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“Z” MAN BEHIND THE TURNTABLES P. 56

The Sky’ s the limit TEXAS STATE AVIATION’S PRIVATE PILOT COURSE WAS OPEN TO 20 STUDENTS, SHE WAS THE LONE WOMAN IN THE CLASS.

THE CODDLING OF COLLEGE MINDS P. 58 APRIL | 2016

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GAME FACE SHOT

CONTENTS

April 2016

Taking To The Sky P. 62 Earning her wings while closing the gender gap in a male dominated air space.

BOBCATFANS 52 Everybody Wants Some! Give us the tidbits!

54 From NFL To Opera House Meet Lawrence Harris

57 Fashion

Festival season is here

58 Political Correctness

Taking coddling to the extreme

60 The Equestrian Jumping horses

66 San Marvelous Kitten Salicia Kol

ONLY @

DJ “Z” P. 56 Keeping the late night parties going. Teach us how to spin.

10 Celebrating

years

On The Cover

Texas State Aviation pilot Kendra Wells Photo by Parker Thornton

EST. 2006

EN

TERTAINMEN

EST

2006 AND

50 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M

C U LT U R

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T


NEW BUSINESSES: APRIL 2016 54TH STREET RESTAURANT & DRAFTHOUSE Not a lot of casual chains claim to make their food from scratch but that’s the appeal here. 54th Street is made for both a bar crowd and a group looking to chow down on appetizers, steaks, burgers and more. Over 50 draft beers also on tap daily, served ice cold with real-time keg temperatures on display.

1303 South IH 35, San Marcos | 512-396-5400 NEWK’S EATERY From the founder of McAllister’s Deli comes a new chain that promises to evolve its menu as consumer tastes and new ingredients evolve. Newk’s serves up fresh made salads, soups, sandwiches and pizzas.

THE GROWLING Since Texas craft beers have become hot, what better than a Texas craft beer bar? We’re sold. A total of 27 Texas craft beers are represented, ready to drink at the bar. Better yet, you can buy growlers (plastic, glass or porcelain), cans or bombers to go. 700 North LBJ Drive Suite 111, San Marcos | 512-216-6044 NATE’S AT BUDA MILL & GRAIN Set to open soon, Nate’s is a cafe and bar featuring 19 craft beers and nitro-infused iced Cuvee coffee. Pastries and food made from scratch, wine, cocktails and a porch with Wi-Fi connection.

306 South Main Suite 101, Buda | 512-523-8256

1285 South IH-35, San Marcos | 512-992-8667

A LITTLE BIRD TOLD ME @LMC4SANMARCOS

#SMTX indie film awesome footage in bw today whoah amazing script @SERVESANMARCOS Helping #serveSanMarcos as they cleanup the river! #txst #txstate #smtx @PASTRAMEE 

2:54 so happy I’ma get to go to #TXST with quez next year

BO BC AT F ANS APRIL 2016 51


BF TIDBITS

New TXST Class Ring Options Voted on By Students. The New Design Has Not Yet Been Finalized.

THE TRANSFORMATION OF A TRADITION TXST students were notified via email that there was “a legal challenge” with the design of the right side of the official TXST class ring. Jayme Blaschke, director of the Office of Media Relations, said officials adopted new logos when the university changed its name to Texas State. One of the adopted logos was the intertwined “T”, “S”, and a star with “State” underneath; similar to a trademarked Texas A&M logo. In the official class ring “State” was not included and when the university applied for a trademark of the logo last year, the Secretary of State denied the application. Students were given the opportunity to vote on a new design to replace the “T”, “S”, star logo. “The student surveys and on-site votes were pretty telling,” Gene Bourgeois, provost and vice president for academic affairs, told the University Star. “I think students who have voted really supported the SuperCat logo design.” Bourgeois said the new design has not been finalized or sent to the ring manufacturer. Officials still have to consult with other stakeholders before finalizing the design. Bourgeois says the new class rings will most likely be given at the December 2016 or Spring 2017 ring ceremonies. Original TXST Class Ring

BANANA WORLD RECORD Young tech entrepreneurs and San Marcos residents launched Gnack, a “micro-influencer” advertising app at SXSW in Austin with a fun and unique promotional event. “Our goal was to break the world record for most people dressed as bananas in one location,” says Chief Revenue Officer Chico Tirado of Banana Bash. The existing record, yes there was an existing record, was 629 people dressed as bananas. Within 48 hours of launching the event page, Banana Bash went viral reaching nearly 200,000 people. Jumping in on the excitement, Del Monte Fresh Produce stepped in and sponsored the banana suits. “The purpose of the event was to bring together the community and bring awareness to the mobile app, Gnack, which allows Instagram and Snapchat users of all sizes to earn cash and free products for posting about their favorite brands,” says Tirado. The Gnack team is proud to say the event was a huge success. 671 people (and one dog) dressed in banana suits, breaking the world record. The Gnack team has submitted the event to Guinness World Records for approval. .

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New Hookah On the Block

Taylor Henry, Ericksen Stewart, and Ryan Castillo were seniors

pursuing entrepreneur degrees at Texas State University when they decided to take entrepreneurship out of the classroom and into reality. The trio joined forces and founded Bad Habits, a new hookah bar experience in San Marcos in the former Los Cucos building (1617 Aquarena Springs Drive). Bad Habits AKA “purveyors of fun

Southeast Texas University March 30th, Richard Linklater’s highly anticipated latest film “Everybody Wants Some!!” was released in theaters. Set in 1980 at the fictional Southeast Texas University, the film follows a new member of the school’s baseball team during the weekend before classes start. The ensemble cast — composed almost entirely of young men — romps through parties, chases women, shoots the breeze and plays surprisingly little baseball. Linklater said “Everybody Wants Some!!” is the “spiritual sequel” to “Dazed and Confused,” his 1993 breakout film about a group of bored teens in Austin looking for fun on the last day of the school year. The movie was filmed in 2014 in several Central Texas towns but the majority of outdoor scenes were

filmed in San Marcos. Numerous scenes take place on TXST’s campus, the Square, and the San Marcos River. Some on campus scenes were filmed while classes were in session, creating a lot of excitement and a social media buzz from students witnessing a bit of Hollywood at home. In recognition of Linklater’s immense talent and commitment to Texas as seen in “Everybody Wants Some!!” the Texas Film Commission inaugurated the Richard Linklater Texas Film Trail, highlighting 16 filming destinations from some of his most iconic features. Included on the trail is the San Marcos River where one of the most poignant scenes of “Everybody Wants Some!!” takes place.

and good will” has a bold and unique interior design with large murals and neon lighting. “From the off the wall art work, to our ‘Bad Habits’ chalk board wall, our team is focused on bringing the customer an experience to remember,” says Henry. The new 18+ hookah spot has set itself apart with some unique features. In addition to traditional hookah guests can try ‘fire hookah’ where bowls are heated on charcoal. Bad Habits is also the first oxygen bar in San Marcos and is BYOB with $5 cover. At 10:30pm on Thursdays, Five Star Entourage Party Busses pick up patrons at Bad Habits and transport them to 6th Street in Austin, making it an ideal pregame spot for college night.

The adventures of high school and junior high students on the last day of school in May 1976.

BO BC AT F ANS APRIL 2016 53


BF ALUMNI

THE NEW YORK TIMES PRAISED HARRIS AS “A BARITONE WITH INCREDIBLE DRAMATIC INTENSITY AND ENORMOUS VERSATILITY.”

FROM GRIDIRON TO OPERA HOUSE

FORMER NFL OFFENSIVE LINEMAN TRAINED TO BECOME A PROFESSIONAL SINGER AT TXST. BY EDMOND ORTIZ

LAWRENCE HARRIS, FOR MUCH OF HIS NEARLY DECADE-LONG PRO FOOTBALL CAREER, KEPT IN SHAPE BY WORKING ON AN OIL PLATFORM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO DURING THE OFFSEASON. OCCASIONALLY THE BARREL-CHESTED HARRIS FOUND HIMSELF SINGING AN OPERA TUNE ATOP AN OIL DERRICK, HIGH ABOVE THE WATER. “I worked in one of the most dangerous places,” Harris said. “But when I sang on top of the derrick, it was 100 feet above the drilling floor. It was just me, God, and the stars.” It was a sign of things to come for Harris, a Texas State University alumnus who has been a professional opera singer for more than 25 years. But Harris fondly recalls his younger days filled with music and football. Harris’ family included bluegrass gospel singers who often recorded together. A younger Harris would grab a radio and listen to Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts. “I’d take the radio into the closet and listen to the Saturday afternoon shows. Opera was something 54 B OB CATFANS APRIL 2016

that intrigued me with the music and stories,” he said. He participated in football and choir in high school, and had private choir lessons. Harris went to Oklahoma State University and was drafted into the NFL by the Houston Oilers in 1976. During his first year in the NFL, Harris and fellow rookies had to take part in a talent contest in front of the veterans. There, he showcased his developing singing skills, performing “I’m a Little Teapot” and “Oklahoma!” before singing an Italian tune. His powerful voice shocked teammates. Although a series of injuries eventually forced Harris to retire from football, he realized singing opera while working as a real “oiler” was a new calling in life. Harris spent two years in an opera program at then-Southwest Texas State University, where he met his future wife, Renee Guerrero. Harris remembers trying out for the role of Marcello in a student staging of “La Bohème” at SWT. “It was a wonderful experience. It showed me that this was where I belonged,” he said.

Harris and Guerrero moved to California, then New York City as their musical careers took off. In time, he landed leading roles in Puccini and Verdi operas. The New York Times praised him as “a baritone with incredible dramatic intensity and enormous versatility.” Harris has exhibited his skills worldwide for diplomats and heads of state, and back in Texas in small, intimate performances, including one at Texas State with his wife. He has become a renowned recording artist in the opera world. Harris is also committed to community outreach. He and his wife run From Football to Opera, an educational program based on his life. Harris demonstrates to students and the public the power of imagination through singing and storytelling. “The kids make a connection to sports and opera this way. It’s about telling a story. Each of them has their own story to share,” he said. Harris has also trained to become a vocal therapist, specifically helping autistic individuals. He’s also finishing a master’s degree in psychology.

Harris spent more than seven seasons in the NFL, and played briefly in both the Canadian Football League and United States Football League.

’s p u o S On

Harris has sung the National Anthem at two Green Bay Packers games and one Oklahoma State football game.

, UE Q S O I H B UMB R S I G E F AW IANA OWD R C UIS CH O M A he O W L E Harris still lovesLfootball,Lbut C has no regrets about & the path he N I Lharrisopera.com AB has traversed. “I’m really happy VA A about how my life and career worked out. When I’m doing therapy and working with kids, I’m thrilled I can bring everything together,” Harris said. “I’m three for three in careers.”


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BF Q&A

J

“Z” MAN BEHIND THE TURNTABLES JOE ZAPATA MAY NOT BE A HOUSEHOLD NAME BUT HE IS MORE FAMILIAR TO BAR-HOPPERS AND TEXAS STATE STUDENTS THAN THEY REALIZE. WE CAUGHT UP WITH JOE, OR Z AS HE IS BETTER KNOWN, THE RESIDENT DJ AT VERANDA ROOF TOP PATIO, TO FIND OUT WHAT MAKES THE MAN BEHIND THE TURNTABLES SPIN. BY JONATHAN RODRIGUEZ ON GETTING STARTED I come from a music background on my dad’s side of the family. My dad plays the drums, my grandpa plays the guitars and accordion and he’s blind! I have an uncle that plays the bass and another that plays the drums. I wanted to be a DJ in high school but I was too involved in sports. After I graduated I saved a little money and bought a pair of turntables. This was back when you had to have the ear for deejaying because you mixed actual records. There were no laptops or any of that stuff back in the day.

56 B OB CATFANS APRIL 2016

I’d like to give a special shout out to DJ Skillz. He’s from San Marcos and when I first started he was the biggest DJ. If it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t be deejaying today. ON HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED I’ve been deejaying for 13 years. Back then, it was hard. People used to pay for talent and skills but nowadays everybody wants to be a DJ and it has become cheaper to find one. All you have to do is have a laptop and press the sync button that helps you mix the song, which I never use. I don’t believe in that. The talent has died down, there’s a lot of upcoming DJ’s that will do it for a cheap cost. Also the internet has made music easy to find for free and to download. Every payday I used to go to Austin, actually go to a record store and dig through crates to find the hottest record. I really miss doing that. That was the fun of it, having that record when other DJ’s didn’t. But now technology has changed a lot, all you have to do is download it. It’s not the same.

ON SPINNING It all depends on the crowd, the atmosphere, and the moment. It has to go together at one moment and I read the crowd and usually get a good response. ON YOUR FAVORITE MEMORY I would have to say it was a set I did back in 2005. MTV came down and rented a venue out in Kyle. It was a Real World party and they had the entire cast there and I was deejaying. There were over a thousand people there, it was an amazing experience. ON WHERE TO FIND YOU Right now my home spot is Veranda on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. I’m also at the Vault every other week on Tuesday night.

djz512 djz512

P H O TO S BY: ANDRES SOTOMAYOR


BF

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BF POLITICAL

PC GOES EXTREME, BUT NOT AT TXST INTENSIFIED POLITICAL CORRECTNESS ON SOME UNIVERSITY CAMPUSES HAS INHIBITED LEARNING, BUT TEXAS STATE’S ENVIRONMENT AND VALUES HAS KEPT THE UNIVERSITY A SAFE AND POSITIVE PLACE. BY ROBIN BLACKBURN LAST YEAR, THE ATLANTIC RAN A COVER STORY CALLED “THE CODDLING OF THE AMERICAN MIND.” THE ARTICLE DREW NATIONAL ATTENTION TO THE ISSUE OF WHAT IT CALLED “VINDICTIVE PROTECTIVENESS” -- A STRAIN OF POLITICAL CORRECTNESS BASED ON THE IDEA THAT COLLEGE STUDENTS ARE FRAGILE AND MUST BE PROTECTED FROM PSYCHOLOGICAL HARM.

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This has led to policing for “microagressions” -- word choices or actions that might not be intended as mean-spirited but are considered offensive -- and “trigger warnings” for course material that could cause a negative emotional reaction. For example, a Harvard law professor wrote an article for The New Yorker in which she said student organizations on some campuses have requested trigger warnings for the section of class on rape

law, because mention of the word rape could traumatize survivors of sexual assault. According to the article in The Atlantic, some students have called for trigger warnings for “The Great Gatsby” because it depicts misogyny and sexual abuse. One of the authors of the piece in The Atlantic shared an anecdote about students complaining when, during a discussion of “The Odyssey,” he showed a painting of the Sirens trying to lure Ulysses and his crew to their deaths, because the Sirens were topless and thus the painting was degrading to women. The Atlantic ran another article about a new fear among stand-up comics who don’t want to perform on college campuses because student groups don’t want to book acts that might offend someone. The concern -- as with the classes on rape law -- is that such sensitivity is stifling education. One professor wrote (under a pseudonym) an article that was published at Vox. com called “I’m a Liberal Professor, and My Liberal Students Terrify Me.” The professor recounted his own and other professors’ struggles to adapt to student sensitivity and how violating a student’s sensibilities can amount to professional suicide. Texas State University Associate Provost and Political Science professor Dr. Cynthia Opheim says this kind of


political correctness hasn’t caught on at Texas State.

emergencies they face. The Division of Student Affairs also has exceptional health related services through our Counseling Center and Student Health Center. But these services only complement the individual care that many students receive from individual faculty and staff members.”

“I am not aware that student demands for trigger warnings have become an issue,” she said. “These incidents, if they have occurred, have not been brought to my attention.” Associate Dean of Students Dr. Vincent Morton said he is not aware of any protests, either. “Hopefully it’s because Texas State faculty and staff respect the voices of students,” Morton said. “I would assume that if there are concerns, they are addressed on an individual faculty/staff-tostudent level first, so the concerns are adequately addressed and attended to.” Opheim said that Texas State provides an environment that values academic freedom, open and free dialog, transparency and inclusiveness. “We celebrate the free exchange of ideas and welcome diversity of opinions,” she said.

“HOPEFULLY COLLEGE, AND SPECIFICALLY TEXAS STATE, IS A PLACE WHERE LIFE CAN BE EXPLORED, AND WHEN DEALING WITH LIFE THERE IS NOT 100 PERCENT COMFORT.”

- DR. VINCENT MORTON,

ASSOCIATE DEAN OF STUDENTS

Morton says he considers any student discussion of trigger warnings and the desire for safe spaces as “continued communication” about what could affect students in different ways.

“Avoiding relevant class topics is absolutely communicating sensitivity, but it’s also reinforcing the ‘don’t touch PTSD’ mindset. PTSD is highly responsive to psychotherapy that focuses on the cognitive and behavioral aspects of the disorder, and one of the behavioral components of treatment involves exposing yourself to triggers in a manageable way,” Bira said. “Am I saying the classroom should become a therapy zone? Definitely not. However, it is an opportunity to take personal control over what happened in the past.”

Opheim said if a student has a problem with class material, the student should discuss it with the professor. If the two can’t reach a resolution, the student could appeal to the department chair or director. Furthermore, there are oncampus resources to help students who have been through traumatic experiences, such as the counseling center, the student health center and the Office of Equity and Access.

Morton said students encountering problems with course materials can contact the Dean of Students Office. “Based on what the issue is, we’ll try to direct students to both internal and external resources and options,” he said. As for dealing with traumatic experiences, Morton said the university’s faculty and staff has “genuine care and concern” for students. “The Dean of Students Office has a component, Student Emergency Services, that will attempt to assist any currently enrolled student with any

“Avoidance is a behavior that feels great in the moment, because it allows you to escape distress. At the same time, it prevents your brain from learning something new and your body from taming the nervous system. Thus, the trigger you repeatedly avoid will always bring about the same level of fight or flight symptoms and negative mood states because you aren’t allowing your brain and body to learn what’s different now (usually, triggers are false alarms).” Bira says there is nothing wrong with being concerned about potential triggers, but it can hinder recovery from trauma in the long term.

“The university has over 38,000 students, so their positions, experiences, beliefs and values in life are not all the same -- not to mention the different towns, cities, states and countries represented at a university of this size,” Morton said. “Therefore, it’s important that students have the right to express their concerns and/ or needs. Not all of the needs and/or concerns for over 38,000 can be met, but students’ voices should always be listened to and considered.”

“In addition, there are a number of groups that represent diverse interests with which a student can find support and companionship,” she said.

Of course, there is a lingering question about whether trigger warnings would benefit traumatized students in the first place. Typically, psychologists recommend “exposure therapy” rather than avoidance. Dr. Lindsay Bira, a Texas state alumna and a clinical health psychologist specializing in both combat-related and civilian post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), says that research indicates that one of the reasons why victims of trauma experience PTSD is avoidance.

“I highly encourage students to actively face their mental health road blocks of all kinds in order to pave the way for a life the highest possible success,” Bira said. “I also highly encourage instructors to mindfully design coursework, communicate unbiased concern and provide reasonable flexibility for students who may be struggling, without compromising education.”

“AM I SAYING THE CLASSROOM SHOULD BECOME A THERAPY ZONE? DEFINITELY NOT. HOWEVER, IT IS AN OPPORTUNITY TO TAKE PERSONAL CONTROL OVER WHAT HAPPENED IN THE PAST.” - DR.

LINDSAY BIRA, CLINICAL HEALTH PSYCHOLOGIST AND TEXAS STATE ALUMNA

Morton said that the university is one of many places where students can learn how to deal with new experiences, and that could include discomfort. “Other places and people include family, friends, church, or sport, civic, professional or academic teams, et cetera. I do not believe there is any one best place. The experiences of many will contribute to the ability to face, address, change or accept things in life that may be difficult or new. Hopefully college, and specifically Texas State, is a place where life can be explored, and when dealing with life there is not 100 percent comfort.” BO BC AT F ANS APRIL 2016 59


BF ATHLETES

PROFILE

way to me.” When she was a little girl, Slade’s aunt introduced her to horses and Slade rode from elementary through middle school. She was eventually forced to stop riding because of the time and costs involved. “It just got too expensive to continue riding,” Slade said. “And I started to focus on other things in school.” Slade and the Bobcat Equestrian Team ride in Intercollegiate Horse Show Association competitions. The IHSA is an organization that promotes competition for riders of all skill levels, who compete both individually and as teams at regional, zone, and national levels. IHSA competitions operate as catch-riding events, meaning each rider draws a random horse before the show. With no familiarity or previous experience with the horse, riders’ individual abilities are better gauged.

REINING SUPREME

BOBCAT FRESHMAN ANNA SLADE HAD NO EXPERIENCE IN COMPETITIVE RIDING BEFORE JOINING THE TEXAS STATE EQUESTRIAN TEAM. NOW SHE HAS NATIONALS IN HER SIGHTS.

A BY TRAVIS ATKINSON

ANNA SLADE IS GALLOPING PAST THE COMPETITION. WHILE MOST COLLEGE STUDENTS SPENT THEIR SPRING BREAKS SOAKING UP THE SUN ON A BEACH, SLADE WENT RIGHT BACK TO WORK. FRESH OFF HER RESERVE CHAMPION FINISH AT THE INTERCOLLEGIATE HORSE SHOW ASSOCIATION’S REGIONAL FINALS IN MARCH, SHE SPENT HER BREAK TRAINING AT HUNTER’S CHASE FARMS IN WIMBERLEY TRAINING FOR THE ZONE CHAMPIONSHIPS ON APRIL 2ND. If you’re not familiar with the Texas State Equestrian Team, don’t feel bad. You are not alone. “Most people don’t even know we have an equestrian team,” Slade said. “And a lot of them are confused because they don’t know what equestrian means.”

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When Slade came to Texas State, the 18-year old biology major from Austin needed a way to relax in her free time. “I was thinking of things I could do other than studying my butt off in college,” Slade said. “And riding horses seemed like the right thing to do.” It may be Slade’s first experience in competitive riding, but she’s no rookie in the saddle. After accumulating the 36-points needed to qualify for regional finals, Slade placed second in the competition, just finishing behind LSU. Another top two finish in the Zone Championships and Slade will move on to the National Championships in Lexington, Kentucky. “I’ve always loved riding horses,” Slade said. The fact that you get to ride these giant fluffy beasts is so cool. They are like giant dogs in a

“You’re judged on how you are able to handle the horse and how well you can ride it,” Slade said. “On our riding as individuals, not on how good the horse is.” Catch riding also opens the sport up to more people. Because the horses are selected at random, the IHSA provides the horses and equipment. This takes the burden of caring and maintaining the horse away from riders, and allows people without the means of raising horses to still ride and compete. “The IHSA really makes it accessible to everyone,” Slade said. “It’s a really great way to get back into riding if you haven’t ridden in a while like me.”

“I WAS THINKING OF THINGS I COULD DO OTHER THAN STUDYING MY BUTT OFF IN COLLEGE,” SLADE SAID. “AND RIDING HORSES SEEMED LIKE THE RIGHT THING TO DO.” texasstateequestrian.webs.com txstequestrian

P H O TO S BY: PARKER THORNTON


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The San Marcos Regional Airport is located at the former Gary Air Force Base, which was operational (save for one brief deactivation) between 1943 and 1963. At one time, it was the nation’s largest training operation for U.S. Air Force helicopter pilots.

97%

of Commercial Pilots Are Men

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The International Society of Women Airline Pilots reports there are only 4000 female commercial pilots in the world, making men 97% of the worldwide commercial pilot population.


The Sky’s

the Limit With help from a local university-associated training center, Kendra Wells is learning what it takes to fly an aircraft. By Edmond Ortiz Photos Parker Thornton

“I’m not fazed [by the lack of females in aviation]. For the longest time, I’ve just thought about doing things to build my career.” SMTX

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Kendra Wells recalls going up for a private flight with a friend behind the airplane’s controls not long ago. Riding shotgun in a private aircraft was an immediate revelation. “I thought, wow, this is what I want to do!” Wells remembers. She’s on her way to becoming a licensed private pilot and plans to start her own business.

A

fter moving to Central Texas from the Lubbock area, Wells went to school through Austin Community College (ACC). There, she found information about Texas State Aviation (TSA), a flight training center associated with Texas State University and ACC. Currently, in order to enroll for training, one must register through ACC. The center is located at the San Marcos Regional Airport, offering training for private and commercial pilot certificates. Former employees of other aviation schools helped to develop TSA in the mid-1990s, taking advantage of the airport’s location, where traffic is minimal and aerial conditions are often ideal. With four instructors on staff, including TSA President Erik Landrum, and relatively small class sizes, students can create their own flying schedules. Lessons are highly individualized. Wells spent this spring focusing on her 16-week private pilot course, which includes ground school. She wasn’t taking any additional college courses for the time being. The Federal Aviation Administration requires an individual to accumulate a minimum of 40 hours in the air before they can secure a private pilot license.

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By the end of one Thursday afternoon in early March, Wells had recorded her 11th flight. When asked if her friends feel excited about flying with her on a private aircraft, Wells says, “Oh no, they’re like, ‘That’s OK, we’ll just watch from over here’.”

population. But he hopes that with programs such as TSA, women and minorities find piloting to be an exciting, rewarding career. This is particularly important because the world is facing an overall pilot shortage, he adds.

Wells had no experience coming into the program. “Most individuals haven’t had piloting experience. Now they have to think of aerodynamics, weather, mechanics, instrumentation,” Landrum says.

Wells says she and her friend, a medivac, want to open up their own helicopter transport company. The shortage of women pilots doesn’t discourage her. “I’m not fazed. For the longest time, I’ve just thought about doing things to build my career,” she says.

Wells enthusiastically talks about piloting an aircraft. She remembers her first time doing it for class. “It was awesome. I thought, ‘I knew it, I knew this was how it was gonna be’,” she says, smiling. The spring private pilot course was open to 20 students but Wells was the lone woman in this specific class. She is one of the few women to recently train with TSA amid a trend where small numbers of women are licensed to pilot aircraft. According to the FAA’s Aeronautical Center, women make up less than 7 percent of the total pilot population in the United States. “I don’t know why. There just seems to be a lack of enthusiasm,” Landrum says of certain groups in the general

Preparing for her 11th flight, Wells walks to a Cessna Skyhawk, a singleengine trainer plane, for pre-flight checks. “This is one of my favorite things I get to do in the morning,” Wells says. “Clear prop!” Wells yells out the cockpit window with Landrum in the front passenger seat. Aside from some wind gusts, it’s a sunny, mild day. She smiles and chuckles a few times in the air. After a solid landing, Wells remains selfassured. “It was a good flight. It’s all a learning process,” she says. “It’s all about having the ability to know I can do it and have more confidence.” tsaviation.com

The Gender Gap One of the biggest factors historically stopping women from becoming commercial pilots is most pilots come from a military background. That option wasn’t open to women in many countries (and some still not) until relatively recently. In the U.S. women weren’t allowed to fly combat aircrafts until 1993. So if a woman wanted to become a commercial pilot without military training, they’d have to foot the $100,000-ish bill to acquire all the necessary training and experience. On top of that, commercial pilots just starting out don’t get paid much. According to the Future and Active Pilot Advisers, first officers can start out as low as $20,000 per year. Commercial pilot Jill Schilmoeller said, “You have to love flying, because you start off getting paid horribly and you are gone a lot.” Within today’s aviation industry, some airlines such as British Airways are looking to increase the number of females applying for given positions. While women still need to bring the skills and the experience, they actually might have a leg up on the competition to become a commercial pilot. Pilot and editor of Aviation for Women magazine Amy Laboda says, “I can tell you that [female airline pilots] have made tremendous progress, and the reason … is because most of the dinosaurs are gone… The men who didn’t want women in the cockpit have mostly retired.”

BO BC AT F ANS APRIL 2016 65


BF SM KITTEN

SALICIA KOL Fashion Merchandising & Business student at TXST AGE: 23 HOBBIES: Designing, modeling, yoga, and exploring new food places BEST TRAIT: Witty PET PEEVE: People who don’t use their car blinkers LOVE ABOUT SAN MARCOS: How the city is growing and I love being at the river CAREER GOAL: To have a job that doesn’t require a vacation. I hope to have a job that allows me to travel around the world and motivates me. 

@salicianicolette

SA N M A RV EL OU S

66 B OB CATFANS APRIL 2016


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Contents

April 2016

The 4 C’s of jewelry…

Classic, Contemporary, Custom…

The Incredible Texas Getaways P. 22 Escape, relax, play and unwind, and leave the drive time to a minimum. From treehouses to the birth of a nation, stay at the best places within 100 miles.

SMTX 10 Gallery Opening See what’s new on the scene

20 Walking With Benefits The secret is out

12 Aquabrew 28 Fire Spinning These suds are for you A hot Q&A 14 Wine + Art Walk 30 Trailer Park Boys The best hand picked events Canadians invade for 15 Cinema Club Local movie buffs unite

a one night comedy show

16 Challenging The Audience Provocative artist

18 Crowdfunding Open your wallets

208 N LBJ Drive San Marcos, TX 78666 | Ph. 512-392-4100 | christiesjewelry.com S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M 6

Cover Cypress Valley Canopy Treehouses Spicewood, TX


The Magazine of San Marcos PUBLISHER Rick Koch ART DIRECTOR Will Bowling

Eat Well Today

MANAGING EDITOR Tiffany Koch COPY EDITOR Steven F. Helsing CONTRIBUTORS Cory Townsend Travis Atkinson Kristen Sowell Edmond Ortiz Jeremy Thomas Jonathan Rodriguez Robin Blackburn Travis E. Green Jordan Gass-Poore’ Danny Coleman Cristopher Paul Cardoza Parker Thornton Cathy Dillon Carl Deal

WRITE TO US Send your raves, rants or questions to smtxmagazine@gmail.com or bobcatfans@gmail.com Please include name and daytime phone number, and remember that letters are subject to editing for clarity and space.

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Featuring the enviromentally sensitive homes of the 2016 Heritage Home Tour

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LOOK FOR NEXT ISSUE IN AUGUST We explore the Tiny Homes in the Summer 2016 edition

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HEADQUARTERED IN SAN MARVELOUS 139 E. Hopkins Suite B San Marcos, TX 78666 Copyright 2016, BOBCATFANS LLC All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited. Not affiliated with Texas State University. Printed In USA - Locally Operated Please Recycle This Magazine

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LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER

SMTX MAGAZINE

APRIL 2016

CHEERS TO TEN YEARS Hello Neighbors, This is a very special issue! And while some of you might be reading our pages for the first time, this issue marks our magazine’s 10 Year Anniversary. We are celebrating with a new layout, the debut of Balcones Home & Design – it features beautiful sneak peek of the 2016 Heritage Home Tour – and we are extremely excited to expand our home delivery to Buda and Kyle neighborhoods. Capturing interesting people and our culture through written word and beautiful photography, telling the best stories we can find, it makes us so proud to be a part of this community. It’s almost too much fun exploring the area’s uniqueness to share with our readers. This month in SMTX magazine, we set out on a quest to find what we thought might be the weirdest places to spend the night, but judging by the cover, what we discovered are incredible spots, not too far away, that’ll ensure life long memories with friends and family. Speaking of memories, Ten Years Ago, BobcatFans magazine launched on the Texas State campus. It was an honor to feature Texas State Aviation, to go up high in the sky with them, celebrating the past decade by getting a bird’s eye view of the all beauty that surrounds us. Thank you Kendra Wells for putting our writer back on the ground safely. After 10 years there are so many people who have contributed to the journey of producing a decade worth of issues. I want to thank you all for bettering our pages with your words, pictures, ideas, thoughts, and time. Thank you to our advertisers, business professionals, city officials, mentors, artists, interns, photographers, writers and all the people who have allowed us share their stories and talents. And lastly, thank you to our family, friends and neighbors who love to read. Cheers to all of you! Best,

8

S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M

years EST. 2006

Rick Koch & family

P.S.

10 Celebrating

If this is the first issue you’ve received in Kyle or Buda by mail, I hope it finds a welcome place in your home. If you want to share your thoughts you can reach us info@smtxmagazine.com.


wine + art

weekend

April 29 - May 1, 2016

DOWNTOWN SAN MARCOS

presented by Main Street San Marcos + Heritage Association + KTSW

wine + art walk

april 29 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. hays co. courthouse lawn tickets $25

featuring over 15 artists in 15 downtown shops

heritage home tour april 30 - may 1 12 - 1 p.m. hays co. courthouse lawn tickets $15 Ecological Inspirations and Great Green Features

mr fest april 29 - april 30 all weekend long presented by ktsw free admission family friendly fun featuring over 40 bands in downtown

www.smtxwinewalk.com

SMTX

9


SCENE

SMTX MAGAZINE

APRIL 2016

DAHLIA WOODS GALLERY OPENING NIGHT

Left to right: artists Spencer Harris, Michelle Jane, and Kristy Richard

Artist Rene Perez with wife Susan Perez in front of his artwork.

San Marcos’ Downtown Gallery Night on March 24 was an evening art walk of four downtown art galleries including the grand opening of Dahlia Woods Gallery. A string quartet comprised of young members of the San Marcos Orchestra and singer and banjo player Tracy Weinberg performed at the Dahlia Woods opening night event. The gallery features Texas painters, sculptures, writers, a revolving group of artists from Texas State University, and more. Artist Clay De Stefano with his work, “Merman Relic”.

Brianna Bergstrom, holding recently purchased “Night Life” with artist and gallery owner Dahlia Woods.

Gallery owner, Dahlia Woods

TXST student artist Michelle Jane with her work, “Sustained Improvisations”. Photos Jeremy Thomas

10 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M


SCENE

SMTX MAGAZINE

APRIL 2016

218 STUDIO WORKS Another art gallery participating in San Marcos’ Downtown Gallery Night was 218 Studio Works. Featured artists include owner Steven Ness who specializes in portraits, fashion, and art nudes; Kevin Huffaker who has 20 years experience developing experimental and creative projects; and Helen Jade an internationally published photographer.

Kevin Huffier, co-owner of 218 Studio Works

Left to right: Madison Richards and Kayla Haack

Brianna Bergstrom with Robert Slevin

Artist Helen Jade

Steven Ness, artist/owner of 218 Studio Works with his work, “The Chain”

SMTX

11


SCENE

SMTX MAGAZINE

AQUABREW OPENS ITS DOORS

Aquabrew opened its doors to the public for the first time on Friday, March 18th. All proceeds from the soft opening benefited the San Marcos River Foundation. Guests were the first to sample Aquabrew’s food and craft beer menu and enjoyed live music by three performers.

View From Behind the Bar on Opening Night

UPS & DOWNS APRIL 2016 UPS

The revival of Springtown Shopping Center should please just about everyone in San Marcos. Austinbased Chuy’s Fine Tex-Mex is the latest high profile business announced for the center, which not too long ago was only 10% occupied. Chuy’s will join EVO’s The Spot and Gold’s Gym at Springtown. San Martians love their river and it was never more evident than March 5th at the 31st annual Great Texas River Clean-Up. According to the City of San Marcos, more than 100 volunteers collected over 17,000 pounds of trash and 117 tires in the effort. And by the way, when it comes to the river, tubes are okay to see there, tires are not. We seldom mention our large neighbors to the north, since they’re pretty full of themselves already. But we truly want to thank them for combining South by Southwest with President Obama on March 11th. Austin’s traffic nightmare was a blessing in disguise for those of us who travel south to go home to Buda, Kyle and San Marcos. The southbound traffic flow on I-35 leaving Austin at rush hour was as smooth as you’ll ever encounter on a Friday.

From Left to Right: Aquabrew Hostesses Brooke Sweeney and Hayley Pilcher

DOWNS

If you build it, they will come. Not necessarily. Apparently they did build it and because nobody came, the operator of the stretch of the 130 toll road from Mustang Ridge to Seguin has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The company says there’s no reason to worry, the road will remain open while they go through bankruptcy. Thanks, but if nobody’s using the road, then we’re not particularly worried about it, are we?

From Left to Right: Chris James and Erica Renger Photos Cristopher Paul Cardoza 12 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M


LOCAL

SMTX MAGAZINE

APRIL 2016

THE ARTISTS OF AQUABREW

Owner Carlos Russo has hosted soft openings of Aquabrew, each event supporting a different local charity.

Many Aquabrew employees are singers, actors, and artists and can use their stage names at work rather than their legal names. The creative staff even designed and decorated much of Aquabrew.

REDEFINING HOSPITALITY Aquabrew will soon be one of the largest venues in Hays County for beer, food, and music. fter becoming accustomed to a life of fine dining and outstanding service during his time as a travelling consultant, Carlos Russo found himself dissatisfied with the standards of the local service industry. After 5 years of hard work and planning, with a vision derived from the founder of Union Square Café in New York City, Aquabrew: brewery, restaurant, and live music venue has finally come to fruition. To be located at 150 South LBJ in San Marcos, Aquabrew is a unique business with an equally unique team composed almost entirely of employees from the arts industry. When asked how the team was put together, Administrative Assistant Alex Robertson said, “We were very particular in hiring.

Experience is a huge deal, but we have hired people [who have] personalities that outshined people with experience. We literally counted smiles.” She added that Aquabrew has a vision statement “to help raise the bar of hospitality while providing a holistic experience for the customer,” which all of the staff agreed is the most important part of any business. Manager Joe Stewart says that in addition to being cost effective and having a gorgeous and inviting space, “The unique food, plate sharing, communal tables, and fresh concept will help bring everyone out of their shells.” In terms of building a community and a community space Joe stated, “I think the whole experience of sitting down, having a meal and telling stories is going away and it needs to come

back. This will be the place to help bring that back.” Aquabrew plans to have a rotating menu based on consumer needs, seasonal changes, and availability of local ingredients. Aquabrew is one of the only bars in the area that is also a brewery. Brewmaster Brian Bush has crafted beers for over 21 years and has a degree in brewing science. The plan is for Aquabrew to have 8 original brews on tap, all starting from raw grade. Aquabrew is not only extremely unique and authentic, but Russo and the staff are working hard to instill a sense of community and create a home to foster the growth of that community right in the center of San Marcos.

By Travis E. Green SMTX

13


WHAT TO DO

SMTX MAGAZINE

HANDPICKED EVENTS

MR Fest

What started as a one-day, one-venue event in 2008 has grown to over 40 artists performing at over 13 venues around downtown San Marcos. The 9th annual MR Fest (pronounced mister) is produced by the official radio station of Texas State University, KTSW. The festival is a showcase of talented local and regional indie musicians. Admission to all events are free to the public and benefit the United Way of Hays County.

Butterfly Festival The 17th annual Butterfly Festival at Wimberley’s EmilyAnn Theatre & Gardens will feature live butterfly releases every 30 minutes, a flight house featuring native Texas butterflies, nature activities, pirate & princess tent, games, concessions, live entertainment, butterfly art, and a Commemorative Air Force flyover. Free admission, donations appreciated.

Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30, Various Downtown Venues, San Marcos, Full lineup at mrfest.net

Saturday, April 16, EmilyAnn Theatre, 1101 Ranch Rd 2325, Wimberley, 9 am to 5 pm

Wine + Art Walk

At the Wine + Art Walk, 15 downtown San Marcos venues will host artists displaying their work. Each venue provides guests with wine and paired hors d’ oeuvres. Tickets are $25 presale and $30 at the door. Downtown San Marcos wine walk events often sell out so advance tickets at smtxwinewalk.com are strongly suggested. 21+ only. Friday, April 29, Courthouse Lawn, San Marcos, 5:30 pm to 8:30 pm

Real Ale Brewery’s 20th Anniversary Party Celebrating two decades of brewing at Real Ale’s 20th Anniversary Party. The brewery will be stepping up the annual event with their biggest party yet in honor of the milestone. $20 per person tickets will include a high-quality anniversary beer glass, four beer tickets with access to the finest beer lineup the brewery has ever offered (including several very rare, impossible-to-find selections), a raffle ticket to win prizes, five hours of live music, food vendors, face painting, and animal balloons. Advance tickets from realalebrewing.com recommended. Free entry for designated drivers and under 21 guests. Saturday, April 16, Real Ale Brewery, 231 San Saba Court, Blanco, Noon to 5 pm

14 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M


LOCAL

SMTX MAGAZINE

APRIL 2016

Each free screening is an event, with food, costumes and education incorporated.

Members of Cinema Club helped pack the courtroom of a bond hearing for Maribel Zelaya, an asylum-seeker who helped launch a hunger strike with other refugee women held in Hutto Detention Center in Taylor, TX, a case spotlighted in their January screening of “No Sanctuary.”

REEL EXPOSURE

San Marcos Cinema Club offers unique movie going experiences.

B

eing served baked goods in honor of a scene from the horror film being screened is just one way the new San Marcos Cinema Club offers unconventional movie watching experiences. For the screening of the horror-drama “A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night”, about a lonely vampire in a fictional Iranian town, the San Marcos Cinema Club partnered with the local Jo’s Cafe. “It’s a cultural hub,” says Jordan Buckley about Jo’s Cafe. It’s also where one of the club’s members currently works, another formerly worked and where club co-founder Buckley frequents. According to Buckley, the San Marcos Cinema Club began with informal conversations at Jo’s Cafe last year. The artist and writer collective sponsored its first free screening in October. “It’s been going quicker than we’ve been thinking it,” he says. The club’s members certainly aren’t running out of ideas to inspire and create unique movie going experiences for locals. Other club members, including co-founder Bailey Dieckman, a Jo’s Cafe barista and Texas State student, have been inspired by the club’s screenings and contributed their artistic talents. Dieckman created the T-shirt design for “A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night,” which were sold at the event. Expensive movie theater tickets discourage people from going to the multiplex, but thanks to the San Marcos Cinema Club, residents can have movie nights in less traditional venues.

Every second Monday of the month the club sponsors free screenings of movies shot in San Marcos at local coffee shop Wake the Dead. Each free screening is an event, with food, costumes and education incorporated. The club also partners with local businesses, including Redbud Roasters, who hosted the screening of the Frida Kahlo biopic “Frida” last month. (Local florist The Floral Studio also donated flowers for the screening to adorn attendees’ hair, Kahlo style.)

Cinema Club Events Gasland

Part of Cinema Club’s every-2nd-Monday-of-the-month residency, a Gonzo-esque odyssey of the age of fracking in America via one filmmaker’s traipse across the country interviewing everyday folk impacted by hydraulic fracturing -- several of whom, iconically, can ignite their tap water with a lighter. Monday, April 11 Wake the Dead Coffeehouse at 8pm

The event doesn’t end after the movie’s credits roll. Local filmmakers are invited to attend Princess Mononoke A critical and commercial success, screenings of their work, sponsored by the club, to tell the story and explain the process this Japanese fantasy was the highestgrossing film in Japan in 1997 when it behind their film. “It’s about getting people was released. Dubbed in English and distributed in the US two years later it together,” says Jenn Garcia, San Marcos eventually became a cult classic.  Cinema Club co-founder and Texas State Thursday, April 21 philosophy lecturer. Backyard of HomeBrew Supply at 7:30pm

Director Anne Lewis attended a March The Years of Living Dangerously screening at the San Marcos Public Library Hosted by the local chapter of Citizens’ of the documentary “Anne Braden: Southern Climate Lobby, a discussion about Patriot,” about the Kentucky woman who global environmental effects of presentMartin Luther King, Jr., praised as a white ally day practices will follow the viewing. Free snacks provided. in his famous “Letter From a Birmingham Jail.” Sunday, April 24 San Marcos Public Library at 2pm

These events are also ways for the club to promote and raise awareness of local causes. Made in San Marcos: Music Flicks From The ‘666 This month, the Cinema Club will sponsor In collaboration with KTSW, an a screening of French director Francois exposition of new music videos from local bands and film makers. Truffaut’s movie adaptation of “Fahrenheit 451” that coincides with the library’s month- Sunday, April 24th Cheatham Street Warehouse at 7pm long book drive, in an effort to collect books on CD for the new Martindale Public Library. Moving forward, Buckley says the San Marcos Cinema Club wants to fundraise for movie screening rights and eventually open an arthouse theater in town. “We have our eyes on the prize,” he says.

SMCinemaClub

By Jordan Gass-Poore’ SMTX

15


ARTS

SMTX MAGAZINE

APRIL 2016

“Sometimes, it’s not about making a pretty picture, it’s not about that”.

PROVOCATIVE ARTIST CHALLENGES HER AUDIENCE The woman behind the “Naked Alkek girl” and “ChikFil-A girl”, Monika Rostvold.

Y

ou have likely heard of her or maybe even seen her performance art on campus, which has received national media attention. Monika Rostvold’s art is both provocative and thought-provoking. Rostvold grew up in San Antonio, and originally came to Texas State University in pursuit of a degree in nutrition. Now in her senior year as an art major, Rostvold can’t imagine what life would be like if she hadn’t made the switch, “If I didn’t change my major to art, who knows what I would even be doing.” Keeping her schedule tightly packed, Rostvold is both a painter and a performance artist. Samples of her paintings and videos of her performances can be seen on her website, monikarostvold.com. She explores many of the same themes and ideas between her two chosen mediums, though ultimately they are wildly different

16 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M

methods of transmitting a thought. When asked which of the two she preferred, she replied, “I feel like they’re very close. I feel like, lately, I sort of need to do one to do the other.”

Though she prefers to let her art speak for itself, Rostvold notes that the point she is trying to make becomes clearer when viewed as a whole, rather than on a pieceby-piece basis. Is there a definitive meaning or answer in her work? Rostvold says, “One thing that gets misinterpreted as an artist, I paint about a topic and people think I’m saying I have a solution to these problems. I don’t. I’m just kind of putting it out there and asking a question, having the viewers almost give me their answer.” The confusion you may feel at what kind of message the performance piece “Naked Chik-Fil-A girl” (actually titled “All You Can Eat”) is attempting to send is likely matched by at least a few thoughts on the matter. According to Rostvold, those thoughts you have, though they may not be her exact intent, are a part of the process. Art that challenges the viewer to think is important to her, saying, “Sometimes, it’s not about making a pretty picture.” She enjoys the interactivity of her performance art in particular, finding it a more

direct connection with her audience than painting; “I want to take from the audience, sort of like a cycle”.

Her artistic influences range from the impressionists Henri Matisse and Claude Monet, to pop culture, to contemporary artists such as Laurel Nakadate (video artist and photographer, also one of Rostvold’s biggest inspirations). Rostvold is currently in the process of choosing a graduate school in New York. If she gets her way she will be studying under Nakadate, which she says would be a dream come true.

Rostvold is keeping busy with plenty of shows of both her performance art and her paintings. Coming fresh out of March with a new performance piece at the NorthernSouthern Gallery, her work can be seen during the thesis show at the Texas State Galleries on April 25th. Soon after graduation, she has been commissioned to work on a 12’ x 12’ painting in Buda, which she estimates will take around a month to complete. monikarostvold.com monikarostvold monika.rostvold monikaugh

By Cory Townsend Photos By Parker Thornton


FESTIVAL MAGAZINE

Featuring All The Best Festivals In Our Area! - Twice A Year -

NEW In Christmas

July Edition

Reaching 40,000 Targeted Homes in New Braunfels, Wimberley, San Marcos, Kyle & Buda. info@smtxmagazine.com | sights-n-sounds.org


COMMUNITY SMTX

MAGAZINE

APRIL 2016

“We see it as an opportunity to provide a new tool for Texas State faculty, staff and students to fund approved projects by sharing the projects’ stories with their networks.” Wesley Clark, Director of Annual Giving, Texas State University

CROWDFUNDING COMES TO TEXAS STATE University to harness the power of the internet and social networks to bring fundraising efforts to a broader audience.

T

exas State University and its students will no longer have to rely on traditional fundraising from alumni and local supporters to raise money for projects. This month, Texas State is launching a crowdfunding platform through Community Funded, a Colorado-based company that helps organizations connect with a broad base of donors. Wesley Clark, Director of Annual Giving in the Office of University Advancement, said the university looked at other online crowdfunding platforms before deciding on Community Funded. “Crowdfunding has [gained] momentum at universities in recent years,” Clark said. “We see it as an opportunity to provide a new tool for Texas State faculty, staff and students to fund approved projects by sharing the projects’ stories with their networks.” Adopting a crowdfunding platform like those available through Community Funded has many benefits, Callahan said. “It moves any professional fundraising operation into the 21st century. It appeals to younger and new donors that enjoy the convenience of technology but more importantly 18 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M

the transparency, engagement and impact it conveys,” he said. “Community Funded offers both technology and tactics to evolve the way professional fundraising organizations tell their story and raise money,” said McCabe Callahan, co-founder and CEO of Community Funded. “Community Funded works by providing technology that connects, supports and empowers communities, allowing them to tell their story, unite a community around their passion and garner support from their community.” Oklahoma State University has already used its Community Funded platform, PhilanthroPete, to fund several projects, including scholarships, homecoming and community projects. John Tatum Grice, assistant director of annual giving at the OSU Foundation, said this was the university’s first crowdfunding venture. “We’ve been fortunate to experience a number of successful projects through crowdfunding because they have compelling stories and the means to share their message with an engaged audience,” Grice said. “It’s been our experience in annual giving that not every project will be able to reach their goals through traditional direct marketing techniques. Therefore, PhilanthroPete has been a valuable tool.” Grice added that traditional

fundraising is often costly and can prevent interested parties from engaging with projects beyond donating. “Crowdfunding provides the tools that enable project creators to tell their story visually, engage socially with interested audiences and provide updates on how donor dollars are benefiting their project,” Grice said. Clark said that Texas State’s crowdfunding platform will benefit a variety of organizations on campus. “We expect the program’s crowdfunding projects to be diverse, representing many areas of the campus as the program grows,” he said, adding that the university expects each project to raise up to $5,000-$10,000. “Effective crowdfunding projects have a builtin deadline, which creates a sense of urgency to motivate donations during the campaign period (typically 30 days). Effective projects also have an active team of committed fundraisers who have engaged personal networks with an interest in the project area.” Callahan says Community Funded has high hopes for Texas State’s new crowdfunding platform. “The expectations are to unite their community around all the great stories from such a great organization; to engage donors, students, faculty and staff around an organization making an amazing impact in the world; and to gain additional support from new donors to ensure the opportunity continues and is accelerated.” By Robin Blackburn


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SMTX

19


LIFESTYLE

SMTX MAGAZINE

The Secret Benefits of Walking The simple movement that lowers stress, improves mood, and crushes pizza cravings.

“Typically, the people who lash out saying, ‘Who has time for that crap?!’ [in reference to walking] are the people who need it the most.”

20 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M

APRIL 2016


O

ur ancestors walked between 12 and 20 miles daily. Nowadays the typical American takes around 5,900 steps a day, about half a mile, according to the Walking Behavior Laboratory at LSU.

On Sundays, when my girlfriend and I go to Mellow Mushroom for $2 mimosas, I’m lucky if my Fitbit reads between 12 and 20 steps total to account for the few times I go to the urinal. My Sunday vices aside, one of my favorite activities is grabbing a cup of coffee, putting a good audiobook on my headphones, and walking down to the park near my house. Walking is something that I recommend to every single one of my personal training clients as a part of their fat loss program. All of my clients should walk between 30 and 60 minutes every day. But many see it as a waste of time, or as additional exercise to be done, rather than leisurely walking through the park.  They’re missing the point. I’m not talking about a swift power walk. My clients are required to leisurely walk (about a speed of 2.0 on a treadmill), preferably outside, 7 days a week. Typically, the people who lash out saying, “Who has time for that crap?!” are the people who need it the most.  As my boy Jade Teta from Metabolic Effect says, “Don’t view walking as exercise, but rather a necessity.” When we view it as a necessity, like brushing our teeth or taking a shower, we can begin to make time for it.

BENEFITS OF WALKING When I lived in North Carolina, I was taught more about hormonal fat loss, nutrition, and lifestyle in a few weeks than most learn in a lifetime. Health and wellness is a bigger picture than simply adding broccoli, a protein shake, and Instagram #FitFam pics. It’s more than

calories-in vs. calories-out. Health and wellness is also hormones, social connection, sleep, stress, and feeling a sense of purpose. That’s where the secret benefits of walking lie. It’s not so much that you’re going to shed calories as you’ll shed stress, hunger and cravings, and bad vibes.  Leisurely walking has been shown to reduce the stress hormone cortisol. Cortisol is released when the body is under stress (physical or mental), and is meant to help us escape an attack by a saber-tooth tiger. We spot the tiger and stress hormones are released into the bloodstream so we can fight or flightthe-hell-out-of-there. Once we escape the sharp-toothed feline, we calm down and stress hormones return to normal.  Nowadays, there are no saber-tooth tigers threatening to eat our face while we’re enjoying eggs benedict, but stress from work and school, bad dates, and endless to-do lists keep our cortisol levels high moment by moment, day after day. When cortisol levels stay too high, for too long, it causes us to lose muscle, store fat, and develop serious pizza cravings. Taking a nice relaxing walk through Sewell Park is just what we need to bring our stress hormones back to normal. This is the power of walking. It relaxes and lowers our stress hormone levels.

FOREST BATHING The Japanese use the word “Shinrinyoku,” which means “forest bathing.” No, not streaking through the forest with a bottle of Dove For Men; it roughly translates to “leisurely visit a forest.” We can enhance the effects of our leisure walk if we head outside. Now that it is getting warmer, I encourage all of my clients to walk outdoors. Researchers show that being in nature, or merely looking at nature on your screen saver for five minutes, lowers levels of cortisol and blood pressure.

In her book The Willpower Instinct, Kelly McGonigal says, “Just five minutes of what scientists call ‘green exercise’ [i.e. forest bathing] decreases stress, improves mood, enhances focus, and boosts self-control.” Whoa. Just a 5-minute walk around the block can do wonders.

CHALLENGE YOURSELF Walking daily, especially though nature, impacts your health on a hormonal level. It improves your mood, decreases your stress, lowers hunger, increases energy, improves sleep, and can help release fat from the fat cells.  This, in turn, has a huge impact on your life. When you’re less hungry and have fewer cravings for pizza, it can lead to a shredded six pack. When your mood is improved, so is your dating life. And when you sleep better, stress less, and have more energy you’re more productive at work.  Make walking a necessity. Start a 30-day challenge: can you make time for walking every day for the next month? Try it, and see what happens. Even if you keep your Sunday mimosa habit, you’re sure to see improvements in your life.

WALKING: THE SUPERIOR EXERCISE

1. It is one of the only forms of exercise that lowers stress hormones. Feel like stress is the reason you’re having issues? Walk! 2. It is one of the only forms of activity that reduces hunger. And because of its effects on stress hormones, may even reduce cravings as well. 3. Leisurely walking is one of the only forms of exercise you can do as much as you like with little concern for over-training.

Danny is a storyteller and blogger who uses psychology and personal experiences to guide people to happier and healthier lives. dannycoleman.net

By Danny Coleman

SMTX

21


Incredible (and incredibly close)

Texas Getaways You don’t have to travel far to have an unforgettable vacation. Spend the night in a treehouse, a silo, a Spanish mission, or even a zoo. Unbelievable and one of a kind hotels and vacation rentals within a 2 hour drive of San Marcos.

Treehouse - 56.8 miles Spend the night nestled high in beautiful cypress trees in one of four unique treehouses. Cypress Valley Canopy Tours in Spicewood offers zipline tours through trees up to 100 feet tall. The 90 minute tour includes 5 ziplines, 2 sky bridges, and a rappel back to the ground. After the incredible tour guests can relish in nature by spending the entire night in the trees. The Nest is Cypress Valley’s largest treehouse and includes two bedrooms, a lounge area and kitchenette/dining area, all situated above the beautiful creek ravine beside a small waterfall. An outside shower offers guests the ability to rinse off under the stars, and a small bridge connects guests to a private bathhouse complete with a bath and shower. Modern conveniences include heating, air-conditioning, and electricity. Resort amenities include picnicking and swimming at a small private lake or clear water pool. The Nest accommodates up to 6 guests. Cypress Valley Canopy Treehouses 1223 Paleface Ranch Rd, Spicewood cypressvalleycanopytours.com Treehouses start at $200 a night ($400 for the Nest) plus tax and $75 per person zipline tour.

22 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M


Silo House - 16.1 miles Stay in historic and quaint Gruene in a 1940’s grain silo. The silo was relocated to the Gruene Homestead Inn and remodeled to include a beautiful porch and garden exterior and a loft apartment interior. There is a king bed in the upstairs loft, sofa-bed in the living area, bathroom, kitchenette, and private porch. Guests will love the full size hot breakfast served in the inn’s dining room, along with the outdoor swimming pool and hot tub. Gruene Homestead Inn 832 Gruene Road, New Braunfels gruenehomesteadinn.com $175 on weeknights and $120 on weekends and holidays.

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Glamping Paradise - 19.4 miles Glamping or “glamorous camping” means enjoying the great outdoors without sacrificing luxury and comfort. The private safari style tent at Sinya in Wimberley is situated on 300 feet of Lone Man Creek. Guests can relax amidst treetops and take in the beauty of the Texas Hill Country from the veranda while sipping freshly brewed gourmet coffee. Situated high atop a ridge overlooking a waterfall, the constant breezes and multi-layered canvas allow Sinya to maintain a surprisingly comfortable temperature, even on the warmest of days. Swimming and tubing are available when the creek is flowing. The luxury accommodations for 2 include a kingsize bed with extravagant linens, spa bathrobes,

24 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M

claw foot bathtub, feather sofa, kitchenette, outdoor shower, hot tub, outdoor grill, hammock, and a garden fire pit with complimentary S’mores. Complete with air-conditioning, heating, and highspeed Wi-Fi you’ve never camped like this before. Pass the time watching hummingbirds eat from your feeder during the day and stargazing at night. Plan ahead, many dates are sold out 6 months in advance and premium dates can book a year in advance. Sinya on Lone Man Creek Deer Lake Estates, Wimberley hillcountrysinya.com Rates start at $299 in 2016 and $325 in 2017. Two night minimum.

Fredericksburg Anyone? Need to sleep off all the wine you drink on the way? We have two unique places to consider.


Hangar Hotel - 71.1 miles Built to look like a 1940’s, WWII airport hangar, this quirky boutique hotel is a minute’s walk from the Gillespie County Airport in Fredericksburg. Staying at the Hangar Hotel is a total experience; the hotel features airplane memorabilia, model planes, USO history and the romance of the 1940’s. The aviation and WWIIbased setting is comfortably complemented with today’s luxuries of high speed internet, bomber jacket leather covered furniture, and Egyptian cotton sheets. The hotel has gone beyond conventional hotel standards by combining fine woods, granite, custom carpet and tile, and unique furnishings. Experience the Airport Diner, designed after 1940’s-style railcar diners of old and serving traditional diner fare such as the “Bomber Burger”, old-fashioned malts, and daily chef ’s blue plate specials. Large windows allow ample viewing of aircrafts arriving and departing on the nearby runway. The airport is commonly visited by all types of aircraft, from single engine planes to multi-engine jets and helicopters. The hotel’s second floor observation deck is another great place to watch the planes come and go as you can see the entire length of the runway. Nearby, the Officers’ Club features a mahogany and granite fireplace, soft leather furniture and grand piano, making it the perfect spot to sip one of over 100 martinis on the cocktail menu. Hangar Hotel 155 Airport Rd, Fredericksburg hangarhotel.com Rates start at $149 on weekdays and $189 on weekends.

Historic B&B -

62.7miles

Located in Fredericksburg, Settlers Crossing comprises seven houses spread across 35 acres of towering oak trees, rolling pastures and flower gardens, with Settlers Creek meandering through. Each house is an historic home either relocated to or originally built on the property and outfitted with traditional decor and modern amenities. The antiques-filled cottages and cabins come with wood-burning fireplaces, kitchens, separate living areas, Jacuzzi tubs, and porches. Resort amenities include continental breakfast, a swimming hole, and BBQ pits. The country setting is completed by Brighty the donkey, a flock of sheep, and resident native deer roaming free. The oldest home on the property is the Von Heinrich home. Built in 1787 in Pennsylvania, the home was later relocated to Settlers Crossing. This 2 bedroom home features 19th century art and antiques and the living room has a wood burning fireplace. Other amenities include a Jacuzzi tub, full kitchen, central heat and air, and satellite TV. A split rail fence, historic outbuildings, and an arbor with a great view of the Texas hill country add to the country feeling. Settlers Crossing 104 Settlers Crossing Rd, Fredericksburg settlerscrossing.com Rates start at $145 a night for double occupancy, fee for extra guests. SMTX

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Ghostly Historic Mission - 106 miles For Texas history buffs or haunted hotel lovers, it doesn’t get more authentic than this. At the Goliad Massacre of 1836 over 300 Texian troops were intercepted by the Mexican army, escorted back to the Spanish mission Presidio La Bahia, and then executed nearby. The historic site is not a place you’d ordinarily expect to be able to stay alone, overnight. But the officers’ quarters at the presidio are available to overnight guests to experience history first-hand. Presidio La Bahia fell to ruin after the Texas Revolution but was restored in the 1960’s. The mission was featured on the Travel Channel’s “Most Terrifying Places in America” which interviewed people saying they’d heard footsteps, cannon shots and random bell chiming from the chapel while they were in the quarters. One woman even said she’d been

choked by a ghost. The quarters, as the accommodations are known, include two bedrooms, a living and dining area with fireplace, a kitchen, a bathroom, and central heat and air conditioning. With the exception of visitors from the spirit world, you’ll have the entire historic mission all to yourself after visiting hours. Guests of the mission are allowed full access to the interior of the fortress during their stay, should they have the nerve to venture into the dark, cold, stone hallways in their pajamas. Presidio La Bahia 217 US-183, Goliad presidiolabahia.org Rates are $212.50 per night, tax included.

lighting, take a dip in the hot tub, enjoy a morning shower under the trees in the private, spacious outdoor shower big enough for two (ohh la la!), and end your day relaxing by the fire. The owners go out of their way to add special touches to make your trip complete with gestures such as leaving fresh eggs in the fridge (as long as the chickens keep up) and providing local organic coffee. This cozy retreat is nestled in a grove of Elm Trees along the banks of Smith Creek on 10 beautiful acres shared with the owners. The Dixie Daisy 3 miles from downtown Wimberley airbnb.com/rooms/577410 Rates start at $130 per night. Two night minimum.

Airstream Hideaway - 11.9 miles A renovated airstream trailer near Wimberley isn’t just super cute — it also has its own hammock, tree house, hot tub, outdoor shower, and grill. If that wasn’t enough, it even backs up to its own creek. If you enjoy camping, but secretly wish you had a real bed, a real bathroom, Wi-Fi, and satellite TV then the Dixie Daisy is for you. Grill up a yummy dinner and dine al fresco on the large deck, take a morning stroll along the creek, turn on the string lights for mood

26 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M


Tipi Quarters - 19.4 miles Geronimo Creek Retreat offers rustic outdoor living with a modern twist. Overlooking Geronimo Creek in Seguin, the five Native American-style tipis surround the property’s beautiful fish-stocked pond. While conventional on the outside, the tipis feature a stateof-the-art experience with air conditioning and heating; satellite TV; a kitchenette; two or three queen-size beds and a pullout couch. Each tipi has access to its own private bathroom with a walk-in tiled shower. Tipis are spacious enough to comfortably accommodate up to six guests. In addition, each tipi comes with its own barbeque pit and picnic table.

The 4 acre property is packed with amenities, allowing guests to enjoy the beautify scenery and springfed creek. Families will love the dock for swimming and fishing, the large hot tub, hammocks, rope swing, kayaks, paddleboards, playscape, and even a sand pit complete with sand toys. If the weather doesn’t cooperate, guests can enjoy the rec room with an indoor big screen TV, couches, ping pong table, darts, and games. Geronimo Creek Retreat 2050 Laubach Rd, Seguin

geronimocreekretreat.com

Rates start at $119 on weekdays and $159 on weekends plus tax and $39 cleaning fee.

Zootopia - 53.7 miles At the Exotic Resort Zoo you can rent a cabin and stay with the animals all night. Located in Johnson City, the resort is a preserve for endangered animals. Daily guided safari tours feature over 500 animals and 80 different species. Guests ride through 137 wooded acres in an open-air vehicle while feeding animals such as “Omar the Camel” and “Rusty the Buffalo,” who eat right out of your hand. Professional guides share interesting facts about each animal’s habits, backgrounds and life-span. Play with a baby deer, elk and other small animals at the two petting zoos. Resort amenities include a free zoo tour, pool, hot tub, playscape, billiards room, outdoor grills, fire pits, and a walking trail to the lake, where you may encounter kangaroos and wallabies. The 5 cabins are primitive but do provide linens and refrigerators. Most have kitchens and even front porches that overlook the lake and kangaroo exhibit. You can also simply visit the zoo if you don’t want to sleep amidst the wild animals. Exotic Resort Zoo 235 Zoo Trail, Johnson City zooexotics.com Cabins start at $130 a night for double occupancy, $10 per extra guest

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27


Q&A

SMTX MAGAZINE

APRIL 2016

Fire Spinning Live Shade and Brannigan perform April 10th at the monthly art event Art Haus at Poor Haus in New Braunfels. For booking information visit gigsalad. com/brannigans_flow_ arts_san_marcos.

“The thrill of trusting someone with fire near your face gives you quite the adrenaline ride.”

- Brannigan Goguen

HEARTS ON FIRE or two performers, the art of fire spinning led to an emotional partnership that manifests in performance. Fire spinning is dynamic and exciting to watch and to perform. That excitement led two local fire spinners -- Travis Shade and Brannigan Goguen of Brannigan’s Flow Arts -- into a partnership that is both artistic and romantic.

SHADE Q: WHAT IS FIRE SPINNING? A: Fire spinning is the art of dancing with fire. There are many interpretations of fire spinning, paved by each individual performer, from belly dancing with palm torches, to the sword/baton mash-up of the fire knife from Hawaii and the poi spinning from the Maori tribe of New Zealand, which was my introduction to the art and my all time favorite instrument. Q: HOW DID FIRE SPINNING BECOME POPULAR IN CENTRAL TEXAS?

A: There was a lady who traveled through Austin in the ‘90s that taught a small group of people the art of fire dancing, including poi moves, safety precautions and how to make your own wicks. This group of less than 10 has formed multiple dance troupes in Austin such as Bruhas del Fuego, Tantien and Sangre Del Sol. Q: WHEN DID YOU GET INTERESTED IN IT? A: When my older sister turned 18, she had a drum circle party in the backyard of our North Austin house. I remember the look of concern on my parents face when my sister and her friend approached them to ask permission to spin fire. At the time, I was in the Boy Scouts. To me, Boy Scouts wasn’t about merit badges -- it was all about camping, living outside and spending all our free time making bonfires. Each time we made one it got bigger and better, so fire was super intriguing to me. When I heard the possibility of spinning fire around you, I was instantly interested.

ordering a set of poi (a ball on a string with handles and streamers on the ends one held in each hand) and an instructional VHS, my family started practicing in the yard. The time spinning in my backyard really helped with my fundamentals. I started to learn a lot when we found a group of fire spinners who practiced every Tuesday at a hidden coffee shop by the railroad tracks in East Austin called Café Mundi. It was populated by a strong group of really nice and welcoming people who all were really good at spinning.

BRANNIGAN Q: HOW DID YOU GET INTO FIRE SPINNING?

Q: HOW LONG DID IT TAKE TO LEARN?

A: About 10, maybe 11 years ago, I was standing in line at a Social Security office in Dallas when I had a random run-in with a friend who had the desire to gift me my first pair of fire wicks. I had been practicing moves and patterns with sock poi, but once I spun fire for the first time the seed was planted. I was hooked. Fire spinning guided me toward a particular form of art scene, or flow arts, where I met many other flow artists.

A: It was a pretty slow learning process. This was pre-YouTube, a great source for instructions and inspiration now. After

Q: HOW DID YOU AND SHADE MEET? A: Shade and I met at FreezerBurn back in 2009. It was a funny interaction because I was

By Robin Blackburn Photos Courtesy Albrecht Photography and Sharon Sturgis Photography 28 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M


set on a day burn, which is spinning fire during the day. I guess you’d say fire spinning is done mainly towards darker hours; however, my passion for fire just couldn’t wait until night. He was surprised but absolutely down. We’ve been good friends ever since. There are always those few you connect with -- sometimes it’s romance, sometimes it’s just like minds and sometimes it’s like minds that one day become romance. Q: WHEN DID YOU KNOW IT WAS LOVE? A: The moment our bond transformed we were sitting on the side of a giant hill or mini mountain out in the rural parts of the hill country when he started to sing Monty Python’s “The Universe Song” from the film “The Meaning of Life” at the moment I needed it the most. We decided we wanted to put together a flow team and see what collaborations we could come up with. We realized our flow was so similar that spinning partner poi together came easily. When we practiced we always figured out some crazy advanced concept quickly with ease and excitement. Partner flow arts gave our minds a way of understanding [that] if we flow well together, we should be together. Q: HOW DOES YOUR FIRE SPINNING EXPRESS YOUR LOVE FOR EACH OTHER? A: A love blossomed, but like any relationship, there are times when the butterflies aren’t hanging out on a flower. We express the roller coaster ride of relationships. Our battle scene is typically him beginning a contact staff set and me coming into the set with an unlit fire sword preparing for attack. He accepts the challenge and we engage in battle where he lights my fire sword after our weapons cross. Lovers disagree sometimes, especially if he eats the last Oreo without sharing. Partner fire poi is the second set, and it’s more like dancing with each other and slowly building up toward intertwining our poi. In my opinion, space and timing are everything with partner poi. One must be aware of each other’s timing and spin plane in order to flow together smoothly, much like a loving relationship. When we intertwine our poi, it brings our bodies close and we are able to kiss while we spin fire around one another. People react to that in the cutest of ways because I think everyone appreciates bold love. Our fire story, for me, is an expression of how relationships go. It’s also just fun to swing fire around each other in hopes we don’t set one another ablaze. The thrill of trusting someone with fire near your face gives you quite the adrenaline ride. Same goes for any relationship, I suppose. SMTX

29


COMEDY SMTX

MAGAZINE

APRIL 2016

SUNNYVALE RESIDENTS TARGET SAN MARCOS Trailer Park Boys Randy and Mr. Lahey are coming to Kiva Lounge & Bar on April 30th.

andy and Mr. Lahey have solidified themselves as stand out stars from the popular Canadian series, and are now venturing out for a two-man live show which promises hilariously offensive subject matter. From Mr. Lahey’s drinking problem to Randy’s addiction to cheeseburgers, nothing is off limits. The comedy duo have rocked the stage since 2007 and deliver laughs based on an array of topics. Randy and Mr. Lahey have made such an impact on the fans of the TV series that a live show had to be done. You don’t have to be a fan of Trailer Park Boys to enjoy their live show; it’s geared towards all types of people (as long as they’re adults and not easily offended). The live performance is based around the television series but calls for a much different approach than fans are used to. This unique approach makes for a one of a kind experience where two outrageous characters from the TV series interact live with seemingly unscripted banter. Kiva, one of San Marcos’ newest bars located in the former Taxi’s space, is an optimal setting for this type of performance. The dive bar feel and college student friendly drink prices fit the theme of the show and the intimate venue gives off an exclusive affair vibe. You can depend on Randy to be shirtless and Mr. Lahey to be under the influence, but don’t bet on much more of the show being predictable. These two know how to bring line-crossing hysterics to an audience. Getting up close and personal with

two of the most hilarious characters featured in Trailer Park Boys is an experience. There is not much structure to the show, leading to hysterical digressions and anecdotes and making each performance different. There are opportunities for interaction with the comedy duo, who won’t hesitate to yell back at audience members who feel the need to speak their mind. Get to know Randy and Mr. Lahey on a closer level, but don’t get too close or you might run the risk of being targeted with Mr. Lahey’s next expletive-filled rant. Fans of Trailer Park Boys won’t even notice the absence of other main characters once Randy and Mr. Lahey get started. Seeing them together gives the performance the feeling of watching a deleted scene or bonus feature from the series, only you’re watching it unfold live in front of you. Drink, eat, and laugh at two of the most iconic characters in comedy history as they make a rare public appearance far from home.

TRAILER PARK BOYS

is a Canadian mockumentary television series that focuses on the misadventures of a group of trailer park residents, some of whom are exconvicts, living in the fictional Sunnyvale Trailer Park. Seasons 1-9 are available on Netflix. RANDY AND MR. LAHEY LIVE KIVA LOUNGE & BAR Saturday, April 30, 10 pm kiva.localtickets.com Advance tickets recommended. Randy and Mr. Lahey performances often sell out. randyandmrlaheylive

By Kristen Sowell 30 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M


Happy Hour Specials Monday-Friday from 4-7 p.m.

$0.99 Crispy Beef Tacos

$12 Domestic Buckets

$2 Landshark, Zeigen, Miller Light, Coors Light,

$13.50 Import Buckets

& Bud Light Pints

(Including Margaritas)

$3 Double Wells

$1 Off All Tequila $1.50 Off Beer Ritas

By Kristen Sowell

SMTX

31


YOUR TRUSTED GUIDE TO THE VERY BEST OF SMTX

SAY HELLO TO THE BEST AROUND NEVER MISS A CHANCE TO MAKE A GREAT INTRODUCTION! Be Featured This September info@smtxmagazine.com


HOME & DESIGN Balcones

Spring Edition 2016

ECOLOGICAL INSPIRATIONS A SNEAK PEEK AT THE 2016 HERITAGE HOME TOUR FEATURING ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE HOMES.

SMTX

33


FOR OVER 40 YEARS, THE HERITAGE ASSOCIATION OF SAN MARCOS HAS PROUDLY PRESENTED A REVOLVING COLLECTION OF HOMES, OPEN FOR PUBLIC TOURS ON THE WEEKEND OF THE FIRST SUNDAY IN MAY. THIS YEAR THE TOUR WILL BE HELD FROM 12 TO 5 ON SATURDAY APRIL 30 AND SUNDAY MAY 1. | By: Cathy Dillon Photos by: Carl Deal |

ENERGY-EFFICIENT

LOOP STREET, OWNED BY KAITLIN HOPKINS AND JIM PRICE Built on a hilltop in the 1970’s, this split-level rock home has just undergone a thorough modernization. Its new owners, theater professionals with entertainment obligations, needed a space for sophisticated entertaining as well as a comfortable energy-efficient home. The end product contains 34 H O M E A N D D E S I G N 4 . 1 6

abundant glass, decks, and seating areas; a solar-heated pool and pavilion complete with outdoor fireplace; an incredible view of the city; and xeriscape gardens with a living green pergola. The trendy décor is enticing and full of ideas.


TOUR TICKETS

Guests will be entertained by live Texas and folk music as they board buses and limousines from the downtown San Marcos courthouse square to be driven to each home as costumed docents tell stories of the town’s history. Tickets $15 presale, $20 day of tour, or $45 in combination with a year’s membership to the Heritage Association. Presale Tickets available at the San Marcos Chamber of Commerce, the Price Center, the Main Street office, or online at smtxwinewalk.com. Further information can be found at heritagesanmarcos.org.

4.16 HOME AND DESIGN

35


RAINWATER

SCOTT STREET, OWNED BY VICTOR AND JUDY FELAN Ask anyone in the Historic District if there are any “green houses” in the neighborhood, and they will all point to this newly constructed, exquisitely detailed and decorated home nestled into the side of a wooded ravine. There is so much to see that it’s hard to know where to look, but its 36 H O M E A N D D E S I G N 4 . 1 6

dogtrot floorplan, great natural lighting, extensive rainwater collection system, xeriscaping (landscaping that needs little to no irrigation), and rockwork are good places to start. Every nook and cranny contains something interesting.


BIG DOWTOWN WEEKEND

This year’s tour coincides with the downtown Spring Art and Wine Walk, and the MR Fest indie music festival. The three events together form a multifaceted San Marcos showcase.

4.16 HOME AND DESIGN

37


LANDSCAPING

EAST MIMOSA CIRCLE, OWNED BY LISA AND JIMBOB SPENCER Newly arrived in San Marcos, the artistic Spencers sought a sprawling single-story house with lots of good light and studio space. But a surprise lesson awaited during the renovation journey that began when they found this hilltop ranch-style home: its aged underground pipes were riddled with leaks,

38 H O M E A N D D E S I G N 4 . 1 6

so every time the existing St. Augustine lawns were sprinkled, there was massive invisible water loss. So they installed water-conscious landscaping right along with entirely new piping and an extensive rework of the home’s interior. The results both inside and out are inspiring, beautiful, and environmentally sound.


LOOKING TO SELL? ONE STORY OR TWO STORY, CALL CHRIS TORREY! He sold ours in 5 days, and got us top dollar. - Lacey Honig Residential Sales Specialist Broker/Owner

512.813.0213 visit EliteRealtyAdvisor.com for a free home evaluation

Extremely Professional, Not Pushy, And Very Informative. - Matt Capps

5Acres of San Marcos Hill Country

Featured Listing

Immaculate Hill Country home on 5 Acres. Built in 2012, 2226 Sq Ft, 3 Bed, 2 Baths with Study. Large kitchen, Open floor plan, Call Chris for details.

Chris Is An ExcelLent Resource For Selling Who Genuinely Cares About The Work He Does. - Travis Damron SMTX

39


HALF PRICED TAPAS

(512) 396-4260 MON-SAT: 3:00 P.M. - 2:00 A.M. SUN: 11:30 A.M - 2 A.M.

ENJOY OUR DELICIOUS TAPAS AT A PRICE YOU CAN FEEL GOOD ABOUT FROM 3 – 7 P.M. EVERY DAY!

FULL BAR, TAPAS MENU AND UNIQUE PUB FARE. 40 S M T X M AG A Z I N E . C O M


OLD JEWEL

BELVIN STREET, OWNED BY ED AND BONNIE LONGCOPE One of the most significant houses on picturesque Belvin Street, this elegant 1870’s home has very rarely been on tour, so we are delighted at the chance to present it this year. We’re cheating a bit because there is not too much “green” about it besides its color, though recent landscape renovations have minimized the amount of lawn, and added an extensive new sprinkler/drip irrigation system to prevent water wastage. But this is a historical tour, after all, and we couldn’t resist the chance to spotlight this green-painted jewel at the heart of San Marcos’ first historic district. 4.16 HOME AND DESIGN

41


“THE ALAMO”

BELVIN STREET, OCCUPIED AND DECORATED BY GARY GERMER, OWNED BY CHRIS AND DINA SECREST

This adorable not-so-little cottage couldn’t be more unlike the rest of historical Belvin Street, because it appears to have escaped from historical Santa Fe. Built in the 1930’s and for years known locally as “The Alamo”, this renovated treasure features thick energysaving adobe walls, plenty of interior arches, matching outbuildings, and rocky xeriscape landscaping. Great style and flair have gone into its interior decor.

GREEN LOFT

S. LBJ DRIVE, LOFT APARTMENT OWNED BY BRIAN JEFFREY AND AVAILABLE FOR RENT AS AN AIR B&B LOCATION You may think that this loft is green because of Sean Patrick’s Irish pub downstairs, but on the tour you’ll find that this location is green in more ways than one. “If these walls could talk” should be its motto. The building’s ground floor was a popular music venue in the 70’s so there is recent as well as 1800’s history in this sturdy brick structure, which has been repurposed to suit its current urban mission in life. Think minimalist with a Texas flair and a colorful past.

NEXT YEAR’S TOUR

The 2017 tour will focus on Interior Design, the Soul of any Home. 42 H O M E A N D D E S I G N 4 . 1 6


your dream home

Kyle I San Marcos I Buda

1801 S. Mopac Suite 100 Austin, TX 78746

is one look away. David Lewis REALTOR

San Marcos Resident – Born and Raised

Call/text: 512.618.9460 Email: david@corridorteam.com Browse: corridorteam.com Kyle I San Marcos I Buda

and surrounding communities

buy ~ sell ~ invest Find out what your home is worth. Free comparable market analysis!

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

4.16 HOME AND DESIGN

43


Old School San Marcos A tribute to some of the oldest continuously running businesses

1

3

4

83 YEARS

6

2

113 YEARS

9

41 YEARS

5

71 YEARS

7

44 YEARS

87 YEARS

8

43 YEARS

10

40 YEARS

50 YEARS

42 YEARS


1 1903 WONDER WORLD PARK Wonder Cave, the main attraction, is older than the amusement park itself. Created by the Balcones Fault Line, tours take you deep inside the heart of Texas.

2 1929

DIXIE CREAM Artisan donuts with a local history as rich as the glaze.

3 1933 RILEY’S TAVERN The only reason it’s not older is that whole prohibition thing. Drink in the history and say you had a cold one at the oldest bar in Texas.

4

1945

GLASS BOTTOM BOATS With water so clean and clear in Spring Lake you can see to the bottom, it made perfect sense to turn boats into a aquarium-like experience.

5 1966

FUSCHAK’S The name is synonymous with San Marcos barbecue. Generation after generation have grown up eating their smoky sweet meats.

6 1972 GILL’S FRIED CHICKEN Just plain good. Nuff said.

7 1973

CHANCES R Once known as Restless Wind, the historic bar offers up world class cocktails as well as cold bottles of bud light. Look for their new outdoor patio expansion coming soon.

8 1974

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE Still the home of live music in San Marcos, it’s as pure Texas country as it gets. Just ask anyone, including Mr. George Strait.

9 1975 GRINS RESTAURANT Burgers, chicken fried steak, fajitas and $.99 margaritas. Sitting out on the tree laced deck and feeling the warm Texas sunshine on your face never goes out of style.

10 1976 LIONS CLUB TUBE RENTAL Tubing veterans agree, the calm 45min float ending at Rio Vista Park is the best familyfriendly tubing experience in the state.

A DOWNTOWN GEM The Crystal River Inn In a grand, circa 1883 Victorian mansion, this cozy bed-and-breakfast is a five minute walk from the LBJ Museum of San Marcos and six minutes from the Texas State campus. The staff is touted for catering to guests every need, making visitors feel like family. The whimsical, Victorian-style rooms are individually decorated with antiques and feature private bathrooms, TVs and free WiFi. Some have fireplaces, claw-foot tubs and sitting areas. The free homemade breakfast is always hot, fresh and very delicious. Spa services are also available for a fee. 326 W. Hopkins St. San Marcos, TX 78666 (512) 396-3739

“As a matter of fact, the bed felt like I was sleeping at home” - Wes from Cleburne, Texas


10 Celebrating

years EST. 2006

CELEBRATING

TEN YEARS THANK YOU SAN MARCOS! WE LOVE SHARING YOUR ENTERTAINMENT & CULTURE.

April 2016  
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