nation’s most adopted building construction and use codes. The International Building Code, International Fire Code, International Mechanical Code and 12 other land use and construction codes are used in some form in 50 states, the District of Columbia and several international agencies. The ICC relies on its 63,000 members representing business, industry, government and others to develop model consensus codes that are easily adopted by state and local governments. The advantages of using model construction codes are numerous: They have been developed by persons with expertise and experience in their disciplines and Archaic building materials, such as these clay tiles, can achieve credit for structural they are consensus-based and they are integrity and fire resistance in the International Existing Building Code guidelines. legally validated. Perhaps most important, all leave the ultimate interpretation and application to the local code official who is best suited underupdates or renovations: a prescriptive compliance method, a “work stand local needs and conditions. area” compliance method and a performance compliance method. The widely used International Building Code applies to the For seismic repairs only, the work must meet specific requiredesign and construction of new buildings. Attempts to modify an ments of the International Building Code or the American Society of existing building to satisfy its health and safety requirements can Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standard 41 Seismic Evaluation and Retrofit of be trying at best and often impossible: Buildings erected 10, 50 or Existing Buildings depending upon the anticipated risk. more than 100 years ago may not come close to compliance. For those conditions, the IEBC recognizes methods and mateCompliance approaches rials that may have been common when the building was new, but The prescriptive compliance approach provides specific requirements have been replaced by modern techniques and products. for additions, alterations or repairs especially as they influence flood-,

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CODE WARRIORS

Modernizing a long-unused building, such as Atlanta’s infamous Winecoff Hotel, can bring properties a new life. On December 7, 1946, a fire in this building killed 119 persons making it the deadliest hotel fire in US history.

wind- or seismic-resistant design. For most cases in the prescriptive compliance option, the must meet the requirements for new construction outlined in the International Building Code®. It includes guidance on the design and use of fire escapes, fenestration and barrier-free access. Unless an existing building is little more than a shell or must undergo a complete renovation, this option may not be the most desirable for the designer or investor. The “work area” approach offers flexibility based on the project scale and scope. It includes specific guidance for repairs to structural and fire protection features as well as electrical, mechanical and plumbing systems. For alterations, the work is classified into one of three increasingly complex levels as listed in Table 2. A third compliance option is the “performance method.” Unlike traditional prescriptive codes that specify in detail dimensions and materials, performance-based design approaches identify desirable outcomes and the provide safety solutions to meet them. The IEBC employs a scoring evaluation method to evaluate fire safety, means of egress and general safety for additions, alterations or changes of occupancy. This method may be used for all occupancies except high hazard and some

As markets change, owners often want to alter a property’s complexion with a complete makeover. The choice to do so may have an important impact on the code compliance approach that is selected.

institutional uses where occupants are incapable of escape because of physical or mental conditions or restraints. In the performance method the building owner must arrange to have the building evaluated against a variety of important criteria: building area and height, fire and smoke resistive barriers, fire protection systems, means of egress and even ratios of caregivers to patients in those uses where the IEBC is permitted. Points are assigned in the evaluation based existing or proposed features such as fire barriers, sprinklers, fire detection systems, vertical opening protection and emergency lighting improvements. The points are summed and subtracted from “mandatory safety scores” specified in the IEBC for three categories: fire safety, means of egress and general safety. If the final score in any category equals zero or more, the building is considered in compliance with the IEBC. This method enables the owner to “cut and paste” designs and features in a variety of configurations that could achieve a zero or better score. An important tool for all compliance options is the IEBC's resource "Guidelines on Fire Ratings of Archaic Materials and Assemblies." Older buildings may be constructed of materials that no longer are in production or that cannot meet current structural or fire resistance standards. The guide provides a means to evaluate these products and assign them load-bearing or fire resistance ratings. This can be a huge savings during construction to avoid the cost of demolition and reconstruction with newer materials.

A final word on adaptive reuse

As markets change, owners often want to alter a property’s complexion with a complete

Table 1 International Existing Building Code Scope of Work Definitions Addition – An extension or increase in floor area, number of stories, or height of a building or structure.

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Alteration – Any construction or renovation to an existing building other than a repair or addition.

Repair – The reconstruction or renewal of any part of an existing building for the purpose of its maintenance or to correct damage.

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Change of Occupancy – A change in the use of the building or portion of a building.


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CODE WARRIORS

makeover. The choice to do so may have an important impact on the code compliance approach that is selected. Buildings that undergo a change of occupancy (say, from a factory to apartments) face special scrutiny, but may not have to comply completely with current editions of the “new” construction codes. Table 3 lists those end uses that must comply with the latest adopted version of the International Building Code if they are converted from some existing use.

Covered and open mall buildings Motion picture projection rooms The complexity of the use and nature of these occupancies makes it imperative that an owner consult with a qualified design

Table 3 New occupancies in existing buildings that must comply with current IBC

Buildings erected before contemporary safety codes existed create a special challenge for today’s owners, contractors and government officials. professional before attempting a project in these areas. Design professionals should study and promote the IEBC as a means to promote cost-effective compliance for these sometimes complicated projects. The ICC’s International Existing Building Code offers owners, developers, investors, designers, contractors and code officials broad latitude in find safe and affordable solutions to repair, alter or add space to ex-

• Ambulatory care facilities • Buildings with atriums • Motor vehicle-related occupancies • Aircraft-related occupancies • Incidental use areas • Stages and platforms • Special amusement buildings • Hospitals and nursing homes • Hazardous materials use areas isting buildings without complete compliance with contemporary building codes. While it is a handy tool, it must be adopted at the state or local government level to be used as a meaningful construction alternative. If it’s not already in place, both private and public sector representatives would be well-served to support adoption of the International Existing Building Code. Furthermore, the variety of IEBC compliance options makes it imperative that an owner or investor work with a knowledgeable and qualified design professional to select the best route to bring life back to existing buildings. CCR

Table 2 International Existing Building Code Alteration Level Definitions Level 1 – Removal and replacement or covering existing materials, elements equipment or fixtures, or fixtures using new materials elements equipment or fixtures that serve the same purpose

Level 2 – Spatial reconfiguration, addition or elimination of any door or window, reconfiguration or extension of any system, or the installation of any additional equipment.

Level 3 – Projects where the work area exceeds 50% of the area within the exterior walls or between fire walls.

Once the alteration level is established, the IEBC provides guidance on a variety of construction options ranging from something as simple as new Level 1 carpeting or roofing materials to Level 3 elevator controls and structural retrofits. Rob Neale is the International Code Council VP for Government Relations: National Fire Service Activities. He can be reached at rneale@iccsafe.org or 888-422-7233, ext. 6256.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


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Welcome to Cellars

San Antonio welcomes the first residential tower of its kind along the iconic Riverwalk

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By Tolly Moseley

t was the kind of wholly unique project that architect Don B. McDonald

couldn't wait to start. Six years ago, he was approached by private equity firm Silver Ventures to develop a grand, residential tower in San Antonio that overlooked the historic jewel of the city – The Riverwalk – but still fostered a sense of residential intimacy, and a sense of community. "Every major American city, from New York City to Los Angeles, has these great tall, old apartment buildings that really feel like they belong there," McDonald says. "And when you walk in, you are immediately rooted in the environment. You have a sense of place."

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But this project would be something a little different. Key to the building, McDonald points out, was that, "We didn't want to replicate a Manhattan high-rise. We wanted to create a quintessential San Antonio building." What unfolded is Cellars, a luxury, 10-story apartment building that is the first of its kind in San Antonio. With 122 units (at the time of writing, all but one are, astonishingly, filled), it opened May 2017 to enormous anticipation and fanfare. What makes it such a special addition to the city, however, is not just its novelty: Urban high-rise living in a city that, up until that point, didn't really have that living option. Rather, the most notable thing about Cellars is how the development team accomplished the

original premise. To conjure a residential space that fostered a sense of place. In this case, San Antonio.

Getting to know Cellars

Something to know about Cellars: Yes, it's adjacent to The Riverwalk, but to get even more location-specific, it is part of Pearl – a multiuse district that itself harkens back to San Antonio's past. The Pearl Brewing Company set up shop in downtown San Antonio in 1883, and prior to Prohibition, Texas was a hot spot for beer production. The brewery changed hands over the years, but in 2001, Pearl Brewery closed down and with it, a chapter of local history. That's when Silver Ventures stepped in, buying the property in 2002,

and making it the heart of revitalization efforts in southern Midtown and northern Downtown San Antonio. Today, Pearl is thriving – with Farmers' Markets, boutiques, restaurants, the striking Hotel Emma – and the Cellars concept offered an opportunity to fill a residential niche in the city. This then is the backdrop for the project: A location rich with local lore, and even brewery materials available to repurpose, and incorporate into construction. "We knew we wanted to use actual components from the original brewery," says Gabor Pelli, project manager at Don B. McDonald & Associates. "There is a pool deck on the fifth floor, and beer storage tanks from Pearl have been reutilized as cabanas. For the lobby, we refinished tank ends with a gunmetal glaze, and they now read more as artwork than old remnants." But, backing up to the more nascent stages of the construction process: What "feel" was McDonald trying to create with a San Antonio high-rise? What influences did he draw upon? "We chose materials for the building that would reflect the city's European and especially German heritage, along with our deep Hispanic roots and culture," McDonald says.

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A specific set of design choices, to be turkey floor, quail and turtles. It's something sure. When you see Cellars from the outside, residents love to remark on to visitors." its salmon brick exterior fits in with the But that’s not where the whimsy Pearl's overall aesthetic, but a closer look stops. In the dining room, there's a touch reveals more site-specific design choices Carrington Foultz made herself: a perma– tall archway entrances, brick entry floors, nently-set dining table top, suspended 15 gorgeous gardens that take advantage of feet off the ground with a sarape "table top," South Texas' semi-tropical climate. flanked by wooden chairs and mounted with But the property isn't simply an Old antique Mexican pottery. It reads as sophistiWorld pastiche: angular exterior lines place cated wall art, but as Carrington Foultz says, Cellars in time, giving the property a more "It evokes the idea of a community meal, modern vibe. And then, there's the first floor always about to happen." common areas, or "Uncommon Areas," as The learning center they are lovingly called. Another one of the signature design choices "This is probably my favorite project of the Cellars development I've ever worked on," says Alice team? Its first floor library. With Carrington Foultz, San Antoin-set, floor-to-ceiling booknio-based curator and member cases filled with books about of the White House Historical Texas and San Antonio, as well Association. A go-to name in as custom furniture covered the city for building private and in leather and regional wood, corporate art collections (she it strikes the balance between curated all of the art in the refined study and airy reading Spurs Sports and Entertainment lounge. Arena – a staggering collection It's here you'll often find of 200 pieces), she was brought some Cellars residents doing in to flesh out the details of – Don B. McDonald, Don their homework, or curling Cellars' interiors, especially the B. McDonald & Associates up with a book in front of the rooms residents and guests first mission tile-covered fireplace. encounter when they walk in. Vital though to the construction process "One of the first pieces you see when of any residential tower is, of course, the you walk in is a vibrant, three-panel mural by design of the resident rooms themselves. Carlos Betancourt. It literally looks like it's in The materials selected reflect the type of bloom," Foultz says. While based in Miami, quality you'd see more in a high-end home, she spent five days in San Antonio studying with hardwood floors, marble and honed its iconography and taking photographs to granite countertops, and custom furniture capture its character – wildflowers, Mexican from local San Antonio craftsmen. Ranging restaurants, funky downtown signage. The from 650-square-foot spaces to sprawling result is an explosion of San Antonio symbols 3,986-square-foot suites, residences were rendered in rose, pinks, and peaches, set designed with a variety of life stages in mind. against a charcoal black canvas. "Our biggest goal with Cellars was to Carrington Foultz also commissioned an help residents feel like they were coming original collection of carved wood sculptures home," McDonald says. "And the moment representing native Texas wildlife, which now you walk in your front door, that is exactly animate each floor. "Each level has its own the feeling you get." MH character," she says. "There's the bear floor,

“Our biggest goal with Cellars was to help residents feel like they were coming home.”

Tolly Moseley is a writer based in Austin, Texas. Her work has been featured in Salon, The Atlantic and the Austin American-Statesman, where she is also co-host of "I Love You So Much: The Austin360 Podcast." Follow her at @tollym on Instagram and Twitter.

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CIRCLE NO. 55


Conversations with... Barbara Anne Spignardo, Shapiro, Lifschitz & Schram

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arbara Anne Spignardo has seen trends come and go in the Washinton, D.C. and national real estate markets since beginning her law practice 16 years ago. "B.A." is a member of the transactional/real estate team at Shapiro, Lifschitz & Schram, a construction, real estate and general business boutique law firm with an office less than a mile from the White House. She focuses on the financing of commercial real estate transactions, and represents both developers and lenders, as well as sellers and institutional investors. She counts a significant number of community banks as clients. The firm serves as general counsel for some of its developer clients, managing all their corporate and other legal issues, in addition to real estate transactions. These close relationships with clients on both the borrower and lending sides offer B.A. a ground-level view of their business concerns and helps her spot trends early on. She also is an active member of Commercial Women in Real Estate (CREW). She credits her involvement with the D.C. chapter for helping her gain insight into real estate trends. We recently sat down with Spignardo to get her insights on what to expect in real estate and construction in the year ahead.

Where are the best opportunities in 2018 for your commercial real estate clients?

I am optimistic that we will see growth, but it will be nontraditional. One area where I expect growth is in – surprise – retail. Despite the continued emphasis on online shopping, we are seeing a shift in stores looking for small spaces to highlight their product lines and provide a shopping experience. This will also create the need for more warehouse space. The very successful CityCentre in D.C. is a good example of a retail rejuvenation, with no single store occupying a "major" footprint in terms of occupying large amounts of space.

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What about multifamily projects?

That area is going to slow down. We're on the cusp of a renters' market as we approach saturation in some markets. That's not to say the market for multifamily will dry up, but developers and lenders will be more selective. Local lenders, such as community banks, will be positioned better to evaluate these projects because they usually understand their markets in ways that often outside lenders do not have access to, by virtue of not being fully immersed in the community.

Will the movement of young people back to the central cities continue?

Young people like living in the core urban areas for a few years, but when they get married and have children they often move to desirable suburban communities, such as Arlington or Falls Church, or further outside of D.C.'s borders. They want green space, good schools and safe communities, and in many regions they are more likely to find these attributes in suburban areas. We call it "suburban creep." This is a trend that is going to continue as maturing millennials get their fill of the fast life in the city and refocus their priorities for the next phase of their lives.

Smart offices and collaborative, open spaces continue to be strong trends. It doesn’t work for every business, but more companies are choosing to have less personal office space and more general work areas.

How should cities respond to suburban creep?

There is a lot that cities can do. Planners must have their eyes on the future and what young people want. Anything that makes a city more walkable will give it an edge over suburban areas, but that does not mean much if you don't have grocery stores and other such practical amenities. Green spaces are essential, but families also need schools that are comparable to the suburbs. None of these are new ideas, but the renaissance of cities will be fleeting if they don't pay attention to the needs of young families.

Will developers continue to turn to community banks as well as the large lenders?

There will be substantial opportunities for community banks and smaller lenders. These institutions tend to be more flexible, and they base their decisions partly on the strength of relationships. They know their communities and can use that knowledge as they evaluate

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the numbers. Of course, they are limited in the amount of their loans – many community banks stay in the $5 million to $10 million range. But syndications and participations will allow these lenders to get in on some of the bigger transactions.

What trends will develop in renovation?

Smart offices and collaborative, open spaces continue to be strong trends. It doesn't work for every business, but more companies are choosing to have less personal office space and more general work areas. The collaborative mindset remains strong. Generally, companies that use more collaborative space need less overall space. Some are encouraging employees to use flexible schedules or telecommute part of the time. The open space concept especially lends itself to older buildings that can be renovated and that can create open areas that get away from the traditional walls lined with offices and huge interior spaces defined by cubicles.

How can developers get an edge on the competition? Smart offices are very much in demand. Work areas may have temperature and lighting that are customized for each work space, for example, and digital options in security have become very sophisticated. You'll be hearing more about the "Internet of Things" as offices take advantage of interconnectivity. This also is a big trend in hotels; using technology to customize the experience of each guest.

What keeps your clients awake at night?

I think it's mainly the potential oversupply of multifamily. A lot of these projects are under construction and will be delivered in 2018 and 2019. Certainly, many were well-thought out and are on solid footing, but lenders and developers are still sensitive to what the overall market is telling them about oversupply.

What is your advice for younger lawyers in construction and real estate? Get involved. I'm very active in CREW, which is particularly valuable for me because it helps me meet people and learn about the industry. Our D.C. chapter is the largest in the nation, and the leadership has done a phenomenal job of providing programming and networking events. There are many other excellent networking groups, and you can find one that's right for you. It can be intimidating to walk into a luncheon with 400 people you don't know, but everyone is there for the same reason - to network and help each other. So open the door and step in. MH

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

P E O P L E 2018 SCHEDULE: February 20th (Tuesday) in Atlanta GA

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(Thursday) in Boston, MA

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(Thursday) in Los Angeles, CA

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For information about membership or events, contact Kristen Corson, kristenc@ccr-people.com • 770.990.7702 For information about co-sponsoring an event, contact David Corson, davidc@ccr-mag.com • 678.765.6550

www.ccr-people.com www.ccr-mag.com CIRCLE NO. 56


JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

For the Craft Brewing Professional

Hitting its stride

Inside Evil Horse Brewing’s mission to share its beer with the world

PLUS: The Power of Space, Branding of Place Taphandles: Why you need them and how to design the perfect one

Evil Horse Brewmaster Steve Kamp


insights

Book Rec

Crushing It!: How Great Entrepreneurs Build Their Business and Influence-and How You Can, Too By Gary Vaynerchuk

Where do the secrets to success rest with all of those people who left the whole corporate thing and made a go at it by themselves? Four-time New York Times best-selling author Gary Vaynerchuk decided to ask for you. Crushing It!, the follow-up to his 2009 international bestseller, Crushing It, offers new lessons and inspiration drawn from the experiences of dozens of influencers and entrepreneurs who rejected the predictable corporate path in favor of pursuing their dreams by building thriving businesses and extraordinary personal brands. Here, Vaynerchuk shares stories from entrepreneurs who have grown wealthier – and not just financially – than they ever imagined possible by following his Crushing It principles. The secret to their success (and his) is learning how to master social media platforms, along with their willingness to do whatever it took to make these tools work for them. If you’re looking for ways to build your brand, Vaynerchuk offers both theoretical and tactical advice on how to become the biggest thing on mediums like like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest and Snapchat; podcast platforms like Spotify, Soundcloud, iHeartRadio and iTunes, and other emerging platforms such as Musically. This state-of-the-art guide to building your own path to professional and financial success is something every craft beer brand should follow. In it, you will find a blueprint to living life on your own terms.

The numbers game If you’re putting together a direct mail piece, blog or post, here’s a tip. According to data from Venngage, the No. 10 garners the most shares, on average, across all four social networks: Facebook, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Twitter. The study examined the performance of 121,333 “listicle” articles/posts from brands and publishers. Other suggestions include using the No. 5, which had the second-most shares, followed by the No. 2. To note, listicle headlines that use a numeral (10) are better than ones that are written out (ten).

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78 The percent of consumers who expect to use email as much or more than they do now in five years, according to “Inbox Report 2018” by Fluent. In addition, 26 percent say they went to a website and 26 percent made a purchase after engaging with a brand via email, the study says.

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MEET LANCE One of Boelter’s regional Field Sales Managers. His favorite beer style? German dark lagers.

(800) BEERCUP • BEERCUP.COM

“It’s all about learning each brewery’s unique story and providing innovative, affordable, quality products to match.”

YOU BREW BEER. BOELTER GROWS BRANDS. Lance loves helping breweries and distilleries spread their craft and grow their brands through custom glassware, promotional products, and brand fulfillment services.

ARE YOU READY TO TALK BRANDING OVER A DRINK WITH LANCE OR ONE OF OUR OTHER PASSIONATE REGIONAL SALES MANAGERS? CALL 800 BEERCUP TODAY.

CIRCLE NO. 57

TA L K B R A N D I N G & M O R E W I T H O U R D E D I C AT E D S A L E S M A N AG E R S C A L L (80 0) B E E R C U P T O D AY O R V I S I T TA P.B E E R C U P.C O M / C B A M - M A G T O L E A R N M O R E .


Hitting its stride

Inside Evil Horse Brewing’s mission to share its beer with the world

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Evil Horse Brewing Company was born two years ago in the small town of Crete, Illinois. Located less than 30 miles south of Chicago, where craft beer superstars Revolution, Lagunitas and Goose Island shine brightly, and the selection of smaller craft breweries is constantly on the rise, Evil Horse is making a name for itself. With more than 30 years of home brewing and beer judging under his belt, Evil Horse Brewmaster Steve Kamp has spent decades perfecting his craft by working with other breweries, the Chicago Beer Society and Brewers of South Suburbia; attending conferences, judging hundreds of beer competitions, and constantly increasing his knowledge about the industry.


Kamp’s goal is to brew beer that's stylistically correct, well balanced and quaffable. Evil Horse’s core brands are its Trot Hopple (IPA), Downtown Hottie (American wheat), Sgt. Reckless (APA) and Paxon the Ponyless (Porter). Many of the beers sport names that are horse related, in part because of Crete’s close proximity to Balmoral Park, a horse racing facility that operated from 1926 to 2015, and now operates as HITS – a show jumping facility. Evil Horse operates with a 15-barrel system in a former bowling alley. With the goal from the beginning to be self-distributing, the brewery has a tasting room where only its own brews can be sold. Nods to the building’s former life can be seen in the bar top and tables that are repurposed bowling lanes, and the original Crete Lanes neon sign. Being a small brewery in a small town has its challenges. While budget restrictions make creative marketing essential, Evil Horse Brewing Company is a firm believer in having a solid, consistent branding strategy and marketing plan. We sat down with Kamp to get his thoughts on where the craft brew market is heading and why Evil Horse will continue to help lead the way:

Give us a snapshot of today's craft brew market from your perspective. The way I see it, today’s craft brew market is trending more toward smaller breweries that are locally owned and independent. The larger brands seem to be stagnating somewhat, while the smaller brands seem to be growing at a faster pace. Consumers are jumping on board with the whole locally sourced movement, wanting to know not only where their beer comes from, but who makes it and where the ingredients are sourced. As there has been, and continues to be a large number of new breweries coming

on the scene with regularity, I think that those brands that create a quality product and market themselves in a relational way with a solid brand story will rise to the top. Those that don’t will eventually trickle off.

What trends are defining the space? Well, again, I think it’s smaller, independent breweries. I think the trend is a market where consumers are far more educated now than they were 10 years ago. They understand the difference between a mega brewery-owned “crafty” beer and a locally owned craft beer. Consumers are more knowledgeable about what goes into making beer – not only the ingredients, but the time and talent it takes to make different styles of beer. The Brewers Association independent craft brewer seal is going to be very important to the

industry going forward, and will help consumers to differentiate between mega breweries and independent breweries much more easily.

What is the Evil Horse story from a brand perspective? The heart and soul of our Evil Horse brand is attitude, and I don’t mean that in an obnoxious way. It’s about the perseverance needed to conquer challenges, the pride we take in crafting the best beer possible, the passion to share our beer with the world, and the drive to make it all happen. Our brand isn’t something that was created on a whim. The story actually goes back almost two decades to when I bought a farm in the country near Beecher, Illinois. I owned an Appaloosa that was stubborn as could be and refused to be ridden by anyone except occasionally me. The horse came

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to be known as Evil Horse, because she was just ornery, and the farm was named Evil Horse Farm. As a home brewer, I made beer and wine in my basement and sold the eggs that the chickens laid by the dozens. A friend of mine from church created a logo for Evil Horse Farm and made a beautiful sign for me, which is still hanging on my dining room wall. That sign was the inspiration for Evil Horse Brewing Company’s name and logo. We brought that original logo and story to Mixdesign, a local branding, marketing and interiors firm. They helped us refine our logo, define our brand story and create a unified look across all areas, from the interior of the tap room, to the marketing materials, and the labels for our beer.

head is what we want to be ingrained into consumer’s minds. Whether they see it in our tap room, on a tee shirt that a beer fest attendee is wearing, on our tap handle at a bar or restaurant, or on a six-pack of beer that’s on their local liquor store’s shelf, that’s what we want them to see and immediately think “Evil Horse. Great beer.”

What's the biggest issue today related to the marketing/sales side of the craft beer business? I think right now it’s the volume of breweries that are opening and the volume of breweries that are already in the marketplace. I believe that we’re at a point where there is going to start to be some fallout. A branding and marketing plan is very important to the success of a brewery, as is the quality of the beer. You can have a brewery that makes incredible beer, but doesn’t have a plan in place to consistently brand and market it, thus it doesn’t progress. On the flip side, you can have a brewery that makes okay beer, but has an awesome brand and markets itself incredibly well, and they’ll be a success. The breweries that have both the branding and marketing down pat and make great beer are the ones that are going to stay around for the long haul.

What is the secret to creating a branding story that consumers can buy in to? Walk us through your branding strategy. Our strategy from the beginning was to make our brand relatable, welcoming, compelling and memorable. Our motto is Dutch in origin (quite a few of us on the Evil Horse team are Dutch) and literally means, “Coziness knows no time.” “Gezelligheid kent geen tijd” translated into English means, “Time spent together is time well spent.” That’s how we want our customers to feel – that time spent at our tap room or simply drinking our beer with good friends, is time well spent. We also wanted to be consistent in our branding. The horse

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It needs to be real. It needs to be relatable. It needs to be fun. We think that we hit all of those marks when we defined our brand story. It’s based on a true story that people can relate to. Who hasn’t had something obstinate in their lives? Sure, it’s not a horse for most people, but I think they can relate to the general idea. And I think it’s a great story, one that I tell at most of the events we do. It never fails to get a laugh out of the crowd.

What is the one thing that every craft beer brand should be doing in the way of marketing? Intentional relational marketing. Putting a face to their brand. Taking the time to go out and

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meet with beer buyers, work at beer festivals, chat with customers in the taproom, train staff to treat all customers like they would their best friend. Word of mouth is by far the cheapest source of marketing any company can have. Chances are if you have a great relationship with your customers, they will happily spread the word about how awesome you are. The second thing is consistency. You have to have to have identifiable products. We have our horse head on all of our marketing materials, beer labels, merchandise and signage. It’s simple and memorable. Without a consistent brand, consumers won’t be able to recognize you as easily.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead? Our current sales strategy is to go into underserved markets. We are on the outskirts of Chicago, but there is the whole state of Illinois to sell to, and the majority of the state doesn’t have easy access to numerous breweries like Chicagoans do. Since we self-distribute our beer, our sales team has the ability to go anywhere in the state. And we believe that our own staff is going to sell our beer far more effectively than a distributor will. Do we hope someday we’re so busy that the only option is to get a distributor? Heck, yeah. But for now we feel that our best opportunities will come in markets that don’t have a huge craft beer footprint currently.

What's the biggest item on your to-do list right now? It’s getting our brew schedule to the point where our core brands are always available to our customers and still be able to come out with new brews to keep customers happy and excited to come back. With our 15-barrel system and 14 of our own beers on tap daily, it takes a lot of planning to keep our stock steady.

How do you feel about collaborations with other brewers? Funny you should ask. We actually have not done one with another brewery yet, but soon we are

doing a collaboration with Arrowhead Ales from New Lenox, Illinois. As you know, the craft brewing community is very strong and collaborations are not only important, but they’re fun as well. We have done collaborations with the local home brewing club, where we take the winner from a competition and together we brew their beer on a larger scale. We’ve done a Belgian dubbel and a Dortmunder lager, which were received very well in our taproom.

What are your thoughts on how taprooms fit into branding and market-building? Our taproom is what our customers associate with our brand, so it’s important that our taproom carry the overall theme of our brand. We have our horse head on the tap handles, on all merchandise and glassware, painted on the wall, drawn on the chalkboard, etc. We want customers to walk away and remember that logo. We also have a variety of events to draw different facets of the public to the taproom. Musical entertainment, game nights, fundraisers and tours all play into building our market share and brand awareness.

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Customer appreciation. After a day of brewing, I’ll sit in the taproom, have a few beers and chat with our customers. Generally, being the brewmaster kind of makes you a local rock star. It’s great to hear a customer tell me how much they love what they’re drinking.

What is your favorite brand story? Some friends of mine opened a brewery in Bourbonnais, Illinois, in 2006. Brickstone Brewery has been growing steadily since its inception and now has a 50-barrel system in an offsite location and they can barely keep up with demand. They recently rebranded their logo to include the State of Illinois. They focus on selling their beer only in their home state and are doing extremely well. It’s not often that I go to a bar or restaurant and don’t find Brickstone on tap.

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branding

By Eric Johnson

The Power of Space, Branding of Place With first impressions, you only get one chance Space and place influence us. We are all sensory beings. Light, color, shapes, noise and movement all contribute to our instinctive "feel" for a place. And, impact the tasting experience. Let's say your brew portfolio, graphics, packaging, signage and other branding tools are sharp and consistent. What about your taproom? That space, and how it is designed, is a great opportunity for expression of your brand identity. My career has been brand execution in its physical, tangible sense. Lots of retail and restaurant environment experience, including design and specification work. I can't help but approach taproom experiences through those same trained and biased eyes.

First impressions‌ one chance When visiting a brewery, first impressions begin at the front door. What does the building look like? Is it attractive? Distinctive? Inviting? How is the signage done? All signal what's inside. Once in the door, instincts respond to the "feel" of the place. Floor layout? How's the lighting? Is it noisy? What artwork does one see? Sit or stand? Do people look like they're enjoying themselves? Where's the beer? And, on from there. I'm not unique in those types of responses. Most of your customers, especially first-time visitors, go through the same. Even if they don't stop to consciously think. It just happens. How do you effectively control and influence the customer experience? Here's a collection of ideas, reminders and images from my own taproom experiences. National names to very local.

Exterior Paint, lighting and signs‌ best tools available. You may have restrictions of leases, building and signage codes, etc. Push them as far as you can. Get creative. One of my favorite brewery buildings is BrewDog USA, Columbus, Ohio. New construction, supportive community, big budget. Net result: giant mural, huge logo, architecturally-planned entry way. The visual experience starts 1/4 of a mile away. And what's inside is keenly considered. West Sixth Brewing, Lexington, Kentucky is a different scale. Their building is a 100 year-old former bakery. That does set limits. Note use of murals. And they've got one of the more distinctive signs I've seen. Great use metal materials and illumination. Proclamation Ale, Warwick, Rhode Island, is a full-on treat.

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A 2017 expansion done, moving to an old industrial complex from a smaller and more-remote space. Great use of paint for broad swatches of their signature color and logo. And a cool, retro sign to boot. Use of multi-hued wood elements link back to their previous taproom dĂŠcor. If you can't go big, and you can't use cases of paint, how about extra focus on the front door? Highland Brewing, Asheville, North Carolina, is distinctive, richly detailed. Look/feel of materials consistent with their company personality.

Interior Rhinegeist, Cincinnati, is one of my favorite spaces. The front entrance is modest with minimal signs/ banners. Located in the 1895 exo-skeleton of the old Christian Moerlein factory, it's historic. Inside, it's up you go, via vintage-type industrial stair construction. Where is it all leading? Is this climb worth it? Oh, yah. Spiritual awakening. The natural lighting is almost magical. I felt as if I'd just entered a "cathedral of beer." Arrival is the reward. You just know this will be good. Shifting scale again, I'm fond of 350 Brewing, Tinley Park, Illinois. Signage is limited to Illuminated channel letters per lease agreement. Up close, there's an inviting view through the windows. Looks like a fun place. Once inside, first-impressions are amplified. Definitely fun. Crazy, unusual signage. Bright colors, wild letter fonts, contrasting mix of construction materials evoke a dynamic collision effect of industrial grunge, comic book flash and quirkiness. The place is high-energy. Even when empty. Inside Proclamation, the attention of visitors is quickly snagged. Big place, high ceilings. Mega-scale wall logo. Is that Atari? Your eyes are led down to the bank of vintage video games along the same wall. Brilliant. Proc deserves kudos for another idea. They've got an ultra-long bar which caused problems at first. Servers couldn't efficiently get to customers

approaching the entire length. Solution? Queue management tapes/posts. Never seen it in taproom use before. That works.

Sound Having managed concerts, music gigs and original music talent, I'm attuned to noise and room acoustics. Always a challenge to find balance between positively dynamic and distractingly noisy. Changes per audience, too. Are you managing to your intended customer group? Highland Brewing's taproom is one of the best I've experienced. Another cavernously-big space. Hard surfaces. High potential for boomy echoes. A planning challenge as the room is intended as a 500-plus person music venue as well. Solution: sound baffles. Lots of them. Done on a budget, done effectively.

Light Plenty of alternatives and options there. Warm or cool in hue? Spot or broad flood? Intimate or daytime bright? Natural or artificial? All of the above? More choices to cover than this intro article allows. Lighting design is a professional discipline worth many separate articles.

You're not selling beer, you're selling experience I've been reminding my craft beer connections for years. Consider the full sensual experience, including the place where your brews are consumed. How do you effectively use what you have to express the personality of your business and your products? In future issues this year, we'll be covering architectural and lighting design as used in branded environments. We're looking forward to welcoming guest writers who are tops in their respective fields. Stay tuned! Eric Johnson is the strategy director for Craft Brand & Marketing Magazine. He can be reached at ericj@cbam-mag.com.

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Leadership

By Eric Balinski

‘Unseen Is Unsold’ A look at the art of craft beer artwork In visual marketing, the axiom that "Unseen is Unsold" suggests that products that are not noticed will not get bought by customers. This notion rests on the idea that the consumer's choice process is heavily influenced by their visual search. With huge craft beer sections in stores these days, standing out may not be so easy. Online, people use search engines to find what they want. Searching in a store, people's saccadic eye movement is a key search tool. You will see the relationship of eye movement and memory as you read on. Visual marketing for craft brewers starts with significant work and imagination that are part of creating a craft beer label. Craft beer labels are much more than product identification, as it often expresses the craft brewery's brand identity, story, and even its ethos in compelling artistic imagery and words. The brand imagery is often created by local artists, a brand design firm, or even a brewer with a passion for art and beer making. The resulting outcome of a craft beer label is an important component for branding as well as merchandising with its merchandising significance becoming greater as a brewer expands distribution. The challenge is standing out among all the other craft beer labels from other brewers who put in as much work, passion and imagination into their labels. (For tips on what makes great brand identity and design, see the "The Fine Art of Label Design" in our digital issue at www.cbam-mag.com.) Now let's discuss what you may not be considering about your visual marketing. Perhaps there is no more underutilized asset a brewer has than its label artwork. A label's magnificent depth, color and complexity in its artwork and graphics can be lost on the shelf among the many other competing artistic label's with magnificent depth, color and complexity, all of whom are unseen because they are so small. As such, being unseen leads to potentially becoming unsold. To me, this is a real shame because craft beer labels are often pieces of artwork. Their small size limits how your craft beer fans appreciate the creativity and beauty of your label art, thus reducing your brand's identity. The small size also limits the mental impression it makes on your fans, too.

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Perhaps if craft brewers thought more of their label art and graphics as artwork, there would be more ways to help your beer fans experience it and remember you. Perhaps if a craft brewer thought more like a cognitive or a neuro scientist, the brewer might recognize the brain can be trained to recognize even small images and symbols, but first there needs to be an indelible impression in the craft beer fan's brain. Hum? Forget for a moment you make great beer. What if you were an artist that made their living as an artist? Through hard work and diligent effort, your artwork becomes admired, thus growing your fame and business. Your success reaches a point where you branch out and use your brand identity to market items other than your works of art. This is exactly what artist Michael Godard, a.k.a., "The Rock Star of the Art World," has done with his artwork based on olives. Yep, olive art has made him one of the most sought after artists in the world. Godard's success enabled him to parlay his popularity into craft distilled spirits – a vodka and a gin.

Naturally, as an artist with a widely recognized style, Godard created new art, one called "Mr. Smooth," for his vodka, and another piece, "The Spa Treatment," for his gin. These pieces of art became the basis of Godard's bottle labels, with each label measuring 3.5 inches by 7.5 inches on his 750ml size bottles. Granted, they are bigger than a typical craft label, but still pretty small to appreciate the detail of his art in the labels. If you've seen typical vodka shelf displays in a liquor store, these labels might standout even with their small size, but they could just as easily be lost, too.

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You are thinking to yourself right now, you also create specific label art for each specific brew. Yes true, nothing new here. However, the interesting question to consider is, how would a world famed artist market their craft made brand? Well with a tasting coupled with an art exhibit of course. At Godard tasting events, his actual label artwork is prominently displayed throughout the tasting area in a 24-inch wide x 41-inch tall size. To put

it in perspective, Godard's spirit labels have 26.25 square inches of viewing area, while the tasting room exhibit art pieces had 984 square inches of viewing area or 37.5 times great size than the 750ml bottle label. (Godard's 1.5L bottles have 50 square inches of viewing area) The result: The Godard craft spirit tasting-art exhibitions gave Godard's fans a full sensory experience of taste, smell, sound (of other Godard fans' enthusi-

asm and comments) as well as full visual imagery of his vodka and gin brand. People see clearly the detail and beauty of the artistry in the brand label's motif.

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Leadership

Understanding Saccadic Eye Movement Saccade eye movements are the quick movements made by your eyes, characterized by a sudden change from point to point. Saccades direct the fovea portion of your eye onto an object or region of interest enabling high-acuity detailed visual analysis at that location. In normal viewing, several saccades are made each second and their destinations are selected by our cognitive brain process.

Godard fans' brains also will more • Consider your craft beer easily remember his label art, too, labels as pieces of art, exas the larger size leaves a more pressing the craft brewery's detailed mental impression. brand identity, story, and Now when that fan goes to even its ethos in compelling buy vodka or gin in the store, no artist imagery by using it to matter how crowded the shelf maximize how your fans fully is or the sameness visually is on experience what you do and the shelf, that fan's saccadic eye who you are. movement rapidly scans the shelf • The visual experience of the space and more easily locks in label is lost by its small size. on Godard's brand that is their That one reality often makes it memory bank. an under-utilized asset of the That is, our minds naturally go craft brewer. Don't be afraid to what they recognize, espeto find new ways to display cially when there is a compelling it in ways that are larger and brand story behind the image. bolder. This will increase your (For more on the Saccadic Eye brand story being etch into Vision is dependent upon Movement, check out our sidethe memory of your fans. the information taken in during bar in our digital issue at www. fixation pauses between saccbam-mag.com.) Things to consider: cades. Sometimes these moveWhen Godard arrived at the • Increase label art visibility at ments are small, as when your event, his reaction to this piece your next tap takeover eyes are reading a beer label. was priceless. Nothing drew his • Create a gallery of your own They can also be bigger, such as attention more, that is, his sweeplabel artwork in your tasting when viewing a large picture on ing saccade eye movement upon room or pub a wall. Although some saccades entering the room, locked in right • Leverage your creative can be done intentionally, most away to what was so embedded designs to further enhance of the time, they are a reflex that in his mind. He was pulled to see blend the décor of a craft happens without our awareness. his own work, shown in a new brewery, a retail location or Saccades are important way and format. a craft brand pub location to us as they help us notice the Once the tasting was under• Better leverage your label art on interesting parts of a picture. The way, his loyal fans and collectors your social media and website parts your eyes rest on between were also drawn to the illumi• Bigger is better as people's its rapid movements are called nated piece because they, too, eyes will spend more time fixations. These fixation aid your had never experience his work on the details of your craft memory and later can become in such a way, yet their mental beer artwork leading to a memory guided saccade queus gave them instant recogmore details in the memory where your eyes move toward a nition that it was relevant. remembered point of interest. At the end of the tasting-exRemember another old axihibit, he autographed the piece om, "A picture is worth a thoubecause he felt it was an impressive fan tribute sand words." Don't let yours become just underutipiece of his work. Today, that piece is hanging in lized assets. Give a full visual sensory experience my personal space, right next to the Giclee print for your beer fans. version of Mr. Smooth. Now please go back to producing a great craft beer. The Visual Marketing Lessons for Craft Brewers: •B  randing is about creating an all-out visual sensory experience (which is why most craft brewers spend time and creativity on it.)

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Eric Balinski is the owner of Synection, LLC, which is a strategy and growth consultancy firm. For more information, visit: synection.com.

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CIRCLE NO. 59


Design

By Sarah Carpenter

Tap Handles Why you need them and how to design the perfect one

There are so many options today for creating tap handles that are out of this world. But don't fall into the “Tap Handle Trap.” What's the “Tap Handle Trap?” Glad you asked. The Trap is when a brewery focuses too much on how awesome they can make their handles without considering consumer behavior and a marketing strategy. Even if your design includes a giant gorilla climbing up a glow in the dark skyscraper carrying a rotating disco ball that plays Saturday Night Fever songs and shoots confetti every time the bartender draws, it's nothing more than a novelty item without a tie-in to your beer style and brand. But we're getting ahead of ourselves. Why should you invest in tap handles for your beer? Tap handles are a favorite added value item for distributors and sales reps. Craft breweries are continuing to pop up all over the country, creating a competitive atmosphere. As a result, your brand has the task of not only trying to make your beer stand out to customers, but also to distributors and sales reps. Because tap

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handles are a proven method for connecting with consumers at the bar, adding a functional, well-designed tap handle to your package will make your brand an easier sell to bar owners. This could be a significant advantage in the effort to put your beer at the top of their distribution list. Tap handles are both functional, attention-grabbing, and a chance to show a glimpse of your brand's story. Picture yourself walking into a bar that serves beer. Whether it's the local dive or attached to a 5-star steakhouse, the row of tap handles takes center stage. It's one of the first parts of the bar your eyes go to, and, because they at eye level a customer's eyes will continue to explore them while hanging out at the bar. This scenario presents an opportunity for you to take a bartending accessory and make it a customized piece of branded artwork, showcasing your brand and promoting your beverages. Now that you know why you need a tap handle, it's time for the next hurdle. How do you design a tap handle that stands out amongst the competition?

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Design

Here are five tips to help get you started:

No. 1 – Make the beer style clear During popular beer-drinking times of the day, bar areas and restaurants are fast paced. Customers feel more under pressure to get their orders in quickly, which means they are less likely to take the time to ask their server what style of beer each tap handle offers. Displaying your brand's beer style loud and proud on the side of the handle will quickly answer that question for both the bartender and bar customers, giving it an upper hand.

down at the beer list and, at a glance, nothing stands out. Then you look up toward the bar at the array of tap handles. Which one stands out? The one that you can read from a distance. Customers will not always be looking at your tap handle from up close, so it's important to make the beer style and your brand viewable from multiple angles and from far away.

No. 4 – Use contrasting colors between the glaze and art An excellent way to ensure your beer style and brand stand out from a distance is to use contrasting colors. For example, a white glazed tap handle with black typography will be much easier to read than a dark blue glazed tap handle with black typography. Use whatever colors fit your brand best, but make sure they are contrasting enough for the darker mood lighting of a restaurant or bar. Going along with this, using a clean design can also keep your brand standing out. After all, less is sometimes more.

No. 5 – Choose a custom tap handle shape that's recognizable and unique to you

No. 2 – Stay consistent with your brand across beer styles For those of you with multiple beer styles on tap at the same restaurants and bars, it's essential to maintain some consistency across your brand. Otherwise, customers will have a harder time connecting your beer to your brewery, which could hurt their recognition of your name in the long run. Plus, consistent handles make it fast and easy to show off your beer.

No. 3 – Make your tap handles legible from multiple angles and a distance Imagine sitting at a restaurant. Your server is asking if you would like anything to drink. You look

Of course, what's written on the tap handle is only half the battle. You also don't want your handles to look like all the others at the bar. Creating a custom tap handle that fits your brewery's story is a fantastic way to make your beer pop. Keep in mind that tap handles are spaced 3 inches apart at the bar when considering how to design your handle. That means the max width we can make it is 2.625 inches. Heavier tap handles are also less appealing, because they can cause problems for the bartender. With a unique shape, contrasting colors and a visible beer style and brand, your tap handle is already surpassing the competition and ensuring your brand gets the attention it deserves from both customers and distributors alike. Keep these tips in mind not only when designing your tap handles, but when designing your branding in general. And, of course, please feel free to reach out to Boelter with any of your brand questions and needs by visiting https://tap.beercup.com/cbam Cheers!

Sarah Carpenter is the marketing manager for Boelter Beverage, scarpenter@boelter.com.

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CIRCLE NO. 61


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

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ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE: Bubba's 33

Chesapeake, VA

$2,000,000.00

7,575

New Construction

Q2 2018

Burger King

Greensboro, GA

$1,000,000.00

3,410

New Construction

Q2 2018

Starbucks #53838

Jacksonville, NC

$300,000.00

2,310

Remodel

Q2 2018

Bahama Buck's #1215

Kissimmee, FL

$200,000.00

1,500

Remodel

Q2 2018

Q3 2018

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS: IKEA - Cary Towne Center

Cary, NC

$80,000,000.00

380,000

New Construction

Floor & Decor - Aviation Square

North Charleston, SC

$10,000,000.00

75,002

New Construction

Q2 2018

AutoZone #4482

Coral Springs, FL

$1,500,000.00

7,147

New Construction

Q2 2018

Walmart Supercenter #521-221

Lake Charles, LA

$930,000.00

183,917

Renovation

Q2 2018

H&M #593 - Brookwood Village Mall

Birmingham, AL

$850,000.00

22,338

Remodel

Q2 2018

Orlando, FL

$87,000,000.00

395,000

New Construction

Q1 2019

RAD Lofts

Asheville, NC

$45,000,000.00

400,000

New Construction

Q2 2018

Cromwell Hills Apartment Development Rehabilitation

Chattanooga, TN

$12,000,000.00

250,000

Renovation/Addition

Q2 2018

Home2 Suites

Saint Augustine, FL

$8,500,000.00

57,800

New Construction

Q2 2018

Sheraton Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

$4,000,000.00

15,127

Renovation

Q1 2019

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE: Magnolia Rose

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION: Loudoun County Elementary School

Ashburn, VA

$35,000,000.00

102,852

New Construction

Q2 2018

Mangham High/Junior High School - Phase 2

Mangham, LA

$2,100,000.00

83,573

Addition/Renovation

Q2 2018

Monroe County High School and Middle School Renovation

Tompkinsville, KY

$287,000.00

176,544

Renovation

Q2 2018

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY: Design-Build Services for the New US Courthouse

Anniston, AL

$38,180,000.00

63,000

New Construction

Q1 2019

Charles R. Jonas Courthouse New Annex and Alteration

Charlotte, NC

$15,338,003.00

333,000

Renovation

Q2 2018

Historic Public Safety Complex Project Number 53018

Miramar, FL

$8,000,000.00

24,000

New Construction

Q2 2018

New Cancer Center - East Alabama Medical Center

Opelika, AL

$40,000,000.00

40,000

New Construction

Q2 2018

Sequatchie County Regional Hospital Erlanger Health System

Dunlap, TN

$26,000,000.00

50,000

New Construction

Q3 2018

Receiving Units Buildings A2 and B East Mississippi State Hospital

Meridian, MS

$14,000,000.00

52,862

Renovation

Q2 2018

Design Build Services at North Shallowford Annex

Dunwoody, GA

$510,000.00

13,700

Renovation

Q3 2018

MEDICAL:

156

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


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AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

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HFA Creative Solutions.......................................... 77.......................38

Arc Vision Incorporated......................................... 71.......................35

Hunter Building Corp............................................. 14.......................10

Beam Team Construction................................... 47, 87.................25, 43

ISA International Sign Expo.................................. 131......................54

Benjamin Moore................................................... 23.......................15 Boelter................................................................. 141......................57 Bostik.................................................................34-35....................20 The Blue Book..................................................... 117......................51 CDO Group........................................................... 101......................47 Ceso..................................................................... 43.......................23 Commerical Construction & Renovation Retreats.............................................. 55.......................29

Kaston Group........................................................ 83.......................41 L2M Architects...................................................... 19.......................14 Lakeview Construction, Inc.................................... 9.........................7 Laticrete................................................................ 5.........................3 May Group........................................................... 151......................59 Metropolitan Ceramics........................................... 8.........................6 Moda4 Design...................................................... 73.......................36

Commerical Construction & Renovation People............................................... 138......................56

National Pavement................................................ 41.......................22

Commerical Construction & Renovation Women in Construction...................... 111......................50

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association............................................... 27.......................16

Construction Data Co. (CDC)................................ 157......................62 CONSTRUCT-ED................................................... 121......................52 Construction One................................................... 3.........................2

Newton................................................................. 11........................8 Nvironment Design..................................................... 75.........................37 Permit......................................................................... 17.........................13

Controlled Power.................................................. 16.......................12 Core States.............................................................103...................... 48 Coverings................................................................135...................... 55 Cyntergy...................................................................65....................... 32

Porcelanosa................................................................ 81.........................40 Prime Retail Services.................................................. 49.........................26 Rockerz Inc............................................................ 7.........................4

Dark Horse..............................................................107...................... 49

Sargenti Architects............................................... 33.......................19

Egan Sign............................................................. 39.......................21

Schimenti......................................................... 8, CVR4.................6, 64

EMG..................................................................... 53.......................28

SGA Design Group................................................ 63.......................31

Energex Wall Systems....................................... CVR2-1....................1

ShopTalk 360º...................................................... 13........................9

Evil Horse Brewing Co.......................................... 149......................58 Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber....................... 79.......................39 Georgia Printco.................................................... 153......................60 Glab Maintenance Services................................... 45.......................24 Gleman & Sons..................................................... 85.......................42 GlobalShop........................................................... 89.......................44

Storefloors............................................................ 51.......................27 Urban Architectural Group..................................... 97.......................45 Wagner................................................................. 13.......................10 Warner Bros........................................................ CVR3.....................63 Window Film Depot............................................... 29.......................17

GPD Group............................................................ 67.......................33

Wolverine Building Group.................................. 99, 155................46, 61

Greenberg Farrow................................................. 61.......................30

WoodWorks.......................................................... 31.......................18

GSB, Inc. Architects & Planners............................. 69.......................34

ZipWall................................................................. 15.......................11

158

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


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JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

159


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

New day rising

I

always say, “The day I stop learning is the day I should go

From day one though, the young coach was impressive with his knowledge and do something else.” Well, that’s true to the core, as I of the game and took my old school game and tweaked it to a modern day process start my 2018 spring high school lacrosse season. that has completely changed the image of the team that went 9-10 last season. We go into the 2018 season with high expectations for our Varsity squad with basically the same players they had last season made up of sophomores, juniors and 4 seniors so the future looks bright on the horizon. Every practice on the field or in the film room, we learn from each other something new whether it is a drill, play or thought process on how to succeed when the going gets tough and buying into the system. At first, it was a little bumpy, but as every day of preseason passed, it became easier to adapt and stay on the same page. For us, winning is the ultimate goal, with making the playoffs for the first time in school history a priority. They say, “An old dog can’t learn new tricks,” well, I beg to differ. I’m honored I have a chance to keep on learning. Our team motto is “family,” and we stick together through thick and thin. Our bond On New Year’s Day, I was hired as cannot be broken. We all have each other’s the Boy’s Varsity Lacrosse Assistant Head backs. That goes for the coaches, parents, Coach and Offensive Coordinator for a players, booster board and student body. local high school in a northern county near It really has been a unique learning where I live outside of Atlanta. experience. And while I thought I knew it all, What’s interesting is at 54 years I am humble enough to say I don’t. I cherish young, I was hired by the new 24-year old each day that I can learn something new. head coach. I’ve been playing lacrosse for We hope you feel the same way. Take 40-plus years, almost double the time he at least one nugget of knowledge from has been alive. our magazine or events, and you’ll be able During the interview process, the young to apply it to improve your projects. If so, head coach said he was looking for experience we feel we’ve both won the game – as it and heard through the local lax grapevine should always be win-win for all involved. that I was a quality candidate to check out. To all of you out there in the highly He told me all he wanted me to do competitive commercial construction and was to put goals on the scoreboard. He, renovation sector, best of success in the rest of 2018, have fun and and the other assistants, would do the rest. That sounded pretty good keep the faith. And “Go Alpharetta Raiders Lax”! CCR to me. After playing for so long, I thought I knew it all.

They say, “An old dog can’t learn new tricks,” well, I beg to differ. I’m honored I have a chance to keep on learning.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

160

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2018


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CIRCLE NO. 63


CIRCLE NO. 64


INSIDE THIS ISSUE: New Advisory Board Member.......... pg 2

President’s Message....................... pg 3

Milestone Memberships................ pg 2

Giving Back: How RCA Members are Improving Their Communities...... pg 7

WINTER EDITION • 2018

NEWSLETTER

Emerging Trends in Construction Law By Kevin Murphy, General Counsel and Vice President, Triad Retail Construction, Inc. The new year is a great time to reflect on the emerging trends in Construction Law that may affect the retail construction industry. When I tell people I’m a construction lawyer, the most common reaction I get from those outside our industry is, “What’s a construction lawyer?” In the spirit of clearing this up, the first trend I’ll discuss is the growing recognition of construction law as a distinct area of law. Construction law presents a unique challenge because of the numerous overlapping areas of law that include procurement, business organization, general business law, contract law, real property transactions, and, in most states, a special body of law that regulates the construction industry both in terms of safety, contracting, and lien rights. Despite this unique mix of issues, it was just over 40 years ago that the American Bar Association recognized the Forum on Construction Law for those who specialize in construction law. Many states have construction law divisions and construction law has become a board-certified specialty practice area in Florida and Texas. The board certification process requires years of experience in Kevin Murphy the field, specialized continuing legal education and, in most cases, sitting for a comprehensive exam. Several other states, including Virginia, North Carolina, and New York are considering adding certifications in construction law. Last year brought the 2017 updates to the AIA contract forms. These updates are always a good indicator of trends in the construction industry. The 2017 updates reflected increased use of electronic notices and digital data. Specifically, section A201 1.6 allows for electronic (email) notices for everything other than Notice of Claims, which must still be delivered by certified or registered mail or courier. Other provisions reflect the need for protocols for the use, exchange, and reliance on BIM/digital data. The trend in the industry in cases of termination by the owner for convenience has been toward a negotiated fee. However, the default in the AIA left the owner paying reasonable overhead and profit for work not

executed after the contract has been terminated for convenience. The AIA made a change to reflect this trend. While a competent construction attorney can easily and effectively manage the risks of liens to an owner’s property, liens continue to be an issue of concern in retail construction. The 2017 AIA form revision incorporated a standard practice by including language requiring the general contractor to indemnify the owner for liens arising under the general contractor’s work. Another positive change is a trend toward preliminary notices, like the North Carolina approach. Many states are looking at creating online registry—think of a UCC for preliminary notices and liens—that would require subcontractors and suppliers to file electronically at the beginning of a project. This has the advantage of putting everyone on notice of who the players are and reduce surprises. Some subcontractor groups have opposed these moves due to the additional paperwork and because they see it as a way to limit their lien rights. As mentioned above in the discussion of the AIA form changes, technology is becoming an important part of the practice of law. Two areas of concern are electronically stored information (ESI) and social media. ESI discovery costs in litigation can quickly eclipse the value of the underlying lawsuit. Consider the large number of emails, text messages, reports, photographs, and videos collected in even a small construction project. We should add to this list the fairly new and fast-growing internet of things (IoT), which includes an incredible list of data sources from such diverse sources as electric lamps, security systems, and RFD tags on merchandise. To manage the discovery costs, there is a trend toward crafting ESI or e-discovery protocols as part of the initial contractual dispute resolution process. The parties will agree in advance on the scope and cost, should disputes arise. Social media has become an unavoidable part of the landscape, and attorneys must take notice. Several bar associations, including the American Bar Association, New York Bar Association, and the Texas Bar, have explicitly stated that a lawyer cannot be competent absent a working knowledge of the benefits and risks associated with the lawyer’s use of social media. While we may not want to be tweeting our every thought, we need to be able to counsel our clients on their social media use. These are just a few of the construction law issues that are worth watching in the new year. 2018 promises to have more challenges and opportunities for the construction industry and the lawyers who serve it.

Friday, March 16, 2018 6:00pm–8:00pm: No-Host Welcome Reception Saturday, March 17, 2018 8:00am–3:00pm: Annual Conference, featuring an economic update by Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group, Inc.; keynote remarks by Rich Chapman, Managing Director, Chartwell; Author, The Greater Game; Advisory Board panel & industry experts panel. 4:00pm–5:30pm: Owner’s Event

7:00pm–9:00pm: Networking Reception RCA Member companies get one free conference registration and can register additional attendees for a nominal fee. Retailers and architects can attend at no charge. Sunday, March 18, 2018 8:00 am – 1:00pm: Golf Tournament at Cowboys Golf Club Registration and full agenda: retailcontractors.org.

RCA’s mission is to promote professionalism and integrity in retail construction through industry leadership in education, information exchange, and jobsite safety.


NEWSLETTER

New Advisory Board Member RCA’s Advisory Board is comprised of negotiations, entitlements, A/E management, representatives from retail markets including specialty, construction and procurement. big box, department stores, developers, architecture/ The CBRE|Skye client list includes landlords engineer, and restaurant retailers. Advisory Board and developers such as Simon, Howard Hughes members are appointed by the President and serve Corporation, Westfield, New England Development, three year terms. During that time, Steiner, DeBartolo, Ivanhoe Cambridge they actively assist the RCA Board of and Forest City. The CBRE|Skye retailer Directors in identifying key industry client list includes Barneys, Macy’s, issues and formulating policies and David’s Bridal, AT&T, New York & Co, programs designed to positively Bare Minerals, Nobu, Aspire Fitness, impact those issues. Meet RCA’s Pokeworks and Sprint. newest Advisory Board member. The CBRE|Skye team opens Brad Sanders is Senior Managing over 1,500 new stores annually in Director of CBRE|Skye Group. In mall, lifestyle, outlet, mixed-use, 2000, Brad founded Skye Group as a power center, campus, airport and Brad Sanders Project Management firm specifically urban high street projects nationwide. dedicated to supporting construction projects for both Brad and the CBRE|Skye team have guided the landlords and retailers across the U.S. and Canada. In development process for over 75 million square feet 2016, Skye Group merged into CBRE and became of new projects throughout North America. CBRE’s Retail Project Management Platform for Brad is a member of the ICSC Centerbuild the Americas within CBRE’s Project Management Planning Committee. He is known for his active staff of over 550. The CBRE|Skye team is uniquely charity work with Bellefaire JCB, where he has been dedicated to all aspects of the retail store opening a Board Member since 2005.He resides with his wife process: due diligence, pricing, construction exhibit of 20 years and three daughters in Cleveland, Ohio.

2

WINTER EDITION • 2018

Milestone Memberships Congratulations to our members celebrating milestone membership anniversaries! We appreciate your ongoing support of the RCA! 25 Years

All-Rite Construction Co., Inc.

20 Years

EDC J. G. Construction KBE Building Corporation Lakeview Construction, Inc. Retail Construction Services, Inc.

15 Years

PWI Construction, Inc.

10 Years

Bogart Construction, Inc. DLP Construction Timberwolff Construction, Inc. Warwick Construction, Inc.

5 Years

Buildrite Construction Corp. DGC Capital Contracting Corp. Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. James Agresta Carpentry Inc. National Building Contractors Triad Retail Construction


ADVISORY BOARD

President’s Message Brad Bogart, CDP, President, Bogart Construction, Inc.

I hope everyone’s new year is off to a great start! At its winter meeting, the RCA Board approved changes to the RCA membership process and policies. Here’s a brief summary. Experience Modification Rating (EMR) In early 2016, we updated our membership requirements to include reporting of three years of EMR. With jobsite safety as one of the tenets of our mission, we wanted to review EMRs Brad Bogart to ensure our applicants and members are focusing on safety. In an effort to raise safety awareness, we began to request explanations for EMRs over 1.0. During the most recent renewal process, we heard some concern from our members about this process and realized that we needed to better communicate the reasoning behind requesting the information and the steps we will take to address high EMRs. The Board has approved the following policy regarding EMRs: RCA renewing members and applicants are required to submit a three-year history of their EMR rating. If said rating exceeds 1.0 for a period greater than three years, a letter of explanation may be required. If during said three-year period of a greater than 1.0 EMR, the rating continues to increase, a letter of explanation will be required, detailing the nature of the incident(s) that caused the increase in EMR rating and a description of actions taken modifying the safety program of that member/applicant. An EMR rating above 1.0 does not exclude a member from renewal or applicant from membership.

Three-Year Renewal Cycle Our Board and membership committee have received a lot of feedback on the membership application and renewal process. Foremost, that it is complex and time intensive. In recent years, we have modified the process of reviewing contractor and licenses and registration, moving from the “license grid” to having staff check license/ registration status in public databases, and requiring a signed affidavit attesting that members will only operate in states where they are properly licensed/registered. Even with these changes, the membership process remains rigorous. We need to maintain this rigor; we market our membership process as more detailed than the prequalification process many retailers use. Working with RCA members can alleviate some of the work retailers must do, making our members an attractive option for their bid lists. In the interest of making continued membership in RCA as accessible as possible to our members, the Board has voted to implement a three-year renewal application process. Membership dues will be payable in full every year, but a full membership package needs to be submitted every third year. During the two interim years, member companies must submit only an affidavit with their dues. The Board of Directors, at its discretion, may require submission of additional supporting documentation. The implementation of this process will be staggered over the next three years under the following guidelines: • Companies who joined the RCA within the past three years and companies with representatives currently serving on the Board of Directors will submit full renewal packages in 2018, 2021, 2024… • The remainder of RCA members will be divided into two groups at random. One group will submit full renewal packages in 2019, 2022, 2025… The second group will submit full renewal packages in 2020, 2023, 2026… Members will be notified in April, with their dues notice, of which year their complete package is next due. I look forward to seeing you at our Annual Conference, March 16-18, at the Gaylord Texan, prior to SPECS. Cheers,

Brad

— brad@bogartconstruction.com

Chuck Barnes - Spinoso Real Estate Group

Jeffrey D. Mahler - L2M, Inc.

Ken Christopher - LBrands

Jason Miller - JCPenney Company

Mike Clancy - FMI

Steven R. Olson, AIA - CESO, Inc.

Craig Hale, AIA -

Kristen Roodvoets - ALEX AND ANI

HFA - Harrison French Associates

Brad Sanders - CBRE | Skye Group

COMMITTEE CHAIRS EDUCATION/CAREER DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Mike Wolff 909-949-0380 mike@timberwolff.com

Joseph Schimenti 914-244-9100 JSchimenti@schimenti.com

MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS

SAFETY

Robert Moore 714-491-1317 RAMoore@gray.com

SCHOLARSHIP & STUDENT OUTREACH

Mike McBride 817-302-2050 mikem@westwoodcontractors.com

Jack Grothe 909-993-9332 jackG@JGConstruction.com

Justin Elder 952-345-6069 justin@elderjones.com

MEMBERSHIP

SPONSORSHIP/MEMBER BENEFITS

Ray Catlin 972-800-2910 rcatlin@emjcorp.com Hunter Weekes 864-233-0061 hweekes@weekesconstruction.com

MILITARY SERVICE INITIATIVE Jay Dorsey 281-485-4700 J.Dorsey@triadrc.com

Phil Eckinger 330-453-2566 phil@eckinger.com

STRATEGIC PLAN

Eric Handley 847-856-0123 eric.handley@warandolph.com

TECHNOLOGY

David Martin 920-490-3104 david@hjmartin.com

OFFICERS President - Brad Bogart

Secretary/Treasurer - Steve Bachman

Vice President - Rick Winkel

Immediate Past President Robert Moore

Bogart Construction, Inc.

Winkel Construction, Inc.

Retail Construction Services, Inc.

Gray

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2021 Jay Dorsey

2020 Rick Winkel

2021 Phil Eckinger

2020 Mike Wolff Timberwolff Construction, Inc.

2021 Jack Grothe

2019 Ray Catlin

2021 David Martin

2019 Eric Handley

2021 Mike McBride

2018 Steve Bachman

2021 Joseph Schimenti

2018 Brad Bogart

2021 Hunter Weekes

2018 Justin Elder

Triad Retail Construction, Inc. Eckinger Construction Co. JG Construction H.J. Martin & Son, Inc. Westwood Contractors Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Weekes Construction, Inc.

Winkel Construction, Inc.

EMJ Corporation William A. Randolph, Inc. Retail Construction Services, Inc. Bogart Construction, Inc. Elder-Jones, Inc.

2020 Robert Moore Gray

PAST PRESIDENTS David Weekes 1990-1992 W. L. Winkel 1993 Robert D. Benda 1994 John S. Elder 1995 Ronald M. Martinez 1996 Jack E. Sims 1997 Michael H. Ratner 1998 Barry Shames 1999 Win Johnson 2000

Dean Olivieri 2001 Thomas Eckinger 2002 James Healy 2003 Robert D. Benda 2004-2006 K. Eugene Colley 2006-2008 Matthew Schimenti 2008-2012 Art Rectenwald 2012-2014 Mike Wolff 2014-2016 Robert Moore 2016-2017

2018 • WINTER EDITION

3


NEWSLETTER

RCA Membership

RCA members must meet and maintain a series of qualifications and are approved by the Board of Directors for membership. They have been in the retail construction business as general contractors for at least five years; agree to comply with the Association’s Code of Ethics and Bylaws; are properly insured and bonded; are licensed in the states in which they do business; and have submitted letters of recommendation.

COMPANY CONTACT A. F. Alber General Contractor, Inc. Anthony Alber Acme Enterprises, Inc. Robert Russell All-Rite Construction Co., Inc. Warren Zysman Atlas Building Group Brian Boettler BALI Construction Kevin Balestrieri Bogart Construction, Inc. Brad Bogart Buildrite Construction Corp. Bryan Alexander Burdg, Dunham and Associates Harry Burdg Comet Construction Bernard Keith Danzansky Commercial Contractors, Inc. Kenneth Sharkey Commonwealth Building, Inc. Frank Trainor Construction One, Inc. Bill Moberger David A. Nice Builders Brian Bacon De Jager Construction, Inc. Dan De Jager Desco Professional Builders, Inc. Bob Anderson DGC Capital Contracting Corp. Gerry Ryan Diamond Contractors Lori Perry DLP Construction Dennis Pigg, Jr. E.C. Provini, Co., Inc. Joseph Lembo Eckinger Construction Company Philip Eckinger EDC Christopher Johnson ELAN General Contracting Inc. Adrian Johnson Elder-Jones, Inc. Justin Elder EMJ Corporation Ray Caitlin Engineered Structures, Inc. Mike Magill Fi Companies Kevin Bakalian Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Greg Freeh Fred Olivieri Construction Company Dean Olivieri Fulcrum Construction, LLC Willy Rosner Go Green Construction, Inc. Anthony Winkco Gray Robert Moore H.J. Martin & Sons, Inc. David Martin Hanna Design Group Jason Mick Harmon Construction, Inc. William Harmon Hays Construction Company, Inc. Roy Hays Healy Construction Services, Inc. James Healy Herman/Stewart Construction Terry Varner International Contractors, Inc. Bruce Bronge J. G. Construction Jack Grothe James Agresta Carpentry Inc. James Agresta KBE Building Corporation Michael Kolakowski Kerricook Construction, Inc. Ann Smith Lakeview Construction, Inc. Kent Moon M. Cary, Inc. Bill Tucker Management Resources Systems, Inc. Doug Marion Marco Contractors, Inc. Martin Smith Metropolitan Contracting Co., Ltd. Jane Feigenbaum Montgomery Development Carolina Corp. John Fugo Murray Costello Construction, Inc. Murray Costello National Building Contractors William Corcoran Pinnacle Commercial Development, Inc. Dennis Rome Prime Retail Services, Inc. Donald Bloom PWI Construction, Inc. Jeff Price R.E. Crawford Construction LLC Jeffrey T. Smith Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc. Art Rectenwald Retail Construction Services, Inc. Stephen Bachman Retail Contractors of Puerto Rico Sean Pfent Rockford Construction Co. Thomas McGovern Royal Seal Construction, Inc. Gene Colley Russco, Inc. Matthew Pichette Sachse Construction and Development Corp. Jeff Katkowsky Scheiner Commercial Group, Inc. Joe Scheiner

PHONE STATE EMAIL MEMBER SINCE 215-249-4885 PA office@afalber.com 2015 586-771-4800 MI rrussell@acme-enterprises.com 2009 973-340-3100 NJ warren@all-riteconstruction.com 1993 636-368-5234 MO bboettler@abgbuilds.com 2017 925-478-8182 CA kevin@bali-construction.com 2017 949-453-1400 CA brad@bogartconstruction.com 2008 770-971-0787 GA bryan@buildriteconstruction.com 2013 816-583-2123 MO harry@burdg-dunham.com 2016 561-672-8310 FL barney@danzansky.com 2016 616-842-4540 MI ken.t.sharkey@teamcci.net 1990 617-770-0050 MA frankt@combuild.com 1992 614-235-0057 OH wmoberger@constructionone.com 2015 757-566-3032 VA bbacon@davidnicebuilders.com 2011 616-530-0060 MI dandj@dejagerconstruction.com 1990 860-870-7070 CT banderson@descopro.com 1995 914-664-7244 NY gryan@dgccapital.com 2013 816-650-9200 MO loriperry@diamondcontractors.org 2015 770-887-3573 GA dpigg@dlpconstruction.com 2008 732-739-8884 NJ jlembo@eprovini.com 1992 330-453-2566 OH phil@eckinger.com 1994 804-897-0900 VA cjohnson@edcweb.com 1998 619-284-4174 CA ajohnson@elangc.com 2010 952-345-6069 MN justin@elderjones.com 1990 972-580-1210 TX RCaitlin@emjcorp.com 2014 208-362-3040 ID mikemagill@esiconstruction.com 2016 732-727-8100 NJ kbakalian@ficompanies.com 2017 440-716-4000 OH gfreeh@fortneyweygandt.com 2013 330-494-1007 OH dean@fredolivieri.com 1992 770-612-8005 GA wrosner@fulcrumconstruction.com 2014 412-367-5870 PA anthony@ggc-pgh.com 2017 714-491-1317 CA ramoore@gray.com 2005 920-494-3461 WI david@hjmartin.com 2016 847-719-0370 IL jmick@hannadesigngroup.com 2016 812-346-2048 IN bill.harmon@harmonconstruction.com 2017 303-794-5469 CO r.hays@haysco.biz 2002 708-396-0440 IL jhealy@healyconstructionservices.com 1996 301-731-5555 MD tvarner@herman-stewart.com 1995 630-834-8043 IL bbronge@iciinc.com 1995 909-993-9332 CA JackG@jgconstruction.com 1998 201-498-1477 NJ jim.agresta@jacarpentryinc.com 2013 860-284-7110 CT mkolakowski@kbebuilding.com 1998 440-647-4200 OH ann@kerricook.com 2012 262-857-3336 WI kent@lvconstruction.com 1998 631-501-0024 NY btucker@mcaryinc.com 2014 336-861-1960 NC dmarion@mrs1977.com 1992 724-741-0300 PA marty@marcocontractors.com 1994 210-829-5542 TX jfeigenbaum@metcontracting.com 1995 919-969-7301 NC jfugo@montgomerydevelopment.com 1999 239-482-2770 FL Susan@MCIUSA.com 2014 651-288-1900 MN bill@nbcconstruction.us 2013 732-528-0080 NJ dennis@pinnaclecommercial.us 2012 866-504-3511 GA dbloom@primeretailservices.com 2014 480-461-0777 AZ price@pwiconstruction.com 2003 941-907-0010 FL jeffs@recrawford.com 2011 724-772-8282 PA art@rectenwald.com 1996 651-704-9000 MN sbachman@retailconstruction.com 1998 586-725-4400 MI spfent@rcofusa.com 1996 616-285-6933 MI info@rockfordconstruction.com 2014 817-491-6400 TX gene@royalseal.com 1994 508-674-5280 MA mattp@russcoinc.com 1995 248-647-4200 MI jkatkowsky@sachseconstruction.com 2009 719-487-1600 CO joe@scheinercg.com 2012 (Continued on page 5)

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Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Shames Construction Co., Ltd. Shrader & Martinez Construction, Inc. Singleton Construction, LLC Solex Contracting Southwestern Services Sullivan Construction Company Taylor Brothers Construction Company, Inc. TDS Construction, Inc. Thomas-Grace Construction, Inc. Timberwolff Construction, Inc. TJU Construction, Inc. Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Trainor Commercial Construction, Inc. Travisano Construction, LLC Tri-North Builders, Inc. Triad Retail Construction Warwick Construction, Inc. Weekes Construction, Inc. Westwood Contractors, Inc. William A. Randolph, Inc. Winkel Construction, Inc. Wolverine Building Group Woods Construction, Inc.

Matthew Schimenti Carolyn Shames Ronald Martinez Denise Doczy-Delong Gerald Allen John S. Lee, Amanda Sullivan Jeff Chandler Robert Baker Don Harvieux Mike Wolff Tim Uhler Aaron Rectenwald John Taylor Peter J. Travisano Randy Danielson Jay Dorsey Walt Watzinger Hunter Weekes Mike McBride Tony Riccardi Rick Winkel Michael Houseman John Bodary

914-244-9100 925-606-3000 928-282-7554 740-756-7331 951-308-1706 817-921-2466 954-484-3200 812-379-9547 941-795-6100 651-342-1298 909-949-0380 530-823-7200 724-452-8801 415-259-0200 412-321-1234 608-271-8717 281-485-4700 832-448-7000 864-233-0061 817-302-2050 847-856-0123 352-860-0500 616-949-3360 586-939-9991

NY CA AZ OH CA TX FL IN FL MN CA CA PA CA PA WI TX TX SC TX IL FL MI MI

mschimenti@schimenti.com 1994 cshames@shames.com 1994 info@shradermartinez.com 1990 denisedelong@singletoncontruction.net 2012 jerry@solexcontracting.com 2015 JLee@southwesternservices.com 2017 amanda@buildwithsullivan.com 2012 jchandler@tbcci.com 2014 inbox@tdsconstruction.com 1994 don.harvieux@thomas-grace.com 2012 mike@timberwolff.com 2008 tim@tjuconstruction.com 2016 arectenwald@trcgc.net 2010 john.taylor@trainorconstruction.com 2012 pj@travisanocontruction.com 2015 rdanielson@tri-north.com 2015 j.dorsey@triadrc.com 2013 walt@warwickconstruction.com 2008 hweekes@weekesconstruction.com 1990 mikem@westwoodcontractors.com 1990 tony.riccardi@warandolph.com 2011 rickw@winkel-construction.com 1990 mhouseman@wolvgroup.com 2012 jbodary@woodsconstruction.com 1996

Visit retailcontractors.org to view the profile of each RCA member company. Click on “Find a Contractor” on the home page to search the member list. Please notify the RCA Office (800-847-5085 or info@retailcontractors.org) of any changes to your contact information.

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NEWSLETTER

Giving Back: How RCA Members are Improving Their Communities Members of the Retail Contractors Association are high caliber retail contractors united to provide a solid foundation of ethics, quality, and professionalism within the retail construction industry. But our members are not just building stores around the country; they are also giving back through a variety of public service efforts. In this feature series, we share how our members are making a difference in their local communities. “Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the human race.” — H.G. Wells

Riding to Support Kids n’ Kinship

In late May 2006, John Elder, then president of Elder-Jones (and a past president of RCA), and three friends began a 900-mile journey from Wolf Point, Montana to Minneapolis. John and two of his companions rode their bicycles while the third served as a support driver. It marked the beginning of a charity ride, eventually titled the Merchants Bank Christian Elder Memorial 900, committed to the support of a local mentorship organization, Kids n’ Kinship. It was also the beginning of an ongoing commitment of resources from Elder-Jones, many of its employees, from other companies that associate with Elder-Jones. Kids n’ Kinship serves the local community by providing friendships and positive role models to children ages 5-16 who are in need of an additional supportive relationship with an adult.

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For 12 years running, Merchants Bank, which has been Elder-Jones, bank for almost 20 years, has served as the title sponsor. ElderJones, and Single Ply Systems, a company owned by John Elder’s brother Joe, have served as associate sponsors. The ride has generated over $375,000 in donations for Kids n’ Kinship, including $45,000 from the 2017 ride, and has become the largest single source of income for the charity. Besides donations from the three sponsors, income sources include employees, friends, numerous subcontractors and suppliers, and several RCA member companies.

Christian Elder The ride became titled the Christian Elder Memorial 900 following the of death John’s son Christian in 2007. Christian, an avid supporter of the ride, flew from his home in Charlotte to Minneapolis each of the first two years to greet the returning


riders at an annual reception hosted by Kids n’ Kinship and Merchants Bank. He planned on joining the ride the following year. Christian had two careers. He was a professional racing driver in what was then the NASCAR Busch Series. In the NASCAR Goodies Dash Series, he had wins at Daytona and Charlotte, and won the pole position with a track record qualifying lap at Bristol Motor Speedway. On the road racing circuit, he drove to victory in the Motorola Cup at Mosport in Canada, and co-drove to two endurance race wins with his brother, Justin. At Elder-Jones, he spent several years on the road as a field superintendent. When his racing career ended, he transitioned to a position of project manager, where he served until his passing.

Committed and Involved Elder-Jones Staff

Transitions

Gray Construction Supports Save A Warrior ™ to Extend Hope to Veterans

The ride has grown, and transitioned, from its origin. It began 12 years ago with three riders and a support driver. In 2017, the ride included 11 riders and four support volunteers, with a motorhome and a travel trailer. Prior to 2014, the route was primarily run on paved ‘back roads.’ The first eight years, various routes were run in Montana, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri and Wisconsin. Beginning in 2014, with safety in mind, the ride moved exclusively to paved trails—to date, all in Minnesota.

Adventures along the Way Over the years, there were no shortages of memorable experiences. Weather occasionally created problems—including strong headwinds, hot days, cold days or rain and, in one case, even flooding. One evening, the motorhome was invaded by moths, many of which stubbornly remained on board for the duration of the ride. On the same night, the riders were startled when the park manager shot an invading skunk. Riders have seen badgers and bears, and have been occasionally pursued by snarling dogs. Year two marked a torturous ride through the Ozark Mountains, while on year three RCA past president Bob Benda joined the ride and had to endure a sweltering 17mile uphill climb on a coarse gravel trail in the Black Hills. One year, the rooftop air conditioner was ripped off as the rig passed under a low bridge. The following day, temperatures soared above 100 degrees, turning the ‘Mother Ship’ into a virtual sauna. There have been numerous incidents involving lost riders or a missing support driver and vehicle. Fortunately, the team has always eventually reunited.

From its inception, numerous Elder-Jones employees have been participants in the charity ride. Dennis Hill has completed every ride since year two. Jay Saterbak has ridden his bike, but primarily served as a support volunteer. Justin Elder has ridden five 900s, has recruited several of his friends to participate, and heads up the drive for donations from vendors. Additional support volunteers include Ann Gurholt and her husband, Doug. The gender barrier was broken when Kathy Kelly became a rider, and two years ago she was joined by Joy Predmore. In the office, Cindy Higgins oversees the CEM 900 website, including entering a daily ride summary written by Dennis Hill. John Elder has been the primary organizer of the ride and has ridden every year.

With Purpose Kids n’ Kinship provides a worthy and greatly needed purpose to the children of the community it serves. In 2018, CEM 900 participants will push past the 10,000 total miles ridden mark, and as they embark on each day’s 62 mile ride, there will undoubtedly be new adventures on the trail. But most importantly, the riding team will focus on the purpose behind the nine days of pedaling—which is to help children in need with their united support of Kids n’ Kinship. RCA members, if you are interested in having your firm featured in this series, please contact Carol Montoya at carol@retailcontractors.org.

Did you know that more than 80,000 veterans have been lost to suicide over the last decade? Sadly, this is more than the 58,209 soldiers who lost their lives during 18 years of combat in Vietnam. As difficult as this information is to grasp, it brings to light the staggering impact of Post-Traumatic Stress (PTS) on active duty military, veterans, and first responders who struggle to cope with the aftermath of war. Save A Warrior™ was founded more than five years ago in Malibu, CA with a mission to reduce the devastating effects of PTS for active duty personnel, returning Warriors, families, and their communities. Through its “War Detox” program, Save A Warrior™ aims to reduce pain and increase resiliency utilizing a holistic approach to healing. Since 2016, Gray Construction has been a proud partner of Save A Warrior™ working with the organization to move the program forward and extend its reach. To learn more about how Save A Warrior™ is changing countless lives of our nation’s heroes, visit saveawarrior.org.

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