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CCR HOUSTON: INDUSTRY LEADERS PROVIDE INSIGHTS ON ROAD AHEAD

Hiten Patel VP of Development & Construction, Vision Hospitality Group Inc.

Clear road

ahead

Inside Vision Hospitality Group’s quest for excellence Check out our

Kitchens

Commercial

Inside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s sustainability groove How to turn metal into money See our Leading Architecture & Fixture Manufacturers listings

Magazine and Supplement inside Also featuring: Inside the world of ADA

Exclusive Inside:

Official magazine of

January/February 2016 • www.ccr-mag.com


Advertorial

Who Doesn’t Like The Feeling of a Job Well Done? Johan Bohlmann and Alex Rogers AC•Tech Field Operations

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pecifier, contractor, architect, installer, project estimator, material purchaser, product manufacturer, building owner. We all feel the satisfaction when a project comes together as planned ... and our reputations go up a notch. That’s why AC•Tech puts so much emphasis on actually, physically “being there” when it counts. It’s one thing to manufacture specialty coatings that have been engineered to perform. It’s quite another to invest in the technical expertise and field experience necessary to make these coatings actually meet the FIELD performance SPECIFIED. It’s one thing to provide a toll-free number to respond to problems and warranty claims after something goes wrong. It’s quite another to work with a specifier to design an appropriate system, to counsel a project manager in the most cost-effective application

protocol, and to train installers to overcome an unexpected concrete slab issue before it cascades into a catastrophic flooring failure. So, we may advertise that AC•Tech “specializes in preventing excessive moisture, alkalinity, and oil contamination from causing commercial flooring failures in renovation, remodeling, and tenant improvement projects.” And we may try to hype our industry awards for product and process innovation in moving moisture mitigation to Division 3 in ground-up, fast-track construction projects. But, our measure lies in our attitude. We believe that helping everyone to do it right the first time is what builds success, reputation, and that “atta boy” feeling when all is said and done. And who doesn’t like that feeling?

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January/February • 2016 Vol. 15, No.1

56

22

104

Cover and opening feature photos by: Diana Stevenson Photos

FEATURES

22 Clear road ahead  Inside Vision Hospitality’s quest for excellence 56 Keeping the beat  How the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame got its sustainability groove on

122 A view to the year  Survey shows companies more optimistic, but worries about staffing abound 144  Turning metal into money  Inside the conversion of an old metal building into Class A shopping space

104 Front and center  State-of-the-art waterjet process gives Utah’s state logo one-of-kind look

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

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January/February • 2016 Vol. 15, No.1 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Scottsdale, Ariz. 38  2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat – Houston

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

18

36

64  Right on the mark See who topped our list of the leading architecture firms 80  The perfect fit Annual report shines light on today’s leading fixture manufacturers

SPECIAL SECTION

Commerical Kitchens 88  Turning up the heat  How The Melting Pot is evolving to meet consumer demand 96 Another shade of grey  From bus depot to bustling diner Federal Construction 109  Shootin’ for Gold  Inside Creede, Colo.’s hopeful Wild West LEED show

87

116 The Clean Up  New tax case good news for environmental remediation design contractors

DEPARTMENTS

6 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 141 Perspective 150 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 154 Ad Index 152 Product Spotlight 152 Calendar 156 Publisher’s Note

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

On demand E

very morning, Mike Lester heads to his treadmill with a handful of reports from a handful of restaurants that The Melting Pot targets as test groups. He is today’s new CEO. You work your mind, your body and the bottom line. The feedback Lester rolls through while putting himself through the paces helps the chain of franchised fondue restaurants get a beat on what their customers are thinking – what they want to see (see, “Turning up the Heat,” on page 88).

In an ever-growing competitive business landscape, The Melting Pot is just one of scores of brands across every segment, in every industry, that is embracing the importance of Big Data as a strategic resource. Recent research by the Economist Intelligence Unit reported that 60 percent of the executives believe data is generating revenue

within their organizations, while 83 percent say it is making existing services and products more profitable. For brands built around customer data, customer trust is everything. And the mining of large data sets that can identify trends and patterns is quickly becoming a standard business practice. Brands within our industry continue to evolve with new and exciting concepts. Take Circuit City, which is making a comeback by targeting Millennials as an electronics boutique. Resurrected by a pair of New York retail vets, Ronny Shmoel and Albert Liniado, the new and improved electronics retailer will launch in the Dallas market in June. After surveying the demands For brands of the marketplace and consumer built around sets, the stores now will sell tabcustomer data, lets, video game systems, drones, 3D printers and smartphones customer trust in 2,000- to 4,000-square-foot is everything. stores. There are talks of 50 to 100 And the mining stores later in the year. of large data And bd’s Mongolian Grill’s sets that can president and COO Joe Phraner also identify trends saw the need to meet consumer demand head on. The createand patterns is quickly becoming your-own stir-fry restaurant chain recently acquired fast-casual Asian a standard Flat Top Grill. With Asian business practice. chain concepts being one of the fastest growing segments in the restaurant industry, Phraner wanted to give his guests the opportunity to customize, create and be in control of their dining experience. Said Phraner: “Bringing together these two great brands creates a new synergy with tremendous opportunity, which we look forward to developing in the coming months.” As the quest for Big Data continues, it will be interesting to see how the brands we follow continue to evolve in a world where there can never be enough Big Data and evolution. In the end, that spells more promise for each of you, as evolution always brings opportunity. And for that, we don’t need to dig to deep to find the good.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 678.765.6550 • Fax 678.765.6551

EDITORIAL EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 772.232.6614 SCC MISSION Preserve 3.12:Eagle qrt pg FINAL

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Building REI’s new flagship store in the landmark Puck Building, New York City, required great efforts to preserve and honor the historic building elements while meeting the needs of a modern retailer. Our experience and commitment helped create a unique blend of the historic and the new.

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EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England SEAN COAKLEY Director of Facilities Ann Inc. DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes BROOKS HERMAN Project Manager of Construction Academy Sports + Outdoors STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company BRYAN NOVAK Sr. Director of Engin eering, Estimating, Quality Assurance Wal-Mart Stores DAVID OSHINSKI Director of Construction Home Depot JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury JANIS WILLIAMS Director of Store Facilities Tuesday Morning ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design

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RESTAURANTS MIKE HUDSON Director of Construction CEC Entertainment GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Rave Restaurant Group DAVID SHOTWELL Director of Construction Bojangles’ Famous Chicken ‘n Biscuits RON BIDINOST Senior Director of Franchise Operations & Administration Marie Callenders Restaurant & Bakery LLC

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development JOHN LAPINS Vice President, Architecture & Construction Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. DENNIS MCCARTY Vice President, Technical Services, Construction InterContinental Hotels Group, the Americas GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership ROBERT RAUCH President R.A. Rauch & Assoc. Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels

RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT

Senior Vice President, DTZ STEVE JONES

International Director JLL MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

SCOTT OFFERMANN Managing Director Global Occupier Services Cushman & Wakefield LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations & Project Management Interserv Hospitality Solutions JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

DON HASULAK

Managing Director Big Red Rooster

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Herschman Architects STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group GINA NODA Noda Retail Consultancy

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA MIKE AUTENRIETH Academic Director Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management The International Culinary School at The Art Institute International Minnesot DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail Under Armour

Under Armour will open 200 new stores this year. The brand operates 144 factory stores internationally, as well as 29 higher-end brand houses. it also sells smaller selections of its styles at in-store shops in Dick’s Sporting Goods and other stores.

ALDI

ALDI will open four new stores in the Richmond, Va., market through next year. The new stores, part of the Germany-based retailer’s plans to open 650 new U.S. stores, are in addition to the five stores it currently operates in the Richmond area. ALDI is looking to have about 2,000 stores operating in the United States by 2018.

Dollar General

Dollar General is set to open 900 new U.S. stores in 2016, boosting the retailer’s total square footage by 7 perecent. The company plans to roll out a more customer-friendly store prototype in early 2016.

Restaurants Quiznos

Quiznos has debuted a fast-casual Quiznos Grill that features wine, craft beer, housemade potato chips and table service. The chain also is testing a new menu dubbed “Toasteria” at 20 of its Denver-area restaurants.

Shake Shack

The In-N-Out vs. Shake Shack burger rivalry is heating up. Shake Shack, the New York City-originated burger chain plans to open a location in downtown L.A.

Sweetgreen

Salad chain Sweetgreen will relocate its main headquarters from Washington, D.C., to Los Angeles as part of its westward expansion. The chain plans to maintain its Washington, D.C., and New York offices, even though the headquarters will be based in California.

Krispy Kreme Doughnuts

Krispy Kreme Doughnuts is expanding its presence in Central America through a franchisee agreement to open 16 shops in Panama by the end of 2020. The company is working with Barcenas Group International Inc. Panama becomes the 31st country – counting the United States – in which Krispy Kreme has doughnuts shops or plans to open shops in the near term.

Safeway

Safeway will open a new full-service store in a 23,200-square-foot former Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market store in San Jose, Calif., as the retailer shifts to smaller-format spaces. The new store, which is scheduled to open next summer, is one of four locations opening in the Northern California market this year.

Hospitality Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group

Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group plans to expand its Country Inn & Suites brand from about 480 properties to approximately 600, and open 60 new Radisson Red hotels by 2020. Country Inn & Suites will continue to serve a mix of markets in the Americas, while Radisson Red will target tier-one cities worldwide.

Hard Rock International

Hard Rock International is surging toward a goal of managing or franchising 100 hotels on several continents by 2020. The hotelier said there are 130 deals in some stage of development.

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Marriott’s AC Hotels

Marriott International plans to open 22 hotels worldwide in 2016. The lifestyle brand looks to open hotels in Cincinnati North/West Chester, Ohio and Boston. Other locations around the world include France, Mexico, Brazil, England, Poland and Germany.

Yotel

Yotel plans to spend five years adding 50 hotels; eight already are in development. The eight-year-old chain, which offers pod rooms, plans to open new properties in Boston, Miami, New York, San Francisco, Singapore and Dubai, United Arab Emirates, along with airport sites at Charles de Gaulle in Paris and Changi in Singapore.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


Integrated Program Delivery. It Defines Everything We Do. Engineering Architecture

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INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

Green is the new green

Did you

know When it was all said and done, the U.S. restaurant industry saw a 1 percent increase in traffic in 2015, according to an NPD Group study. This year, NPD predicts another 1 percent increase. Fastcasual was the fastest-growing segment in 2015, with an 8 percent jump in visits, and breakfast was the winning daypart.

Sustainability is growing business in U.S. lodgings

W

hen it comes to today's hospitality market, environmentally friendly practices continue to gain ground. The reason: Hoteliers are continuing to respond to guest demands and finding sustainability beneficial to the bottom line. But, while shifting toward sustainable business practices and installing eco-friendly technology attracts more guests and saves money, the adoption of these concepts has had a slow start. To date, only three U.S. hotels reportedly having earned LEED Platinum designations, including Hilton Hotels & Resorts, which said three of its hotels were the first to win Superior Energy Performance certification from the U.S. Department of Energy. With energy and water representing the largest cost associated with hotel operations, it will be interesting to track how sustainable practices continue to play out.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

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CIRCLE NO. 11


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS There are great things happening in our industry in terms of great product – exciting new designs, innovative technology, great food-andbeverage options. Product is essential, but it’s not enough. – Marriott International CEO Arne Sorenson on the state of new products in the hospitality sector

Survey lists most popular casual chains

Quick: Name today's consumers' favorite casual chain. According to Market Force's latest survey on the popularity of U.S. casual chains with at least 100 restaurants, Cracker Barrel topped the list in the general menu category. Other winners included Cheesecake Factory, Red Robin, TGI Fridays and Ruby Tuesday. Maggiano's, Texas Roadhouse and Bob Evans, which led in the Italian, steakhouse and breakfast categories respectively.

865 The number of hotels that are under construction in the United States, with 103,230 new rooms to be available this year, according to hotel research firm STR. New York, Chicago, Detroit and Washington, D.C., are some of the top markets for the new construction, and many of the new lodgings will be limited-service.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Meet me in the West’s Most Western Town CCRP invades Scottsdale, Ariz.

T

here’s something about a restaurant originally built around a 150-year-old Saguaro cactus that grabs your attention. Isabella’s Kitchen (www.isabellaskitchen.com), one of Scottsdale’s favorite dinner haunts, was the site of the most recent Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) event. Scottsdale continues to be one of the more popular meeting spots for the industry’s best networking gigs. If you’re looking to join in on the fun in 2016, call Kristen Corson today at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com.

Chris Brown, Oldcastle; Chris Love, BCBG; Stephen Hekman, Kingsmen; Alex Grange, iFace

Kirk Stateson, Identity Management; Larry Schwartz, Inside Edge; Lisa Ploss, ProCoat Products; Ken Christopher, L Brands

REGISTERED COMPANIES: 92nd Street Café Aarons Rents ABS GROUP Architectural Design Guild ArcVision Arizona State University Assa Abloy BCBG Belmontez Construction Capacity Builders Carney Contracting Services CDO Chain Store Maintenance Coast 2 Coast Coastal Signage Communicators Intl Construction One Container Management

CT Addison Consulting, LLC Dash Retail EMG Fairmont Sign Federal Heath Federal Realty Fi Companies Fortney Weygandt Frontier Development Fun Brands GA Tech Gabes Glassman Planning Associates H&M Heights Venture Acrchitects Horizon Retail Construction iFace Inside Edge

JA Carpentry Inc JCP JG Construction JLL Kingsmen L Brands L2M Lakeview Construction Leslie’s Mart Lightfinder PR Little Loosemore PR Marco Contractors Martin Architectural MBH Architects MC Sign MLE MPG Consulting

Nedlaw Living Walls North American Signs Oldcastle Pantera Pollack Investments Poma Retail Porcelanosa Prime Retail Services Procoat RCA RE-AL Rectenwald Brothers Construction Retail Maintenance Specialists Rockerz Inc Rogers Electric Sargenti Architects SBLM

Schimenti Cnstruction SGA Design Group Solex Contracting Southwest Signs Storefloors Target TD Farrell The AmGraph Group The Home Depot The Joint The McIntosh Group Timberwolff Tricarico Under Armour Venture Heights Architects LLP Wallace Engineering Warwick Construction The Wendy’s Co.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: Construction One, Inc. Don Skorupski, Business Development 101 E Town St, Suite 401 Columbus, OH 43215 Ph: 480-528-1145 dskorupski@constructionone.com

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

Retail Contractors Association Carol Montoya, CAE, Executive Director 400 North Washington Street, Suite 300 Alexandria, VA 22314 Ph: 703-683-5637 • Fax: 703-683-0018 carol@retailcontractors.org


At RDH Interests, Inc. we believe that design is about creating experiences. Design starts by discussing with Ownership, Management, and the Brand what their vision is for the space. “We want to give the client and their guests and customers more than they expect, make them feel special”, says Founder and Principal, Randall Huggins.

RDH Interests is proud to present our most recent suites project at the Bellagio Casino Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. RDH provided Architect and Interior Designer of Record services for the project in conjunction with MGM Resorts International Design.

ARCHITECTURE

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ONLINE RDHINTERESTS.NET INFO@RDHINTERESTS.NET


INDUSTRY EVENTS

1.

2.

4.

3.

5.

7.

8.

11.

12.

9.

10.

13.

14.

1: Tom Walsh, Under Armour; Jeff Mahler, L2M; Mitch Gruesen, MPG Consulting; David Glassman, Glassman Planning Associates

7: Byron Edgmon, JLL; Monica Munoz, JLL; Blake Snow, Heights Ventures Architects

2: Kent Swank, The Home Depot; Rita Biggs, Fairmont Sign Company; Julia Versteegh, Storefloors; Dave Oshinski, The Home Depot; Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services

8: Mike & Chris Pastiak, 92nd Street Café

3: Randy Davis, North American Signs; Ron Treister, Communicators Inter.; Tracy McCormick, Lightfinder PR/Creative Edge; Brad Gaskins, The McIntosh Group 4: Carol Montoya, RCA; Jason Miller, JCP; Art Rectenwald, Rectenwald Brothers Construction; Irina Dudina, Rectenwald Brothers Construction 5: John Stallman, Lakeview Construction; Bob Meza, Target; Rhianon Huff, North American Signs 6: Walt Watzinger, Warwick Construction; Dorothy Hammell, Container Management; Kelly Weiss, Horizon Retail Construction; Jessica Foster, Container Management

20

6.

9: Randy Walden, Nedlaw Living Walls; Robert Smith, Rockerz Inc. 10: Jim Agresta, JA Carpentry Inc; David Corson, CCR; Bob Krzykowski, JA Carpentry Inc 11: Devin Campione, Construction One, Nick Makowski, Construction One; Don “Scrappy” Skorupski, Construction One 12: Clay Addison, CT Addison Consulting, LLL; Wayne Rausch, Capacity Builders; Dan Belling, Federal Heath Sign Co. 13: John Catanese, Chain Store Maintenance; Kelli Buhay, Retail Maintenance Specialists; Milissa Garrity, Chain Store Maintenance; Brandon Finkenhoefer, Rogers Electric 14: Samra Savioz, Marco Contractors; Rob Sargenti, Sargenti Architects

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 15


Clear

road ahead Inside Vision Hospitality Group’s quest for excellence By Michael J. Pallerino

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


T

hey are more than the markers of a job well done. When the Vision Hospitality Group left the “2015 CONNECT” conference in Orlando, Fla., in December of last year, they walked away with more than three awards from Marriott International, which just happened to be for “Developer of the Year – US,” the “Spirit to Serve” and “Best Custom Project.” When the team reflected on the hardware in front them, they saw the continued opportunities afforded not only by its partnership with Marriott, but also by the intense contributions from its entire organization. But as Vision president and CEO Mitch Patel would tell you, the awards recognized its contributions in the hotel development market, but they also served as a reminder of just how succulently a project can be developed when everybody is on the same page.

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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CLEAR ROAD AHEAD

This is what Patel envisioned when he created the Vision Hospitality Group in 1997 in Chattanooga, Tenn. His goal was to build a business upon a foundation of values that could guide its respected hotel management and development company at every turn. His vision: to be the best, most respected hotel company in America. The family-owned and operated company owns and manages premium select- and full-service hotels affiliated with the Hilton, Marriott and InterContinental brands. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Hiten Patel, VP of development and construction, to get his take on where the company is heading and other areas of excellence it can strive to conquer.

Give us a snapshot of today's hospitality marketplace. As I’m sure you know, the hospitality marketplace is experiencing a period of record performance, and the sale and debt markets definitely reflect that. The question that everyone is asking now is how long will this last? We’re certainly hoping to enjoy it as long as we can.

24

Efficient and sustainable development is a priority. With each project, we evaluate and incorporate responsible sustainability elements that often go beyond legal requirements.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

Tell us about what we should expect from Vision in 2016.

We are experiencing another growth period like we did in 2012-2013, and we’re expanding in familiar and new markets. Currently, our development pipeline is comprised of 18 projects that extend as far west as Denver and also includes our first luxury boutique hotel, The Edwin Hotel.

What is the most pressing item on your to-do list? Trying to get our under construction hotels opened

How’s business?

It has already become a busy year. We have 18 projects in the pipeline, of which seven are under construction. We are looking to start a few more within the next 45-60 days and we have several in the planning stages.

What have been some of the biggest surprises this past year?

It is how busy the Nashville real estate market has become and the number of


hotels that are coming into that market. We have also been surprised by how hard it has become to find hotel specific sub-contractors.

What are some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We consider each new project an opportunity to exceed brand standards and develop a product that meets the needs of today’s modern traveler. Looking at the industry as a whole, we see a great number of opportunities, as markets are thriving in ways that we have not seen before. Greater Nashville is a prime example. We are seizing the opportunity in this growing market by developing several projects, including a dual-branded AC Hotel-SpringHill Suites by Marriott and Home2 Suites by Hilton.

Are you optimistic about the road ahead?

We are optimistic about our future, which is due in great part to our partnerships with Hilton and Marriott, both of which offer the best brands available today. In addition, our team works diligently to plan our course strategically. We know that another downturn or decline in the market will happen, so we try to be provident and continue to foster the partnerships we have to pursue an aggressive development pipeline.

CIRCLE NO. 16

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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CLEAR ROAD AHEAD What is your growth plan?

Our priority is to develop our portfolio of hotels in a strategic way that makes sense. Although we are a growing company, our focus is on quality and stability. That being said, our current development efforts are in full swing. We currently anticipate opening five hotels in 2016: the Courtyard by Marriott Atlanta (NE) in Duluth; TownePlace Suites by Marriott Nashville in Smyrna, Tenn.; Courtyard by Marriott Nashville (SE) in Murfreesboro, Tenn.; Home2 Suites Nashville in Franklin, Tenn.; and the Hampton Inn by Hilton in Wilmington, NC, downtown.

What's driving the growth? Primarily demand and flag availability

What markets are you targeting?

We like the Southeast for its business-friendly climate. We are able to deliver greater operational efficiencies by concentrating in the region.

Our priority is to develop our portfolio of hotels in a strategic way that makes sense.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 17


CLEAR ROAD AHEAD

Our goal is to always aim high in everything we do. That includes the way in which we develop our hotels, to the energy that we invest back into the communities where they are located.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


Talk about your refresh strategy?

We are currently working on a few Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott renovations and updating the properties to the latest design standards. ®

What trends do you see evolving in the hotel construction arena?

rt Smao rs, s n e S art m S ces! Choi

I am seeing a lot more design build projects, where a developer gets a contractor on board during the early stages of design so the project can be designed, with the contractor working toward a predetermined budget. In theory, the design build concept also speeds up the permitting and overall construction schedule.

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Walk us through your construction strategy.

When it comes to construction, we are extremely involved. Depending on the project, we will bid a job to three-plus contractors. Once we have identified which contractor we are going to use, we will set up a kick off meeting with the entire team and go over budgets, schedule and set the expectations on quality. We require the contractor to provide a weekly status report with progress photographs. We also require the contractor to copy us on all RFIs and submittals to the architect in order to expedite responses so the project maintains schedule. It’s truly a team approach.

What does your sustainability plan look like?

Efficient and sustainable development is a priority. With each project, we evaluate and incorporate responsible sustainability elements that often go beyond legal requirements. In addition to choosing “green” over economical, we partner with state organizations to continually improve the efforts of existing hotels to ensure Vision is always leading in its commitment to sustainability. As such, our entire portfolio participates in the “Clean the World” initiative that recycles discarded soap and bottles, and distributes them to areas in need.

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JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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CLEAR ROAD AHEAD How important is that your customers?

We find that our guests love to travel and enjoy the amenities and hospitality offered at our properties. However, beyond cleanliness and courtesy, our guests seek to have memorable experiences and know that their favorite hotel or brand cares as much about the environment and the community as they do. We share the same values as our guests, and as such, continue to expand our efforts to be strong corporate citizen.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


We consider each new project an opportunity to exceed brand standards and develop a product that meets the needs of today’s modern traveler.

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CLEAR ROAD AHEAD

You won three awards last year. How do they serve as further proof of your strive for excellence?

Our goal is to always aim high in everything we do. That includes the way in which we develop our hotels, to the energy that we invest back into the communities where they are located. To be recognized for these efforts by one of the industry’s best brands today is truly an honor, especially for the work our team has committed to improving the lives of others and to make our world a better place to live.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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1-866-628-9196 info@carneycontracting.com CIRCLE NO. 19


CLEAR ROAD AHEAD What is today's customer looking for?

Today’s modern traveler is seeking more than a comfortable bed. They are seeking an experience that can be shared with friends and family. With today’s social media technology, people are sharing more about their experiences with vastly more people than ever before. What we are doing at Vision is providing that memorable experience through top-of-class hospitality and service and with hotels that exceed expectations. For example, a variety of amenities, including hotel markets and grocery services, provide the convenient, on-demand needs of today’s traveler.

How do you see the hotel market playing out in 2016?

I think it’s going to look a lot like 2015. Our existing pipeline will take us through 2017. After that, we’ll see. There are a lot of

forces pushing and pulling the hospitality industry as well as the greater economy.

What should people expect from the Vision Hospitality Group brand moving forward?

Vision’s plan over the next few years is to strategically expand in growing markets. Our partnership with Hilton and Marriott will facilitate our goals to develop exceptional hotels. We are particularly excited about The Edwin Hotel, our first boutique hotel project, which will be located in our hometown of Chattanooga, Tenn. This hotel will offer an authentic, southern experience, and be a destination for adventure seekers, foodies and art enthusiasts. The Edwin will feature 90 rooms, upscale décor, a rooftop bar and a restaurant along with a wide range of luxury amenities. It is projected to open in spring 2017. CCR

One-on-one with... Hiten Patel VP of Development & Construction, Vision Hospitality Group Inc. What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Opening a hotel and listening to our guests talk about how amazing the hotel is. I always get a kick out of guests saying, “This doesn’t look like a Hampton Inn or Fairfield Inn,” because we always go above and beyond standards. What was the best advice you ever received? It was during my mother’s funeral in 1993. I was feeling sorry for myself and a gentle confident voice said to me, “Keep your head up. This is one of the most difficult things you will ever go through, but be strong because your family still needs you.” Ever since then, no matter how hard life gets, I think back to those words and I raise my head up and keep on going. What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? Thank you for taking the time to listen. What are the three strongest traits any leader should have? Confidence, vision and honesty.

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What is the true key to success for any manager? Respect your people, listen to them, set and live the standard that you expect them to achieve, and then help them get there. What’s your favorite vacation spot and why? I was born in Africa, so I like anywhere where there is warm weather and a beach. What book are you reading now? It is a biography about Elon Musk. The guy is intense. How do you like to spend your down time? I love to run and play basketball (it’s my “me” time) and, most importantly, I like to spend time with my family. My kids are into sports and I love spending weekends with them playing something outdoors. I like to cook as well; so spending time with my wife in the kitchen is always a fun time.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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FAST FORWARD

Fast forward Construction execs give insights to industry’s road ahead

T

hey spoke of resources and real estate, and human resources and sustainability. They discussed strategies in finding qualified people to help replenish the human resources that were lost amid the recent downturn. In a climate that continues to trend upward, executives attending the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat were positive about the road ahead and what it could mean for the industry’s future.

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The discussions were part of the roundtable discussion held during the three-day event at Houston’s Hotel Derek, which included myriad networking opportunities such as a skeet shooting competition at the American Shooting Center. Following is the final installment of our Retreat coverage, including a look at our Friday afternoon forum. For more information, visit us at www.ccr-mag.com.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


Jon Armour

Jermaine Brown

Darrel Chaney

Albert Chincuanco

Sean Coakley

Grace Daly

Project Manager JLL

Sr. Director of Construction Francesca’s

Construction Mgr Francesca’s

Director Store Facilities ANN INC.

Consultant Prime Retail Services

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Steve DeBerardino

Richard Flores

National Accounts Cosentino NA

South Region PM-Store Development Team Whole Foods

Mike Gordon

Sara Korvi

Facilities Manager South Region Einstein Noah

Interior/ Procurement specialist H&M

Prime Retail Services 866.504.3511

Prime Retail Canada 905.827.2662

www.primeretailservices.com

www.primeretail.ca

Brad Gaskins

Principal The McIntosh Group

Christine Mastandrea

VP of Corporate Strategy Whitestone REIT

Jan McKenzie

Mike Morelli

Patrick Ringlever

Roz Strapko

David Tanner

Chris Varney

Julia Versteegh

Tom Walsh

Joe Wegrzyniak

National Accounts Assa Abloy

Account Executive Exclusive Retail Interiors

Director of Marketing & Business Development Storefloors

National Accounts Signage Solutions

Director of Construction Steak `n Shake Enterprises, Inc.

Sr. Dir, Global Store Development Under Armour

Bus Development Interplan LLC

Principal/SVP EMG

Sr VP of Construction Jersey Mike’s

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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FAST FORWARD CCR: What type of things are you seeing around redesign and sustainability? Mike Gordon, Einstein Noah Restaurant Group: I think we have the same challenges. We run into what everybody else is running into – resources and finding good real estate. With us doing this co-brand, we’re moving locations, because we don’t have enough space and it’s hard to stay where we are. In some locations, if we want to expand, we may need a couple more hundred feet. We’re running into a lot of problems there. With co-branding, we’re looking at how are we going to do this, how do we want to do this? We’re looking at the front of the house right now, the back of the house, where the oven is, and different things like putting dishwashers into the stores [etc.]. How deep back into the house do we go? Chris Varney, EMG: You mentioned nighttime remodels and some of the challenges. Several of our customers seem to prefer nighttime remodels. What struggles have you experienced and what should be done differently? Einstein’s Gordon: It’s not a struggle. It can be done. I’ve done it. I just don’t

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think it’s wise. If you’re going to do an in depth remodel that we’re doing in our co-brand, then you really need to shut the location down and do it right, instead of trying to do it in pieces over multiple nights.

I think we have the same challenges. We run into what everybody else is running into – resources and finding good real estate. – Mike Gordon, Einstein Noah Restaurant Group

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

Tom Walsh, Under Armour: I think just the unrelenting speed to market that I think we probably all have experienced at some level is whether you’re completely developing a new concept. Speed to market is a trend we’ve experienced, and that’s from a store design and space standpoint. We have been simplifying what the space is and what we put into a space, to the point where they’re very vanilla. It becomes all about the product. I know everybody says that, but that’s we’re trying to do now, from a consistency and scalability standpoint. Localization is a huge part of every story. And for a company like Under Armour, when the experience within the store is so important, from a design standpoint, we have to design the stores simple, cost effective. They can be scaled and it’s consistent across the globe. CCR: You’re building a lot of stores, internationally, correct? Under Armour’s Tom Walsh: Yes, we don’t have nearly the number of stores that a lot of folks have here yet, but we’re building quite a bit over the next three years internationally. When you go international, and you have partner stores, the consistency of the scalability is obviously important. We talked a little about sustainability. If you look at consistency and scalability, it’s kind of an indirect feeder for sustainability. You’re not creating one-offs–from a fixture standpoint, we’re using fixtures now that are the same fixture that go into a Dick’s Sporting Goods in Colorado or a Brand House Store in Chongqing, China. What you do from a localization standpoint changes things that affect the experience. It’s the mannequins, the marketing, the graphics. It’s the way the lighting’s done or the scent or sounds in the stores that change. We found that by getting that consistency and scalability across the design, it helps with the cost, which helps with the maintenance. It does start to create this life cycle.


CIRCLE NO. 21


FAST FORWARD CCR: What types of trends and challenges are you seeing out there? Under Armour’s Tom Walsh: One trend we’ve seen is in the amount of digital being used in the stores today. We have a lot of digital in our stores. We’re not doing digital like iPads and things like that for POP, but it is more of a difficult play. I’ve seen that with other retailers. Mike Morelli, Signage Solutions: We starting to see a flip in the sign industry, where people care more about the project management and performance – hitting deadlines, communication and maximizing signage area and then closed out. That’s becoming more and more valuable; more than price, which is a good trend for us. We’ve always taken pride in our project management team. That, along with competitive pricing, has grown our national business. We invest in experienced professionals and encourage forward thinking. We put professionals in place so they can maintain the model we put forth.

you walk into those situations and have to overcome them. It’s not in our budgets. It’s hard to explain to our development guys. It’s hard to get them to understand the criteria we need to bring forward. I love the idea about qualifying your GCs and teaching your architects. Our biggest challenge internally right now is bringing on qualified GCs. I know that what I did back in the big box many years ago to bring in qualified people. Today, it’s tough when you have anywhere from a 3,000-to a 4,000-square-foot building that sits on an acre that has 80 parts and the guy has been a patriarch in the area, not only for his family, but also for the community. He knows everybody in town, so he doesn’t want to butter anybody else’s bread from out of town. He wants to butter this guy with the red pickup truck who has three people in it who have come to build a store. That is constantly in our faces, and we don’t have the legal precedence behind this to allow for something different on the franchise side. The franchisee has the ability to say I don’t care what you say, “I’m going to use my brotherin-law’s cousin’s uncle to put that in.” And when you’re 120 days late, and you haven’t opened the store according to what you told the guys on Wall Street, it goes downhill. So the biggest challenge is finding good, qualified GCs. We have approved a ton. We have a great group who follow us around the country.

“I have to say that I’m impressed with the collaboration over the last few years. Retail has been in decline for maybe five or six years. Now it is coming back – and the pace is very demanding.

Steve DeBerardino, Cosentino North America: We are seeing a couple of trends. First, in the area of products, we are seeing a big move to large formats, whether that is counter– Jan McKenzie, ASSA ABLOY tops, flooring, interior wall cladding and facades. Cosentino is well positioned to One challenge that rears its face now and again is permitting. take advantage of this large format trend with both our flagship A lot of these new centers are getting these “tenant coordinators” Silestone engineered stone product, and our new indoor/outdoor, for a lack of a better term, that think they know how to build a sign. 100 percent mineral Dekton material. We make Dekton in a very They spec out a sign that’s completely impossible to build or one that large format. Dekton is an ultra compact material that’s made in doesn’t get the biggest impact for your brand. a very large format for all uses – countertops, flooring, interior cladding and exterior facades. David Tanner, Steak ‘N Shake: We see IT – or TI – space becomIt’s an exciting move to large formats, but the challenge is that ing more and more driven in the trends are out there. We’ve walked there is not many specifications out there, whether it’s for flooring, into the TI space that literally does not have a slab, period. You have wall cladding or façade work. We’re really driving the bus in the to put in the plumbing, the water – everything. architectural and design community. In thinking of where the industry has come during the 2000s, In addition, timelines are being squeezed, specifically regarding development has been challenged in that the greatest issues in deal countertops. Usually when they are installed, cabinets have to go in making and putting deals together – tax implications on developfirst, and, unfortunately, they never go in the same way. Walls are just ments and REITS – everything makes them skinnier and skinnier. not straight. Cosentino is used to dealing with this for our customers Having to find that same profit margin because REITS promised they and providing an acceptable look to your countertop. would give a certain amount back to those developers related to that Invariably, that means we must come out and template and REIT have to still meet that margin, while cutting all the extremes out. measure that job, which adds another five to seven days, depending That’s a trend, but it also presents a challenge. on the size and complexity of the materials. That’s a lot of time. So The challenge is unspoken. I think we’re all educated. We’ve the timeline being squeezed is a great opportunity for us to show been in the business. We know what those challenges would bring if that we’re not just a product, but part of your team, able to work

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 22


FAST FORWARD Signage Solutions’ Morelli: We are seeing a huge growth in the retail segment. We also saw turn times get quicker, from signed lease to store opening. Several pop ups and new trendy retailers, including restaurants are hitting the marketplace giving us the opportunity to expand our footprint in many different segments. The square footage for a typical retail store has been reduced therefore shaving time off the build out and making our deadlines much more critical.

with other parts of the overall construction group to address issues before they develop, and making sure that we are on top of your schedule throughout the process. CCR: What has been the biggest surprise you’ve seen this year in relation to the marketplace? Cosentino North America’s DeBerardino: The bad is that there is a lack of trained technicians. I don’t care if it’s an electrician, a mason, flooring guy, you name it; there is a lack of technicians, fabricators and installers out there. It’s really impacting the timeline to get the job done. Every commercial job I’m involved in seems to be getting stretched more and more, as you wait for that person who is still tied up on another project. Cosentino is prepared with trained, experienced personnel that you can tap into to either fabricate, fabricate and install, or even help problem solve at the design phase of the project. There’s a dearth of trained technicians out there and we have to deal with it. On the good side, we see a trend where decision makers want to select durable and sustainable materials – not ones that are completely price driven. Price is important, but it has to be a competitive thing. There’s a better understanding of performance of the product and sustainability, which is refreshing. That’s a nice development. Steak ‘N Shake’s Taylor: The biggest surprise this year came about mid-year for us in an above average price jump just across the board. We saw a price jump in construction all the way across the board to equipment of close to 5 to 7 percent. It was bittersweet. Bittersweet means that increase came for those general contractors hired to do the volume of business coming out of those manufacturers. At the same time, that cut a company with lead time increases for a number of things –everything from mobilizing the job to actually getting your equipment and your signage and everything else onboard. For us, it kind of caught us a little off guard. That little bit of change has us trying to justify to the franchisee, who we gave certain numbers to a year ago. Why am I paying more than you paid last year?

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Under Armour’s Walsh: For me, this year [2015] was interesting. We have a very small team at Under Armour. There is our development team, and our partners, whether they’re architects, engineers, vendors, suppliers [etc.]. We’ve treated our partners like extensions of our team. The surprise was the amount of growth that our company continues to have. Our partners took their eyes of the ball and took the work for granted. I was just dumbfounded, to be honest. The work that you have is right in front of you. You don’t have to sell the service. It’s yours.

The biggest surprise I’ve seen in the marketplace is taking place in Atlanta, where the City of Atlanta had a 20-year lease with their baseball team, the Atlanta Braves. – Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

Einstein’s Gordon: One of the things I’ve seen on the construction side is that there are not enough plumbers and electricians out there. When you have your job bid, your GC has trouble being able to get the numbers back from the guys in a timely manner. A lot of these guys will inflate their prices because they have so much work. They think that if I bump up the price, I don’t get the job, and they end up getting the job. I’ve seen this delay the construction process. There’s certain markets where it is virtually impossible to get your bids back when you need them because of the timeframe it takes a lot of the GCs to be able to get the information for themselves. Jan McKenzie, ASSA ABLOY: I have to say that I’m impressed with the collaboration over the last few years. Retail has been in decline for maybe five or six years. Now it is coming back – and the pace is very demanding. The other thing that I see is transparency – from the buyer side, to the manufacturer, and the seller side. It has to do with the cost, codes and sustainability. Sometimes the transparency is forced, but it is a good trend.


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FAST FORWARD $15,000 to start a process weeks – sometimes months – prior to an executed lease and us working on projects, a lot of our projects still don’t have executed leases, but we’re in permitting for them. It’s a way for us to back fill the pipeline. Our pipeline is constantly being filled from site approval, which is prior to executed leases, all the way through in construction. A good 20 percent of our jobs are falling into that point. Again, the corporate structure of backing the franchisees by giving them the sense that if the site falls through, we’re going to pick that expense up, which builds the relationship between the franchisee and enables us to move projects faster than the standard timeframe. Now you have 90 to 150 days to build that location now.

Brad Gaskins, The McIntosh Group: We’re really starting to see a lot more proactive programs to comply with accessibility issues, as opposed to waiting until the back end and getting the lawsuits.

My biggest surprise is around sustainability. It’s still a big buzzword. To Storefloors, that’s all it is. Hardly anybody comes to us wanting green, sustainable type products.

JLL’s Armour: We have a number of projects that migrate out of the pipeline and are also in process of real estate deals. There’s no lease signed. We’ve engaged in a due diligence process with the city or the municipality and to do site invasive work. It really pays off, because it saves us in the permit process and the clients’ deals are usually pretty solid. It’s possible that out of the due diligence process, what we get is information that’s important to relay to people who sometimes go back and rewrite portions of the lease based on the information you extract from a site through the invasive process.

Jon Armour, JLL: Over the last year and a half or so, we’ve seen project cost escalations in excess of 20 percent in some of our projects. That’s in the Houston market. The client directed who he wanted to build the project. We’d go through a bidding process, and then ultimately it would be the client’s decision. Oftentimes, you end up with people who really didn’t put a lot of work in Steak ‘n Shake’s Tanner: So you’re bidding the project because they knew saying you take on that small portion of they were going to get it. In a competidue diligence; if it goes to that deal, it’s tive bidding atmosphere, the prices are your baby. starting to go back down to that same 20 percent, back to where they were – Julia Versteegh, Storefloors Jersey Mike’s Wegrzyniak: How do about two years ago. It’s about relationyou convince people to move forward? ships. The relationship with the GC and You support your methods by opening it up financially to say it the client needs to be a sustainable one over a period of time in works. Trust the system that we have it in place. We try to make order to bring all of this quality and all this stuff together. it simple enough for somebody to understand, and systems are in Joe Wegrzyniak, Jersey Mike’s: We corporately back franchi- place because they work. We’re delaying with people who don’t deal with building out new stores. They might be great operators, sees’ efforts to move forward with their architectural documents but do they know how to run Einstein Bagel? It’s about partnerand site surveys. Out of the 180 or so that we’re going to build ships. It’s our job is to educate. this year, we only ended up having two fall through. So, for us,

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 24

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FAST FORWARD JLL’s Armour: What I try to do is make sure that the relationship is pretty tight, so that things like that – critical dates and schedules [etc.] don’t fall through the cracks. We encourage biweekly meetings to go over all transactions for projects, status of the projects and things like that. There’s good communication between groups of people to make sure that the deal does go through. If there are any issues in the jurisdiction over the property with the lease, everybody’s involved in it. No one’s blindsided later. Patrick Ringlever, Interplan: With regards to the due diligence previously discussed, we have developed a dedicated permitting department in

“With a lot of the plans we have, in the next year, we’d like to make sure the team provides value to them and that we’re the partner they signed us up to be.” – Patrick Ringlever, Interplan

our office that is responsible for providing not only the permitting of all our clients’ projects but also the upfront site investigation reports. For a tenant lease space, you can find out so much about permit timeframes, exterior design requirements, and landlord approval processes that can impact your lease. We have noticed that tenants are signing leases which often times include timeframes for having completed permit drawings ready for Landlord review or even construction start dates. If the tenant is able to have some up front due diligence completed prior to signing of the lease, they can find out valuable information that can assist them in better lease negotiations. JLL’s Armour: Sometimes payments or fees have been obligated in the lease to be paid in the construction budget. You have to be working tightly with the transactions associates to fully understand all the monies obligated at various stages of project development. Darrel Chaney, Prime Retail Services: The biggest surprise I’ve seen in the marketplace is taking place in Atlanta, where the City

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of Atlanta had a 20-year lease with their baseball team, the Atlanta Braves. The lease was to run out in 2016, at the end of the baseball season. The Braves asked for around $200 million in renovations to the ballpark – the ballpark is 20 years old and is in great shape. But they say they didn’t want to spend the money, so the went out and purchased a new track of land [in Marietta, Ga.]. They’re building a city around the baseball park. It’s going have hotels, restaurants, office space, high-rise office space and high-rise hotels. It will open in 2017. The City of Atlanta is going to be left with a beautiful baseball facility that they don’t know what to do with. They have a big quandary there. I don’t know if the planning was an issue or what, but it’s a shame to see something like that go. The new facility they’re building is huge. The lease has already been signed and restaurants have already leased their space and construction of the ballpark is going up. Sean Coakley, Ann Inc.: I don’t know if it’s just the marketplace this year, but in general I’m surprised that people don’t listen. It never fails to amaze me. If you want to do business with me, and I am spending time talking with you, telling you how to do it, in essence to set you up for success, why wouldn’t you listen? But more often than not, they don’t listen; it leaves me shaking my head.

Roz Strapko, Exclusive Retail Interiors: My biggest surprise this year is how many clients have come to us not only asking for fixtures, furniture and design but also consolidation and project management. That is our specialty, but in the past, clients would handle more of the project management and consolidation on their end. I think retailers have seen the value in utilizing a company like ours to not only fabricate their fixtures, but also to value engineer and maintain their inventory as well and to work with a one stop shop like ours. EMG’s Varney: My biggest surprise has been that every program and project a retailer is embarking on is getting approved. Once approved, it is amazing how quickly they want to get to market and without proper planning that creates problems. Several clients performing TIs are relying on a landlord or a broker to take pictures and tell them what’s out there and they are not performing the proper due diligence. The lack of proper due diligence creates problems during the construction phase and leads to unanticipated cost.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 25


FAST FORWARD The other surprising thing is that there is a lot of franchise work and I don’t see corporate PM’s getting out timely to sites to verify that the integrity of the brand is being maintained. They will get to the site eventually, but it is surprising that the effort is not there to spend time with the franchisee before the site is open. Sara Korvi, H&M: I’ve only been in my position in the United States for about six months, but what I see as the biggest surprise is the global exchange of best practice. To be able to move across the country, move to different states, move to different places and to be able to exchange information – best practice – is something. The codes are different. The laws are different – everything. There are a lot of things that you can’t use because of laws and codes. I see it as a huge benefit.

cycle it to where there’s one store in reserve that you would have in an emergency. But to your point, everybody is lean manufacturing now. It has come down to just in time. And it is a challenge to get vendors to truly take that capital, investment and cost – in some cases a half million or a quarter million dollars – and put it on the shelf and rotate it out of inventory. That’s a whole new concept. We used to do it years ago. But now it’s a whole new concept with lean inventory management, with lean process and development. Whole Foods’ Flores: To get it back to what I’m saying, they had to add a second crew. It seems like it would have been smart to just think six or eight months before, use your own crew to continue, and then push out your product versus having to put in another time or another shift. Imagine the dollars being spent for that. I think it would be more profitable if we’d taken those terms versus having to put in the second shift.

“How do you convince people to move forward? You support your methods by opening it up financially to say it works. Trust the system that we have it in place.”

Jersey Mike’s Wegrzyniak: We over communicate. We send out weekly reports to all our national accounts showing them what’s in the process. Our expectation is by over communicating, we expect them to keep up with it – to manage it without having to stock it. None of our brands would be caught – Joe Wegrzyniak, Jersey Mike’s off guard by saying, “My God, you’re opening 20 stores in the first quarter. Julia Versteegh, Storefloors: My biggest surprise is around susWe’re communicating weekly with them on those changes. For us, tainability. It’s still a big buzzword. To Storefloors, that’s all it is. Hardly it’s really worked great to communicate. anybody comes to us wanting green, sustainable type products. I Another positive is that we were for the second year in a row know many companies out there aspire to make more sustainable from National Restaurant News as the fastest growing QSR consecstores, yet it’s rare that someone comes to us looking for more utively. The amount of phone calls you get from people who want to sustainable flooring options. As important as it is, I’m amazed that join the company because of it is pretty incredible. Half of my day we don’t get such requests on a regular basis. Maybe it’s because is reading emails or taking phone calls from perspective people. My of shortened timeframes and smaller budgets; but if that was it, I’d philosophy is I never know whom I need. still expect the conversation to come up. Or maybe there is so much The other surprise I saw is that as we develop these 180 stores, else that designers are focused on, that there’s no time for it to be a we had very few issues with our providers keeping up with us. They priority yet for the majority of retailers. didn’t drop the ball and say, “We ran out of stock. We just don’t have it.” They gave us something else, enabling us to open and do those Richard Flores, Whole Foods: I wanted to kind of echo the things. So our vendors actually pulled through for us. sentiment today about the shortages of GCs and labor. I don’t know why there are still shortages and long lead times on materials and CCR: Are you direct buying from your vendors? equipment. It seems like they also would know about the trend in conJersey Mike’s Wegrzyniak: That’s a good question. It’s a mixed struction. In my case, you can have refrigerated cases that take eight bag. Some is direct; some is through vendors. We’re seeing a lot less to 10 or 12 weeks, where I’ve talked to people who have had to add a middle people, per se. We communicate – all our equipment packagsecond shift just to continue to get the product done and it’s still late. es, our furniture graphics, all of that goes direct to the manufacturer. Why would you tell somebody it’s on the shelf if it’s not available? So if there is something bought through a third party supplier, they’re notified as well. That information ends up going right to manufacturers. Steak ‘n Shake’s Tanner: We tried to do what they did many years ago. We would get vendors with a certain percentage of CCR: They already have those – even though they’re buying volume in the stores that would keep an extra store in inventory. You from the GC or someone else, if you buy them, they still have just roll the inventory based on that, so that you’re always trying to all that in stock?

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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FAST FORWARD Jersey Mike’s Wegrzyniak: Not necessarily in stock, but they coordinate and facilitate that delivery process for us based on our communication, our timelines for us. CCR: What does 2016 hold in store? Jersey Mike’s Wegrzyniak: I may have said it before, but we opened more stores every year since I’ve been there – and that has been for eight years. So, my goal for next year, personally, is to open more stores in 2016 than I did in 2015, which corporately I believe we’re trying to open. The plan is to open 200 to 225 stores next year. Whole Foods’ Flores: As far as we’re concerned, we’re looking forward to expanding, and putting more remodels and new stores out there in the market in our region.

On the good side, we see a trend of decision makers wanting to select durable and sustainable materials. – Steve DeBerardino, Cosentino North America

Storefloors’ Versteegh: My goal in 2016 is to increase communication and education to our clients and prospects. H&M’s Korvi: Our goal for 2016 is also expansion. We’re growing, so we’re planning to open 100 new stores and rebuilding some stores. EMG’s Varney: Our goal for 2016 would continue to be an extension of your staff, and to provide value with scalability and consistency on a national basis. Exclusive Retail Interiors’ Strapko: This year is going to be a good year for us. We just got a new contract with a very high-end hair salon and will be doing two other new constructs. I think 2016 will be fantastic. I’m looking forward to it. Ann Inc.’s Coakley: My goal is to have smooth integrations with my new service partners. I have three words that I go back to consistently when I describe what is important to me and they are relationships, partnerships, and teamwork. It all starts with relationships for me, can I work with this person or company? When I feel that connection is there, then you have the foundation on which to build a partnership. Partnerships are successful when all of the parties involved derive benefits from the partnership, and that is best achieved through great teamwork. Prime Retail Services ‘s Chaney: Our president and CEO would want me to say our goal is to increase our revenue another $5 million by the end of the year. Having said that, I’m sure we want to continue our growth pace internally, with a strong, steady pace. Interplan’s Ringlever: We will be rolling out a new company website along with our new company message, “40 years and 40,000 projects”. Our whole company is based on developing relationships

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with our clients so that we become a trusted architectural partner. That is only earned one project at a time and is what we plan to continue on with this year as well. JLL’s Armour: Currently there are a lot of different types of local projects that are assigned across project managers that travel from different areas. I would like to see some efficiencies in performing these projects with a local team. The McIntosh Group’s Gaskins: I believe our goals for 2016 are to continue learning, improving by providing better value to our clients and extending our footprint.

ASSA ABLOY’s McKenzie: Our goal is to help our customers realize theirgoals. The best way to do that is to work/plan with reliable supply chain partners and to be able to provide sustainable cost savings. Einstein’s Gordon: My goal would be really to have a successful co-brand roll out for 2016. Under Armour’s Walsh: A goal that I have for our team is that as we continue to grow globally, to gain process alignment around what we do in North America, tighten those up and scale. Signage Solutions’ Morelli: My goal is to grow more relationships and maintain our level of service to exceed our clients’ expectations. Steak ‘N Shake Tanner: The departmental goals for all of us is definitely to reduce cost of crude delivery and to grow a pipeline. Pipeline growth is definitely something that we’re focused on in the business right now. Cosentino North America’s DeBerardino: Cosentino’s commercial business is growing at a very fast clip – year over year. My personal goal is to exceed Cosentino’s overall commercial growth in the national account side. That’s a nice goal to have. The only way I know how to do that is being part of your team, understanding your needs, reducing your budget and providing value to you and being part of your solutions to shrinking your timelines. Grace Daly, ShopTalk 360: My goal with ShopTalk 360, the design, construction and facilities industries’ podcast talk show, is to chat with more industry professionals to share their POVs, victories and challenges. I’ve love to have air time with them on a ShopTalk 360 show and perhaps interview them for an upcoming Inspiring Leadership book. I am also very excited my industry fiction series: SHOP will be made into a book later next year. CCR

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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JuliaV@storefloors.com CIRCLE NO. 27

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FAST FORWARD

Houston – We have a Retreat Attendees kick off first night with Italian dinner The best thing about Houston is its diversity when it comes to food. Known as one of the the city's best Italian restaurants, the Grotto offered the ideal spot to kick off the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat. The cozy setting and warm atmosphere was like a trip to the Old Country. The dinner was the first part of the Retreat, which was held Oct. 1-4 at the Hotel Derek.

PULL

Networking heads to the shooting range They came. They networked. They shot (skeet, that is). That's what attendees of the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat in Houston had the opportunity to do at the American Shooting Center, located on 563 acres in George Bush Park. If you want the inside scoop, you'll have to ask them. What happens on the range – stays on the range. The networking event was part of the three-day Retreat, held Oct. 1-4 at the Hotel Derek.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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FAST FORWARD

Do as Texans do When in Texas, you have to try the steak, right? To celebrate the activities of the first two days, attendees of the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat headed to one of Houston's premiere haunts – Sullivan’s Steakhouse. Defined by its rich interiors and expansive wine cellar, Sullivan's provided the perfect backdrop to discuss the events of the first two days. The dinner was part of the three-day Retreat, held Oct. 1-4 at the Hotel Derek.

A Houston-sized lunch – New York Style When it comes to lunch, nobody does it like New Yorkers – even in Houston. Lauded the world over for its famous deli sandwiches, Lenny & Ziggy's NY Deli hit the Houston market in 1999 – and never looked back. What better way for attendees of the 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat to network after skeet shooting. The lunch was part of the three-day Retreat, which was held Oct. 1-4 at the Hotel Derek in Houston.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


ARCHITECTURE

PROTOTYPES

ACCESSIBILITY

SITE SELECTION

PROCESS

The McIntosh Group mcintoshtransforms.com

918.585.8555

info@mcintoshtransforms.com CIRCLE NO. 29


How the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame got its sustainability groove on By Jake Oberle

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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lthough the chance to design and build a historic building is considered by many to be the opportunity of a lifetime, the task is not without its challenges.

Unlike traditional commercial buildings, the creation of landmark structures can introduce unique elements into the construction process that force industry experts to find innovative, cost-effective solutions to unique problems. For facility executives at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, the dilemma involved the building’s iconic façade. Ultimately, how could the museum protect numerous priceless artifacts from the UV and heat effects of more than 55,000 square-feet of windows? Often considered the birthplace of rock and roll, Cleveland is the perfect home for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. However, the city was not always known for its musical pedigree. Despite it’s position as a thriving metropolis in the early 1940s and 1950s, Cleveland was primarily recognized for its steel and automobile industries. But that changed after World War II when the city became synonymous with the rapidly growing music scene. Unbeknownst to many music aficionados, Record Rendezvous owner, Leo Mintz and WJW-AM deejay, Alan Freed, both Cleveland residents, are credited for popularizing the term “rock and roll.”

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KEEPING THE BEAT Throughout the 1960s, Cleveland was home to several legendary radio stations that introduced residents to a wide variety of notable musicians, including Chuck Berry, Frankie Ford and Jerry Lee Lewis. The business of rock and roll became a major industry in the 1970s and 1980s, when Cleveland brothers Jules and Mike Belkin capitalized on events such as the World Series of Rock, held at Municipal Stadium. After hosting several prestigious musical events, Cleveland eventually became a mandatory tour stop for contemporary bands and singers. When the idea of a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum was first introduced, many Cleveland residents believed the building should reside in the city. In fact, more than 660,000 individuals signed petitions fighting for the museum to be built in downtown Cleveland. In addition, city leaders were among the first and most enthusiastic in the country to lobby for the Hall of Fame. On June 7, 1993, Cleveland was able to celebrate its hard-fought victory during the groundbreaking of a new $92 million, 55,000 square-foot Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, designed

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Despite the building’s unique construction and aesthetic elements, the installation of sun control window film addressed several key issues at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

by world-renowned architect, I.M. Pei. The facility officially opened its doors on Saturday, Sept. 2, 1995, and was celebrated citywide with a benefit concert at Cleveland Municipal Stadium. Today, the Museum is a nonprofit organization that exists to educate visitors, fans and scholars from around the world about the history and continuing significance of rock and roll music. The historic landmark carries out this mission through its operation of a world-class museum that collects, preserves, exhibits and interprets relevant artifacts and through its library, archives and educational programs. Since its opening, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum has welcomed nearly eight million visitors from around the world, and reaches more than 50,000 students and educators each year through its education programs.

The Challenge – 55,000 square-feet of windows Many exhibitions at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame are housed in an iconic geometric building designed by renowned architect,


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MAKING THE COMPLEX SIMPLE Since 1939

Wolverine Building group wolvgroup.com company/wolvgroup wolvgroup wolvgroup1939 CIRCLE NO. 30


KEEPING THE BEAT

I.M. Pei. The main tower soars more than 160 feet into the air and supports a dual-triangular-shaped glass “tent” that contains more than 55,000 square feet of exhibition space, along with administrative offices, shopping space and a café. From Chuck Berry’s guitar to Elvis Presley’s custom three-wheel motorcycle, the building is responsible for the historic preservation of many irreplaceable objects. Unfortunately, although the all-glass covered structure allows the Hall to present their collections in a natural light, protecting the museum’s exhibitions from the effects of ultraviolet (UV) rays and keeping the building cool on sunny days presented a unique challenge to facility managers.

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Since its opening, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum has welcomed nearly eight million visitors from around the world.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

In addition to needing sun control capabilities, Hall of Fame executives were dedicated to finding a solution that promoted sustainable practices throughout the facility. After researching several products on the market, building executives decided to install a window film manufactured by 3M.

The Solution – Let the light In

With uncompromised aesthetics, the unmatched and distinct architecture of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and the specific angle of the building’s custom windows made traditional coverings and energy saving solutions difficult. Fortunately, due to 3M’s unparalleled experience in window films and application techniques,


CIRCLE NO. 31


KEEPING THE BEAT

“The window film is durable enough to give us years of performance, while simultaneously enhancing the aesthetics and efficiency of the museum.” – Brian Kenyon, CFO, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

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the 3M Sun Control Window Film Prestige Exterior Series successfully addressed all the building’s unique challenges. Prestige window films use nano-technology without metal to create a reflectivity that’s lower than glass. Specifically, the film selectively refracts light from the spectrum and rejects up to 97 percent of the sun’s heat-producing infrared light and up to 99 percent of UV rays to keep visitors cool. “Window film was an easy decision,” says Brian Kenyon, CFO of the Hall. “It protects our artifacts from UV rays, improves our visitor experience and reduces energy consumption. The window film is durable enough to give us years of performance, while simultaneously enhancing the aesthetics and efficiency of the museum. After researching numerous options, 3M was the only solution that didn’t contain any metal, preventing corrosion and thereby making it the only viable solution.” Despite the building’s unique shape and cantilevered spaces, the window film was installed in just six weeks. Once the film was in place, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum began seeing

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


immediate benefits, including increased energy efficiency and decreased cooling costs. Overall, the facility is expected to experience a total energy cost savings of $20,00040,000 a year. Despite the building’s unique construction and aesthetic elements, the installation of sun control window film addressed several key issues at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, including UV exposure, inconsistent temperatures and high cooling costs. Most importantly, the film’s installation ensured that future generations will be able to see everything from Michael Jackson’s suits to Chuck Berry’s guitar in pristine condition. CCR Jake Oberle is the U.S. Commercial Marketing Manager for 3M. For more information on window film, please visit 3M.com/windowfilm.

CIRCLE NO. 32

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SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Right on the mark Annual report spotlights today’s leading architecture firms

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t all comes down to the design. In today’s ever-evolving commercial construction market, the look and feel of the project is everything. Our annual “Leading Architecture Firms” report details the leading firms in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. The report provides you with the contact information and contact person at each of the reporting firms. If you want to be included in next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com.

STANTEC ARCHITECTURE, INC.......... $70,042,169 GREENBERG FARROW...................... $37,400,000 FRCH DESIGN WORLDWIDE.............. $32,891,250 LITTLE............................................. $29,800,000 HFA.................................................. $25,700,000 WD PARTNERS................................. $24,573,000 SGA DESIGN GROUP PC................... $16,700,000 SARGENTI ARCHITECTS.................... $15,450,000

RESTAURANT

RETAIL

Top Ten Totals

REBEL DESIGN + GROUP....................... $12,866,239 DAROFF DESIGN, INC............................. $12,000,000 LEO A DALY............................................. $11,000,000 DLR GROUP............................................ $8,000,000 PFVS ARCHITECTURE & INTERIORS....... $7,900,000

TOTAL BILLINGS

HOSPITALITY 64

STONEHILL & TAYLOR............................ $13,845,500

GREENBERG FARROW....................... $12,000,000 CORE STATES GROUP....................... $7,461,729 INTERPLAN LLC................................ $6,474,743 LEO A DALY....................................... $5,800,000 STANTEC ARCHITECTURE, INC........... $5,715,675 REBEL DESIGN + GROUP.................. $5,292,100 CHUTE GERDEMAN, INC.................... $4,968,000

KENNETH PARK ARCHITECTS PLLC.. $15,000,000

VOA ASSOCIATES, INC............................ $21,846,118

CHIPMAN DESIGN ARCHITECTURE..... $14,150,000

GPD GROUP...................................... $5,000,000

TRICARICO ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN PC................................ $15,250,000

HKS INC.................................................. $59,210,000

WD PARTNERS.................................. $22,931,000

STANTEC ARCHITECTURE, INC.......... $733,591,480 HKS INC........................................... $314,210,000 DLR GROUP..................................... $158,000,000 LEO A DALY...................................... $157,000,000 GPD GROUP..................................... $88,560,000 VOA ASSOCIATES, INC...................... $70,471,350 LITTLE............................................. $70,000,000 AECOM............................................ $58,000,000

STANTEC ARCHITECTURE, INC............... $7,051,177

GREENBERG FARROW...................... $52,500,000

FRCH DESIGN WORLDWIDE................... $6,488,750

RSP ARCHITECTS............................. $51,832,000

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


AECOM Arcsine Cincinnati, OH Beth Myers Graham/Vice President 513-651-3440 • Fax: 877-660-7727 www.aecom.com • beth.myers-graham@aecom.com Year Established: 1904, No. of Employees: 90,000 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $58,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1,000+ Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: N/A

Oakland, CA 510-444-2410 www.arcsine.com • design@arcsine.com Year Established: 2003, No. of Employees: 13 Retail Billings: $9,423.87, Hospitality Billings: $829,953.80 Restaurant Billings: $528,263.60, Other Billings: $398,065 Total Billings: $1,765,706.27, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 23 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Renovations of Sheraton Palo Alto Hotel, Various restaurant projects including Dirty Water, Calavera, Teleferic, Popsons (all in CA)

ASA Architectural Design Andrew Franz Architect Madison, NJ

New York, NY Chris Sullivan/Principal 973-744-4101 christopher@ccsullivan.com Year Established: N/A, No. of Employees: 15 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 10 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Mixed Use Leading Clients: N/A

api(+) Tampa, FL Juan Romero/President & CEO 813-281-9299 • Fax: 813-281-9292 www.apiplus.com• jlauer@apiplus.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 30 Retail Billings: $4,627,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $249,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $4,876,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Specialize In: Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Fresh Thyme Farmers Market, Earl of Sandwich, Luxottica, The Fresh Market

Amy Sjursen/Retail Director 973-377-1313 • Fax: 973-377-1562 www.asaretailstudio.com asjursen@asaarchitectural.com Year Established: 2001, No. of Employees: 17 Retail Billings: $5,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $5,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: +/- 200 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: Ann Inc., DKNY, Equinox, Simon L’Oreal, Toys R Us

Big Red Rooster Columbus, OH Aaron Spiess/President, Co-CEO 614-255-0200 • Fax: 614-255-0205 www.bigredrooster.com • aspiess@bigredrooster.com Year Established: 2002, No. of Employees: 150 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $30,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 228 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Home Depot, FedEx, Under Armour, T-Mobile, Office Depot, Rheem, ALDI, L.L. Bean, Foot Locker

Architectural Design Guild BKA Architects, Inc. St. Louis, MO Sam Estes/Vice President 314-644-1234 • Fax: 314-644-4373 www.adg-stl.com • sestes@adg-stl.com Year Established: 1981, No. of Employees: 21 Retail Billings: $2,200,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Other Billings: $100,000 Total Billings: $2,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 150 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Leading Clients: Office Depot, Mattress Firm, Scrubs and Beyond, PetSmart

Brockton, MA David Seibert/President 508-583-5603 • Fax: 508-584-2914 www.bkaarchs.com • dseibert@bkaarchs.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 48 Retail Billings: $5,219,226, Hospitality Billings: $66,817 Restaurant Billings: $311,817, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $7,424,220, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Lululemon, Chipotle Grill, CVS Pharmacy, Talbots, Reebok, Adidas, Rock Port

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SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Built Hospitality Design Group Chute Gerdeman, Inc.

Los Angeles, CA John Sofio/President 323-857-0409 • Fax: 323-297-2511 www.builtinc.com • jsofio@builtinc.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 15 Retail Billings: $840,000, Hospitality Billings: $1,944,000 Restaurant Billings: $1,875,000, Other Billings: $664,000 Total Billings: $6,163,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 7 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Night Clubs, Bars, Lounges, Office Space, Quick Service, Residential, Studios Leading Clients: H. Wood Group, Hakkasan, Michael Ovitz, Peter Lowey (Westfield Malls)

CASCO Diversified Corp.

St. Louis, MO Daniel Cutter/President 314-821-1100 www.cascocorp.com • info@cascocorp.com Year Established: 1959, No. of Employees: 123 Retail Billings: $12,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000 Restaurant Billings: $145,000, Other Billings: $855,000 Total Billings: $14,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 900 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Industrial Leading Clients: N/A

CESO, Inc.

Akron, OH Steven R. Olson/Vice President 330-933-8820 www.cesoinc.com • olson@cesoinc.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 130 Retail Billings: $11,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000 Restaurant Billings: $2,000,000, Other Billings: $10,200,000 Total Billings: $23,700,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 475 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: PetSmart, Speedway, Bloomin’ Brands, Valvoline, KFC, Wal-Mart, Kohls

Chipman Design Architecture

Des Plaines, IL Kate Kerin/Principal, HR & Corporate Affairs 847-298-6900 • Fax: 847-268-6966 www.chipman-design.com kkerin@chipman-design.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 135 Retail Billings: $4,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $500,000 Restaurant Billings: $14,150,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $19,150,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 760 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Sustainable Design, 3D Photo-Accurate Renderings, Virtual Reality, Immersive Project Walk-Throughs Leading Clients: Ulta Beauty, Gap Inc., Banana Republic, Chik-fil-A, Wal-Mart, Noodles & Co., Red Robin Gourmet Burgers, Lexus, Athleta, Dunham’s Sports, Skechers, Westfield, Sbarro Pizza, Brunswick Bowling & Billiards, Pizza Cucinova, Centerplate, Saks Fifth Avenue, Blackhawks Flagships

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Columbus, OH Amanda Seevers/Sr. Manager, Marketing Communications 614-469-1001 • Fax: 614-469-1002 www.chutegerdeman.com • aseevers@chutegerdeman.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 60 Retail Billings: $5,292,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $4,968,000, Other Billings: $540,000 Total Billings: $10,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 226 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: Verizon Wireless, Dylan’s Candy Bar, Whole Foods, American Family Insurance, Wendy’s, Sweetwater Sound, HMS Host

CMA Minneapolis, MN Nicole Urista/Marketing Coordinator 612-547-1314 • Fax: 612-547-1301 www.cmarch.com • nurista@cmarch.com Year Established: 1977, No. of Employees: 100 Retail Billings: $8,717,700, Hospitality Billings: $1,286 Restaurant Billings: $3,362,198, Other Billings: $1,139,075 Total Billings: $13,220,259, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 654 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Starbucks, Torrid

Core States Group Duluth, GA Kevin Behnke/Director of Business Development 813-319-8755 www.core-eng.com• nrodriguez@core-eng.com Year Established: 1999, No. of Employees: 250 Retail Billings: $3,312,806, Hospitality Billings: $585,514 Restaurant Billings: $7,461,729, Other Billings: $9,985,353 Total Billings: $21,345,402, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 2,628 Specialize In: Drug Stores, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Radisson, CVS, Wal-Mart, McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Panera Bread, 7-Eleven, Bloom Energy, Greenskies, TD Bank, Chase Bank, Citibank, Intel

CREATE Architecture Planning & Design New York, NY Frankie J. Campione/Principal 212-297-0880 www.createworldwide.com • FCampione@createapd.com Year Established: 1996, No. of Employees: 15 Retail Billings: $ 75%, Hospitality Billings: $ 5% Restaurant Billings: $ 5%, Other Billings: $ 20% Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 52 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Master Planning Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Cyntergy Tulsa, OK Jim Turner/VP Retail 918-877-6000 • Fax: 918-877-4000 www.cyntergy.com • jeturner@cyntergy.com Year Established: 1997, No. of Employees: 104 Retail Billings: $7,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $8,000,000 Total Billings: $15,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 300 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Government Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Dollar General, AFES-Armed Forces Exchanges

Daroff Design, Inc. + DDI Architects PC Philadelphia, PA Karen Daroff/President 215-636-9900 • Fax: 215-636-9627 www.daroffdesign.com • kd@daroffdesign.com Year Established: 1973, No. of Employees: 35 Retail Billings: $1,500,000, Hospitality Billings: $12,000,000 Restaurant Billings: $1,000,000, Other Billings: $1,500,000 Total Billings: $16,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 40+ Specialize In: Casino, Hotels, Restaurant, Aviation Terminals Leading Clients: Comcast, NBC Universal, Philadelphia Division of Aviation, MGM, Mohegan Sun

DDG Baltimore, MD MJ Dame/Director of Communications & Marketing 410-962-0505 www.ddg-usa.com • mjdame@ddg-usa.com Year Established: N/A, No. of Employees: N/A Retail Billings: $4,325,000, Hospitality Billings: $480,550 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $3,805,356 Total Billings: $8,610,906, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 27 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Master Planning, Graphics Leading Clients: PT Kapuk Naga Indah, Cimento

Degen & Degen Architecture and Interior Design Seattle, WA Melissa Walling/Marketing Director 206-623-6368 • Fax: 206-623-6548 www.ddseattle.com • melissa@ddseattle.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 22 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $3,000,000 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $3,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 8 Specialize In: Hotels Leading Clients: N/A

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DLR Group Pasadena, CA Brian Arial/Principal, Hospitality Retail Design Leader 626-204-5704 www.dlrgroup.com • barial@dlrgroup.com Year Established: 1966, No. of Employees: 700 Retail Billings: $11,100,000, Hospitality Billings: $8,000,000 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $138,900,000 Total Billings: $158,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 310 Specialize In: Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurant, Education, Workplace, Sports, Justice, Civic Leading Clients: Google, Boeing, NRG Energy, Mandotti, Hilton, Mall of America

DJ Medin Architects Faribault, MN David J. Medin/President 507-334-2252 • Fax: 507-334-8350 dmedin@djmedinarchitects.com Year Established: 2008, No. of Employees: 5 Retail Billings: $277,000, Hospitality Billings: $97,000 Restaurant Billings: $210,000, Other Billings: $310,000 Total Billings: $894,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 73 Specialize In: Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Industrial Leading Clients: Hardees, Tru-Vue, Wendy’s, Trystar, Cardinal Glass

DLW Architects Dunedin, FL David Wallace/President & CEO 727-736-6000 • Fax: 727-738-8343 www.dlwarchitects.com dlw2@dlwarchitects.com Year Established: 1981, No. of Employees: 21 Retail Billings: $45,000, Hospitality Billings: $3,470,000 Restaurant Billings: $45,000, Other Billings: $180,000 Total Billings: $3,700,000,Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 27 Specialize In: Hotels, ALF, Multi-Family Residential Leading Clients: Marriott, Hilton, Starwood, IHG

ESa Nashville, TN Sandy Dickerson/Director of Communications 615-329-9445 • Fax: 615-329-0046 www.esarch.com • sandyd@esarch.com Year Established: 1961, No. of Employees: 185 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


FHA Architects

Omaha, NE Harlan R. Faust/President 402-895-0878 • Fax: 402-985-9561 www.fhaarchitects.com • fhainfo@fhaarchitects.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 20 Retail Billings: $200,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $2,300,000, Other Billings: $200,000 Total Billings: $2,700,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 165 Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Health Clinics Leading Clients: Chipotle Mexican Grill, Noodles & Co., Suji’s, Korean Grill, PepperJax Grill, Snooze: an AM Eatery, Vera Whole Health, Sweetgreen

Finn Daniels Architects

St. Paul, MN Tom L. Williams/Marketing Manager 651-690-5525 • Fax: 651-690-5545 www.finn-daniels.com • twilliams@finn-daniels.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 19 Retail Billings: $1,895,250,Hospitality Billings: $33,250 Restaurant Billings: $698,250,Other Billings: $698,250 Total Billings: $3,325,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 133 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Housing Leading Clients: Christopher & Banks, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, Gymboree, Salon Lofts

Fisher Architecture Salisbury, MD Keith Fisher/Principal 410-742-0238 • Fax: 888-879-7149 www.fisherarchitecture.com • kfisher@fisherarchitecture.com Year Established: 2009, No. of Employees: 13 Retail Billings: $450,000, Hospitality Billings: $850,000 Restaurant Billings: $150,000, Other Billings: $350,000 Total Billings: $1,800,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 115 Specialize In: Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: LaQuinta, Hyatt Place, Salad Works, Chipotle, Jersey Mikes, Dominos, Dairy Queen, Roly Poly, Starbucks, ReMax, Tutti Frutti

FRCH Design Worldwide Cincinnati, OH Jim Harkin/VP Architect 513-241-3000 • Fax: 513-241-5015 www.frch.com • jharkin@frch.com Year Established: 1968, No. of Employees: 230 Retail Billings: $32,891,250, Hospitality Billings: $6,488,750 Restaurant Billings: $4,922,500, Other Billings: $447,500 Total Billings: $44,750,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 2094 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Premium Outlets/Simon, General Growth Properties, Glimcher, Macerich, The Cordish Company, Macy’s, Dicks Sporting Goods, Target

GPD Group

Akron, OH Michael Morrison/Director of Business Development 330-572-2158 www.gpdgroup.com • mmorrison@gpdgroup.com Year Established: 1961, No. of Employees: 560 Retail Billings: $7,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $200,000 Restaurant Billings: $5,000,000, Other Billings: $76,360,000 Total Billings: $88,560,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 950+ Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Drug Stores, Restaurants, Hotels, Healthcare, Education, Other Leading Clients: Racetrac, Taco Bell, Dollar General, Travel Centers of America

GreenbergFarrow Atlanta, GA Hughes Thompson/Principal 404-601-4000 Toll Free 877-686-1033 • Fax: 404-601-3990 www.greenbergfarrow.com • hthompson@greenbergfarrow.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 286 Retail Billings: $37,400,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $12,000,000, Other Billings: $3,100,000 Total Billings: $52,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 650 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, High-Rise Residential, Mixed-Use Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, IKEA, The Home Depot, Meijer, Whole Foods Market, Aldi, L Brands, Michaels, Texas Roadhouse, Starbucks, Chipotle, Panda Express, Wendy’s, Carl’s Jr., Murphy Oil, Circle K, Empire Petroleum, Clean Energy

GSB, Inc. Oklahoma City, OK Ronald G. Smith/President 405-848-9549 • Fax: 405-848-9783 www.gsb-inc.com • rsmith@gsb-inc.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 35 Retail Billings: $525,850, Hospitality Billings: $3,962,100 Restaurant Billings: $1,025,620, Other Billings: $2,820,300 Total Billings: $8,333,870, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 29 Specialize In: Casinos, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Entertainment Leading Clients: Disney, Lake Nona, DPR Corporation, Cedar Fair Entertainment, Black Palm Development Corp., Populous

Gruskin Architecture & Design, P.C.

Springfield, NJ Kenneth A. Gruskin/Principal 973-376-4411 • Fax: 973-376-8989 www.gruskingroup.com • kgruskin@gruskingroup.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 38 Retail Billings: $5,467,652, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $32,962, Other Billings: $981,081 Total Billings: $6,481,695, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 134 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Banks, Corporate, Residential, Auto Experience, Environmental Branding Leading Clients: Verizon, Colgate-Palmolive

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Herschman Architects, Inc.

Cleveland, OH Fred Margulies/Director of Retail Architecture 216-223-3200 • Fax: 216-223-3210 www.herschmanarchitects.com • mailbox@herschmanarchitects.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 78 Retail Billings: $12,320,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $140,000, Other Billings: $1,540,000 Total Billings: $14,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 518 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: Dicks Sporting Goods, Fabletics, Z Gallerie, CBL, Simon, DDR Corp, Kimco, Woodmont, Staples, RPAI, Fred Meyer

HFA Bentonville, AR Larry, Lott/President, COO 479-273-7780 www.HFA-AE.com • info@hfa-ae.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 190 Retail Billings: $25,700,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $25,900,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 450 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Academy Sports, Stripes, Loves Country Stores, Slim Chickens, Fresh Thyme Farmers Market, Circle K Stores

Hixson Architecture, Engineering, Interiors Cincinnati, OH Bruce Mirrieless/Sr. Vice President & Project Manager 513-241-1230 • Fax: 513-241-1287 www.hixson-inc.com • bmirrielees@hixson-inc.com Year Established: 1948, No. of Employees: 130 Retail Billings: $2,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $2,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 10 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s, General Growth Properties (GGP)

HKS, Inc. Dallas, TX Julie Wellik/Communications Manger 214-969-5599 www.hksinc.com • jwellik@hksinc.com Year Established: 1939, No. of Employees: 1,200 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $59,210,000 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $255,000,000 Total Billings: $314,210,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 118 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Sports, Entertainment/Arts, Commercial Office, Interiors, Aviation, Urban Design, Multi-Family, Residential, Mixed-Use, Government, Convention Center Leading Clients: Hines, AM Resorts, Four Seasons, Omni Hotels, Disney Development Corp., KDC

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Hospitality Design Group

San Antonio, TX Robert L. Herbage/Principal, Architect 210-831-3580 • Fax: 210-399-9063 www.hospitalitydesigngroup.com rherbage@hospitalitydesigngroup.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 5 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $500,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 25 Specialize In: Restaurants Leading Clients: Taco Cabana, Fuddruckers, McDonalds, Subway, Dairy Queen

Interplan LLC Orlando, FL Patrick Ringlever/Business Development Manager 407-645-5008 • Fax: 407-629-9124 www.interplanllc.com • pringlever@interplanllc.com Year Established: 1972, No. of Employees: 130 Retail Billings: $4,952,315.00, Hospitality Billings: $60,525.62 Restaurant Billings: $6,474,743.29, Other Billings: $1,561,961.38 Total Billings: $13,049,545.30, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 741 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Convenience Stores, Banks Leading Clients: N/A

Jacobs Pasadena, CA Sam Pena/Principal 817-222-8675 www.jacobs.com • sam.pena@jacobs.com Year Established: 1947, No. of Employees: 63,000 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $12,100,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 556 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Mixed-Use, Transportation Facility Concessions, Banks, Salons, Post Offices, etc. Leading Clients: N/A

Jencen Architecture Cleveland, OH Juleen Russell/Architect, Business Development 216-781-0131 • Fax: 216-781-0134 www.jencen.com • jrussell@jencen.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 24 Retail Billings: $3,977,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $23,000 Total Billings: $4,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 266 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Salons, Commercial Development/Retail Leading Clients: Jared the Galleria of Jewelers, Kay Jewelers, Le Vian, Alex & Ani

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 34


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS JGA Southfield, MI Ken Nisch/Chairman 248-355-0890 • Fax: 248-355-0895 www.JGA.com • info@jga.com Year Established: 1971, No. of Employees: 44 Retail Billings: $7,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $7,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 125 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Restaurant Leading Clients: Hershey’s, The North Face, Whole Foods Market, Blue Nile, Sleep Number, H&M

Kenneth Park Architects New York, NY Amie Bentley/Director of Business Development 212-599-0044 • Fax: 212-599-0066 www.kennethpark.com • info@kennethpark.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 60 Retail Billings: $15,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $15,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 148 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: H&M, Diane Von Furstenberg, Michael Kors, Tourneau, Industry City, Seritage Growth Properties, Thor, Urban Edge, Vornado, Westfield

Kuhlmann Design Group, Inc. St. Louis, MO Darrell L. Abernathy/VP, Director of Business 314-434-8898 • Fax: 314-434-8280 www.kdginc.com • dla@kdginc.com Year Established: 1974, No. of Employees: 50 Retail Billings: $1,074,000 Hospitality Billings: $1,264,000 Restaurant Billings: $902,000, Other Billings: $2,418,000 Total Billings: $5,658,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 145 Specialize In: Grocery, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Federal, Government, Municipal Leading Clients: Seneca, The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf Co., Pieology, DESCO, Isle of Capri Casinos, Nekter, Edwards Group, Hard Rock International, Schnuck Markets Inc.

L2M Architects Glen Burnie, MD Jeffrey D. Mahler/Vice President 410-863-1302 • Fax: 410-863-1308 www.l2m.com • jmahler@l2m.com Year Established: 1994, No. of Employees: 19 Retail Billings: $2,300,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $700,000, Other Billings: $300,000 Total Billings: $3,300,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 250 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants Leading Clients: Advance Auto Parts, Au Bon Pain, Payless, Roy Rogers, Kimco, Federal Realty, Westfield, DDR, GGP

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Leo A Daly

Omaha, NE John McGauvran/Corporate Director of Marketing 402-391-8111 • Fax: 402-391-8564 www.leoadaly.com • jtmcgauvran@leoadaly.com Year Established: 1915, No. of Employees: 782 Retail Billings: $3,800,000, Hospitality Billings: $11,000,000 Restaurant Billings: $5,800,000, Other Billings: $136,400,000 Total Billings: $157,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 142 Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: Hearst Corporation, Marriott Hotels, Dollar General, Yahoo!

Lifescapes International, Inc. Newport Beach, CA Julie Brinkerhoff-Jacobs/President & CFO 949-476-8888 www.lifescapesintl.com • julie@lifescapesintl.com Year Established: 1958, No. of Employees: 45 Retail Billings: $3,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $5,000,000 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $8,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 4 Specialize In: Casinos, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Wynn Resorts, Caruso Affiliated, CenterCal Properties

LGA Partners Pittsburgh, PA Paulette Burns/Partner 412-243-3430 • Fax: 412-224-4747 www.lga-partners.com • pburns@lga-partners.com Year Established: 1993, No. of Employees: 51 Retail Billings: $3,844,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $505,000, Other Billings: $3,722,000 Total Billings: $8,121,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 650 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Education, Airport Retail & Restaurant Leading Clients: Aeropostale, Rue21, Bluemercury, Villa Join the Movement, Claires, Brahmin, InMotion, Airest Collezioni, AIRMALL AMERICA!, TUMI, Sound Balance

Little Charlotte, NC Bruce A Barteldt Jr./Global Practice Leader-Retail 704-525-6350 • Fax: 704-561-8700 www.littleonline.com • bbarteldt@littleonline.com Year Established: 1964, No. of Employees: 350 Retail Billings: $29,800,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Other Billings: $40,000,000 Total Billings: $70,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 900 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Banks/Financial, Office, Public Sector Leading Clients: Bank of America, Publix Supermarkets, CVS Caremark, BB&T, Belk, Smart & Final, Concentra, The Fresh Market, Whole Foods, Bealls Dept. Stores, Bunulu, Blains Farm & Fleet

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


LK Architecture Wichita, KS Dennis D. Smith/President 316-268-0230 • Fax: 316-268-0205 www.LK-Architecture.com • dsmith@lk-architecture.com Year Established: 1967, No. of Employees: 123 Retail Billings: $8,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $3,000,000 Restaurant Billings: $2,000,000, Other Billings: $3,000,000 Total Billings: $15,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 25 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Hotels Leading Clients: N/A

LSArchitecture, PLLC Mandeville, LA Terri Lewis Stevens/Architect, Principal 409-299-0162 www.LSArchitecture.com LSAinfo@LSArchitecture.com Year Established: 2004, No. of Employees: 4 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 43 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education Leading Clients: National Pizza Franchise, National Fast Casual Restaurant Franchise, National Orthodontic Franchise, Public School, Municpal Projects

Mayse & Associates, Inc. Dallas, TX David Goldston/Partner, VP of Marketing 972-386-0338 • Fax: 972-386-0578 www.mayseassociates.com dgoldston@mayseassociates.com Year Established: 1983, No. of Employees: 18 Retail Billings: $10,213, Hospitality Billings: $1,534,339 Restaurant Billings: $1,754,429, Other Billings: $549,181 Total Billings: $3,848,162, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 103 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Industrial Leading Clients: N/A

MBH Architects Alameda, CA Hillary Thompson/Marketing Job Captain 510-865-8663 • Fax: 510-865-8611 www.mbharch.com • info@mbharch.com Year Established: 1989, No. of Employees: 160 Retail Billings: $25,202,000, Hospitality Billings: $50,000 Restaurant Billings: $2,538,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $31,275,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1000+ Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Housing/Mixed Use Leading Clients: Tesla, Kona Grill, Levi’s

The McIntosh Group Tulsa, OK Karen MacCannell/Sr. Associate 918-585-8555 • Fax: 918-583-7282 www.mcintoshtransforms.com • karenm@mcintoshtransforms.com Year Established: 1998, No. of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: $3,161,743, Hospitality Billings: $65,650 Restaurant Billings: $1,508,262, Other Billings: $266,226 Total Billings: $5,001,881, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1,763 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Wendy’s, Pizza Hut, Kit & Ace, Kwik Trip, Regions Bank, JC Penney, Kohl’s, etc.

Michael Armani Design Studio Studio City, CA Michael Armani/Principal & Creative Director 818-762-7046 http://michaelarmani.prosite.com michaelvarmani@gmail.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 4 Retail Billings: $600,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Office Billings: $1,100,000 Total Billings: $1,700,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 3 Specialize In: Casinos, Hotels, Restaurants, Office, Retail Leading Clients: NBC Universal Inc. Offices, Showtime Networks Offices

Michael Brady, Inc. Knoxville, TN Louis Cortina/President 865-584-0999 • Fax: 865-584-5213 www.michaelbradyinc.com louisc@mbiarch.com Year Established: 1990, No. of Employees: 85 Retail Billings: $1,000,000, Hospitality Billings: $650,000 Restaurant Billings: $650,000, Other Billings: $8,800,000 Total Billings: $11,100,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 110 Specialize In: Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Industrial, Jails Leading Clients: BoJangles, Pilot, Publix

Moda 4 Design Dayton, OH Matt Bruggeman/Director 888-686-6324 www.moda4.com mbruggeman@moda4.com Year Established: 2005, No. of Employees: 10 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $2,200,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 100+ Specialize In: Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Estee Lauder, Petsmart, Planet Fitness, Sky Zone, Tilted Kilt, Lava Cantina, Univ. of Dayton

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SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS MRP Design Group

Kennesaw, GA Ken Dalton/President 770-971-9172 • Fax: 770-971-9470 www.mrpdesign.com • kdalton@mrpdesign.com Year Established: N/A, No. of Employees: 11 Retail Billings: $200,000, Hospitality Billings: $300,000 Restaurant Billings: $700,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $1,200,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 76 Specialize In: Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Zaxby’s, Wendy’s, Yum Brands, Popeyes’, Dunkin Donuts

Nvironment

Columbus, OH Christopher Collins/Principal 614-725-4644 www.nvironmentdesign.com • christopher@nvironmentdesign.com Year Established: 2008, No. of Employees: 15 Retail Billings: $250,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $1,500,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $1,750,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 35 Specialize In: Grocery, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Restaurants Leading Clients: N/A

Paradigm Design Group

Houston, TX Lisa H. Haude/President 281-256-1689 www.paradigm-design.com lisah@paradigm-design.com Year Established: 2000, No. of Employees: 11 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $1,366,444 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $1,366,444, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 10+ Specialize In: Hotels Leading Clients: Dinapoli, Rockbridge, Dimension

PFI Displays, Inc.

Rittman, OH Anthony Tricomi/President & CEO 330-925-9015 • Fax: 330-925-8520 www.PFIDisplays.com • artricomi@PFIDisplays.com Year Established: 1970, No. of Employees: 25 Retail Billings: $2,900,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $2,600,000 Total Billings: $5,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 20 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Drug Stores, Education, Sporting Goods Leading Clients: Macy’s

PFVS Architecture Atlanta, GA Greg Portman/President 404-503-5000 • Fax: 404-503-5050 www.pfvs.com • gportman@pfvs.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 39 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $7,900,000 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $7,900,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 5 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: White Lodging Services , Concord Hospitality

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Poole+Drennan Design Studio

Dallas, TX Damon Drennan/Principal 888-707-0104 • Fax: 214-948-5530 www.pooledrennan.com • info@pooledrennan.com Year Established: 2010, No. of Employees: 5 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $1,250,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $1,250,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 30 Specialize In: Restaurants Leading Clients: TGI Friday’s, Twin Peaks, Jack in the Box

RDH Interests, Inc.

Las Vegas, NV Randall Huggins/President 972-267-5300 www.rdhinterests.net • info@rdhinterests.net Year Established: 2000, No. of Employees: 12 Retail Billings: $150,227, Hospitality Billings: $1,435,814 Restaurant Billings: $152,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $1,738,041, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 8 Specialize In: Hotels Leading Clients: MGM Resorts International

Rebel Design+Group

Douglas DeBoer/Founder, Owner, CEO 800-92-REBEL www.rebeldesign.com • douglas@rebeldesign.com Year Established: 1985, No. of Employees: 75 Retail Billings: $2,356,434, Hospitality Billings: $12,866,239 Restaurant Billings: $5,292,100, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $20,514,773, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 23 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Aircraft, Yachts, Spas, Retail Leading Clients: All major hotel brands, Privately held hotels, Restaurants, Other hospitality projects

RSP Architects

Minneapolis, MN Jackie Peacha/Creative Director 612-677-7100 www.rsparch.com • jackie.peacha@rsparch.com Year Established: 1978, No. of Employees: 258 Retail Billings: $13,375,000, Hospitality Billings: $2,465,000 Restaurant Billings: $1,734,000, Other Billings: $34,258,000 Total Billings: $51,832,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 239 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Target, Sprouts Farmers Markets, PetSmart, Granite City

SAJO

Mont-Royal, QC Canada Victor Khoueiry/Director 514-385-0333 x-213 • Fax: 516-385-1108 www.sajo.com • vkhoueiry@sajo.com Year Established: 1977, No. of Employees: 160 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 185 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Retail Leading Clients: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 35


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Sargenti Architects

Paramus, NJ Robert Sargenti/Principal 973-253-9393 www.sargarch.com • rsargenti@sargarch.com Year Established: 1997, No. of Employees: 100 Retail Billings: $15,450,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $15,450,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 1,300 Specialize In: Big-box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: H&M, Victoria Secret, GAP, Saks Fifth Avenue, Foot Locker

SGA Design Group

Tulsa, OK Daryl Bray/COO 918-587-8600 • Fax: 918-587-8601 www.sgadesigngroup.com • darylb@sgadesigngroup.com Year Established: 1995, No. of Employees: 81 Retail Billings: $16,700,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $50,000, Other Billings: $705,000 Total Billings: $17,500,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 254 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Hobby Lobby, Cabela’s, Best Buy, BSRO, Dollar Tree

Smallwood Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart & Associates, Inc.

Atlanta, GA Michael Brown/Associate 404-233-5453 • Fax: 404-264-0929 www.srssa.com • mbrown@srssa.com Year Established: 1979, No. of Employees: 136 Retail Billings: $2,593,000, Hospitality Billings: $5,500,000 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $14,647,000 Total Billings: $22,740,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 20 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Education, Mixed-Use, Office, Government, Renovation, Residential, Retail, Parking Decks Leading Clients: N/A

Stantec Architecture Inc.

De Pere, WI Mary Jepsen/Marketing & BD Lead, Commercial 920-278-3217 • Fax: 920-592-8444 www.stantec.com • mary.jepsen@stantec.com Year Established: 1954, No. of Employees: 15,000+ Retail Billings: $70,042,169, Hospitality Billings: $7,051,177 Restaurant Billings: $5,715,675, Other Billings: $650,782,459 Total Billings: $733,591,480, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: Architecture: 5,452 / Commercial: 2,175 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Casinos, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Airports, Attractions, Arts & Entertainment, Automotive, Community/Institutional, Justice, Mixed-Use, Office, Research/Labs, Transit, Warehouse/Light Industrial Leading Clients: Wal-Mart, Kohl’s, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, 7-Eleven, Ivanhoe Cambridge, The Irvine Company, JP Morgan Chase, Shape Property Management, IKEA, Walgreen’s, McDonald’s, Boston Properties, Oxford Properties Group, HewlettPackard, Fidelity Investments, AutoNation

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Stonehill & Taylor New York, NY Grace Oakley/Marketing & Communications 212-226-8898 • Fax: 212-941-1874 www.stonehilltaylor.com • goakley@stonehilltaylor.com Year Established: 1986, No. of Employees: 88 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $13,845,500 (includes restaurants in hotels) Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $13,845,500, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 32 Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Hyatt, Hilton, Marriott, Host

Studio 11 Design Dallas, TX Stacy Elliston/Principal 214-206-1131 www.studio11design.com • hi@studio11design.com Year Established: 2011, No. of Employees: 17 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $1,450,000 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $1,450,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 15 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Multi-Family Properties Leading Clients: Hilton, Starwood, Marriott

Studio3877 Washington, DC David Shove-Brown/Partner 202-350-4244 • Fax: 202-350-4245 www.3877.com • dsb@studio3877.com Year Established: 2010, No. of Employees: 12 Retail Billings: $8,915.62, Hospitality Billings: $620,278.34 Restaurant Billings: $240,187.52, Other Billings: $312,780.06 Total Billings: $1,182,161.54, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Marriott, AppleREIT, Baywood

Studio Four Design Knoxville, TN Stacy Cox/President 865-523-5001 • Fax: 865-523-5003 www.studiofourdesign.com scox@s4dinc.com Year Established: 2002, No. of Employees: 19 Retail Billings: $900,000, Hospitality Billings: $40,000 Restaurant Billings: $200,000, Other Billings: $1,240,000 Total Billings: $2,300,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 50+ Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants, Education, Church, Industrial, Office/Corporate Leading Clients: Altar’d State, Hurricane Grill & Wings, Local Motors, Scripps Networks

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 36


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS Thomas Hamilton & Associates P.C. Richmond, VA Doreen Louderback/Director of Marketing 804-266-4853 x-305 • Fax: 804-266-5203 www.thomashamiltonassociates.com doreen@thomashamiltonassociates.com Year Established: 1980, No. of Employees: 13 Retail Billings: $N/A, Hospitality Billings: $2,100,000 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $2,100,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 49 Specialize In: Hotels, Restaurants Leading Clients: Marriott International, Guest Services Inc.

Torres Architects Torrance, CA Denise Torres/Director of Projects 310-320-6285 www.tarci.com • denise@tarci.com Year Established: 1984, No. of Employees: 8 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 140 Specialize In: Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Retail Leading Clients: Blaze Pizza, Mooyah Burgers, PLS Financial, Catapult Learning

TransSystems Corporation South Norwalk, CT Rosemarie Rawson/Sr. Associate, VP 203-866-9221 • Fax: 203-286-2591 www.transystems.com • rrrawson@transystems.com Year Established: 1966, No. of Employees: 900 Retail Billings: $4,300,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $4,300,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 45 Specialize In: Specialty Stores Leading Clients: N/A

Tricarico Architecture and Design PC Wayne, NJ Jennifer Sussman/Business Development 973-692-0222 • Fax: 973-692-0223 www.tricarico.com • jennifers@tricarico.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 115 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $15,000,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 800 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Drug Stores, Specialty, Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurant, Automotive Leading Clients: BMW, Rag & Bone, Kate Spade, John Barrett Salons, Footlocker, Coach

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VOA Associates Incorporated Chicago, IL Kevin Krejca/Marketing Communications Manager 312-453-7618 • Fax: 312-554-1412 www.voa.com • kkrejca@voa.com Year Established: 1969, No. of Employees: 295 Retail Billings: $1,394,526, Hospitality Billings: $9,064,423 Restaurant Billings: $14,642,530, Other Billings: $44,624,855 Total Billings: $69,726,334, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 165 Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Cultural, Themed Entertainment Leading Clients: Google, Virgin, BlueCross BlueShield, Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt, TopShop, Disney

WATG Irvine, CA Dean Kawamura/Marketing Manager 949-574-8500 www.watg.com • dkawamura@watg.com Year Established: 1945, No. of Employees: 348 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $54,877,700 Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $2,888,300 Total Billings: $57,766,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: N/A Specialize In: Hotels Leading Clients: N/A

WD Partners Dublin, OH Mark Bateman/VP, Business Development 614-634-7000 • Fax: 614-634-7777 www.wdpartners.com • mark.bateman@wdpartners.com Year Established: 1968, No. of Employees: 300 Retail Billings: $28,400,000, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $16,800,000, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $45,200,000, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: 2,870 Specialize In: Specialize In: Big-Box/Dept, Grocery, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Specialty Stores, Restaurants Leading Clients: Aramark, NFL, Microsoft, Zensho, Sonic/EchoPark

Zuzink Sherman Oaks, CA Dawn Hollingsworth/Principal 818-370-6411 www.zuzink.com • dawnh@zuzink.com Year Established: 2016, No. of Employees: 1 Retail Billings: $ N/A, Hospitality Billings: $ N/A Restaurant Billings: $ N/A, Other Billings: $ N/A Total Billings: $ N/A, Completed Projects as of 12/31/15: Specialize In: Healthcare, Casinos, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Entertainment Leading Clients: Tarrant Lighting

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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Architecture

CIRCLE NO. 37

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Sustainability

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Prototype Development


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES

The perfect fit Check out our annual Fixture Manufacturing Listing

A

sk today’s commercial construction professionals, and they will tell the importance of having solid fixtures. To help keep in front of the companies leading the marketplace, our annual “Fixture Manufacturing Listing” provides you the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If you’re not listed, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. Accel Group , Inc.

Phil Wright/Dir. of Sales & Design 325 Quadral Dr. Wadsworth, OH 44281 Ph: 330-336-0317 x-2137 • Fax: 330-336-1224 www.accelgrp.com • philw@accelgrp.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Wire, Wood. Other MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls

Allen Cabinetry & The CounterTop Shop

Matt Schag/President 154 Distl Ave. Mansfield, OH 44902 Ph: 419-526-6505 • Fax: 419-526-1009 www.allencabinetry.com • sales@allencabinetry.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Architectural Millwork, Furniture/Upholstery, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

ATS, Inc.

Mike Omann/Corporate Business Development 725 Opportunity Dr. St. Cloud, MN 56301 Ph: 320-255-7420 • Fax: 320-223-7618 www.atsinc.com • mikeom@atsinc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Logistics/Transportation MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

B Free Hanger Design & Display Ltd.

Bert Spitz/President 450 7th Avenue, Ste. 1308 New York, NY 10123 Ph: 855-714-2428 www.bfreehangers.com • bert@bfreehangers.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Garment Racks, Custom Acrylic & Wood Garment Hangers, Mannequins, Racks, Store Supplies MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

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Baresque

Angus Blaiklock/Executive Director 53-55 Whiting Street Artarmon, NSW 2064 Australia Ph: 855-922-7377 http://baresque.us • info@baresque.us FIXTURE MATERIALS: Wallcoverings, Acoustic Ceiling Treatments MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Baywood Interior Millwork

John D. Lassel/Director of Operations 55 Hollinger Crescent Kitchener, ON Canada N2K 2Y8 Ph: 519-748-9577 • Fax: 519-748-6563 www.baywoodinteriors.com • johnl@baywoodinteriors.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Gondolas, Islands/ Back Islands, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Beam Team

Rick Hall, President 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 Ph: 678-867-6588 www.thebeamteam.com • rickhall@thebeamteam.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Fixture Installation & Repair Services MARKETS SERVED: Retail

Bishop Fixture & Millwork

M.K. Nelson, Director Sales & Marketing 101 Eagle Dr. Balsam Lake, WI 54810 Ph: 715-485-9312 x-3127 • Fax: 715-485-3316 www.bishopfixtures.com • mknelson@bishopfixtures.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


Brentano, Inc. CRL-U.S. Aluminum

Kate Tucker, PR & Marketing 260 Holbrook Dr. Wheeling, IL 60090 Ph: 847-657-8481 www.brentanofabrics.com • ktucker@brentanofabrics.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Fabric MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Cabinotch

Mike Lee/Director 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 Ph: 434-203-3280 • Fax: 336-605-6969 www.cabinotch.us • mlee@cabinotch.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets

CAP & Associates

Randy Griffith/VP of Business Development 445 McCormick Blvd. Columbus, OH 43213 Ph: 614-900-6360 • Fax: 614-863-3603 www.CAP-Associates.com • rgriffith@cap-associates.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail

Columbia Forest Products

Richard Poindexter/ Specialty Products Manager 7900 Triad Center Dr., Ste. #200 Greensboro, NC 27409 Ph: 800-637-1609 • Fax: 336-605-6969 www.columbiaforestproducts.com • rpoindexter@cfpwood.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Display Cases, End Caps, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, POP, Shelving, Furniture/ Upholstery, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Wood, Hardwood, Plywood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Cosentino

Steve DeBerardino/Director, Corporate Accounts 2245 Texas Dr. Sugar Land, TX 77479 Ph: 281-202-3110 www.cosentino.com • steved@cosentino.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Shelving, Wallcoverings MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Andrew Haring/VP of Marketing 2503 E. Vernon Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90058 Ph: 800-421-6144 • Fax: 323-581-6522 www.crlaurence.com • andrew_haring@crlaurence.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Display Cases, Metal, Transaction & Hospitality Hardware, Entrances, Storefronts, Curtain Walls, Commercial Hardware MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Dakota Systems Mfg. Edward Owsinski/President 1885 New Highway Farmingdale, NY 11735 Ph: 631-249-5811 • Fax: 631-249-5819 www.dakotamfg.com • info@dakotamfg.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cable & Rod System, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

DAVACO, Inc. Paul Hamer/EVP Business Development 6688 N. Central Expwy., Ste. 1400 Dallas, TX 75206 Ph: 214-373-4700 www.davacoinc.com • info@davacoinc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Fixture Installation MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

DBS 360, Inc. Matt Wanless/Principal P.O. Box 384 Amery, WI 54001 Ph: 715-553-2686 www.dbs360.co • dbs360@amerytel.net FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Dynamic Store Fixtures Covestro LLC Chris Gram/VP Operations

Cindy Race/Marketing Communications 119 Salisbury Rd. Sheffield, MA 01257 Ph: 413-528-7812 • Fax: 413-229-4066 www.sheets.covestro.com • sfdinfo@covestro.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, POP, Polycarbonate MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Other

180 Vinyl Court Woodbridge, ON Canada L4L 4A3 Ph: 905-851-6529 www.dynamicsf.com • info@dynamicsf.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Kiosks, Metal, Furniture/Upholstery, Wire MARKETS SERVED: Retail

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES EcoDomo LLC Granger Contracting Company, Inc. & N-Store Services, LLC

Christian Nadeau/President 14650 #F Rothgeb Dr. Rockville, MD 20850 Ph: 301-424-7717 • Fax: 301-424-7719 www.ecodomo.com • info@ecodomo.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Islands/Back Islands, Architectural Millwork, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wallcoverings, Leather Tops MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls

Envirawood Brad Beardsley/General Manager 2015 Woodlands Way Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Ph: 954-428-4951 • Fax: 954-419-9649 www.envirawood.com • brad@envirawood.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Veneers, Wallcoverings, 2D/3D Vinyl, Laminate MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Exclusive Retail Interiors Joseph Demeri/CEO 998C Old Country Rd., Ste. 318 Plainview, NY 11803 Ph: 516-513-1255 www.exclusiveretail.net • jdemeri@exclusiveretail.net FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Kevin Zigrang/Dir. of Business Development 600 Trade Center Blvd. Chesterfield, MO 63005 Ph: 636-728-0448 • Fax: 636-728-0449 www.gnhservices.com • kevin@gnhservices.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Store Fixture Installation MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

idX Corporation Lin Courtois/VP Marketing Communications One Rider Trail Plaza Dr., Ste. 400 Earth City, MO 63045 Ph: 314-739-4120 • Fax: 314-739-4129 www.idxcorporation.com • lin.courtois@idxcorporation.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/ Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood, Décor & Graphics MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

JBI Interiors

Andy Braddy/EVP Sales & Business Development 2650 E. El Presidio St. Long Beach, CA 90810 Ph: 770-329-6805 www.jbi-interiors.com • abraddy@jbi-interiors.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Shelving, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Kaston Fixtures & F.C. Dadson Design Group, LLC

Larry Myer/VP of Business Development N 1043 Craftsmen Dr. Greenville, WI 54942 Ph: 920-757-1486 • Fax: 920-757-1493 www.fcdadson.com • info@fcdadson.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Architectural Millwork, POP, Slatwall MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

John Steger/President 8610 Directors Row Dallas, TX 75247 Ph: 866-943-5334 • Fax: 972-243-1545 www.kastongroup.com • john@kastongroup.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Metal, POP, Shelving, Wallcoverings, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Kingsmen Projects US Gondola Train Stephen Hekman/VP Retail Services

Brad Walsh/Vice President 135 Tennyson St. Potosi, WI 53820 Ph: 608-763-4216 • Fax: 608-763-4255 www.gondolatrain.com • brad@gondolatrain.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Gondolas, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Shelving MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Corporate

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1824 Monrovia, Ste #D Costa Mesa, CA 92627 Ph: 714-434-9700 stephenhekman@kingsmenprojects-us.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Gondolas, Architectural Millwork MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


RETAIL ENVIRONMENT

SOLUTIONS WORLDWIDE LEADER IN RETAIL DESIGN SOLUTIONS, DISPLAY MANUFACTURING, DÉCOR AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT Imagine a retail solutions company that works as an extension of your business. One that not only creates customized, flexible and functional displays, but one that takes the pressure of managing a complex rollout off your team. Our capabilities include: project management, design, development, engineering, prototyping, manufacturing, store layout, site surveys, inventory management, logistics, construction management, refresh services, décor & graphics fabrication and installation

With 25 years of experience, idX offers superior craftsmanship and technical capabilities, world-class project management, and turn-key retail services. Where ideas and expertise intersect.

WWW.IDXCORPORATION.COM BALTIMORE | CHICAGO | CHINA | DALLAS | DAYTON | INDIA | LONDON | LOS ANGELES | LOUISVILLE MEXICO CITY | NEW YORK | NORTH CAROLINA | ST. LOUIS | SAN FRANCISCO | SEATTLE | TOKYO | TORONTO CIRCLE NO. 38


SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Ladder Industries Tim Gonzalez, General Manager 1040 S Camino Oro Goodyear, AZ 85338 Ph: 800-360-6789 • Fax: 623-932-5804 www.ladderindustries.com • info@ladderindustries.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Ladders MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Education, Shopping Malls

Lozier Corporation

Tracy Keith/Dir. of Marketing 6336 John J Pershing Dr. Omaha, NE 68110 Ph: 402-457-8000 www.lozier.com • tracy.keith@lozier.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wire, Wood, Fitting Rooms, Pharmacy MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

Madix, Inc.

John Clontz/Dir. of Marketing & e-Business 500 Airport Rd. Terrell, TX 75160 Ph: 214-515-5400 • Fax: 214-515-5474 www.madixinc.com • jclontz@madixinc.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Pallets & Pallet Racking, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Shopping Malls

McCowan Design and Manufacturing Limited

Anothony Ruffolo/ Senior Manager, Business Development 1760 Birchmount Road Toronto, ON M1P 2H7 Canada Ph: 416-291-7111 • Fax: 1-888-782-5189 www.mccowan.ca • anthonyr@mccowan.ca FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Other MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Conveniece Stores, Gas Bars, QSR, Pharmacy

Modern Line Furniture

Alexander Vays/Dir. of Operations 531 N. Stiles St. Linden, NJ 07036 Ph: 800-637-5596 www.modernlinefurniture.com • sales@modernlinefurniture.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Furniture/Upholstery MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Bar, Night Club, Lounge

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Pacific Fixture Co., Inc. Keith Stark/President 12860 San Fernando Rd., Unit B Sylmar, CA 91342 Ph: 818-362.2130 • Fax: 818-367-8968 www.pacificfixture.com • keith@pacificfixture.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Islands/Back Islands, Perimeter, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail

PFI Displays, Inc. Anthony Tricomi/President, CEO 40 Industrial St. Rittman, OH 44270 Ph: 330-925-9015 • Fax: 330-925-8520 www.pfidisplays.com • artricomi@pfidisplays.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, POP, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Porcelanosa USA

Andrew Pennington/National Sales Director 600 Rt. 17 North Ramsey, NJ 07446 Ph: 201-995-1310 x-2025 www.porcelanosa-usa.com • apennington@porcelanosa-usa.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Krion Solid Surface MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Prime Retail Services, Inc. Michael Edmundson/Vice President 3617 Southland Dr., Ste. A Flowery Branch, GA 30542 Ph: 866-504-3511 • • Fax: 866-584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com medmundson@primeretailservices.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Installation Services MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

Redman Corporation

R ED MAN

R

Jason Lu/Chairman & CEO 9 Qigan Rd., Zhangjiagang • Jiangsu, China 215600 Ph: +86-512-5816 5899 • Fax: +86-512-5816 5818 www.redmandisplay.com • jason@redman.cn FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Kiosks, Metal, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/ Upholstery, Veneers, Wire, Wood, Printing MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


Rigidized Metals Corporation Beth Neel/Sr. Marketing Specialist 658 Ohio Street Buffalo, NY 14203 Ph: 716-849-4782 • Fax: 716-849-0401 www.rigidized.com • bethneel@rigidized.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Metal MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Elevators, Restroom Partitions

Rock Eagle Store Fixtures

Steven Crowley/Sales Marketing Mgr. Mike Crowley/President 821 Harmony Rd. Eatonton, GA 31024 Ph: 706-484-0000 • Fax: 706-484-0002 www.rockeagle.com • crocas821@aol.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, GT Fixtures MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Healthcare, Medical

SAJO

Rocco Raco/Dir. Marketing & Business Development 1320 Graham Ville Mont-Royal QC H3P 3C8 Canada Ph: 877-901-7256 • Fax: 514-385-1843 www.sajo.com • rocco@sajo.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinet, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood, Glass MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Corporate

Salsbury Industries – Lockers.com Mark Eu/Dir. of Marketing 1010 E. 62nd Street Los Angeles, CA 90001-1598 Ph: 800-LOCKERS (800-562-5377) • Fax: 800-562-5399 www.Lockers.com • Salisbury@Lockers.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Shelving MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Shaw PPC Design Tom Smith/President 44311 Grand River Ave. Novi, MI 48375 Ph: 248-348-7755 • Fax: 248-348-7708 www.Shawandslavsky.com • tsmith@shawandslavsky.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Cases, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Slatwall, Wallcoverings, Wood, Graphics, Signage MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

SignResource Scott Van Ness/President & CEO 6135 District Blvd. Maywood, CA 90270 Ph: 323-771-2098 www.signresource.com • srmarketing@signresource.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Signage MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Petroleum, QSR

TC Millwork, Inc. Leo Couchara/National Sales Manager 3433 Marshall Lane Bensalem, PA 19020 Ph: 215-245-4210 • Fax: 215-245-4729 www.TCMillwork.com • l.couchara@tcmillwork.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Veneers, Wire, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare

Trion Industries, Inc. 297 Laird St. Wilkes Barre, PA 18704 Ph: 570-824-1000 www.triononline.com • info@triononline.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Display Cases, End Caps, Rid Racks/ Grid Systems, Metal, Perimeter, POP, Refrigerated Cases, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Metal Stompings, Extracted Plastic MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education

Universal Custom Display Cindy Heigl/Business Development 9104 Elkmont Way Elk Grove, CA 95624 Ph: 574-225-2004 • Fax: 916-714-2512 www.universalcustomdisplay.com cindy@universalcustomdisplay.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Backroom Storage, Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Architectural Millwork, Perimeter, POP, Shelving, Slatwall, Furniture/Upholstery, Veneers, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Shopping Malls

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SPECIAL REPORT

FIXTURES Visual Citi Happy David/Dir. of Marketing Lindenhurst, NY 11757 Ph: 631-482-3030 • Fax: 631-321-1058 www.visualciti.com • hello@visualciti.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Acrylic, Display Cases, Metal, POP, Wood MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Education, Shopping Malls

Vitra Retail, Inc. Andy Hearle/Director 7528 Walker Way Allentown, PA 18106 Ph: 610-366-1658 www.vitra.com • andy.hearle@vitra.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Garment Racks, Metal, Perimeter, Shelving MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Shopping Malls

Wabash Valley Manufacturing Dan DeNoble/VP Sales & Marketing P.O. Box 5, 505 E. Main St. Silver Lake, IN 46982 Ph: 260-352-2102 • Fax: 260-352-2160 www.wabashvalley.com • ddenoble@wabashvalley.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Outdoor Furniture & Furnishings MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Wildeck, Inc. Kelly Kamlager/Marketing Manager 405 Commerce St. Waukesha, WI 53186 Ph: 800-325-6939 • Fax: 262-549-4000 www.wildeck.com • kkamlager@wildeck.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Education, Shopping Malls, Warehousing Distributing

Wilsonart 2501 Wilsonart Dr. Temple, TX 76504 Ph: 800-433-3222 • Fax: 254-207-3209 www.Wilsonart.com • smartline@wilsonart.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Engineered Surfaces (Quartz, Solid Surface, Laminate, Decorative Metal, Adhesives, etc.) MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

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Wilson Display Limited Elizabeth Wilson/VP, Account Management 1645 Aimco Blvd. Toronto, ON L4W 1H8 Canada Ph: 905-625-9200• Fax: 1-800-388-8357 www.wilsondisplay.com • elizabeth.wilson@wilsondisplay.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Cabinets, Cashwraps/Checkout Counters, Display Cases, End Caps, Garment Racks, Gondolas, Rid Racks/Grid Systems, Islands/Back Islands, Kiosks, Metal, Perimeter, Shelving, Slatwall, Wire, Wood, Other MARKETS SERVED: Retail

Wind Mill Slatwall Products Joan Kersten/Marketing Manager 200 Balsam Rd. Sheboygan Falls, WI 53085 Ph: 920-467-9305 • Fax: 920-467-6114 www.windmillslatwall.com • joan@windmillslatwall.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: POP, Slatwall, Wallcoverings, Wood, PVC MARKETS SERVED: Retail

Winholt Equipment Group Rose Frierson/Marketing Manager 20 Crossways Park North, Ste. 205 Woodbury, NY 11797 Ph: 800-444-3595 • Fax: 516-921-0538 www.winholt.com • marketing3@winholt.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Backroom Storage, Garment Racks, POP, Shelving, Stock Carts, Material Handling Equipment MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Yunker Industries Nadine Seitz/Marketing Manager 200 E. Sheridan Springs Rd. Lake Geneva, WI 53147 Ph: 262-249-5220 • Fax: 262-249-5230 www.yunker.com • nseitz@yunker.com FIXTURE MATERIALS: Kiosks, Metal POP, Wallcoverings, Wire MARKETS SERVED: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, CS Store, Grocery

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


LATE WINTER 2016

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Mike Lester, President, The Melting Pot Restaurants

Turning up the heat How The Melting Pot is evolving to meet consumer demand

Also Inside: A special supplement to:

Another shade of grey Photography by DK Consulting Group, Inc.


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M

ike Lester remembers his first experience in a Melting Pot restaurant. He was on a date night with

his wife several years back. He recalls walking through the restaurant and seeing an office party of around 35 people in a private dining room with “dial-on-the-fun” meter turned up to 10. There were other people on a date night and parents with their kids – young and old.

Turning up the heat How The Melting Pot is evolving to meet consumer demand

Lester was hooked by the experience. It would only be a few years down the road that he would be named president of The Melting Pot, a unique and interactive dining experience that creates, what Lester says, are memories that can last a lifetime. With 126 restaurants across the United States and beyond, The Melting Pot is turning up the heat on its expansion plans. Defined by its 20/20 plan, the polished casual restaurant plans to add 18 domestic and 18 international locations by the end of 2020. Commercial Kitchens sat down with Lester to get his take on the brand’s evolving design and what guests can expect in 2016 and beyond.

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What’s the biggest item on your to-do list for 2016?

It’s hard to nail down the biggest one today. Our concept is a multi-faceted restaurant, so we are constantly learning how to think and react to what our guests want. For us, our to-do list is finding out what they like and don’t like about our facilities. Everything we do is based on listening to our guests so that we can provide them with the kind of dining experience they want today and in the future.

What are some of the ways that you do that?

We conduct a lot of focus groups. We use online surveys that can generate 75,000 to 100,000 responses via our restaurants. We take these surveys, and if we see something that is of interest to us; we can drill down into the specifics of that particular trend. For example, a couple of years ago, we saw that our customers didn’t like the pace of service, so we had to take a hard look at how we could improve our operational efficiencies.

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Today’s guests have higher expectations, but they don’t want to pay more for them. That’s a unique challenge, and it has never been more difficult than it is today.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

What do the focus groups tell you?

About a year and a half ago, we did a focus group in five markets across the United States – two focus groups per market. And what we found was that we had three different kinds of people. We had people who had never dined at a Melting Pot. We had loyalists – people who have dined with us many times. And we had people who had dined with us once in the last 12 months. We asked them what our restaurant of the future should look like. The responses we received were very interesting. We had a similar response across all the groups where they said they loved The Melting Pot for special occasions, but they also craved it on a daily basis. The consensus was that they wanted to keep the restaurant as a destination for those special occasions, but they also wanted us to create a space where they could go on a Tuesday night for cheese fondue, if they wanted. So that’s what we did at our newest restaurant that recently opened in Maple


My anticipation is that The Melting Pot Restaurants of the future will be a little more casual looking – a little more approachable and an inviting atmosphere for everyday use. Shade, New Jersey. We have community tables there, but we also have that area where they can celebrate those special occasions. My anticipation is that The Melting Pot Restaurants of the future will be a little more casual – a little more approachable and an inviting atmosphere for everyday use. You’ll hear livelier, more updated music, which is very important to our guests of the future. We are still positioning the brand as a polished casual restaurant, but we want it to be a little more relaxed. We will always offer our guests superior dining experiences – that’s just who we are.

Describe a typical day.

For me, it starts on the treadmill, where I review our shift surveys. These include what customers are saying in six or eight test restaurants that we track. We also hold many one-on-one and team

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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS meetings. Our processes are very thorough on all of our current projects – on any given day. We are international now, too, so I have to spend time reaching out to those teams, especially due to the time differences. We work very hard to correct and prevent mistakes in the future. Nobody likes to make mistakes, so we want to avoid making the same mistakes whenever possible.

Define some of the brand’s biggest opportunities moving ahead.

While we’re receiving extremely positive results from the experiences we provide our guests, the challenges, like for everybody else, is in addressing those cost pressures that are out there today in the restaurant space – Labor. Food costs. Transportation issues. Today’s guests have higher expectations, but they don’t want to pay more for them. We don’t ever shortchange their experiences, which means we have to deliver exceptional food and beverage, and hospitality. We have to recruit and retain the right kind of team members, and the right number of them in order to deliver on what we promise. We also have to do this in a way that is profitable for our franchisees. That’s a unique challenge, and it has never been more difficult than it is today.

Talk about your growth initiative.

We really support the idea of localization and encourage our franchisees to be a part of their local areas. We celebrate those differences in our store designs.

Most of our growth is focused on international. Our first restaurant in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in Riyadh recently opened. Last year, we opened our first restaurants in Dubai and Jakarta, Indonesia. We have several more that are in development in the Middle East. We also have a presence in Mexico and Canada. Other markets slated for growth include India, China, Brazil and South Korea. We are fielding inquiries for those markets. During the recession, those areas had the most interest for us. Now that the recession is waning, our lead flow domestically is starting to increase. Over the next couple of years, our domestic growth will be one or two units here and there, because it will take time for those leads to translate into units. Our 20/20 plan calls for us to open 18 additional international restaurants and 18 additional domestic restaurants by the end of 2020. Domestically, the company is seeking new franchisees nationwide, including select markets in California, Texas, New York, Iowa and South Carolina, among others.

What’s driving this growth on the international side?

On the international side, we can be more selective. We want to make sure we have the right partners, and that they have the right infrastructure for what we want to accomplish. They have to be able to support multiple units. We turn down more partners than we accept.

Talk about your approach to stores designs.

We launched a strategic initiative, where we take a year or two to go through and design the future looks we want to see. We call it the New Brand Prototype for The Melting Pot. Our goal is to support local, family-owned franchisees across the United States and the world. We are proud that we are able to do that in all of these different communities. We really support the idea of localization and encourage our franchisees to be a part of their local communities. We celebrate

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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TURNING UP THE HEAT

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

those differences in our store designs. So there is no prototypical Melting Pot out there. We have 126 locations, and they are all unique. They might have similar color schemes, table designs and artwork, but that’s about it. We like to work the local elements into the design. Take our newest location in Maple Shade, New Jersey. Some of the artwork is a kaleidoscope of aerial views of downtown Philadelphia. Not only were they interesting pieces to look at, but they were recognizable buildings that celebrated the Philadelphia market. We take this same localization approach at all of restaurants across the country. We’re taking everything into consideration. For example, all of our tables are fondue tables that have been bolted down to the floor, but we’re now looking at ways to be innovative while staying in line with codes and safety regulations. Other restaurants have been able to push tables together for a gathering, but we haven’t.

So that’s something you may address?

Our kitchens today are stable. We offer traditional hot fondue, so our tables work as a prep kitchen. Our guests prepare their food while sitting around the table with their friends and family. It is a very interactive experience.

As I mentioned earlier, we are working on improving the pace of the dining experience. Guests are looking for more convenience and want to dine with us on Tuesday night and get through dinner in a shorter timeframe. That’s why we have introduced two restaurants in the United States that have hot kitchens – St. Petersburg, Florida and Maple Shade. Here, our chefs prepare small plates of fully cooked entrées for our guests to enjoy. Even that’s unique. Our guests can still customize their meal with a variety of fondue dipping sauces. Right now, the guest metrics are through the roof. We are not certain what this may look like in the future, but we are trying to address some of the needs of our guests today.

What should customers expect to see from the brand in 2016?

Our guests will continue to see the efforts we are implementing for innovation. One of the things that I am very proud of is the flexibility we give to our franchisees. For example, years ago we had five cheese fondues in every restaurant. Today, we have six, and three of those reflect where the restaurant is and what their customers want. Staying in tune to with what our guests want and need will always be important to us. CK

One-on-One with... » Mike Lester

President, The Melting Pot Restaurants

What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

I love supporting locally owned businesses. I also love how much our guests are attached to our brand.

What was the best advice you ever received?

An old boss used to say, “Surround yourself with people who are a lot smarter than you, and then get out of the way.”

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? I’m lucky to be greeted with such great stories from our guests. How they met their husband or wife in one of our restaurants. It means a lot that our brand is so deeply connected to our guests.

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What are the three strongest traits any leader should have?

You have to be inspirational, have integrity and be predictable. It’s about always making decisions based on the needs of our guests and our team members.

What’s your favorite vacation spot and why? North Captiva Island in Southwest Florida. It’s only accessible by boat. It’s a great place to decompress.

What book are you reading now? “Rogue Lawyer” by John Grisham.

How do you like to spend your down time?

With our twins, who are heading off to college, and with my wife and our friends.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


Light is like a brick...

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architectural lighting design for the people of planet earth CIRCLE NO. 40


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Another shade of

GREY From bus depot to bustling diner

B

etween what was and what is to come remains a grey area of opportunity. In 2013, Felder & Associates of Savannah, Ga., recognized that opportunity and teamed up with New York–based firm, Parts and Labor Design, and Bloomquist Construction Co. Inc. of Savannah. Together, they breathed new life into an old space. Now a redefined restaurant, The Grey offers a unique food, wine and service experience.

By Krystal Hart

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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Between what was and what is to come remains a grey area of opportunity. In 2013, Felder & Associates of Savannah, Ga., recognized that opportunity and teamed up with New York–based firm Parts and Labor Design and Bloomquist Construction Co. Inc. of Savannah. Together they breathed new life into an old space. Now a redefined restaurant, The Grey offers a unique food, wine and service experience. After being vacant for nearly a decade, the historic Greyhound Bus Depot located in historic downtown Savannah was purchased by John O. Morisano, who was drawn to the architectural details of the property before he even decided what to do with it. Designed in the Art Moderne style of architecture by George D. Brown in the late 1930s, there still were many details in place. The glass façade from the terminal, cathedral ceilings and worn pink terrazoo floors were just some of the features preserved while renewing the old bus station. “All of the major spaces were still intact,” says Brian Felder, principal of Felder & Associates, which specializes in historic preservation, commercial architecture, adaptive reuse architecture, corporate interior design, high-end residential design, green building

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ANOTHER SHADE OF GREY

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Patrons still can enjoy some of the key features, such as original brick walls and stainless steel details from the early 1930s, when it was originally built.

and neo-traditional building. "We just needed the right team to put it all back together, not screwing up anything in the process as we added the layers needed for the restaurant with design elements that also didn’t fight with the existing fabric.” Felder is known for developing fresh practices to create contemporary buildings using classical principles. The project of remodeling a historic bus depot into an haute restaurant was no different from his norm. The fact that it had never been restored or modified left it fundamentally unspoiled. It had been a service station, a bar and a much-loved local restaurant as recently as 15 years ago, yet it had never been stripped of its original materials and spaces. Marisano had the vision and resources to complete the project. He also put together a team of preservationist architects, designers, engineers, a general contractor, subcontractors, tradespeople, a kitchen designer and chef who worked together while remaining sensitive to the importance of the project. “The intent was always to be respectful to the gem of a building that we had to work with,” Felder says. “Preserving the features, finishes and construction techniques while adding new features was a priority.”

Review and go ...

The process began with a review of the interior and exterior. Pictorial and documentary evidence was used to replace old or missing features and details.

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The existing rooms adapted nicely to a restaurant, allowing them to keep most of the original footprint. Inside of The Grey are four areas totaling 5,500 square feet – the bar in front, main dining in back, and two private dining rooms upstairs. The relatively small façade hides the depth and complexity of the building, but once inside, the mix of old and new is a destination of its own. The front diner/bar was always there. Photographs were used as inspiration to return it to the original layout. The large waiting room was perfect for the new dining room. The existing window from the dining room to the bar mimics the old ticket counter. The original kitchen was the same place as the new kitchen is now, but was expanded to take over the ticket counter and the luggage storage room/office. The former restrooms and bunk area for drivers now are home to the two private dining rooms. Patrons still can enjoy some of the key features, such as original brick walls and stainless steel details from the early 1930s, when it was originally built. The pink terrazzo floors almost are entirely unharmed. You even can see the spot where travelers stood to purchase tickets marked by the worn details near the former ticket booth. The interior mint-colored tile in the bathrooms remains, although some of it has been covered in the upstairs private dining room. The interior of the bar and restaurant were designed by Parts and Labor of New York. They conducted careful research of bars and speakeasies from the time period of the bus station. Their effort

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


in preserving the style is evident by how nicely the seating, lighting and other custom details fit into the space.

Outside, looking in

Outside, newer versions of the curved glass window replaced the old façade. Most of the window glass and frames are original. Even though neither Vitrolux nor Vitrolite still are in production, the previous owner purchased old pieces from Hungary in the past. A craftsman from the Midwest that was familiar with installing the product was brought in to install the glass. A marquee sign recreated to resemble the one that hung on the building completed the outside with another blaring reminder of what it used to be while inviting people in to experience the new use. Two of the biggest challenges were the re-creation of the glass façade and shoehorning new structural elements into the building to meet modern codes for floor loads. The Grey was a project of careful

Since its completion in 2014, the building and the restaurant have won numerous awards.

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COMMERCIAL KITCHENS integration of new plumbing, electrical and mechanical systems and a larger, high-output kitchen in an historic building. Felder & Associates overcame those challenges through careful as-built and cataloging of the historic fabric, team approach to the design and integration of systems and a true craftsman approach to replacement of the missing architectural elements. Despite the style being atypical of most Southern scenes, The Grey fits in nicely with the neighboring buildings and streetscapes, while offering a snapshot back into time along with a rare and excellent example of its style of architecture and food in Savannah. Since its completion in 2014, the building and the restaurant have won numerous awards, such as the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Georgia 2015 Design Award in Renovation, Special Judges’ Award from Hospitality Design (HD) magazine and

“Everyone involved had the common goal of authentic representation whether it was the design of the building or the food on the menu.” – Brian Felder, Principal, Felder & Associates Historic Savannah Foundation’s (HSF) “2015 Preservation Award.” “I think this results from the team’s approach to the project,” Felder says. “Everyone involved had the common goal of authentic representation, whether it was the design of the building or the food on the menu. The design is authentic to the historic building; the food to the South and somewhat to the time frame.” Felder says the authenticity is important to any venture like this being successful. “Even the naming of the restaurant harkens back to the black-white issues of the time. It is also, obviously, a shortened form of Greyhound, the original owner,” he says. Thanks to the collaboration that took place in 2014, the Grey is a fine example of the Art Moderne style that they can add to the firm’s portfolio. CK Krystal Hart is a freelance writer working with the Visibility Team at Carriage Trade in Savannah, Ga.

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Front and center

State-of-the-art waterjet process gives Utah’s state logo one-of-kind look By Ron Treister

A

n extensive group of engineers, consultants and other specialists were assembled to address the complex renovation/restoration needs of the historic Utah State Capitol. The project included base isolation and seismic upgrade to the overall building, including the dome and rotunda. As part of the seismic upgrade, an elevated terrace was added to the building. Because the state capitol building is situated on a bona fide seismic zone, the exterior stone and terra cotta were reinforced to seismic standards and repaired or replaced as needed. The mechanical, electrical, and data and communications systems were completely replaced. The interior restoration included replacement of skylights and reestablishment of original spaces, colors and ornamentation. The Capitol, which was divided into four restoration zones, was connected to the East-West buildings through a below podium tunnel. To add even more closure and a sense of visual panache to the building, the State of Utah’s “seal” was created via a stateof-the-art waterjet process, resulting in one of the most brilliant representations of a state’s logo ever to be seen.

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FRONT AND CENTER stone and metals, along with poured-inplace epoxy terrazzo. After all materials were set in place, the floor logo was polished to a shining patina and is permanently bonded to the substrate. “We went all over the country looking for the right stone material to be used in the Utah Statehouse rotunda," says Jim Belilove, founder and CEO of Creative Edge Master Show. "Our stone logo re-creation had to be spot-on relative to which colors of stone were to be used. We just didn’t want to select stone that meets the criteria of Utah’s state logo colors; we wanted durable stone that would stand up to daily foot-traffic for the next 100 years."

More than 1,000 pieces of 25 different color representations of natural stone (and three types of metal) were precisely cut to fit together as a giant, precision puzzle. This circular logo with a diameter of 20 feet was first sent out for bid in early 2013. The building team was exploring ways to best achieve this landmark, full color visual. Ultimately, the project was awarded to Wisconsin Terrazzo of Onalaska, Wis., and Creative Edge Master Shop of Fairfield, Iowa. After the official artwork of the logo was sent to the fabricator, it was scanned using cutting-edge technology that resulted in a computer’s interpretation of what color stone, in what size and shape, should be placed in specific positions to optimize visual perfection. Of the stone material that was selected, the most prominent decorative element, the “beehive,” was represented by an American stone, Utah’s own Honeycomb Onyx. The fabrication technique blended waterjet-cut

Keeper of the seal

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CIRCLE NO. 45

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The Lieutenant Governor of Utah, Spencer J. Cox, also is the official "Keeper of the Seal." Cox was on-hand to verify that all details and requirements were met at the dedication, Jan. 4, 2016… which was the 100th anniversary of Utah’s statehood. The logo, which is located under the main floor of the rotunda, in Utah’s “Hall of Governors,” will be seen and appreciated by hundreds of thousands of visitors every year. The Utah State Capitol Preservation Board oversaw all elements of the renovation and the artwork/selection of materials for this emblem. Director Allyson Gamble was at the helm from start to finish, ensuring that every square inch of the major renovation was done to the highest standards and original intent. Stephanie Angelides, collections manager of the board, also was a major contributor relative to the floor emblem’s authenticity and historical antecedents. “The unique aspect of this project was the exact matching of the red, white and blue flag colors in terrazzo with the combination of waterjet cut stone and poured and polished terrazzo," says Jason Zarwell of Wisconsin Terrazzo. "All of this worked very well and I can assure everyone that this will be a permanent, enduring feature of this beautiful building.” CCR Ron Treister is president of Communicators International, a Jensen Beach, Fla.-based marketing firm. He can be reached at rlt@communicatorsintl.com.


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2016

Schedule: February 25th Atlanta, GA March 31st Dallas, TX April 21st Charlotte, NC May 12th Minneapolis, MN June 16th Los Angeles, CA at Warner Bros. Design Studio

July 7th Boston, MA July 28th Denver, CO August 18th Nashville, TN September 22nd New York City, NY December 1st Phoenix, AZ For information about membership or events, contact Kristen Corson, kristenc@ccr-people.com • 770.990.7702 For information about co-sponsoring an event, contact David Corson, davidc@ccr-mag.com • 678.765.6550

www.ccr-people.com www.ccr-mag.com CIRCLE NO. 47


LATE WINTER 2016

ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

SUPPLEMENT

Shootin’

Gold for

Inside Creede, Colo.’s hopeful Wild West LEED show

Shawn Metzler, controls superintendent, installs a ground wire

A special supplement to:

ALSO:

The Clean Up


Shootin’

Gold for

Inside Creede, Colo.’s hopeful Wild West LEED show By Dan Vastyan

Hours away from their shop, Rogers & Sons technicians work out of van trailers and hotel rooms

Creed, Colorado’s new K-12 school is hoping for LEED Gold certification

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T

he silver belt buckle reads, “Sheriff,” as it glistens in the afternoon sun. Lawman Fred Hosselkus stands outside the courthouse, looking down Main Street from under the brim of his five-gallon hat. It’s tourist season in Creede, the only time of the year that the onehorse-town hustles.

Today, it’s the only town in Mineral County, nestled in a crescent-shaped bowl at 9,000 feet above sea level, between two mountain ranges. Bob Ford, the man who shot outlaw Jesse James in 1882, was killed in a gunfight in Creede. Despite its colorful history, Creede’s current residents maintain a relatively normal existence in one of Colorado’s most beautiful and remote areas. As of this year, they even have a new K-12 school, complete with modern, high-efficiency HVAC systems and an architectural style that fittingly blends wood, metal and stone.

The journey begins

At the new school, heavy insulation joins high-efficiency equipment and local building materials on the drive to gain LEED credits. General contractor, Neenan Archistruction, broke ground on the 37,000-square-foot school in May 2014. In July, Rogers and Sons Inc., arrived on the job in force. The design/build HVAC firm out of Denver handled all facets of the heating system in-house, from sheet metal to controls.

The 530-mile round trip to Creede was one of several unique challenges they’d encounter over the course of the project. “It’s not our first long distance rodeo,” says Aaron Ellis, head of field operations for Rogers. “We cover the whole state, so working out of hotels and trailers isn’t rare.” With LEED Gold certification being sought, energy efficiency and low lifecycle costs were major criteria. Weather can be fickle in Creede. If a cold front moves in, the mercury can drop by 40 degrees F in under an hour, and temps as low as -30 degrees F aren’t unheard of. The job was made easier by a Taco iWorx control system that features field-configurable sequences, yet doesn’t require programming. It allows all components to work in tandem while providing web access. Primary heat is supplied by four, 399 MBH Triangle Tube condensing boilers and nearly seven miles of in-slab radiant tubing divided into 47 zones. Four RenewAire ERV systems supply ventilation to 42 zones per ASHRAE 62.1. Sharing main trunk lines with the ERV units are propane-fired Modine duct furnaces, which further temper makeup air during the winter. Given Creede’s mild summers and lack of humidity, cooling is provided only to one meeting room and an IT closet.

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Remote controls

Aaron Ellis, head of field operations, installs a zone valve relay, which is isolated from the controller

“The advantage of an iWorx system hits home for the building owner out here in the boondocks.” – Shawn Metzler, controls superintendent at Rogers & Sons.

“The advantage of an iWorx system hits home for the building owner out here in the boondocks,” says Shawn Metzler, controls superintendent at Rogers & Sons. “When they realize they don’t need a separate controls contractor – at the time of installation or going forward – they see value. Because of our use of iWorx controls, we’re a onestop-shop: HVAC and controls.” Metzler says there’s no code to write. “You don’t need special tools or software. Compared to a DDC system, you eliminate a lot of hours typically spent programing and commissioning.” Pre-programmed modules are used on equipment, zone valves and dampers throughout the building. All components report back to a touch-screen LCI (local control interface) in the boiler room. Each module self-identifies on the network when first turned on. “Through the design phase, we used Taco’s iWorx Selection Wizard, which gives us a bill of material, sequence of operation, wiring diagram and submittals,” Metzler says. Another selling feature for the school was that the first cost for an iWorx system is the last cost. There are no continuing fees associated with it and software upgrades are free. Proprietary systems, including LON, BACnet and Modbus, interface easily with iWorx. “If we have any technical questions, we call Peter Moore, at McCoy sales, or directly to Taco support,” Metzler says. “Both have answered questions on the weekend.”

Radiant for the Rockies

A Taco iWorx control system serves each component of the intricate HVAC system at the new Creede school

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To satisfy the building’s 1.2 million BTU load, the well-insulated slab contains three-quarter-inch Uponor PEX at 12-inch centers. Each classroom and common area has a small iWorx thermostat linked to the main network. “The individual zones will ‘vote’ upon calling for heat,” Metzler says. “Because these zones are small, we’ve set up the controls so that any single zone can’t fire the boilers. Only numerous T-stats calling simultaneously will cause one or more of the boilers to start running.” The four wall-hung boilers lead, lag and rotate, while providing 25 percent redundancy: a necessary insurance measure for a facility with epic winters and a half-day drive from the nearest supply house.


A division of

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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • SHOOTIN’ FOR GOLD

Modulating, separated combustion duct furnaces made by Modine help temper makeup air when the outdoor temperature drops below 10 degrees F

“It was the first time I’ve purged a system with a fire truck. It was the fastest fill we’ve seen.”

Despite more time and effort, dozens units with capacities of 4,000 CFM. With of remote manifolds were hidden above the VFD-powered fans, the units can modulate ceiling to eliminate access doors. Each stainas low as 15 percent. less steel manifold utilizes a low-kW Taco “A pre-programmed occupancy Zone Sentry zone valve. schedule ensures constant minimum venWhen it came time to fill the radiant tilation while the building is in use,” Ellis system in the winter months, technicians says. “A VAVD iWorx module gathers data found themselves without water. The ground from CO2 sensors in each room. When the was frozen solid, so utilities couldn’t be run level reaches 1,000 PPM, the ERVs ramp to the building. They called the fire departup accordingly.” ment, where Robert Hosselkus, the Sheriff’s To supplement each ERV, Rogers & brother, serves as fire chief. Before long, a Sons installed a separated-combustion red tanker truck showed up at the site. Modine duct furnace. “When the outdoor “It was the first time I’ve purged a air temperature falls below the ERVs’ ability system with a fire truck,” Ellis says. “It was to maintain supply air at 69 degrees F, the Modine furnaces pick up the slack,” Metzler the fastest fill we’ve seen.” says. “We expect this to occur when outdoor “If ever there was a place for outdoor reset – Aaron Ellis, head of field operations, Rogers & Sons temps hit 10 degrees F.” control, this is it,” he says. “Radiant supply temThe duct furnaces were selected peratures will be anywhere between 80 degrees based on their flexibility, both in regard to installation and heat F and 120 degrees F. I think the record low in Creede is -45 degrees F.” input. The separated combustion units supply a temperature rise For the same reasons, the school’s DOAS (dedicated outdoor air system) is robust and flexible. anywhere between 20 degrees F and 100 degrees F, can modulate between 40 and 100 percent, and are available in sizes between 75 and 400 MBH. DOAS: ERV with a sidekick Installed downstream of the ERV core, the modulating duct Two mechanical mezzanines house a variety of ventilation components furnaces will fire only high enough to bring the makeup air to neutral that are completely independent of the hydronic heating system. building temperature. With this setup, efficient ventilation is provided Four RenewAire ERVs serve various parts of the building. Two without raising the load on the radiant system at all. smaller units capable of up to 2,500 CFM each are used, as are two

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(L-R) Rogers & Sons employees, Shawn Metzler, controls superintendent, Aaron Ellis, head of field operations, Calvin Turner, foreman, and Chase Turner, apprentice

When it came time to fill the radiant system in the winter months, technicians found themselves without water. The ground was frozen solid, so utilities couldn’t be run to the building. Against the grain

Despite the marathon commute, the debilitating cold in early stages of the project, and architectural considerations that made the job more complex, Rogers & Sons finished its work three weeks ahead of schedule. The building was ready for students in the beginning of the 2015/2016 school year. “This job went smoothly because of two key factors,” Ellis says. “Careful preparation and familiarity with the products we selected.” Rogers & Sons has been serving the far reaches of Colorado since 1978 and has grown accustomed to the challenges that the big, wild territory can conjure up. “Creede needed a new school,” Hosselkus says. “The old one is a log, and built in 1952. Some of the wood has rotted beyond repair. The new school is plenty big and fancy enough for Creede, but it looks like it’ll serve the town well for a mighty long time.” FC

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Dan Vastyan is a regular contributor to Federal Construction Magazine. CIRCLE NO. 49

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The

Clean Up New tax case good news for environmental remediation design contractors

M

aintaining a healthy environment today is a responsibility that we owe to the generations of tomorrow. In today’s sophisticated world, modern technical capabilities, access to vast stores of information and ever increasing analytical capabilities allow us to gain detailed insights about the environment in order to better protect it for the future.

Part of this initiative involves cleaning up spill sites in a responsible and cost efficient way. Design and engineering firms and environmental professionals use a number of technologies in the environmental remediation of polluted sites. Remediation efforts can range from large, expensive projects, such as the Durango mustard waste water spill in 2015, to smaller, less costly projects, such as cleaning up a highway accident in which gasoline, oil, or other hazardous materials have been spilled.

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By Charles R. Goulding, Michael Wilshere & Andrea Albanese


Designing experiences Architecture | Branding | Interior Design | Engineering Retail | Restaurant | Hospitality | Office | Residential stantec.com/commercial

Design with community in mind CIRCLE NO. 50


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • THE CLEAN UP

Given this wide range of projects, individual sites can present technical challenges, due to a variety factors, including the size of the spill, the dynamics of the site, the depth of remediation required, the effect of specific chemicals on the environment and the nature of the contaminants involved. Many environmental pollution cases involve creative solutions and innovative approaches to problem solving. Bioremediation, which breaks down contaminants through biological processes, is one of the most active areas of research and development. Innovation efforts in this sector are on par with cancer research and software development. These efforts are the result of contributions from the federal government, academia and private institutions – each realizing the importance of innovative solutions when cleaning up a contaminated site. Federal and state R&D Tax Credits are

Remediation efforts can range from large, expensive projects, to smaller, less costly projects, such as cleaning up a highway accident. available for design and engineering firms, as well as other companies and organizations innovating within the environmental remediation sector. The recent R&D Tax Credit case – Geosyntec Consultants Inc. v. United States, 776 F.3d 1330 (Eleventh. Cir. 2015) – provides guidance as to when environmental professionals should claim R&D Tax Credits.

The R&D Tax Credit

Enacted in 1981, the federal Research and Development (R&D) Tax Credit allows a credit of up to 13 percent of eligible spending for new and improved products and processes. Qualified research must meet the following four criteria: • New or improved products, processes, or software • Technological in nature • Elimination of uncertainty • Process of experimentation

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GSB, Inc. ArchItectS & PlAnnerS Turning Visions Into Reality Since 1979. Hospitality | CommerCial | entertainment CiviC | residential | eduCational | Community CIRCLE NO. 51

®

gsb-inc.com


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • THE CLEAN UP

Eligible costs include employee wages, cost of supplies, cost of testing, contract research expenses, and costs associated with developing a patent. On Dec. 19, 2014, President Obama signed the bill extending the R&D Tax Credit for the 2014 tax year. As of this writing, proposed tax extender legislation would extend the tax credit through Dec. 31, 2016.

Geosyntec was successful in completing the expansion and as a result, sought R&D Tax Credits for the qualified research expenses (QREs) incurred. The IRS challenged their position based on a technicality, however, it was clear that the activities involved were eligible R&D activities as the court stated, “like the Fairchild contract, each of the tasks required research, development, and testing.”

Geosyntec Consultants Inc. v. United States

Another project challenged by the IRS involved the evaluation of a system for remediating contaminated groundwater underneath a warehouse. The site was previously used to manufacture and store weapons and radioactive material. Although also challenged by the IRS, the R&D activities for this project involved the following: • The performance of laboratory bench tests to evaluate the feasibility and performance of enhanced in situ bioremediation (EISB) for groundwater cleanup • Preparation of a report describing its methodology, tabulating the results, interpreting the data collected, and discussing site conditions and potential pilot-test designs.

The Geosyntec case of 2015 provided a favorable ruling for consulting and engineering firms that provide environmental remediation services. Well known consulting and engineering firm, Geosyntec Consultants Inc., sought a federal income tax refund of more than $1.6 million in R&D Tax Credits and were claimed for expenses made on a number of projects completed between 2002 and 2005.

Federal and state R&D Tax Credits are available for design and engineering firms, as well as other companies and organizations innovating within the environmental remediation sector. One such project involved design and construction support services for the expansion of a landfill within its existing footprint. Since the landfill sat on a soft foundation, its capacity for vertical expansion was limited. A previously commissioned composite stability analysis of the landfill demonstrated that expansion might be possible and Geosyntec took on the challenge in following seven tasks: 1. Site studies 2. Design work, including site design 3. General services, including permit applications and construction drawings 4. Preparation of an operation and maintenance manual 5. Construction-related services, including on-site supervision and quality assurance monitoring 6. Post-construction services, including as-built drawings and a project completion report 7. Additional analyses, modeling and testing

Similar to the landfill expansion project, the IRS did not question the nature of the activity, as it was clear to all parties involved that similar types of projects were targeted by Congress under the enactment of the R&D Tax Credit regulations.

Geosyntec was successful in defending a significant portion of their claims and for environmental remediation professionals, the holding laid out guidelines for the type of activity that will qualify for R&D tax credits. In addition to the Geosyntec activity described above, other eligible activities typically include: • Treatment design and site mapping • Prototype development • Evaluation of alternative cleanup methods • Smart filter technology • Ex situ thermal desorption • Thermal off-gas treatment • Hot gas decontamination • Plasma high temperature recovery solutions

Environmental professionals, construction companies, and design and engineering firms often encounter technical challenges when remediating a contaminated land site. Solutions to these challenges often involve technical uncertainty, a process of experimentation, state-of-the-art technology, and sophisticated chemical processing. Federal and state R&D Tax Credits are available to help stimulate and support these innovative solutions. FC

Charles R. Goulding, attorney and CPA, is the president of R&D Tax Savers, an interdisciplinary tax and engineering firm that specializes in R&D tax credits. Michael Wilshere is a tax analyst with R&D Tax Savers; and Andrea Albanese is a project Coordinator.

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CIRCLE NO. 52


A view to the year Survey shows companies more optimistic, but worries about staffing abound By Doug Rieder

A

n improving economy usually is a positive for most businesses. But an upsurge in business carries its own

risks, which must be managed as much during a sagging economic period. Perception drives reality, which drove the creation of the initial Sterling Risk Advisors “Construction Risk Sentiment Index” in early 2015.

To see if the situation had improved, we took another look at risk sentiment in the construction industry during the fourth quarter of 2015. The results? Construction companies were growing more optimistic about their risk exposure at the end of 2015. Their “risk sentiment” dropped to a 4.4 (on a scale of 1 to 10), down from 5.2 in Q1 2015. It also shows that while profit margins continue to improve, companies are more concerned than ever about staffing, with access to adequate numbers of employees deepening its hold as the No. 1 risk to businesses. As a risk-management and insurance brokerage firm, we spend our days helping companies identify and respond to potential risks to their business. Risks can be challenging to identify and tend to change over time, so a minor annoyance today could threaten your business tomorrow.

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Restaurant | Hotel | Convenience Store | Travel Center | Retail CIRCLE NO. 53


A VIEW TO THE YEAR

Construction companies were growing more optimistic about their risk exposure at the end of 2015. A few years ago, a slowdown in the new business pipeline was the biggest risk for many construction companies. Today, the pipeline is robust, but labor to work them has become a pressing concern. To identify and track what construction companies consider a threat, we created our “Sterling Risk Sentiment Index,” based on a twice-yearly survey of construction professionals. By going directly to the source, the Index can give us some clarity about how construction professionals view the industry’s trajectory.

Highlights from Fall 2015 Sterling Risk Sentiment Index

(Note: Where noted, comparisons are with the February 2015 Sterling Risk Sentiment Index) • The No. 1 risk issue overwhelmingly is staffing, with construction companies struggling to find enough employees to handle projects – 60 percent choose this, up from 44 percent. Economic issues ranked a distant second at 20 percent. • Staffing again was the issue companies reported they felt least prepared to deal with right now (35 percent). Health care costs were next (16 percent), followed by computer hacking (14 percent). • 71 percent say their company’s exposure to risk is lower than a year ago, a substantial improvement over February’s 55 percent. We think this is attributable to better margins and availability of projects also noted by respondents. • 74 percent of respondents say they have formal strategies in place to manage their risk, slightly down from 78 percent in February. Half say they don’t have those strategies clearly written down. • 72 percent have reviewed their risk management plans in the last 12 months, up from 69 percent.

The new results showed we already are seeing changes in the industry. The good news is that most construction contractors continue to see a significant improvement in their perceived risk profile, as indicated by the improvement in the perceived risk index. That’s alongside numbers that show a steady uptick in business, consistent or higher margins, and consistent or increased contingencies in their project budgets. But, with the increase in booked business, the issue of staffing pressure becomes even more urgent. In our first survey, 44 percent of construction firms marked staffing pressure as their top concern, and now that number has risen to 60 percent. The survey noted other key issues of concern, including economic issues, cash flow issues, HR issues, increased competition and government regulation.

The data from our risk sentiment index shows us that even when economic conditions are improving, risk still can emerge and change rapidly. As the risks shift, your risk management strategies must adapt to meet them. Adjusting your business plans to address shifting risks, and updating your risk management strategies at least annually are smart moves that can pay off for your company. More specifically, look for ways to make your current employees more productive through technology, training or simply different ways to do things (like offsite fabrication or assembly). Re-evaluate your insurance on a regular basis and look for ways to cultivate industry talent. CCR

The Fall 2015 Sterling Risk Sentiment Index surveyed 84 top executives in Atlanta’s construction industry using SurveyMonkey.com. The survey was conducted between August and September 2015. For more information about Sterling Risk Advisors, please visit: www.sterlingriskadvisors.com or call 678-424-6500. Doug Rieder is president and principal of Sterling Risk Advisors in Atlanta, where he heads the firm’s Construction Services Practice. You can reach him at drieder@sterlingra.com.

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Commercial

JANUARY/FEBRUARY, 2016 • VOLUME 2 • ISSUE 2

A McINTOSH GROUP PUBLICATION

Asking the right question to transform accessibility

INSIDE: Operation Automation

Why a PWO System Automation works

ADA Compliance: The Top 5 ADA Compliance Myths You Should Know

ADA Perspective: Inside The Center Experience

ADA Q&A

If You Have Questions, We Have Answers

Retail Trends

Standing Out Above the Crowd


ARCHITECTURE

PROTOTYPES

ACCESSIBILITY

SITE SELECTION

PROCESS

The McIntosh Group mcintoshtransforms.com

918.585.8555

info@mcintoshtransforms.com


PUBLISHER LETTER

Research. Frame. And go ... One of the most rewarding aspects of working in architecture is our shared approach to solving problems through design, and then seeing the results.

Lanny McIntosh, AIA

In today’s world, we have developed and harnessed innovative technologies that allow us to create solutions never before imagined.

Publisher

The McIntosh Group, LLC

Editor Allison Broyles

Managing Editor

Michael J. Pallerino

Art Direction

Brent Cashman

In architecture school, we’re taught to approach challenges by first researching and framing the problem. Often, the problems we believe we have are not in fact the real problems at all, but rather symptoms of a deeper issue. We must think critically to define the real problem, and from there, we can explore options. Then, the final step is effective implementation. This process can be referred to as “design thinking”. It’s what architects do every day. But it’s utility extends beyond building design. It is the answer to solving almost any challenge in business or society. Why not apply design thinking to other problems? The process essentially is the same. Research and frame the problem, and then explore solutions to solve that problem. Collaborate with the client (or our community or partners) to identify options, test, and then narrow it down to one preferred path. Then implement. In today’s world, we have developed and harnessed innovative technologies that allow us to create solutions never before imagined. I like

Commercial Transformations is published by The McIntosh Group, copyright 2016 All rights reserved For more information, contact Karen MacCannell KarenM@McIntoshTransforms.com 918-585-8555 www.mcintoshtransforms.com

Thank you for reading, Lanny McIntosh, AIA, LEEP AP BD+C Founding Principal/CEO LannyM@McIntoshTransforms.com

CONTENTS ISSUE 2, 2016 pg 4

ADA Compliance: T he Top 5 ADA Compliance Myths You Should Know

pg 5

ADA Perspective: Inside The Center Experience

pg 6

That One Thing

Editorial & Design by: F&J Publishing 678-765-6550

to question how design thinking and technology can team up to not only solve building program problems, but also challenges across business and society in general. It can apply to things like software design. Branding. Project management. Program management. Signage and wayfinding. Accessibility. Sustainability. Planning for resilience. Solving neighborhood, community and region-wide problems. In this issue of Commercial Transformations, we explore how technology and design thinking can tackle program management, change management and accessibility. We have the ability to use our skills and innovative technologies for various kinds of good. We can use it to make lives easier and to make us better at our jobs. I hope the stories outlined in this issue inspire you to examine your business and personal challenges, and create a lasting, innovative solution.

Asking the right question to transform accessibility

pg 10 Operation Automation

Why a PWO System Automation works

pg 14 AskBrad

If you have questions, we have answers. AskBrad is an ADA Q&A designed to be your resource for Title III ADA questions.

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ADA COMPLIANCE

The Top 5 ADA Compliance Myths You Should Know The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design generally is not considered a “sexy” topic, but it is an important one. While many property owners have experienced first-hand how an ADA lawsuit can have a detrimental impact on a company’s finances and reputation, others still are unclear on what exactly the ADA Standards are and why they must be followed. Truthfully, the ADA is a sleeping giant that just is beginning to stir. When you live and breathe these compliances every day, you start to get a beat on the consistent series of myths out there today. Here are five on the top you should know: Myth No. 1

“I’ve got a building permit; my architect said it was fine.” Let’s clear up something right here – a building permit does not mean anything to the ADA. Why? The main reason is that the ADA is a Civil Rights law, not a building code. Because of this, it’s outside the wheelhouse of most architects. While only a licensed architect is qualified to make accessibility determinations (according to a recent court ruling in Kirola v. The City and County of San Francisco), it is important to make sure your architect specializes in the ADA.

Myth No. 2

“My store is grandfathered.” The biggest misconception about accessibility is the notion that your store is “grandfathered.” We hear this all the time. “We don’t have to

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Myth No. 4

“People with disabilities do not come in my store.” If you don’t have many individuals with disabilities coming into your store, it might not be welcoming to them. In addition, consider the fact that not all disabilities are apparent. Visual impairments, hearing impairments and a wide range of mobility challenges are all considered disabilities. In the United States alone, 51.5 million people have some kind of disability. And with the Baby Boomers aging, that number is increasing rapidly. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the discretionary spending of individuals with disabilities totals $220 billion. Serving this population is just good business.

Myth No. 5

“Not In My Backyard! ADA lawsuits don’t happen here.” Just because it hasn’t happened yet doesn’t mean it won’t. ADA lawsuits are on the rise, and they’re starting to include previously quiet states such as Idaho and Nebraska. A scary phenomenon that’s emerged over the past few years is that of “drive-by” lawsuits. Individuals and attorneys looking to make easy money are targeting businesses with obvious barriers such as improper accessible parking spaces. One recent lawsuit targeted a small convenience store in Idaho. The plaintiff was working with a serial ADA litigator, a law firm based all the way in Pennsylvania. Accessibility is not a local issue.

Start planning now. Don’t wait for a lawsuit to happen. Make the necessary changes on your own time and budget now.

“We can’t afford to make our site accessible.” If you can’t afford to fix it, you definitely can’t afford the lawsuit if you don’t. The average ADA lawsuit settlement is $12,000. In addition, you most likely will have to pay the plaintiff’s attorney fees. And, you’ll be required to fix the problem. Bypassing the lawsuit actually saves you money. Additionally, planning your barrier removal in phases is a cost-effective solution that allows you to save money by prioritizing the more pressing ADA issues and scheduling projects according to your plans for other updates.

Myth No. 3

do anything, we’re grandfathered.” Write this down: There is no such concept as being “grandfathered” when it comes to the ADA.

So, what is the solution? Start planning now. Don’t wait for a lawsuit to happen. Make the necessary changes on your own time and budget now. By doing this, you not only will save yourself a costly settlement and legal fees, but you will be providing better service to all customers.

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ADA PERSPECTIVE

Inside The Center Experience At The McIntosh Group, we pride ourselves on being a national leader in ADA Compliance. As an intern architect at McIntosh, I have the rare opportunity to truly make a difference in my work, helping businesses better serve their customers and protect their assets, and helping individuals with disabilities have the same experiences and opportunities others are afforded in day-to-day events. By Bethany Husmann, Assoc. AIA But unlike high design, accessibility surveying does not feel glamorous. We travel – a lot – from location to location making painstaking efforts to correctly measure slopes, evaluate accessible routes, assess door weights, etc. It’s a lot of data collection. We often survey multiple locations a day, which can add up to mind numbing amount in a year. While we are always aware deep in the back of our minds that the job we do is very important and meaningful to the end user, in the midst of the daily grind, it is easy to wonder why a fraction of an inch of noncompliance could ever cause an issue and begin to believe that at the end of the day it just doesn’t matter. But the truth is that it does matter. It matters a lot. In 2015, The McIntosh Group entered into a charitable partnership with The Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges in Tulsa, Okla. The Center was created in 1959 to serve the needs of persons with disabilities. Because of the work we do in ADA Accessibility, it seemed like a natural fit. Our Accessibility Team attended the Center’s first “The Center Experience,” a half-day workshop aimed at showing participants first-hand what it is like for individuals with various disabilities to accomplish certain day-to-day tasks, go through workouts and/or rehabilitation, and participate in sports. This workshop hit home for all of us, and I can say without a doubt that it reinvigorated my passion for what I do. My experience at The Center brought that dormant understanding of the value of

our job rushing to the forefront. Helping our clients provide a safer, easier to navigate environment for individuals with disabilities is a very important and meaningful. Those fractions of inches that can seem so trivial during a survey can cause a wheelchair not to fit or cause a visually impaired person to trip. Life with a physical disability is a challenge every day, and doing what we can to make life easier for us all should never be underestimated. After all, it could easily, in an instant, become a challenge any of us could face.

Life with a physical disability is a challenge every day, and doing what we can to make life easier for us all should never be underestimated.

(L to R): Patrick Golden, NCIDQ, CASp, Al Pagano, Assoc. AIA, Jesse Husmann, AIA, Stephen Bowen, Assoc. AIA, Bethany Husmann, Assoc. AIA

Bethany Husmann, Associate AIA, is an intern architect at The McIntosh Group and is part of our Accessibility Team. Before joining the McIntosh team in 2011, Husmann graduated with a bachelor’s degree in architecture from the University of Arkansas.

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That One Thing By Lanny McIntosh & M. Bradley Gaskins

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Asking the right question to transform accessibility

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Research into device-assisted mobility is one of the most relevant things that we in the design industry can be doing. While there are a good number of proponents of universal design (see sidebar, “Defining the Seven Principals of Universal Design”) for new buildings, many businesses wait until they are hit with a lawsuit to make a barrier removal plan to achieve compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). For ADA title III entities, public accommodations must remove structural and communication barriers where it is “readily achievable” to do so.

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THAT ONE THING

In fact, barrier removal itself is a reactionary practice. As a society, and as an industry, we can be more proactive and ethical by not only incorporating Universal Design elements in our new buildings, but also by supporting research and advancement in the field of mobility. Take a look at the way other systems work. We don’t build bigger cars, and then go back and expand highway lanes to fit them more comfortably. That would be enormously expensive. Instead, car companies make sure their models fit the current roads. We can do the same for mobility devices. Currently, the companies that make mobility devices are, in general, making them bigger and bigger. A partner at our firm, whose sister is wheelchair bound, shared a story about how his parents had to buy a large SUV in order to fit her new wheelchair in the trunk. They found the other wheelchair options were not comparable

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As a society, and as an industry, we can be more proactive and ethical by not only incorporating Universal Design elements in our new buildings, but also by supporting research and advancement in the field of mobility.

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in quality with the newer, bulkier model. But a bigger wheelchair means a bigger turn radius, and therefore other mobility challenges and limitations. Dr. Edward Steinfeld, a professor of Architecture and Director of the Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDEA Center) at the University of Buffalo, has proposed a design addendum to the ADA extending the required turn radius in a space from 60 inches to 67 inches. While the goal is noble – to create a better experience for those in wheelchairs – perhaps there should be more to this story. For those who are wheelchair bound, the time is ripe for a breakthrough in the mobility device industry. While medical science is working to solve the real problems, the design industry should direct and fund research aimed at breakthroughs in device technology that will improve the lives of our fellow citizens.


Research into device-assisted mobility is one of the most relevant things that we in the design industry can be doing.

Defining the 7 principles of Universal Design The term Universal Design was coined by Ronald L. Mace, founder and former program director of The Center for Universal Design at North Carolina State University. In 1997 Mace collaborated with a group of architects, product designers, engineers and environmental designers to develop the Seven Principles of Universal Design. They include:

1. E QUITABLE USE The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities.

2. F LEXIBILITY IN USE The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities.

3. SIMPLE AND INTUITIVE USE Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the user’s experience, knowledge, language skill s, or current concentration level.

4. P  ERCEPTIBLE INFORMATION

Device-assisted mobility transformation, paired with continuous improvements in building science is one thing we all can do to change the trajectory and bring equity that much closer. Designing new and altering existing buildings and other facilities of public accommodation to be accessible is only one objective. Research and development with respect to mobility is another. The technology is there. Take a look at the iBOT Mobility System, a gyroscopic wheelchair that allows its users to stand up or even climb stairs. Check out the ergonomic and thoughtfully designed Stryker Prime TC mobile chair, designed by the late architect Michael Graves, himself disabled, who had a passion for improving experiences for hospital patients. This is realistic in our society today. Let’s skip a generation of only moderately effective solutions and create something now that is truly transformational.

The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user’s sensory abilities.

5. T OLERANCE FOR ERROR The design minimizes hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions.

6. L OW PHYSICAL EFFORT The design can be used efficiently and comfortably with minimum fatigue.

7. S  IZE AND SPACE FOR APPROACH AND USE Appropriate size and space is provided for approach, reach, manipulation, and use regardless of user’s body size, posture or mobility.

Lanny McIntosh, CEO and founder of The McIntosh Group, is licensed to practice architecture in 48 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Bradley Gaskins, principal and COO, is one of the nation’s foremost experts on accessibility. He is registered to practice architecture in 14 states, including Hawaii and Alaska.

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Operation Across franchise corporations, strong brand standards are vital. But ensuring construction compliance across all franchises can be a daunting task to manage. The answer may be as simple as automation. Take the case study of a major quick service chain’s recent Prototype Rollout.

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Automation Why the PWO System Works

By Lanny McIntosh, AIA

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OPERATION AUTOMATION

As part of this PWO process, the brand’s team can track trends among its franchisees so that it knows what features are being used the most and what can be phased out. The brand was about a year into a major system-wide re-image program and needed help managing its prototypes. It had dozens of different prototypes being managed by several architects, but couldn’t keep up with the changes coming from corporate. It also was dealing with a high level of inconsistency and problems with quality. We observed it had a small number of base building types with different options for the level of remodel for each base building type. Each option, for each base building was being managed as an independent prototype.

The McIntosh Group developed what we call an “automated deductive” – “smart” prototype – whereby, each base building prototype has all options as part of the prototype file. McIntosh uses web-enabled automation to compile a clean version based upon the options that are chosen. The enabling technology is an online order form – or PWO (Production Work Order) – that both corporate and franchisees could use to order its prototype drawings. The users go to the link, sign in, and then select which base building and major option packages they want. They can select any one of several dozen other options.

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For each option, we illustrate a cost range, so the franchisees may make informed decisions. Once they are satisfied with their order, they click “send,” and we get an email indicating the order has been placed. Next, we run a quick review of the order and initiate the automation. At the end, McIntosh also verifies that the automation was completed correctly. When complete, we upload the files to the online collaboration server in the designated project folder. Each upload includes the native AutoCAD files and a PDF for its Site Adapt Architect to use in its work. As part of this PWO process, the brand’s team can track trends among its franchisees so that it knows what features are being used the most and what can be phased out. This helps increase its efficiency. The data is displayed in a dashboard that corporate can access from a desktop, tablet or smartphone.

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[Change management – The art and science of continually improving a brand] The McIntosh Group also has helped the quick service chain by developing a change management tool that allows both sides to mutually track each change request as it surfaces. This helps assign it to a change cycle, communicate the information that is needed, identify the prototypes and disciplines that are impacted, and agree on the potential and actual fee and time implications.

This one tool has immeasurable impact in that it brings transparency, discipline and accountability to the process of change, allowing the company to manage internal expectations and allows McIntosh to manage our resources as well. The chain remains a leader in the way it utilizes the PWO System technology to manage prototypes and projects generated through this process. Because it can more efficiently manage its prototype program, the chain can put more resources toward making its brand the best choice in quick service restaurants.

Across franchise corporations, strong brand standards are vital. But ensuring construction compliance across all franchises can be a daunting task to manage.

The lowdown on PWO System Using the Project Work Order system, Corporate can: • Create consistency and quality in prototypes and construction documents

• Have accountability across change management process

• Easily order the appropriate prototype drawings

• Manage internal expectations

• Track which items are being ordered

• Greatly increase speed of delivery of construction documents to franchisee’s site adapt architects

• Make informed decisions regarding budget

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ADA Q&A Are handrails required if the curb ramp exceeds 6 inches?

– Derrick, North Carolina

Handrails are not required at curb ramps, which are a different element than ramps. Curb ramps are covered under Section 406, while ramps are covered under Section 405 of the 2010 ADA Standards. There are no requirements for handrails in Section 406 curb ramps, while ramps are required to have handrails when the rise is greater than 6 inches per Section 405.8. The definition of a curb ramp is a short ramp cutting through or built up to a curb. There is no specification for what the height of the curb is, however, one should use reason when determining what may or may not be a curb.

In a high-rise building, what is the ADA requirement for door pressure to open and if assist is required?

– Marvin L., New Jersey

There are several unknowns to the question, so I will make each assumption and apply the appropriate standard. Under the ADA, if the door is an “Interior” door, the maximum opening force is 5 pounds. If the door is an “Exterior” door, there is not opening force requirement. An automatic or assist door is not required in either situation under the ADA, but can be an appropriate accommodation under a request to provide a Title I Employment accommodation. Of course, the owner/operator can at any time decide that the installation is good service for any visitor or user and install a closer.

Do service dogs need to be harnessed? If so, does it need to be labeled “service dog” on it?

– Tom F., USA

Under ADA, service animals must be harnessed, leashed or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal’s work or the individual’s disability prevents using these devices. In this case, the individual must maintain control of the animal through voice, signal or other effective controls. Staff cannot ask about the person’s disability, require medical documentation, require a special identification card or training documentation for the dog, or ask that the dog demonstrate its ability to perform the work or task. The service animal does not need to have identification on the animal such as a collar, leash or vest.

The local hospital recently redid the front doors with a revolving door that makes it nearly impossible for a wheelchair or scooter to enter. Do revolving doors meet the ADA standards? – Ken G., St. Augustine, Fla. Revolving doors cannot be a part of an accessible route per ADA Standards Section 404.2. This usually is handled by placing a 36-inch swinging door adjacent to or in very near proximity to the revolving door.

What is the difference between an Access Specialist and an Architect? An access specialist is someone who is familiar with the Americans with Disabilities Act and can help you identify barriers to accessibility at your facility that may limit the way individuals with disabilities can utilize your space. An architect is a licensed professional that can make accurate design recommendations. Every architect should be familiar with ADA, but many are not specialists in this area. It is important to hire an architect that specializes in ADA. In the 2014 court ruling for “Kirola v. The City and County of San Francisco,” the court questioned the qualifications of the plaintiff’s Disability Access Specialist expert witness. The report reads, “[The plaintiff’s Disability Access Specialist] is not an architect… only licensed architects are qualified to be experts in disability access standards.”

If you have questions, we have answers. AskBrad is an ADA Q&A designed to be your resource for Title III ADA questions. To submit a question, visit us at www.mcintoshtransforms.com/ask-brad.

Brad Gaskins, AIA, CASp is a partner at The McIntosh Group and a leading expert on accessibility and Title III ADA Standards. He also is a continuing education provider and regularly leads presentations, seminars and webinars for professional groups regarding accessibility nationwide.

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Disclaimer: “AskBrad” is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It is provided with the understanding that Brad is not an attorney and is not engaged in rendering legal or other professional services. Additionally, the ADA is subject to interpretation of the courts and the Department of Justice. If legal advice or other expert professional assistance is required, you must seek competent legal and professional advice.

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RETAIL TRENDS

Standing Out Above the Crowd In today’s highly competitive retail industry, every store must stand out from the crowd. From omnichannel marketing, to social media selling, and smartphone applications, retail trends are reflecting a more connected and educated consumer base. However, in all of these platforms, perhaps the most compelling element that speaks both to Baby Boomers and Millennials is customer experience. The layout of the store can have a big impact on how enjoyable the shopping experience can be, and we’re seeing the evidence in our clients’ design trends.

The layout of the store can have a big impact on how enjoyable the shopping experience can be, and we’re seeing the evidence in our clients’ design trends. In the article, “Retailers Prepare for Aging Baby Boomers,” on VOAnews.com, retail expert Georganne Bender references some customer experience changes that drugstore chains already are making to improve experience for elderly customers, a rapidly growing population. “They’re re-setting their counters, not putting things too high or too low, [and] they’re putting carpeting in the store,” she told the publication. Some retail stores take this notion even further by providing exceptional amenities to

all customers. According to a story by S.C. Bhatia in Retail Management, elements of store design and layout should “provide customers with a sense of comfort and sense of belonging” by including features such as lounge areas and refreshments. We have seen this trend recently in some of our high end retail clients who provide areas for customers to sit and chat amongst themselves or with sales representatives while enjoying a cool beverage. Our client Kit and Ace provides a “supper club” table in its stores. The spaces include a large, informal supper table meant for bringing people together, set in a comfortable oasis in the middle of the shop that provides customers a place to sit and look at products or just relax. It also serves as a table for special events, including a literal monthly “supper club,” where artists, influencers and people doing creative things come in and have dinner inside the stores. Kit and Ace also provides a carbonated water dispenser for customers to quench their thirst while shopping. In a few stores, we are designing a small coffee shop within the retail space. But lounge areas and coffee shops take up valuable space for showcasing products. Bhatia suggests that retailers can help offset costs by harnessing technology. By using modern distribution systems and operating procedures, non-selling space can be minimized. The size of retail stock rooms and backstock areas have been shrinking for some time. Technology has allowed retailers to know what items are being sold and at what rate. With this information they are better able to ship only those items needed to restock the merchandise on the sales floor.

By Ted A. Reeds II, AIA and Bruce Horgen, Assoc. AIA According to vend University’s “Retail Trends & Predictions for 2016,” merchants will adopt instore mobile devices such as kiosk centers or even sales associates carrying their own smartphones and tablets to assist shoppers with questions. This is a service that was perhaps first seen in Apple Stores, and has spread to other tech retailers. Customers are greeted as they enter the space and quickly have their needs accessed so that they can be routed to an associate specializing in their need. While there are the traditional point-of-sale areas, each of the associates are also able to close your purchase at any location in the store, using their mobile device to a credit or debit card, and then can email your receipt to you. This saves the customer time, reduces paper receipts, and more quickly places the customer with the specific service they need. But not only does this method increase efficiency; it decreases stress. Smaller checkout lines reduce the sometimes crowded and hurried feel that traditional rows of lines near the entrance or exit of retail spaces can create. By using the right technologies and creating consumer-centric store layout, retail spaces can become places that customers want to go for an easy and fun shopping experience. Ted A. Reeds II, AIA, is a Senior Associate for The McIntosh Group. His broad project experience covers restaurants, lodging, offices, urban mixed-use commercial and residential buildings, and healthcare facilities. Bruce Horgen, Associate AIA, is an Associate Principal for The McIntosh Group. His expertise is in project, program and rollout management.

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PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE

Go time

Handling successful projects in occupied space

By Scott Offermann

C

onstruction projects provide their own unique challenges under the best circumstances. When you add the additional challenge of construction in occupied space, the simplest tasks can become the hardest to deliver. Unexpected interruptions, continued rescheduling and the added client management requirements create undue stress on employees and sub-contractors quickly eroding profits. When undertaking a project that includes occupied space, taking the time to focus on the additional requirements will provide the foundation for a project being delivered without undue stress, on time, on budget and with greater client satisfaction. It also will help preserve the anticipated profits. The preparation for work in occupied space begins at the first engagement. During the first and subsequent job walks, it is important to understand the occupant requirements, cultural employee concerns and any landlord requirements that could cause concern – all of which could delay the project and add additional costs. Recognize that what is considered normal working conditions in the construction industry can be interpreted as hazardous to the occupants. Excessive noise, noxious fumes and excess dust can be reasons for employees to be absent or obstruct the efficient flow of work. When you’re scoping the project, use past experience to identify client sensitivity and think about some additional measures that will help mitigate the impact. There are some very simple things that can be done to reduce occupant impact. These include after hours and weekend scheduling for loud and intrusive work, the use of containment and negative pressure areas to minimize the occupant impact from noxious odors as examples. In addition, it is also important to recognize the requirements of the landlord, other tenants in a multi-tenant building and local municipalities’

requirements for accessing the job site, exterior staging of supplies and equipment and special permitting. If there is a requirement to have material removed from loading docks, entrances or parking areas before a certain time of day, make sure you have the appropriate time and manpower to move the material before the deadline. This may mean bringing on additional temporary staff, adjusting the delivery times or utilizing sub-contractor labor to assist. All of these are easily achievable, however, they may incur additional cost. Identifying these requirement early will allow inclusion into the initial proposal. Much like staging the contractors and equipment during a project, the thought put into minimizing the impact to the occupants will proved a beneficial return on investment. Sub-contractors and suppliers are a key contributor to success. When dealing with sub-contractors, make sure they understand the requirements and conditions of the occupants and landlords. Validate that they have the ability to accommodate the requests. Discuss the options and their experience. Oftentimes, they have encountered similar situations and can provide alternate options to achieve the requirements. Sub-contractors and suppliers must build these additional requirements into their bids as well. Every player in the project needs to protect their profits. Identifying and clearly documenting the additional requirements will prevent surprises during the

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PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE project. Verifying that the subcontractors and suppliers understand the requirements and protect themselves before the project begins will eliminate the much dreaded discussion of who will absorb the cost of the added burden. Today, when bids are being led by procurement teams, it’s essential that this type of information be clearly identified and highlighted. When communication with the client, make sure they understand where the additional cost is coming from and explain the benefits of these additional requirements. This include those items that can be delivered without additional cost as well as the higher cost of accommodating occupants needs. The inclusion of these requirements can be used to highlight your company’s commitment to the customer and the success of their business. This will provide them the information required to accept the higher

Construction in occupied spaces can be accomplished with minimal impact to the project and with increased client satisfaction with some forethought and planning.

cost or to clearly make the commitment to operate without the added conveniences. When the client accepts the risks associated with a lower cost, it is important to document. If is far too easy for customers to claim they were not made aware of the option, and therefore should not pay the additional cost. The documentation is will provide protection to you and the client in the event the project encounters problems. Construction in occupied spaces can be accomplished with minimal impact to the project and with increased client satisfaction with some forethought and planning. Understanding the unique client requirements that create the challenge will help the contractor identify the solutions and resources needed to overcome them. Incorporating these solutions and costs into the project will achieve a heightened positive perception from the occupants and client. CCR

Scott Offermann is the critical operations manager for Cushman & Wakefield. You can reach him at Scott.Offermann@cushwake.com or on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/soffermann.

CIRCLE NO. 54

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 55


Turning

metal into

money

144

By Keith Fisher

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016

H

ow do you take a pre-engineered 1960’s metal building (aka a giant chicken house) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland that's not your typical structure that would attract developers, and turn it into something of value like a shopping center, Class A space?


Not an easy task, especially when the idea is to redevelop the space instead of demolishing and building new. One example of a successful redevelopment of something that was once an eye sore or just a large metal box with not much going for it happened in Salisbury, Md. Salisbury, the largest city in the state’s Eastern Shore region, is sandwiched between the resort town of Ocean City and the state’s capital, Annapolis, situated on the Chesapeake Bay and part of the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area. From the very beginning, the project was not without its challenges. The team working on the venture knew the property owner had tight purse strings and made it clear that upfront investments would be kept to a minimum. The situation called for creativity and strategic thinking, and planning when being tasked with leasing a speculative space.

JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

145


TURNING METAL INTO MONEY The thought is this: Until people see a shovel in the ground, it isn’t real. Once ground is broken and activity is visible, the thought process shifts from “it will never happen,” to “I have to get in on it or else I am going to lose out.” The property owner knew he had to keep brokers at an arm’s length as long as possible to develop a plan to attract retailers to want the opportunity to get in on the space. Attracting tenants when the actual building is a metal box was done through architectural renderings that were able to show retailers what the space “could” become and how it can fit their business needs. You sit them down with the drawing and say, “Look at this design. Your space will be right here with two entrances and access to a very heavily traveled road, close to a university and not far from the city’s downtown business district.” It doesn’t hurt to place signage in the front of the property for people to see as they drive by that activity is happening – in real time. It is no longer an eye sore. It is no longer an idea. It is going to be a “something.” This also adds another level of credibility to the project and potential for business success. But what really is enough when the original structure is not only deteriorated, but also doesn’t fit the mold for a developer’s wants and needs? Especially when the idea behind the project is a redevelopment as opposed to a demolition and new construction

A DISTINCTIVE CHOICE Our business partner’s needs are our first and most important priority. The depth, consistency, and dependability of our construction teams are all crucial to this commitment of excellence. Our outstanding track record right across the North American construction market is built on: • Relationships Built on Trust • Communication • Cost Management • Schedule Management • Workmanship / Quality • A Partnership Vision In bringing together all these assets in one team we are able to offer an integrated approach to the most demanding projects that we face together Building Your Future. “Doing the Right Thing” is more than four words – it’s who we are and have been for over 30 years. CIRCLE NO. 56

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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TURNING METAL INTO MONEY

venture. Saving money for the investor was the simple answer to that question in this particular instance. Within the redevelopment plan, the construction team was able to keep the foundation, brick wall, roof and super structure, which saved tens of thousands of dollars. A price tag of $600,000 for the shell reconstruction for a 10,000 square foot building was a steal. That’s not to say there weren’t other exterior challenges that presented themselves along the way. One was the front driveway which originally existed as a grass lot. And parking. The site could only be and do so much because parking was so limited. The development team took the case to local city officials to ask if they would be willing to work with them in regards to the parking code, which would open up more space for additional spots. The answer they faced was, “Why can’t you just build somewhere else? Somewhere with more parking options?” This was not the solution they were hoping for. Since the preexisting structure was directly in front of a railroad, they came up with a plan to find more space in easements and build a wrap-around driveway that ended up adding 22 parking spots to the property. Because the railroad only needed 18 feet from the center of the tracks, the plan worked. A lease agreement was made between the railroad company and the property owner to add 22 parking spots. The team sought input from local leaders on the idea of the easement between the railroad and the property owner. Officials thought at first that it wouldn’t work, however after continued discussions they agreed to allow this alternative solution to the property owner. The decision not only effected this property, but multiple others along the railroad, too.

The right answer

The redevelopment of this particular space into a shopping center on the south side of Salisbury was the right answer for everyone involved

as the benefits were obvious. It allowed for all parties involved to be socially and environmentally responsible, because it was not a scenario where valuable farmland was being developed to make room for a shopping center. Repurposing the space was good for the owner, development team and the community it existed in. It also made sense in regards to the actual location of the space. The original structure sat off Business Route 13 on Salisbury’s south end. This part of town is filled with rooftops, jobs and institutions (specifically Salisbury University and Peninsula Regional Medical Center), which means people. An equation that equals a prime location for better business. This was the very reason Salisbury’s Salad Works owner Jamie Nichols took steps to open a second location on this side of town. The space was attractive from the beginning, especially knowing that the Top 10 Salad Works in the nation are located in close proximity to universities. Nichols knew Salisbury was a two store market, and three years after taking over the north end Salad Works, he was one of two retailers that bit and made the commitment to take space in the redeveloped shopping center on the south side of town, along with Jersey Mike’s and Long & Foster Real Estate Co. What made this venture work in the end was a team approach. Through coordinated contributions of time, resources, investments and brain power, the team redeveloped a pre-engineered metal structure and, not only transformed it into an attractive and prosperous shopping center, but also saved the developer a considerable amount on his original investment. The business grad student driving down Business Route 13 on his way to his stats class doesn’t need to know the behind-thescenes story of the South Salisbury Boulevard shopping center across from where his class is. What he does know is that a meatball sub from Jersey Mike’s is calling his name come lunch time. CCR

Keith Fisher is the founder of Fisher Architecture in Salisbury, Md., which serves developers, building professionals, homeowners, medical professionals, commercial realtors and government agencies.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


2016 KE YNOTE SPE AKE R

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!

KAREN KATZ CEO AND PRESIDENT, NEIMAN MARCUS GROUP

Registration is now open for GlobalShop, the retail design community’s largest annual store design, merchandising, and shopper marketing trade show and conference. At GlobalShop you can discover new products, attend educational sessions, and benefit from both scheduled and impromptu visits with peers, partners, suppliers, colleagues, and friends.

THE EVOLVING STYLE OF RETAIL

• Visit globalshop.org for a complete listing.

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COME WONDERING CIRCLE NO. 58

SPONSORED BY: PRESENTED BY:

PRODUCED BY:

I N C O O P E R AT I O N W I T H :


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Texas Roadhouse

Howell

$1,000,000.00

7,100

New Construction

Q2 2016

Di Paolo's Italian Ristorante

Penns Grove

$875,000.00

3,500

Addition

late Q1 2016

Popeyes

Hamburg

$780,800.00

2,560

New Construction

Q2 2016

Dairy Queen

Ellsworth

$530,000.00

2,612

New Construction

Q2 2016

Hannaford Supermarket

Waldoboro

$1,300,000.00

19,000

Renovation

Q2 2016

L.L. Bean

Cranston

$2,500,000.00

17,000

Renovation

Q3 2016

Cumberland Farms

Hartford

$1,200,000.00

3,000

New Construction

late Q2 2016

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE:

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE: Bell Works

Holmdel

$200,000,000.00

2,000,000

New Construction/Addition

Q2 2016

Four Corners Millennium

Newark

$410,000,000.00

1,250,000

New Construction/Addition

Q3 2016

Loftel Boston

Boston

$20,000,000.00

71,456

Addition

late Q1 2016

104 Canal Street

Boston

$30,000,000.00

47,355

New Construction

Q2 2016

Harrisville Inn Phase 1

Keene

$4,000,000.00

15,000

Renovation

Q2 2016

Value Place Hotel

Cherry Hill

$5,715,500.00

45,000

New Construction

Q1 2016

Holiday Inn Express

Grand Island,

$800,000.00

72,600

Renovation

Q3 2016

Beals Memorial Library

Worcester

$1,500,000.00

20,000

Addition/Renovation

Q2 2016

Erie Community College Mathematics Building

Williamsville

$10,000,000.00

57,000

New Construction/Addition

Q2 2016

Educational Services Center

Spencerport

$10,800,000.00

15,200

Addition

Q2 2016

Suny Albany Building 27

Albany

$32,000,000.00

98,000

Renovation

Q2 2016

Quirk West Building & Site

Hartford

$5,000,000.00

103,000

Renovation

late Q1 2016

SPCA Animal Shelter

West Seneca

$6,500,000.00

55,800

New Construction

Q2 2016

Crouse Hospital Emergency Room Addition

Syracuse

$23,000,000.00

86,000

Renovation

Q2 2016

Hunterdon Pediatric Associates Reading Ridge Center

Flemington

$700,000.00

4,710

Renovation

Q1 2016

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


CIRCLE NO. 59


PRODUCT SHOWCASE

CALENDAR

Metropolitan Ceramics® Canton, OH

MARCH 31 METRO® PAVERS

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Commercial Construction & Renovation People Dallas, TX Location TBD www.ccr-people.com

APRIL 21

Commercial Construction & Renovation People Charlotte, NC Location TBD www.ccr-people.com

MAY 12

Commercial Construction & Renovation People Minneapolis, MN Location TBD www.ccr-people.com

JUNE 16

Commercial Construction & Renovation People Los Angeles, CA – Warner Bros. Design Studio www.ccr-people.com

CIRCLE NO. 60

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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AD INDEX

CCR • AD INDEX Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


COMMERCIAL KITCHENS: INSIDE CAPTAIN D’S DOWN HOME APPROACH

WHY EFFECTIVE SCHEDULING IS KEY TO SUCCESSFUL RENOVATIONS

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How Oahu’s Turtle Bay Resort went ‘green’ 5 benefits to hiring a security design consultant Check out our

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Exclusive Inside: Building in the new age of bricks Check out our Flooring & PM guides How biofilters are greening today’s indoor spaces

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SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES Call 678.765.6550: Call anytime. If no one answers, leave a detailed message and be sure to include your name, phone number and/or email address so we can contact you if we have any questions. Or write: C  ommercial Construction & Renovation P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 Moving?: Please let us know eight weeks in advance to make sure you do not have interruption in service. Remember to include both your old and new contact information. Duplicate Issues?: If you are receiving multiple copies of Commercial Construction & Renovation, please let us know. And please include information from both mailing labels. A subscription to Commercial Construction & Renovation is your subscription to better-design, better-built and better-maintained facilities.

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155


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Into the wide, blue yonder

T

hose of us who travel for business know it is not

Knowing that these recruits were going to go through a life changing expeglorious for those who do not. As one of Delta Airlines’ rience with Army Boot Camp, I decided I would give my seat up to one of those un“Million Milers,” I have put many legs and time sitting suspecting future service men or women. I boarded the plane, sat down in on planes all over the USA in order to shake hands with current my exit row window seat that I always book, and waited. One by one, the and prospective clients. recruits passed me by. Just when the plane was full, a young recruit stopped, looked at me, and said, “Sir, I think you are in my seat?” I looked up at him, and asked, “Are you going to boot camp?” He replied "Yes sir.” So I gave him my first class upgrade and told him to enjoy the flight down to Texas. “Without people like you,” I said, “we have no freedoms.” He looked dazed, and then responded, “Are you sure, sir?” “Totally,” I said. “You go and enjoy that first class seat.” Many of the passengers around me seemed shocked by what was going on, but said nothing. Two hours later, we landed and parked at the gate. As I got off the plane in San Antonio, there were a bunch of My recent trip down to San Antonio for passengers waiting for me to come off the our 6th Annual Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit was special for me. jet way, a few of them came up to me and As “Million Milers,” I usually receive an said it was the nicest thing they had seen upgrade to first class when flying Tuesdays in a long time. thru Thursdays. Delta Airlines notifies me To be honest, I was humbled, but I before arriving at the airport that there is didn’t deserve the thanks. The recruits on a first class seat waiting for me or find out that plane deserve all the thanks. when I board the plan, as was the case When you least expect it, life can truly with my San Antonio flight. be rewarding. I will remember that recruit's On this trip, as we were waiting to board, saw that there were face for the rest of my life. about 60 new Army recruits going to boot camp in Texas via San Antonio Hope all of you had a relaxing holiday season and that the International Airport. They all looked so young. Some looked ready to take New Year is starting off on a positive note for your firm. on what lied in front of them, while others looked scared to death trying We wish you much success, good health and prosperity in to figure out what they got themselves into. the rest of 2016, and hope to see you at our CCRP 2016 events Sitting in first class is not that big of a deal. On long flights, you are around the country and at our Fall Executive Retreats. served a meal, but on most flights, you get a larger seat and free cocktails. Since I don't drink, it's not a freebie I can enjoy, but is appreciated. Safe travels and God Bless America.

When you least expect it, life can truly be rewarding.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JANUARY : FEBRUARY 2016


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CIRCLE NO. 62


CIRCLE NO. 63

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR Jan Feb 2016  

CCR Jan Feb 2016