Page 1

NextRail KC Phase II Streetcar expansion plan Appendix 2 of 2


486


Appendix 4: Finance

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project

1. Summary table of federal, state, private, county, and local funds 2. Transportation development district bond runs with and without ccrow 3. transportation development district Revenue Table with and without ccrow

489


Table 16.1 possible funding sources for streetcar and related improvements

Federal SOURCE

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

New Starts/Small Starts Program (49 U.S.C. Section 5309 Fixed Guideway Capital Investment Grants)

FTA, through the Capital Investment Grant program, which includes the New Starts and Small Starts programs, provides funds to transit project sponsors to build new or expanded fixed-guideway transit systems.

Federal Transit Urban Formula Grants (49 U.S.C. Section 5307)

Formula grants that fund public transportation capital projects in urbanized areas to finance the planning, acquisition, construction, cost-effective lease, improvement, and maintenance of equipment and facilities for use in transit. One percent of the funds apportioned to urbanized areas with a population of at least 200,000 must be expended for associated transit improvements. The Governor, responsible local officials, and publicly owned operators of mass transportation services, must jointly select the designated recipient for an urbanized area with a population of 200,000 or more.

Note: Resource utilized along with TIGER funding for streetcar in Cincinnati, Charlotte, St. Louis, New York, Chicago and for BRT in Stamford, CT.

Note: Resource utilized for St. Louis Trolley Loop.

New Markets Tax Credits

Federal tax incentive that attracts investment capital to low-income communities by permitting individual and corporate investors to receive a 39% tax credit against their Federal income tax return in exchange for making equity investments in a recognized community development entity (CDE). Reduces borrowing costs and enables higher risk loans and investments that shoulder collateral shortfalls and credit risks. City would retain ownership of the right-of-way but would lease the immovable infrastructure. Note: New Markets credits used for improvements to New York’s transit system.

490


FUNDING INFORMATION

APPLICABILITY

In FY 2012 the New Starts and Bus Programs were not partially earmarked, leaving unallocated funds. Unallocated funds are available for allocation through a discretionary competitive award process.

Capital infrastructure; acquisition of real property, initial acquisition of rolling stock for the systems, acquisition of rights-of-way, and relocation.

Requires 10% match. Federal share cannot exceed 80% of the net project cost. The Federal share may be 90% for the cost of vehicle-related equipment attributable to compliance with the American with Disabilities Act and the Clean Air Act or 85% for the cost of a vehicle that complies with these requirements. The federal share may also be 90% for projects or portions of projects related to bicycles facilities. The Federal share of the eligible operating cost is 50%.

Flexible.

FY 14 estimated obligation is $4,458,650,000. Range of financial assistance is typically $10,890 to $1,293,611. Average is $180,588.

Streetcar Expansion Project

Immovable capital infrastructure (track, catenary, and stations) that is located within a qualified census tract (based upon recent census data, eligible alignments would include only Independence Avenue and Linwood Boulevard); mixed-use and transitoriented developments.

phase II Expansion plan

A national allocatee (such as LISC) typically receives allocation between $85 and $133 million. KC CDE also receives annual allocation, although lesser in amount.

491


SOURCE Promise Zones (HUD)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

A 10-year federal designation to support high-poverty areas. Community must have overall poverty rate of at least 20% and one census tract with a poverty rate over 30%. The boundaries have to spread over more than one contiguous census tract and have between 10,000 and 200,000 residents. A Promise Zone is an overlay program to federal grant area designed to provide an intensive and layered approach to revitalizing communities. For communities selected, the federal government will partner to help the Promise Zones access the resources and expertise they need. Currently, there are only 6 promise zones. The Obama Administration will designate 14 more communities over the next three years. An existing boundary of a current Promise Neighborhoods or Choice Neighborhoods Implementation grant or Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation grant must be encompassed within the proposed Promise Zone boundaries, and the lead grantee and major partner or partners implementing activities under those grants must play substantial roles in the Promise Zone application, such as lead applicant, implementation partner or other partner making significant commitments. At present, the only area in Kansas City potentially qualified to be designated as a Promise Zone is at the location of the Byrne Criminal Justice Assistance Grant (from 27th to 39th, Paseo to Benton).

FHWA Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act Funding (TIFIA)

Federal credit assistance in the form of direct loans, loan guarantees, and standby lines of credit to finance surface transportation projects of national and regional significance. TIFIA credit assistance provides improved access to capital markets, flexible repayment terms, and potentially more favorable interest rates than can be found in private capital markets for similar instruments. TIFIA can help advance qualified, large-scale projects that otherwise might be delayed or deferred because of size, complexity, or uncertainty over the timing of revenues. Eligible transit projects include the design and construction of stations, track, and transit-related infrastructure, purchase of transit vehicles, and any other type of project that is eligible for grant assistance under chapter 53 of Title 49 of the United States Code. An eligible project must have a cost of at least $50 million. Federal funding cannot exceed 33% of eligible costs or the amount of senior debt, if the TIFIA loan does not have an investment grade rating. The project must have a dedicated revenue source to pledge as repayment on the TIFIA loan (many different types, including sales tax, tax increment finance, and fuel taxes). TIFIA often used in P3 transactions.

492


APPLICABILITY

Undetermined. Pending Housing Authority Choice Neighborhood Implementation Grant, if secured, could potentially allocate up to 20% or $4.5 million of grant to streetcar (existing plan would likely have to be amended to designate transit within the neighborhood revitalization focus. Under current plan, transit is mentioned but not a focus). Requires City match. Could potentially use streetcar property tax and sales tax as part of the local match for Choice Neighborhoods Implementation Grant, and use the 20% or $4.5 million Choice allocation to fund the streetcar and related appurtenances within zone.

Capital infrastructure projects within zone, including bus rapid transit lanes and bike lanes, and transitoriented development (TOD) that attracts new businesses and creates jobs. Prospect MAXX improvements within zone.

$750 million in FY 2013 and $1 billion in FY 2014. Additional funds may also be available from budget authority carried over from previous fiscal years. Any budget authority not obligated in the fiscal year for which it is authorized remains available for obligation in subsequent years. Subject to an annual obligation limitation.

Capital infrastructure.

Streetcar Expansion Project

Each dollar of Federal funds can provide up to $10 in TIFIA credit assistance - and leverage $30 in transportation infrastructure investment.

Might also be able to use portions of leveraged grant funds to endow or attract private investment into taxpayer assistance fund.

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

493


SOURCE

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

FHWA State Infrastructure Banks

SIBs are revolving infrastructure investment funds for surface transportation projects that are established and administered by states. Much like a private bank, SIBs offer a range of loans and credit assistance enhancement products to public and private sponsors of Title 49 transit capital projects. A Title 49 capital project is one that provides “regular and continuing shared-ride surface transportation services that are open to the general public or open to a segment of the general public defined by age, disability, or low income.� Previously, states participating in the SIB program could capitalize in its transit account up to 10 percent of federal funds made available for capital projects under Urbanized Area Formula Grants, Capital Investment Grants, and Formula Grants for Other Than Urbanized Areas. MAP-21 has not allowed new 2013-2014 funding to be used to capitalize SIBs. Missouri created a SIB in 1998 under TEA-21.

Build America Bonds

Provide state and local governments with a new, direct federal payment subsidy for a portion of the borrowing costs on taxable bonds. BABs provide a deeper federal subsidy to state and local governments (equal to 35% of the taxable borrowing cost) than traditional tax-exempt bonds that leads to lower net borrowing costs for state and local governments.

Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ)

Provides funding for projects and programs in air quality nonattainment and maintenance areas for ozone, carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matter (PM-10, PM-2.5) that reduce transportation related emissions. [23 USC 149(a)]. CMAQ funds are directed toward projects, programs, and operational strategies that provide residents with transportation options, to make the most effective use of existing facilities, and lead to lower pollution levels. States and MPOs are direct recipients. CMAQ funds are directed toward projects, programs, and operational strategies that provide residents with transportation options, to make the most effective use of existing facilities, and lead to lower pollution levels.

Energy Tax Credits

Tax incentives for private investment in certain energy technologies, and energy payments that can be used in lieu of certain tax credits. These incentives promote deployment of energy efficient or alternative energy technologies, which may help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Could potentially be coupled with a P3 financing to leverage unrestricted funding for streetcar.

494


A state must match the Federal funds used to capitalize the SIB on an 80-20 Federal/nonFederal basis. States also have the opportunity to contribute additional state or local funds beyond the required nonfederal match.

Capital infrastructure.

From the inception of the program in April 2009 through May 31, 2010, over $106 billion of BABs have been issued by state and local governments in 49 states, the District of Columbia and two territories. The pace of issuances remains steady today.

Capital projects including transportation infrastructure.

Federal share is generally 80%, subject to sliding scale. Certain other activities, including transit vehicles, are eligible to receive a Federal share of 100%.

Transit improvements, expanded authority for transit operations, and support for installation of facilities serving electric or natural gas fueled vehicles (not at rest areas).

$5.129 million in FY 2014.

Energy efficiency technologies utilized in transit capital infrastructure or operations, as well as collateral TOD projects.

Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

495


SOURCE HUD Section 108 Loan Guarantee Program

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Section 108 is the loan guarantee provision of the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. Section 108 provides states and communities with a source of financing for economic development, public facilities, and large-scale physical development projects. All projects and activities must either principally benefit low- and moderate-income persons, aid in the elimination or prevention of slums and blight or meet urgent needs of the community. This makes it one of the most potent and important public investment tools that HUD offers to states and local governments. It allows them to transform a small portion of their CDBG funds into federally guaranteed loans large enough to pursue physical and economic revitalization projects that can renew entire neighborhoods.

496

EERE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technology Deployment, Demonstration, and Commercialization Grant Program

Financial assistance for the technology deployment, demonstration, and commercialization of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. This includes infrastructure and vehicle technologies. Qualified applicants include state governments.

Economic Development Administration (EDA) Discretionary Funds and Grants

Strategic grant investments to support the implementation of regional economic development strategies designed to create jobs, leverage private capital, encourage economic development, and strengthen America’s ability to compete in the global marketplace. Solicits applications from urban communities to develop initiatives that advance new ideas and creative approaches to address rapidly evolving economic conditions. City or (related) not for profit entity may be applicant and recipient.

Economic Development Administration Global Climate Change Mitigation Incentive Fund

Grants for projects that foster economic development by advancing the green economy in distressed communities and creating jobs through, and increase private capital investment in, efforts to limit the nation’s dependence on fossil fuels, enhance energy efficiency, curb greenhouse gas emissions and protect natural systems. Grants available to state and local governments. EDA targets its investments to promote the attraction of private capital investment and the creation and retention of long-term jobs.


FUNDING INFORMATION

Entitlement public entities. An entitlement public entity may apply for up to five times the public entity’s latest approved CDBG entitlement amount, minus any outstanding Section 108 commitments and/or principal balances of Section 108 loans.


APPLICABILITY

Eligible projects include, among others, economic development activities eligible under CDBG; construction, reconstruction, or installation of public facilities (including street, sidewalk, and other site improvements); payment of interest on the guaranteed loan and issuance costs of public offerings; and debt service reserves.

Efficiency operations.

No award ceiling or program funding available. Next funding cycles are June 13, 2014 for funding cycle 4 of FY 2014; and October 17, 2014 for funding cycle 1 of FY 2015.

Capital public works and economic development facilities.

$25 million in FY 2011. Requires 50% match. Grants made quarterly via EDC’s regional offices. No FY 2014 data available.

Eligible projects include infrastructure investments that involve the greening of an existing function or process. Investments must result in green enhancements to the resource, energy, water, and/ or waste, or efficiency of an existing function or process. The enhancements reflect changes to the lifecycle process of an existing function so that the function is performed in a more sustainable manner.

phase II Expansion plan

FY 2014 budget request does not provide details on this program.

Streetcar Expansion Project

A state or a non-entitlement public entity may apply for up to five times the latest approved CDBG amount received by its State, minus any outstanding Section 108 commitments and/ or principal balances on Section 108 loans for which the State has pledged its CDBG funds as security.

497


SOURCE Department of Education Grant

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

TOD physical development that includes an educational programming component (e.g., education center tied to transit stop) could qualify a portion of the streetcar project and appurtenances for funding from the DOE. Federal law encourages joint development of facilities that enhance the effectiveness of and are physically or functionally related to public transportation. Such joint development must enhance economic development or incorporate private investment such as commercial and residential development. Although the streetcar line does not fit any currently available DOE funding programs, this resource is notated for future reference as it might relate to station stop improvements that correspond to an educational initiative. Such educational service integration at or within proximity of streetcar lines and station stops could also enhance scoring for other federal grant programs that are more immediately applicable to streetcar and thus help leverage additional funds.

Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Transportation Funding

TOD physical development that includes a social service programming component (e.g., Sam Rogers outpost center tied to transit stop) could qualify a portion of the streetcar project and appurtenances for funding from the HHS. Federal law encourages joint development of facilities that enhance the effectiveness of and are physically or functionally related to public transportation. Such joint development must enhance economic development or incorporate private investment such as commercial and residential development. Although the streetcar line does not fit any currently available HHS funding programs, this resource is notated for future reference as it might relate to station stop improvements that correspond to an educational initiative. Such social service integration at or within proximity of streetcar lines and station stops could also enhance scoring for other federal grant programs that are more immediately applicable to streetcar and thus help leverage additional funds. HHS programming also complementary of DOT/FTA statutory authority and policy of encouraging the integration of child and elder care centers within transit facilities.

498


Undetermined.

Capital construction costs for TOD/transit centers with integrated education services

Undetermined.

Capital construction costs for TOD/transit centers with integrated social services.

Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

499


SOURCE

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Department of Justice TOD physical development that includes a crime prevention social service Grants component (e.g., security center tied to transit stop) could qualify a

portion of the streetcar project and appurtenances for funding from the DOJ. In addition, DOJ periodically provides funding for physical security improvements in at-risk neighborhoods, as part of a greater crime prevention or safety integration initiative. Such improvements have included, for example, security and lighting at locations tied to community policing activities and safety centers. Federal law encourages joint development of facilities that enhance the effectiveness of and are physically or functionally related to public transportation. Such joint development must enhance economic development or incorporate private investment such as commercial and residential development. Although the streetcar line does not fit any currently available DOJ funding programs (excepting, potentially Promise Zones cited above), this resource is notated for future reference as it might relate to station stop improvements that correspond to criminal justice, community policing activities, and safety centers. Such security and criminal justice activity integration at or within proximity of streetcar lines and station stops could also enhance scoring for other federal grant programs that are more immediately applicable to streetcar and thus help leverage additional funds. Although no currently available DOJ funding programs appear to be applicable to the streetcar project, this resource is notated for future reference as it might relate to station stop improvements and leverage additional funds.

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

ARRA program that provides financial assistance to local governments to create and implement a variety of energy efficiency and conservation projects. The program’s objectives are (1) to reduce fossil fuel emissions created as a result of activities within the jurisdictions of eligible entities; (2) reduce the total energy use of the eligible entities; and (3) improve energy efficiency in the transportation, building, and other sectors.

Rail and Transit Security Grant Program

ARRA program designed to create sustainable programs for the protection of critical transportation infrastructure from terrorism, with special emphasis on construction projects that address the most significant risks and can also be completed in a timely fashion. Eligible applicant must be local transit agency that has undergone a security assessment conducted by the Department of Homeland Security. Priority will be given to operational packages and capital projects that address the most significant risks and can also be completed in a timely fashion.

500


Undetermined.

Capital construction costs for TOD/transit centers with integrated crime prevention services or safety integration initiatives.

Statutory formulas are not applicable to this program.

Capital costs of catenary and station stops and related station improvements; marketing. (e.g. developing public education programs to increase participation and efficiency rates for recycling programs.)

There is no local match requirement, however leveraging of funds on the part of the recipient is encouraged. No FY 2014 estimate is available. This program has no statutory formula. This program has no matching requirements. Program was not funded in FY 2014.

Planning and physical improvements related to operations.

Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

501


SOURCE

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Federal Loan Guarantees for Innovative Energy Technologies

ARRA guarantee program available to a private entity or public institution to encourage, through the use of Federal loan guarantees, early commercial use in the United States of new or significantly improved technologies in energy projects that; 1) avoid, reduce, or sequester air pollutants or anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases; and (2) employ new or significantly improved technologies as compared to commercial technologies in service in the United States at the time the guarantee is issued.

Grant Anticipation Notes (GANs)

Lending tool that may be used by transit agencies to borrow against future Federal-aid funds (Federal Transit Administration Title 49 grants) that are allocated by formula.

Innovative Transit Workforce Development Program

Funding of proposals that promote diverse and innovative workforce development models and programs and leverage investments in public transportation infrastructure to generate positive impacts in local employment, particularly in underserved communities. Program could be utilized to leverage funds from other City supported job training programming.

EPA Pollution Prevention and Innovation Grant/ Clean Air Act

Grants to conduct, and promote the coordination and acceleration of research, investigations, experiments, demonstrations, surveys, and studies relating to the causes, effects (including health and welfare effects), extent, prevention, and control of air pollution. Note: Because they are powered by electricity, trolleys are much quieter and cleaner than gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles. For that reason, Clear Air Act funding is a component of St. Louis Trolley Loop.

FTA New Freedom Program 5317

502

The purpose of this grant program is to provide additional tools to overcome existing barriers facing Americans with disabilities seeking integration into the work force and full participation in society. The New Freedom formula grant program seeks to reduce barriers to transportation services and expand the transportation mobility options available to people with disabilities beyond the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990.


FUNDING INFORMATION

Statutory formulas are not applicable to this program.

APPLICABILITY

Might be utilized for capital projects that include efficient end-use energy technologies.

No FY 2014 estimate is available.

Two-thirds of Federal-transit funding is apportioned by formula funds, while onethird is allocated on a discretionary basis by Congress and the FTA. Funds are distributed by a formula based on population and transit characteristics.

Funds may be used for purchase of trains.

Grants range from $500,000 to $1 million. Cost sharing is not required, but leveraged resources are strongly encouraged and may affect an applicant’s final score.

Potential use for capital construction costs for TOD/transit centers with integrated workforce development services (e.g. a LISC financial opportunity center located at or along transit stop)

Undetermined. Act authorizes the federal government to provide grants equaling up to 60 percent of the cost of state and local programs, while state and local agencies must provide a 40-percent match. In practice, the federal share represents approximately 25 percent of total state/local air budgets, while state and local governments provide 75 percent.

Streetcar Expansion Project

Federal share of eligible capital and planning costs may not exceed 80% of the net cost of the activity. The Federal share of the eligible operating costs may not exceed 50% of the net operating costs of the activity. Recipients may use up to 10 percent of their apportionment to support program administrative costs including administration, planning, and technical assistance, which may be funded at 100% Federal share. The local share of eligible capital and planning costs shall be no less than 20% of the net cost of the activity, and the local share for eligible operating costs shall be no less than 50

Capital and operating expenses for new public transportation services and new public transportation alternatives beyond those required by the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 that are designed to assist individuals with disabilities.

phase II Expansion plan

Section 5317 funds are apportioned among the recipients by a formula that is based upon the ratio that the number of individuals with disabilities in each such area bears to the number of individuals with disabilities in all such areas.

503


SOURCE Public D.O.T. Public Lands Highways Discretionary Funds

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Provides funding for the construction of any kind of transportation project eligible for assistance under Title 23, that is within, adjacent to or provides access to Federal public lands, including national parks, refuges, forests, recreation areas, and grasslands. Title 23 projects include capital costs for transit projects eligible for assistance under chapter 53 of title 49, including vehicles and facilities, whether publicly or privately owned, that are used to provide intercity passenger service by bus. Although the Katy Trail is a state-designated trail and not a Federal public land, the portion of the trail between St. Charles and Booneville is designated as an official segment of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail by the U.S. National Park Service, and the entire trail is part of the American Discovery Trail. Thus, transit facilities constructed in Linwood Boulevard, an area that is arguably adjacent to and provides access to the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, via the Katy Trail, might qualify under this program.

504

FHA Transportation Alternatives Funds

Projects defined as “transportation alternatives,� which include infrastructure projects designed to improve non-driver access to public transportation, enhanced mobility, community improvement activities, and environmental mitigation; safe routes to school projects.

SAFETEA-LU Transportation, Community & System Preservation

MPO, State and local governments are eligible for discretionary grants to implement strategies which improve the efficiency of the transportation system, reduce environmental impacts of transportation, reduce the need for costly future public infrastructure investments, ensure efficient access to jobs, services and centers of trade, and examine development patterns and identify strategies to encourage private sector development patterns which achieve these goals.

Transit Investment in Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER)

Capital investments that will reduce the energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions of a public transportation agency. Since inception, a total of 10 projects are investigating efficient rail technologies such as wayside energy storage, locomotive upgrades, and control systems for track heaters. TIGGER Program focuses on the total energy savings, and/or emissions reductions of a project over its expected its useful life.


May be used for the State/local matching share for apportioned Federal-aid Highway Funds, as described in 23 USC 120(l).

PLHD funds can be used for any type of Title 23 transportation project providing access to or within Federal lands. lands or facilities. Under the provisions of 23 U.S.C. 204(b)(1)(A), the PLH funds are available for the construction of transit facilities.

$820M authorization for FY 2014. Section 213 of Title 23 provides for the reservation of funds apportioned to a State under section 104(b) of title 23 to carry out the TAP. 80 percent Federal/20 percent State or local match.

Capital infrastructure related to CCORW (construction, planning, and design of on-road and off-road trail facilities for pedestrians, bicyclists, and other non-motorized forms of transportation, including sidewalks, bicycle infrastructure, pedestrian and bicycle signals, traffic calming techniques, lighting and other safety-related infrastructure, and transportation projects to achieve compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 USC 12101 et seq.; funds may also be used for the conversion and use of abandoned railroad corridors for trails for pedestrians, bicyclists, or other nonmotorized transportation users).

$29 million funded in 2012. Information not available regarding funding levels for FY 2014.

Planning grant for future phase development.

$49.9 million awarded through FY 2011. Information regarding potential FY 2014 unavailable.

Operational or technological enhancements or innovations.

Streetcar Expansion Project

Federal share of the costs for any project eligible under this program is 100 percent.

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

505


SOURCE

506

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

FTA Job Access and Reverse Commute Grants 5316

Capital, planning and operating expenses for projects that transport lowincome individuals to and from jobs and activities related to employment, and for reverse commute projects. States and public bodies are eligible designated recipients.

FTA Veterans Transportation and Community Living Initiative Grant Program

Transportation access programs for veterans, active service members, military families, and others to learn about and arrange for locally available transportation services that connect them with work, education, health care, and other vital services in their communities.

FTA Transportation for Elderly Persons and Persons with Disabilities (49 U.S.C. Section 5310)

Capital expenses that support transportation to meet the special needs of older adults and persons with disabilities.


FUNDING INFORMATION

Section 5316 funds are apportioned among the recipients by a formula that is based upon the ratio that the number of eligible low-income and welfare recipients in each such area bears to the number of eligible low-income and welfare recipients in all such areas.

APPLICABILITY

Flexible.

Marketing; transmit related communications and technology

Section 5310 funds are apportioned among the States by a formula which is based on the number of elderly persons and persons with disabilities in each State according to the latest available U.S. census data.

Capital infrastructure.

The Federal share of eligible capital costs may not exceed 80% of the net cost of the activity. The 10% that is eligible to fund program administrative costs including administration, planning, and technical assistance may be funded at 100% Federal share. The local share of eligible capital costs shall be no less than 20% of the net cost of the activity.

phase II Expansion plan

$29 M annually. MARC received $50,000 in 2012 and $161,000 in 2011. Other states, when coordinated with broader Veteran activities, received allocations in excess of $1.2M.

Streetcar Expansion Project

Federal share of eligible capital and planning costs may not exceed 80% of the net cost of the activity. The Federal share of the eligible operating costs may not exceed 50% of the net operating costs of the activity. Recipients may use up to 10% of their apportionment to support program administrative costs including administration, planning, and technical assistance, which may be funded at100% Federal share. The local share of eligible capital and planning costs shall be no less than 20% of the net cost of the activity, and the local share for eligible operating costs shall be no less than 50% of the net operating costs.

507


SOURCE Livable Cities Demonstration Account

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

LCDA funds innovative development projects that efficiently link housing, jobs, services, and transit in an effort to create inspiring and lasting Livable Communities. Grants are available to fund basic public infrastructure and site assembly. Projects must connect housing, jobs, civic sites, retail centers and local/regional transportation systems and demonstrate efficient uses land and infrastructure. Infrastructure may include local public streets (including new streets, street realignment; reconstruction of an existing street grid); street extensions or connections; street lighting and street signs; permanent pedestrian features (including sidewalks, and benches); public-use or shared-use parking structures; public connecting elements (generally in the public right-ofway or clearly for public use, including sidewalks and trails that enhance the functional connectivity of the project to transit and other surrounding public spaces including schools and parks); and publically-accessible, siteintegrated transit shelters.

DOT-HUD-EPA Partnership for Sustainable Communities (STP)

In 2009, DOT, HUD, and EPA announced a joint “Partnership for Sustainable Communities”. The three agencies made a commitment to work together to advance livable communities and sustainable development. DOT programs must encourage transportation policies that focus on people and communities who use the transportation system. Likewise, HUD programs must be consistent with HUD’s Strategic Goals and Policy Priorities, including, e.g.: creating better transportation access to jobs and economic opportunities and leveraging federal and private resources; decreasing household transportation costs; and providing access to jobs or job training and transportation. Funds may be used for public transportation capital improvements and operations.

508


196 LCDA grants (totaling > $98 million) have been funded projects in 57 cities.

Capital infrastructure.

Subject to MPO.

Flexible.

Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

509


State SOURCE

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Annual Appropriation for Amtrak

State of Missouri, through the Missouri Department of Transportation, provides funds to Amtrak to operate on a line that spans from Kansas City to St. Louis. Program enjoys bi-partisan support from urban and rural factions alike, and there have been recent efforts by Kansas City to tie Kansas City Amtrak to San Antonio and Oklahoma City via Newton and Wichita, Kansas. Coupling the streetcar project to state Amtrak funding and Jackson County’s commuter rail initiative might create statewide political support to increase Missouri’s appropriation, a portion of which could then be leveraged to the streetcar project.

General Appropriation

A limited-term, annual appropriation pledge for the streetcar project is a moral obligation of the State. Mostly general revenue funds are used for transit, as the Missouri constitution prohibits state gas tax money from being used for anything other than roads. Note: The Seattle Streetcar was able to secure $3 million in state budget appropriation for its streetcar project.

Missouri State Transportation Fund

The State of Missouri spent a total of $6.9 million in FY 2009 for transit projects utilizing the Missouri State Transportation Fund. Seven public urban transit providers and 27 rural transit providers receive state transit operating assistance funds. The State Transportation Fund may also provide monies for trails, paths, and bikeways that occupy a transportation facility right-of-way, without limitation to any specific location within that right-of-way, so long as the continuity of the trail, path, bikeway, or sidewalk is maintained. Furthermore, the fund will support trails, paths, and bikeways that are part of the local transportation system and which function primarily for transportation. The State Transportation Fund will also sponsor enhancement projects and mitigation activities. Proposed legislation (SJR 48) for one-cent sales tax for transit is pending.

State Supplemental TIF

510

When local TIF leaves a gap for a redevelopment project, a municipality can apply for a portion of the new state tax revenues created by the project to be disbursed to cover the financing gap for eligible redevelopment costs on the project. 
To be eligible for State TIF, the underlying local TIF must dedicate at least 50% of the amount of the new local sales tax revenue and 100% of the amount of the new real property tax revenue created by the project each year for which state TIF is sought.


State historically funds Amtrak service in the amount of approximately $8.5 million per annum. For FY 2014, that number is $8.9 million.

Operations.

Subject to appropriation.

Flexible.

Subject to appropriation.

Flexible.

An applicant may be approved to receive up to 50% of the net new state sales tax revenue (general revenue portion only; excluding dedicated taxes) generated in the project area OR up to 50% of the increase in state income tax revenue from net new jobs in the project area. An applicant cannot receive both. State TIF may be awarded for a period of up to 15 years (a longer period may be requested, but not to exceed 23 years). The TIF project funds may be derived from a bond issue (retired with the local and state incremental revenues), or a reimbursement to the developer for eligible costs. A redevelopment project cannot receive more than half of the increased amount of state sales tax or income tax it generates.

Capital infrastructure in any local TIF project area located in a state enterprise zone, a federal empowerment zone, an urban core area, or central business district. The redevelopment project must be in a redevelopment project area that, over the past 20 years, has experienced a generally declining population or generally declining property taxes.

Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

511


SOURCE

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Missouri Development Finance Board Contribution Tax Credits

A taxpayer making a donation to MDFB receives a tax credit equal to 50% of any moneys contributed. Application for tax credit is made to MDFB by the public entity. Following deduction of its fees, MDFB distributes the contribution to the public entity for purposes of implementing the project. Donor, by agreement, may sell the tax credits and donate the sales proceeds to the project, whereby allowing a $10 million project to be a $15 million. Public, tax-exempt bond proceeds may be used to fund contribution, through a properly structured agreement with foundation.

Transportation Corporation

Missouri is one of three states in the nation to have transportation corporation (TC) statutes. A TC is a not for profit, non-stock privately owned corporation that may develop transportation projects. The project must be a necessary or desirable extension or improvement of the state transportation system, therefor a nexus between it and the streetcar project would be required. TC’s have the authority to promote and develop public transportation facilities and systems and thereby promoting economic development in the state. A corporation may use any number of funding methods authorized under state law. It may issue bonds, notes and other obligations, and may secure these obligations by mortgage, pledge, or deed of trust of any or all of the property and income of the corporation, subject to state restrictions. They may establish and impose fees for services provided. They may also contract to provide project revenues to MHTC which would apply those revenues to project costs, including debt service on revenue bonds or refunding bonds. A TC may be formed by three registered voters of the State.

Tax-Exempt Certificates of Participation

COPs are tax-exempt bonds issued by state entities usually secured with revenue from an equipment or facility lease. COPs enable governmental entities to finance capital projects without technically issuing long-term debt. COPs have been used by municipalities to pay for prisons, office buildings, vehicles, and even parks. A purpose-formed state entity issues tax-exempt bonds with maturities that match the lease term of assets that are purchased by the state entity with the proceeds from the bond issue. In the case of transit assets, the state entity then leases the equipment to one or more transit agencies. The underlying lease or installation sale agreement furnishes the revenue stream necessary to secure the bond. The resulting lease payments, most often made with a combination of formula grant funds and local matching share, are then “passed through” to the bondholders by the state entity.

Sale of State Land

512

Publicly owned lands near streetcar lines may be considered as opportunities to raise funds for the system. The surplus lands can be sold or, alternatively, unused development capacity of publicly owned property can be negotiated for development by the private sector.


FUNDING INFORMATION

APPLICABILITY

In 2013, maximum contribution was $10 million. An additional $15 million allocation is possible.

Capital “infrastructure facilities,� including public facilities and any other improvements provided by any form of government.

Undetermined. Project and budget subject to Missouri Highways Transportation approval.

Flexible.

Flexible; undetermined.

Capital infrastructure such as rolling stock, depots, and automated toll collection equipment, all of which are well suited to lease agreements.

Flexible; undetermined.

Flexible.

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project

Could be coupled with a P3 transaction.

513


SOURCE Foreign Trade Zone

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Foreign-trade zones for vendor duty savings related to importation of foreign materials and equipment utilized for streetcar line (such as for manufacturers of cars and catenary). Under U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) supervision, the usual formal CBP entry procedures and payments of duties are not required on the foreign merchandise unless and until it enters CBP territory for domestic consumption, at which point the importer generally has the choice of paying duties at the rate of either the original foreign materials or the finished product. Domestic goods moved into the zone for export may be considered exported upon admission to the zone for purposes of excise tax rebates and drawback. While in the zone, certain tangible personal property is generally exempt from state and local ad valorem taxes.

SOURCE

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Transportation Tax Credit

The State of Missouri previously enjoyed a transportation tax credit (now expired) that was created for a St. Louis-based transportation project. Similar to the MDED contribution tax credit, the TTC provided a $10 m per year, 50% tax credit for a private, income taxable investor. Legislative success in reviving a proven transportation tool could produce funds for the streetcar project. Tax-exempt bond proceeds could potentially be utilized for the contribution, and the sale of the tax credits, pursuant to captive agreement, could then redirect the proceeds from the tax credit sale into project for an additional capital infusion.

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax

As permitted by law, the State of Missouri could propose an increase in the Motor Vehicle Excise Tax (MVET) to help fund the streetcar. Note: Washington State employed this approach for the Seattle monorail, taxing at a rate of 1.4% of a vehicle’s estimated value. All or a portion of the tax would be paid to Kansas City yearly, as city residents registered their cars. Based upon historic trends, projects revenues from an MVET could provide security for financing debt service and for ongoing maintenance.

514


FUNDING INFORMATION

Shared capital savings related to the manufacture of rolling stock, track systems, and catenary.

APPLICABILITY

Flexible; undetermined.

Flexible.

Undetermined.

Operations.

Streetcar Expansion Project

FUNDING INFORMATION

phase II Expansion plan

Flexible; undetermined.

APPLICABILITY

515


Private SOURCE Homeland Security EB5 Program

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

US Citizenship and Immigration Services administers the Immigrant Investor Program, also known as “EB-5,” created by Congress in 1990 to stimulate the U.S. economy through job creation and capital investment by foreign investors by setting aside certain EB-5 visas for investors in projects or “regional centers” designated by USCIS as promoting economic growth. All EB-5 investors must invest in a new commercial enterprise engaged in a for-profit activity formed for the ongoing conduct of a lawful business. The investment must create or preserve at least 10 direct or indirect fulltime jobs for qualifying U.S. workers within two years (or under certain circumstances, within a reasonable time after the two-year period) of the immigrant investor’s admission to the United States. Job preservation is only recognized for defined “troubled businesses.” Capital Investment is defined as cash, equipment, inventory, other tangible property, cash equivalents and indebtedness secured by assets owned by the alien entrepreneur, provided that the alien entrepreneur is personally and primarily liable and that the assets of the new commercial enterprise upon which the petition is based are not used to secure any of the indebtedness. The minimum qualifying investment is $1 million. Could couple EB5 investment with P3. Many municipalities and developers are investigating the use of EB5 foreign investments for large-scale infrastructure projects.

Public-Private Partnerships (P3s)

A P3 transaction to attract private investment to the development of transportation improvements. Early involvement of the private sector can bring creativity, efficiency, and capital to address complex transportation problems facing State and local governments. The SEP-15 program, private activity bonds, and the TIFIA Federal credit program are often used to facilitate P3 projects. (The SEP-15 is a new experimental process for FHWA to identify, for trial evaluation, new publicprivate partnership approaches to project delivery. It is anticipated that these new approaches will allow the efficient delivery of transportation projects without impairing FHWA’s ability to carry out its stewardship responsibilities to protect both the environment and American taxpayers). Possible to use initial P3 investment to front-end local match. Possible additional funding investment for streetcar if City shares in returns from a P3 structure that involves an investment in a real estate investment trust (REIT). The City owns the investment during the term of the P3. P3 transactions have funded the streetcar initiatives of San Diego, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and for Maryland’s Purple Line.

Utility Tariff Adjustment

516

City has approximately 1,400 different rate structures and 1,400 different accounts. Petition KCPL to request streetcar tariff rate upon submitting for rate case in the normal course. category.


FUNDING INFORMATION

APPLICABILITY

Flexible.

Determined by agreement.

Negotiated applicability.

Determined by agreement.

Operational savings.

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project

Flexible and undetermined.

517


SOURCE Utility Construction Savings Program

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Kansas City Power & Light has an urban core economic development rider that provides for a reduced utility rate for five years. The first year the rate is discounted by 25% and then the discount reduces 5% per annum. Project must demonstrate it is receiving state or local government financial support. The streetcar will be large KCPL customer. The streetcar system will use 750-volt dc system through catenary, 7-8 kw hours per mile, 8-9 million mega watt-hours per year, based upon a 10-mile extension. Each substation will use roughly 350 kw hours, which is a significant load. (Compare: load at Kansas City’s IRS complex is estimated at 3-5 MW). The streetcar project will generate +/- 15-20 substations, and substation construction cost is about $1.2 million/$115 +/- per substation. The distance from substation affects costs. There will also be a connection fee to extend the electric utility feed from the KCPL line to the streetcar. Utilities will account for approximately 10-15% of the streetcar operating costs per annum. There also exist tariffs that discount rates for usage on off-peak times (11-7, Mon- Friday is peak; everything else in non-peak). Tariff doesn’t automatically apply; the system will have to meet particular consumption criteria. If the projected consumption is high enough, KCPL will cover 85% of costs to construct the independent substations.

Foundation Grants and Philanthropic Support

Kansas City and surrounding communities are home to many foundations that have generously supported large-scale infrastructure projects and initiatives. Likewise, the proven success of streetcar lines to community connectivity and economic development could attract similar private donations to Kansas City’s philanthropic community. Donations could be recognized through streetcar and stop naming.

Not-for-Profit Support - Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC)

Funding opportunities may available through not-for-profit community development entities with transportation oriented development initiatives. LISC has a foundation that makes $100k, 0% loans to important projects in the community. They can do up to $1.2 million a year, in $100k increments. Such funding opportunities may be available through the Greater KC LISC. Additionally, LISC has invested $222M in transit oriented development projects nationwide, which has leveraged over $1 billion in total development investment along streetcar corridors. Examples include, Boston, Los Angeles, Phoenix, and Minneapolis. Note: LISC is currently using its funding products in connection with the Phoenix streetcar initiative to support redevelopment along its existing rail line with some focus on a new four-mile second phase streetcar extension currently under construction.

518


Undetermined.

Operations.

Flexible; undetermined.

Dependent upon foundation funding criteria, if funds are restricted.

Flexible; undetermined.

Flexible; primarily collateral development but could include stations and other community , commercial, and residential developments within and along streetcar line. Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

519


SOURCE Not-for-Profit Support – Living Cities

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Living Cities is a not-for-profit organization that implements the priorities of 22 of the world’s largest foundations and financial institutions to create opportunities for low-income persons and their communities. Living Cities has approved grants for transportation and TOD projects across the country. In Denver, Living Cities has made a grant to connect low-income residents to middle-skill job opportunities and expand resources for both economic development lending and affordable housing in connection with Denver’s $6.7 billion FasTracks project, one of the largest mass transit projects currently under construction in the United States, that will extend fixedguideway transit service beyond the three existing light rail corridors and extensive bus system. In San Francisco, Living Cities supported a grant to align TOD investments with a regional economic development and workforce development strategy. Living Cities has also funded equitable TOD financing systems and is working on a transit procurement model that will help formulate economic development and employment opportunities for low-income residents. In Minneapolis, Livings Cities has partnered with LISC to encourage TOD and related economic development opportunities.

Innovation Investments

Funding opportunities may be available through innovation investments. Utilizing a partnership with Google, the Kauffman Foundation and others, Kansas City may be able to leverage funds for capital and operation costs.

County Jackson County Port Improvement District

520

Authorizes a 1% sales and use tax and/or real property assessment, as well as the issuance of bonds, for port improvement projects undertaken by the Jackson County Port Authority. The project must be within Jackson County, Missouri, excluding the corporate limits of Kansas City, Missouri. Project may include the acquisition, operations, maintenance, rehabilitation or construction of any building or infrastructure determined by the Port Authority. The sales, use and property proceeds may, pursuant to a statutory amendment in 2012, must be used for economic development projects. PID is approved by a simple majority of property owners in the PID district.


Flexible; undetermined.

Flexible; undetermined.

Flexible; undetermined.

Flexible.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible.

Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

521


SOURCE County TIF

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Provides that increased property tax and a portion of other revenues generated by the new development are captured and placed in a special fund to pay for the costs of redeveloping the area. The development may also capture up to 50% of certain locally imposed taxes (commonly referred to as economic activity taxes or “EATS”) such as local sales, franchise taxes and utility taxes and local earnings taxes to fund project costs. Certain new state revenues (one-half of general state sales tax or onehalf of state individual income tax withheld from new employees in the redevelopment area) generated by a redevelopment project may be captured under limited circumstances where the area is blighted and is located in either an enterprise zone, federal empowerment zone, or a central business district or urban core area with at least one 50 year old building and that suffers from 20 year pattern of declining population or property tax revenue. State statutes also authorize bonds to be issued that are paid from the PILOTs and EATs generated in the redevelopment area. Note: St. Louis utilized $4.1M in TIF funds for Loop.

County Urban Roadway System

CURS is authorized pursuant to the Jackson County Code Chapter 28. Under the CURS program, the City may request the county to credit the CURS account of the City in an amount not to exceed twenty-five percent (25%) of the Special Road and Bridge Tax collected by the county from property situated within the corporate limits of the City in any given year. The collected CURS monies can be used for County approved projects which must be within roads that contribute to the County roadway system.

Sale of County Land; Land Trust Property Conveyance

Publicly owned lands near streetcar lines may be considered as funding opportunities for the system. Surplus, unwanted or underutilized lands can be sold to the private sector or the value of the lands might be counted as part of a local match required for federal grants.

Local

522

CDBG ForwardFunding

Local governments may pledge their current and future Section 106 or 108 HUD funding as a local match and guarantee for loans.

Port Authority of Kansas City, Missouri Port Improvement District

Same as Jackson County Port Improvement District, except must be located in Kansas City, Missouri.

New or Existing Parking Meter Revenues

All or a determined portion of new or existing on-street metered parking and public off-street parking and increased meter rates could provide revenue to construct and/or operate the streetcar.

Kansas City Convention and Visitors Association Hotel Tax Increment

All or a determined portion of KCCVA’s hotel/motel occupancy and a business license fee generated after the construction of streetcar could provide revenue to construct and/or operate the streetcar. Potentially viable source following passage of Tourism & Hotel Tax Exemption Removal on April 2, 2013.

Tax Abatement PILOT

Establish City policy for payment in lieu of taxes for Chapter 99, Chapter 100, and Chapter 353 property tax abatement programs to include dedicated allocation for streetcar maintenance and operations. Potential enhanced requirement for developments within benefit area of streetcar.


Flexible and undetermined.

Undetermined.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible.

Based upon a stated multiplier (e.g. 20 times current funding base).

Flexible, provided the use meets Section 106/Section 108 criteria.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible; likely operations and maintenance.

Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

523


SOURCE

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Development Code Requirements

Amend Development Code to require City proportional payment into streetcar system for maintenance and operations. Formula similar to cash in lieu of land dedication formula used by Parks Department. Potential enhanced requirement for developments within benefit area of streetcar.

City Developer Tax Increment Financing

Same as County TIF, above. City could establish a TIF District to overlay the streetcar system. This would enable the City to act as both transit and property developer around new transit stations/hubs. The benefits would include reaping the revenues from the development projects and ensuring that high-density planning intentions that would support the infrastructure are built into place. The TIF revenues could then be used for debt service for streetcar financing or operating costs. The City could then borrow against the predicted uplift in tax revenues.

Private Developer Tax Increment Financing

Same as above, except the City could create a TIF district to overlay the streetcar line and then grant development rights to a private developer. This would allow the City to capture the actual incremental increase of EATs and PILOTs generated by development along the streetcar line that undertaken by private developers, and could include a profit-share arrangement whereby the private construction developer could share in the value capture. Note: Several transit projects have been financed using this method. Examples include the new Transbay Transit Center in San Francisco, Denver’s Union Station, the Dulles Metrorail project in Washington, DC, and the Rail+Property model utilized by Hong Kong’s MTR Corporation (discussed below).

Redirected Tax Increment Financing (unutilized increment in special allocation fund generated by unrelated approved TIF plans)

Potential use of unutilized increment in special allocation funds generated by unrelated approved City or County TIF plans might be applied to streetcar local match. For example, MainCor secured $9.6 million in funds generated by the Federal Reserve Bank from the Southtown Tax Increment Financing (TIF) in 2007. $3.5 million of these funds to be used to help implement the Corridor Plan and $6.1 million for public improvements to Penn Valley Park, neither of which were within the Southtown TIF project area.

“Rail + Property” Master Developer

The City could emulate Hong Kong’s very successful “Rail+Property” value capture model. A variation on a P3 and TIF, the Rail+Property approach involves identifying land within the streetcar-designated “benefit zone” and providing a private developer with the right to construct and develop new transit oriented improvements (potentially, but not necessarily, using a taxpayer subsidy) on such property, and thereafter reap the direct land value increase generated by operating, selling or leasing these developments, all in consideration for the private developer providing the upfront investment of capital in the streetcar rail infrastructure. In Hong Kong, its transit developer, MTR, leases/sells its development rights to a third-party for upfront cash, sells/leases the TOD development it or its third-party assignee has constructed, and also provides property management services. The model has allowed MTR to finance, build and operate most of Hong Kong’s transit infrastructure. Note: The transit financing model also been used in Beijing, London, and Stockholm.

524


Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible; likely operations and maintenance.

Flexible and undetermined.

Capital infrastructure or operations.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible and undetermined.

Plan dependent; flexible and undetermined..

Subject to policies of TIF Commission and authorization by Kansas City, Missouri City Council.

Flexible; undetermined.

Flexible. Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

525


SOURCE Ridership Fare Revenues

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

At present, it is proposed that the Kansas City Streetcar Authority will not charge a fare for streetcar ridership on the Downtown streetcar starter line. Other established streetcar systems that charge fares cover less than 20% of the streetcar operating costs. If the City were to charge a ridership fare, In Portland, for example, the streetcar “TriMet” tickets cost between $1.00 and $2.50, depending upon the hours of utilization, and there are special pass rates for seniors, youth, and large groups. All-year passes cost $200. In Minneapolis, bulk user agreements covering large groups traveling to destination points or high volume user employers are discounted to 50 cents per rider.

Advertising, Promotion and Marketing

Some streetcar systems offer short-term advertising at streetcar stops and advertising spaces marketed on the outside and inside of vehicles. Marketing can also include naming or “sponsorship” rights by regionally based corporations and/or corporations and/or non-profit organizations that provide up-front grants. Note: Based on experience in other cities, lines of length and ridership, advertising could be expected to generate annual revenues in the range of $50,000 to $200,000/yr.

Parks Department Funding

Utilization of Parks Department Public Infrastructure Capital Improvements program and Parks Maintenance Fund for streetscape improvements within established boulevards, including Linwood and portions of the Independence Avenue line between Paseo and Benton Boulevards. Potential applicability to operations and maintenance. Utilize funds as local match for Public Lands Highways Discretionary Funds grant application. Designation of CCROW (to connect to Linwood and Public Lands Highways Discretionary Funds) would increase opportunities for use of Parks funds.

Group Tours

Streetcars rented by private entities for special occasions or events when demand permits. Note: Tampa invokes this rental income stream, which is modest. Tampa charges $225 per vehicle per hour, with a one- hour minimum during regular service hours, and $325 outside of regular service hours. It also offers guided group tours of city neighborhoods and districts along the streetcar route at a cost of $2.00/$1.00 one-way per person.

Sale of City Property; Land Bank/Excess City Property Disposition

Publicly owned lands near streetcar lines may be considered as opportunities to raise funds for the system. The surplus lands can be sold, or, alternatively, unused development capacity of publicly owned property can be negotiated for development by the private sector. Portland had a similar transportation land sale that generated $3.1 million, which represented approximately 3 percent of the total capital cost of its streetcar.

Private Parking Garage and Lot Special Assessment

526

Create special assessment (property and/or sales tax) applicable to privately owned parking garages and surface parking lots for daily use and/or special events. Assessment could be via overlay TDD or PID.


FUNDING INFORMATION

Flexible and undetermined.

APPLICABILITY

Operations and capital infrastructure for future streetcar extensions.

Capital infrastructure and maintenance.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible; likely operations and maintenance.

Flexible; undetermined.

Flexible.

Flexible and undetermined.

Flexible.

phase II Expansion plan

Flexible; subject to appropriation.

Streetcar Expansion Project

Flexible. Flexible and undetermined. If bond funding is used for streetcar, private advertising could compromise requirements of tax-exempt issue. Could do bifurcated bond issues and segregate if line and catenary were issued with exempt bonds and bonds for cars and stops are constructed using taxable bonds.

527


SOURCE Large Employer Parking Special Assessment Waiver for Private

Public Improvements Advisory Committee Funds

528

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OR CONCEPT

Large employers are a promising source of support since the streetcar system may help reduce some of their own parking costs. For employers that provide discounted travel vouchers for use of the KCATA bus rapid transit and bus systems, cost savings may be realized through the streetcar system which, if based upon the downtown starter line, may be fare free. Through private donation of a portion of the savings, large employers may be able to help defray capital or routine operational costs. City may allocate a single or multi-year obligation of in-district or Citywide PIAC funds to the streetcar project.


Flexible; undetermined.

Flexible.

Subject to appropriation.

Capital infrastructure.

Streetcar Expansion Project

APPLICABILITY

phase II Expansion plan

FUNDING INFORMATION

529


530 Debt Service (2) $            4,433,213               4,432,800               4,435,450               4,434,475               4,433,950               4,433,250               4,435,875               4,435,875               4,436,250               4,436,750               4,437,125               4,437,125               4,436,500               4,435,000               4,432,375               4,433,250               4,432,250               4,434,000               4,433,125               4,434,250               4,432,000               4,435,875               4,435,375               4,434,250

$       106,430,388

Debt Service (1) $                          ‐                              ‐                              ‐               31,488,651               28,602,570               28,867,196               28,899,558               29,164,459               29,192,341               29,457,299               29,480,382               29,745,166               29,763,119               30,027,485               30,039,959               30,303,649               30,310,281               30,573,022               30,573,431               30,834,935               30,828,723               31,088,687               31,075,436               31,333,540               25,347,244               25,489,595               25,463,762               25,601,115               25,566,762               16,991,275               16,947,909               16,899,844               16,846,947

$         826,804,339

Year 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046 2047 2048 (3)

$       733,675,414

Series 2014A $                        ‐                           ‐                           ‐            27,054,176            24,168,620            24,433,946            24,463,683            24,728,584            24,756,091            25,020,549            25,043,257            25,308,041            25,326,619            25,592,485            25,607,584            25,870,399            25,878,031            26,139,022            26,140,306            26,400,685            26,396,723            26,652,812            26,640,061             26,899,290            25,347,244            25,489,595            25,463,762            25,601,115            25,566,762            16,991,275            16,947,909            16,899,844            16,846,947

Phase II After

Available for

Net Revenues

D

Tax‐Exempt Revenue Bonds

$                     ‐         13,759,931         13,560,300         13,401,326         13,226,850         13,035,994         12,827,734         12,601,046         12,354,908         12,088,148         11,799,743         11,488,230         11,152,294         10,790,471         10,401,300           9,983,318           9,534,915           9,054,191           8,539,391           7,988,468           7,399,373            6,769,913           6,128,606           5,476,916           4,783,545           4,046,153           3,262,253           2,604,128           2,079,529           1,525,095               939,218               319,118

$                     ‐           4,275,000           2,550,000           2,885,000           3,080,000           3,445,000           3,675,000           4,075,000           4,340,000           4,780,000           5,080,000           5,570,000           5,915,000           6,455,000           6,850,000           7,440,000           7,890,000           8,545,000           9,055,000           9,780,000         10,360,000          11,160,000         10,765,000         11,515,000         12,190,000         13,020,000         13,780,000           8,720,000           9,215,000           9,740,000         10,290,000         10,910,000 $    262,922,400

Interest

$    237,350,000

G

H

$     (18,034,931)

$                     ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                        ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐       (18,034,931)

Fund @ 0%

Reserve

5.85% ‐ 3/1/2017

$    482,237,469

$                     ‐         18,034,931         16,110,300         16,286,326         16,306,850         16,480,994         16,502,734         16,676,046         16,694,908         16,868,148         16,879,743         17,058,230         17,067,294         17,245,471         17,251,300         17,423,318         17,424,915         17,599,191         17,594,391         17,768,468         17,759,373          17,929,913         16,893,606         16,991,916         16,973,545         17,066,153         17,042,253         11,324,128         11,294,529         11,265,095         11,229,218          (6,805,814)

Debt Service

Series 2017 ‐ $215.043 million Project Proceeds (4)

F

Principal

E

Phase II Issue Size ‐ 1.5x Coverage ‐ 30 Year

Streetcar Project ‐ Phase II Analysis ‐ With CCROW

Coverage

I

1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x

Series 2017

(1)  Revenues illustrated for fiscal years 2018‐2047 only.  All revenues provided by Doug Stone. (2)  Final net debt service, callable 2019.  Total issue size produces $62,900,000 and funds Debt Service Reserve Funds (DSRF).   (3)  Final year debt service net of DSRF at 0% interest earnings. (4)  Project proceeds include $10 million in proceeds towards initial Phase II amount financed prior to Series 2017 issuance. Tax‐exempt eligibility subject to review and determination by bond/tax counsel.  Required 1.5x coverage for illustration only, actual coverage level dependent on  rating agency review and investor marketability.  

3/25/2014 ‐ 4.39%

Available for

Series 2014A

$63,955,000

Projected

Tax‐Exempt Appropriation

C

Revenues

B

Fiscal

A

Schedule 1 ‐ 3.21.14

Kansas City, Missouri

$          588,667,857

Debt Service $              4,433,213                4,432,800                4,435,450              22,469,406              20,544,250              20,719,576              20,742,725              20,916,869              20,938,984              21,112,796              21,132,033              21,305,273              21,316,243              21,493,230              21,499,669              21,678,721              21,683,550              21,857,318              21,858,040              22,033,441              22,026,391              22,204,343              22,194,748               22,364,163              16,893,606              16,991,916              16,973,545              17,066,153              17,042,253              11,324,128              11,294,529              11,265,095              11,229,218               (6,805,814)

Streetcar

Combined

J

Year 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046 2047 2048

Fiscal

K


531

Debt Service (2) $            4,433,213               4,432,800               4,435,450               4,434,475               4,433,950               4,433,250               4,435,875               4,435,875               4,436,250               4,436,750               4,437,125               4,437,125               4,436,500               4,435,000               4,432,375               4,433,250               4,432,250               4,434,000               4,433,125               4,434,250               4,432,000               4,435,875               4,435,375               4,434,250

$       106,430,388

Debt Service (1) $                          ‐                              ‐                              ‐               28,144,016               24,329,954               24,537,447               24,569,767               24,776,961               24,805,378               25,012,067               25,036,300               25,242,264               25,262,017               25,467,028               25,481,992               25,685,805               25,695,656               25,898,016               25,902,415               26,103,052               26,101,646               26,300,276               26,292,692               26,489,015               20,509,297               20,589,445               20,571,149               20,645,900               20,620,098               15,656,284               15,622,536               15,584,645               15,542,493

$         702,475,609

Year 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046 2047 2048 (3)

$       609,346,684

Series 2014A $                        ‐                           ‐                           ‐            23,709,541            19,896,004            20,104,197            20,133,892            20,341,086            20,369,128            20,575,317            20,599,175            20,805,139            20,825,517            21,032,028            21,049,617            21,252,555            21,263,406            21,464,016            21,469,290            21,668,802            21,669,646            21,864,401            21,857,317             22,054,765            20,509,297            20,589,445            20,571,149            20,645,900            20,620,098            15,656,284            15,622,536            15,584,645            15,542,493

Phase II After

Available for

Net Revenues

D

Tax‐Exempt Revenue Bonds

$                     ‐         11,383,808         11,194,121         11,065,421         10,924,144         10,769,558         10,600,931         10,417,534         10,218,488         10,002,769           9,769,500           9,517,658           9,246,071           8,953,718           8,639,426           8,301,881           7,939,913           7,552,058           7,136,854           6,692,693           6,217,965            5,710,770           5,200,065           4,688,044           4,143,994           3,566,014           2,952,203           2,401,571           1,918,069           1,406,925               866,531               294,401

$                     ‐           4,420,000           2,065,000           2,335,000           2,495,000           2,790,000           2,975,000           3,295,000           3,510,000           3,865,000           4,110,000           4,500,000           4,785,000           5,210,000           5,535,000           6,005,000           6,370,000           6,890,000           7,305,000           7,880,000           8,350,000            8,990,000           8,470,000           9,035,000           9,565,000         10,195,000         10,790,000           8,035,000           8,495,000           8,980,000           9,495,000         10,065,000 $    219,693,094

Interest

$    196,805,000

G

H

$     (15,803,808)

$                     ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                        ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐                       ‐       (15,803,808)

Fund @ 0%

Reserve

5.85% ‐ 3/1/2017

$    400,694,286

$                     ‐         15,803,808         13,259,121         13,400,421         13,419,144         13,559,558         13,575,931         13,712,534         13,728,488         13,867,769         13,879,500         14,017,658         14,031,071         14,163,718         14,174,426         14,306,881         14,309,913         14,442,058         14,441,854         14,572,693         14,567,965          14,700,770         13,670,065         13,723,044         13,708,994         13,761,014         13,742,203         10,436,571         10,413,069         10,386,925         10,361,531          (5,444,406)

Debt Service

Series 2017 ‐ $177.459 million Project Proceeds (4)

F

Principal

E

Phase II Issue Size ‐ 1.5x Coverage ‐ 30 Year

Streetcar Project ‐ Phase II Analysis ‐ Without CCROW

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project

Coverage

I

1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x 1.50x

Series 2017

(1)  Revenues illustrated for fiscal years 2018‐2047 only.  All revenues provided by Doug Stone. (2)  Final net debt service, callable 2019.  Total issue size produces $62,900,000 and funds Debt Service Reserve Funds (DSRF).   (3)  Final year debt service net of DSRF at 0% interest earnings. (4)  Project proceeds include $10 million in proceeds towards initial Phase II amount financed prior to Series 2017 issuance. Tax‐exempt eligibility subject to review and determination by bond/tax counsel.  Required 1.5x coverage for illustration only, actual coverage level dependent on  rating agency review and investor marketability.  

3/25/2014 ‐ 4.39%

Available for

Series 2014A

$63,955,000

Projected

Tax‐Exempt Appropriation

C

Revenues

B

Fiscal

A

Schedule 2 ‐ 3.21.14

Kansas City, Missouri

$          507,124,675

Debt Service $              4,433,213                4,432,800                4,435,450              20,238,283              17,693,071              17,833,671              17,855,019              17,995,433              18,012,181              18,149,284              18,165,613              18,304,894              18,316,000              18,452,658              18,463,446              18,596,968              18,606,676              18,740,881              18,743,038              18,876,308              18,873,854              19,008,568              19,003,340               19,135,020              13,670,065              13,723,044              13,708,994              13,761,014              13,742,203              10,436,571              10,413,069              10,386,925              10,361,531               (5,444,406)

Streetcar

Combined

J

Year 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046 2047 2048

Fiscal

K


532 105,632,147 $

$

2%

O&M COSTS

46324147.1

2%

PROPERTY ASSESSMENT

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

4,775,751 4,775,751 4,871,266 4,871,266 4,968,691 4,968,691 5,068,065 5,068,065 5,169,427 5,169,427 5,272,815 5,272,815 5,378,271 5,378,271 5,485,837 5,485,837 5,595,554 5,595,554 5,707,465 5,707,465 5,821,614 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

annually

biannually

annually

101,617,989 $

3,583,061 3,654,722 3,654,722 3,727,817 3,727,817 3,802,373 3,802,373 3,878,421 3,878,421 3,955,989 3,955,989 4,035,109 4,035,109 4,115,811 4,115,811 4,198,127 4,198,127 4,282,090 4,282,090 4,367,732 4,367,732 4,455,086 4,455,086 4,544,188 4,544,188

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

COVERAGE @

46324147.3

*DSRF applied to final bond payment

1.5

34,577,048 41,602,570 42,127,196 42,424,758 42,960,163 43,263,959 43,810,349 44,120,493 44,678,080 44,994,691 45,563,688 45,886,886 46,467,515 46,797,424 47,389,908 47,726,655 48,331,224 48,674,937 49,291,825 49,642,637 50,272,085 44,664,560 45,193,258 45,561,497 46,100,805 46,476,446 38,319,153 38,702,344 39,089,368 39,480,262 1,334,191,785

TOTAL REVENUES

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 3,803,722 $

SURFACE PARKING ASSESSMENTS $ 220,031 $ 215,630 $ 211,318 $ 207,091 $ 202,950 $ 198,891 $ 194,913 $ 191,015 $ 187,194 $ 183,450 $ 179,781 $ 176,186 $ 172,662 $ 169,209 $ 165,825 $ 162,508 $ 159,258 $ 156,073 $ 152,951 $ 149,892 $ 146,894

72,266,416 $

2,548,122 2,599,084 2,599,084 2,651,066 2,651,066 2,704,087 2,704,087 2,758,169 2,758,169 2,813,332 2,813,332 2,869,599 2,869,599 2,926,991 2,926,991 2,985,530 2,985,530 3,045,241 3,045,241 3,106,146 3,106,146 3,168,269 3,168,269 3,231,634 3,231,634

COUNTRY CLUB ROW UMKC TO WALDO

7,022,727 $

247,622 252,575 252,575 257,626 257,626 262,779 262,779 268,034 268,034 273,395 273,395 278,863 278,863 284,440 284,440 290,129 290,129 295,931 295,931 301,850 301,850 307,887 307,887 314,045 314,045

LINWOOD BLVD APPROX 1.8 MILES

9,991,970 $

352,318 359,364 359,364 366,552 366,552 373,883 373,883 381,360 381,360 388,987 388,987 396,767 396,767 404,703 404,703 412,797 412,797 421,053 421,053 429,474 429,474 438,063 438,063 446,824 446,824

INDEPENDENCE MAIN EXTENSION AVE APPROX 2.2 TO UMKC MILES

PROPERTY ASSESSMENT 1/2 MILE (RECEIVED JANUARY OF YEAR INDICATED)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

INFLATION RATES

29,581,266 29,880,066 30,178,867 30,480,656 30,785,462 31,093,317 31,404,250 31,718,292 32,035,475 32,355,830 32,679,388 33,006,182 33,336,244 33,669,606 34,006,303 34,346,366 34,689,829 35,036,728 35,387,095 35,740,966 36,098,375 36,459,359 36,823,953 37,192,192 37,564,114 37,939,755 38,319,153 38,702,344 39,089,368 39,480,262 1,029,081,063

STARTER LINE

1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

SALES TAX

SALES TAX

1 2018 2 2019 3 2020 4 2021 5 2022 6 2023 7 2024 8 2025 9 2026 10 2027 11 2028 12 2029 13 2030 14 2031 15 2032 16 2033 17 2034 18 2035 19 2036 20 2037 21 2038 22 2039 23 2040 24 2041 25 2042 26 2043 27 2044 28 2045 29 2046 30 2047 TOTAL

YEAR

REVENUE TABLE - WITH COUNTRY CLUB RIGHT OF WAY EXTENSION

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

(3,088,397) (13,000,000) (13,260,000) (13,525,200) (13,795,704) (14,071,618) (14,353,050) (14,640,111) (14,932,914) (15,231,572) (15,536,203) (15,846,927) (16,163,866) (16,487,143) (16,816,886) (17,153,224) (17,496,288) (17,846,214) (18,203,138) (18,567,201) (18,938,545) (19,317,316) (19,703,662) (20,097,736) (20,499,690) (20,909,684) (21,327,878) (21,754,435) (22,189,524) (22,633,315) (507,387,445)

O&M COSTS

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

31,488,651 28,602,570 28,867,196 28,899,558 29,164,459 29,192,341 29,457,299 29,480,382 29,745,166 29,763,119 30,027,485 30,039,959 30,303,649 30,310,281 30,573,022 30,573,431 30,834,935 30,828,723 31,088,687 31,075,436 31,333,540 25,347,244 25,489,595 25,463,762 25,601,115 25,566,762 16,991,275 16,947,909 16,899,844 16,846,947 826,804,339

REVENUE FOR DEBT SERVICE $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

3/24/2014

20,992,434 19,068,380 19,244,797 19,266,372 19,442,973 19,461,560 19,638,199 19,653,588 19,830,111 19,842,079 20,018,323 20,026,639 20,202,433 20,206,854 20,382,015 20,382,287 20,556,624 20,552,482 20,725,791 20,716,957 20,889,026 16,898,163 16,993,064 16,975,841 17,067,410 17,044,508 11,327,517 11,298,606 11,266,562 11,231,298 551,202,893

AFTER COVERAGE


533

105,632,147 $

$

phase II Expansion plan

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

annually

biannually

annually

93,956,447 $

3,312,914 3,379,173 3,379,173 3,446,756 3,446,756 3,515,691 3,515,691 3,586,005 3,586,005 3,657,725 3,657,725 3,730,880 3,730,880 3,805,497 3,805,497 3,881,607 3,881,607 3,959,239 3,959,239 4,038,424 4,038,424 4,119,193 4,119,193 4,201,576 4,201,576

Streetcar Expansion Project

2%

O&M COSTS

46324147.1

2%

PROPERTY ASSESSMENT

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

4,775,751 4,775,751 4,871,266 4,871,266 4,968,691 4,968,691 5,068,065 5,068,065 5,169,427 5,169,427 5,272,815 5,272,815 5,378,271 5,378,271 5,485,837 5,485,837 5,595,554 5,595,554 5,707,465 5,707,465 5,821,614 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1.5

46324147.3

*DSRF applied to final bond payment

COVERAGE @

31,232,412 35,929,954 36,369,447 36,638,407 37,086,974 37,361,591 37,819,404 38,099,784 38,567,018 38,853,266 39,330,102 39,622,327 40,108,947 40,407,260 40,903,853 41,208,369 41,715,125 42,025,960 42,543,076 42,860,349 43,388,025 37,746,287 38,171,175 38,504,513 38,937,932 39,277,970 34,687,313 35,034,186 35,384,528 35,738,373 1,155,553,926

TOTAL REVENUES

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 3,803,722 $

220,031 215,630 211,318 207,091 202,950 198,891 194,913 191,015 187,194 183,450 179,781 176,186 172,662 169,209 165,825 162,508 159,258 156,073 152,951 149,892 146,894

SURFACE PARKING ASSESSMENTS $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

7,990,583 $

281,749 287,384 287,384 293,131 293,131 298,994 298,994 304,974 304,974 311,073 311,073 317,295 317,295 323,641 323,641 330,114 330,114 336,716 336,716 343,450 343,450 350,319 350,319 357,326 357,326

LINWOOD BLVD APPROX 1.8 MILES

8,390,147 $

295,837 301,754 301,754 307,789 307,789 313,945 313,945 320,224 320,224 326,628 326,628 333,161 333,161 339,824 339,824 346,621 346,621 353,553 353,553 360,624 360,624 367,837 367,837 375,193 375,193

INDEPENDENCE MAIN EXTENSION AVE APPROX 2.2 TO UMKC MILES

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

INFLATION RATES

26,236,630 27,048,072 27,318,553 27,591,738 27,867,656 28,146,332 28,427,796 28,712,074 28,999,194 29,289,186 29,582,078 29,877,899 30,176,678 30,478,445 30,783,229 31,091,061 31,401,972 31,715,992 32,033,152 32,353,483 32,677,018 33,003,788 33,333,826 33,667,164 34,003,836 34,343,874 34,687,313 35,034,186 35,384,528 35,738,373 931,005,129

STARTER LINE

PROPERTY ASSESSMENT 1/3 MILE (RECEIVED JANUARY OF YEAR INDICATED)

1%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

SALES TAX

SALES TAX

1 2018 2 2019 3 2020 4 2021 5 2022 6 2023 7 2024 8 2025 9 2026 10 2027 11 2028 12 2029 13 2030 14 2031 15 2032 16 2033 17 2034 18 2035 19 2036 20 2037 21 2038 22 2039 23 2040 24 2041 25 2042 26 2043 27 2044 28 2045 29 2046 30 2047 TOTAL

YEAR

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

(3,088,397) (11,600,000) (11,832,000) (12,068,640) (12,310,013) (12,556,213) (12,807,337) (13,063,484) (13,324,754) (13,591,249) (13,863,074) (14,140,335) (14,423,142) (14,711,605) (15,005,837) (15,305,954) (15,612,073) (15,924,314) (16,242,800) (16,567,656) (16,899,010) (17,236,990) (17,581,730) (17,933,364) (18,292,031) (18,657,872) (19,031,030) (19,411,650) (19,799,883) (20,195,881) (453,078,317)

O&M COSTS

REVENUE TABLE - WITHOUT COUNTRY CLUB RIGHT OF WAY EXTENSION

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

28,144,016 24,329,954 24,537,447 24,569,767 24,776,961 24,805,378 25,012,067 25,036,300 25,242,264 25,262,017 25,467,028 25,481,992 25,685,805 25,695,656 25,898,016 25,902,415 26,103,052 26,101,646 26,300,276 26,292,692 26,489,015 20,509,297 20,589,445 20,571,149 20,645,900 20,620,098 15,656,284 15,622,536 15,584,645 15,542,493 702,475,609

REVENUE FOR DEBT SERVICE $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

3/24/2014

18,762,677 16,219,969 16,358,298 16,379,844 16,517,974 16,536,919 16,674,711 16,690,866 16,828,176 16,841,345 16,978,019 16,987,994 17,123,870 17,130,437 17,265,344 17,268,277 17,402,035 17,401,097 17,533,517 17,528,461 17,659,344 13,672,865 13,726,297 13,714,099 13,763,933 13,746,732 10,437,522 10,415,024 10,389,763 10,361,662 468,317,073

AFTER COVERAGE


534


phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project

Appendix 5: conceptual streetcar alignments

535


536

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

Estimate Developed by: RPB

90 100

SCC

2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019 2019

2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019

2019 (YR) YoE

Inflation Rate 3.00% Subtotal YoE $19,925,550 $0 $18,456,170 $1,469,380 $2,411,290 $2,411,290 $4,614,043 $4,614,043 $26,644,761 $7,294,152 $6,152,057 $13,198,551 $25,595,665 $2,961,366 $9,228,085 $12,919,319 $486,895 $999,709 $999,709 $25,569,486 $25,569,486 $23,757,392 $2,375,739 $6,335,305 $4,751,478 $4,751,478 $791,913 $1,583,826 $1,583,826 $1,583,826 $12,951,790 YoE Total $142,469,685

5 of 6

Prepared by HDR Engineering, Inc.

Current Year 2014 (YR) Subtotal $17,187,955 $0 $15,920,455 $1,267,500 $2,080,000 $2,080,000 $3,980,114 $3,980,114 $22,984,005 $6,292,000 $5,306,818 $11,385,186 $22,079,045 $2,554,500 $7,960,227 $11,144,318 $420,000 $862,358 $862,358 $22,056,463 $22,056,463 $20,493,335 $2,049,334 $5,464,889 $4,098,667 $4,098,667 $683,111 $1,366,222 $1,366,222 $1,366,222 $11,172,327 Current Year Total $122,895,602 Approximately $32 Million Per Track Mile (YoE) Item Cost Item Cont. $14,242,045 $2,945,909 $0 $0 $13,267,045 $2,653,409 $975,000 $292,500 $1,600,000 $480,000 $1,600,000 $480,000 $3,316,761 $663,352 $3,316,761 $663,352 $20,647,535 $2,336,470 $4,840,000 $1,452,000 $4,422,348 $884,470 $11,385,186 $0 $18,235,455 $3,843,591 $1,965,000 $589,500 $6,633,523 $1,326,705 $9,286,932 $1,857,386 $350,000 $70,000 $663,352 $199,006 $663,352 $199,006 $21,006,155 $1,050,308 $21,006,155 $1,050,308 $20,493,335 $0 $2,049,334 $0 $5,464,889 $0 $4,098,667 $0 $4,098,667 $0 $683,111 $0 $1,366,222 $0 $1,366,222 $0 $1,366,222 $0

Kansas City NextRail Study: Order of Magnitude Cost Back-Up

Streetcar Line Independence (Grand to Benton) 4.4 Track Mile(s) Approximately $28 Million Per Track Mile (Current Year) SCC Sub Item # Item Description GUIDEWAY & TRACK ELEMENTS (Track Miles) 10.02 Guideway: At-grade semi-exclusive (allows cross-traffic) 10.03 Guideway: At-grade in mixed traffic 10.12 Track: Special (switches, turnouts) STATIONS, STOPS, TERMINALS, INTERMODAL (number) 20.01 At-grade station, stop, shelter, mall, terminal, platform SUPPORT FACILITIES: YARDS, SHOPS, ADMIN. BLDGS 30.02 Light Maintenance Facility SITEWORK & SPECIAL CONDITIONS 40.02 Site Utilities, Utility Relocation 40.07 Automobile, bus, van accessways including roads, parking lots 40.08 Temporary Facilities and other indirect costs during construction SYSTEMS 50.02 Traffic signals and crossing protection 50.03 Traction power supply: substations 50.04 Traction power distribution: catenary and third rail 50.06 Fare collection system and equipment ROW, LAND, EXISTING IMPROVEMENTS 60.01 Purchase or lease of real estate VEHICLES (number) 70.01 Light Rail PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (applies to Cats. 10-50) 80.01 Preliminary Engineering 80.02 Final Design 80.03 Project Management for Design and Construction 80.04 Construction Administration & Management 80.05 Professional Liability and other Non-Construction Insurance 80.06 Legal; Permits; Review Fees by other agencies, cities, etc. 80.07 Surveys, Testing, Investigation, Inspection 80.08 Start up UNALLOCATED CONTINGENCY FINANCE CHARGES Segment Totals (10-100)

3/24/2014

Independence Avenue

Cost estimate and conceptual drawings


80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

phase II Expansion plan

Estimate Developed by: RPB

90 100

SCC

Streetcar Expansion Project

2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019 2019

2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019

2019 (YR) YoE

Inflation Rate 3.00% Subtotal YoE $34,175,927 $0 $32,367,459 $1,808,468 $4,069,052 $4,069,052 $8,091,865 $8,091,865 $46,550,598 $12,930,543 $10,789,153 $22,830,902 $44,097,969 $4,457,119 $16,183,730 $22,657,221 $799,899 $1,753,237 $1,753,237 $44,842,417 $44,842,417 $41,095,623 $4,109,562 $10,958,833 $8,219,125 $8,219,125 $1,369,854 $2,739,708 $2,739,708 $2,739,708 $22,467,669 YoE Total $247,144,357

6 of 6

Prepared by HDR Engineering, Inc.

Current Year 2014 (YR) Subtotal $29,480,455 $0 $27,920,455 $1,560,000 $3,510,000 $3,510,000 $6,980,114 $6,980,114 $40,154,955 $11,154,000 $9,306,818 $19,694,136 $38,039,295 $3,844,750 $13,960,227 $19,544,318 $690,000 $1,512,358 $1,512,358 $38,681,463 $38,681,463 $35,449,445 $3,544,945 $9,453,185 $7,089,889 $7,089,889 $1,181,648 $2,363,296 $2,363,296 $2,363,296 $19,380,808 Current Year Total $213,188,893 Approximately $32 Million Per Track Mile (YoE) Item Cost Item Cont. $24,467,045 $5,013,409 $0 $0 $23,267,045 $4,653,409 $1,200,000 $360,000 $2,700,000 $810,000 $2,700,000 $810,000 $5,816,761 $1,163,352 $5,816,761 $1,163,352 $36,029,818 $4,125,136 $8,580,000 $2,574,000 $7,755,682 $1,551,136 $19,694,136 $0 $31,452,955 $6,586,341 $2,957,500 $887,250 $11,633,523 $2,326,705 $16,286,932 $3,257,386 $575,000 $115,000 $1,163,352 $349,006 $1,163,352 $349,006 $36,839,489 $1,841,974 $36,839,489 $1,841,974 $35,449,445 $0 $3,544,945 $0 $9,453,185 $0 $7,089,889 $0 $7,089,889 $0 $1,181,648 $0 $2,363,296 $0 $2,363,296 $0 $2,363,296 $0

Kansas City NextRail Study: Order of Magnitude Cost Back-Up

Streetcar Line Independence (Grand to Topping) 7.8 Track Mile(s) Approximately $27 Million Per Track Mile (Current Year) SCC Sub Item # Item Description GUIDEWAY & TRACK ELEMENTS (Track Miles) 10.02 Guideway: At-grade semi-exclusive (allows cross-traffic) 10.03 Guideway: At-grade in mixed traffic 10.12 Track: Special (switches, turnouts) STATIONS, STOPS, TERMINALS, INTERMODAL (number) 20.01 At-grade station, stop, shelter, mall, terminal, platform SUPPORT FACILITIES: YARDS, SHOPS, ADMIN. BLDGS 30.02 Light Maintenance Facility SITEWORK & SPECIAL CONDITIONS 40.02 Site Utilities, Utility Relocation 40.07 Automobile, bus, van accessways including roads, parking lots 40.08 Temporary Facilities and other indirect costs during construction SYSTEMS 50.02 Traffic signals and crossing protection 50.03 Traction power supply: substations 50.04 Traction power distribution: catenary and third rail 50.06 Fare collection system and equipment ROW, LAND, EXISTING IMPROVEMENTS 60.01 Purchase or lease of real estate VEHICLES (number) 70.01 Light Rail PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (applies to Cats. 10-50) 80.01 Preliminary Engineering 80.02 Final Design 80.03 Project Management for Design and Construction 80.04 Construction Administration & Management 80.05 Professional Liability and other Non-Construction Insurance 80.06 Legal; Permits; Review Fees by other agencies, cities, etc. 80.07 Surveys, Testing, Investigation, Inspection 80.08 Start up UNALLOCATED CONTINGENCY FINANCE CHARGES Segment Totals (10-100)

3/24/2014

537


538


539

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


540


541

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


542


543

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


544


545

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


546


547

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


548


549

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


550


551

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


552


553

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


554


555

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


556


557

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


558


559

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


560


561

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


562


563

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


564


565

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


566

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

Estimate Developed by: RPB

90 100

SCC

2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019 2019

2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019

2019 (YR) YoE

Inflation Rate 3.00% Subtotal YoE $16,939,365 $0 $15,017,869 $1,921,497 $1,657,762 $1,657,762 $3,754,467 $3,754,467 $21,843,906 $5,967,943 $5,005,956 $10,870,007 $21,024,542 $2,690,095 $7,508,934 $10,512,508 $313,004 $813,468 $813,468 $20,806,006 $20,806,006 $19,566,013 $1,956,601 $5,217,603 $3,913,203 $3,913,203 $652,200 $1,304,401 $1,304,401 $1,304,401 $10,640,553 YoE Total $117,046,082

3 of 6

Prepared by HDR Engineering, Inc.

Current Year 2014 (YR) Subtotal $14,612,045 $0 $12,954,545 $1,657,500 $1,430,000 $1,430,000 $3,238,636 $3,238,636 $18,842,745 $5,148,000 $4,318,182 $9,376,564 $18,135,955 $2,320,500 $6,477,273 $9,068,182 $270,000 $701,705 $701,705 $17,947,443 $17,947,443 $16,877,815 $1,687,781 $4,500,751 $3,375,563 $3,375,563 $562,594 $1,125,188 $1,125,188 $1,125,188 $9,178,634 Current Year Total $100,964,979 Approximately $33 Million Per Track Mile (YoE) Item Cost Item Cont. $12,070,455 $2,541,591 $0 $0 $10,795,455 $2,159,091 $1,275,000 $382,500 $1,100,000 $330,000 $1,100,000 $330,000 $2,698,864 $539,773 $2,698,864 $539,773 $16,935,048 $1,907,697 $3,960,000 $1,188,000 $3,598,485 $719,697 $9,376,564 $0 $14,964,545 $3,171,409 $1,785,000 $535,500 $5,397,727 $1,079,545 $7,556,818 $1,511,364 $225,000 $45,000 $539,773 $161,932 $539,773 $161,932 $17,092,803 $854,640 $17,092,803 $854,640 $16,877,815 $0 $1,687,781 $0 $4,500,751 $0 $3,375,563 $0 $3,375,563 $0 $562,594 $0 $1,125,188 $0 $1,125,188 $0 $1,125,188 $0

Kansas City NextRail Study: Order of Magnitude Cost Back-Up

Streetcar Line Linwood (Main to Prospect) 3.6 Track Mile(s) Approximately $28 Million Per Track Mile (Current Year) SCC Sub Item # Item Description GUIDEWAY & TRACK ELEMENTS (Track Miles) 10.02 Guideway: At-grade semi-exclusive (allows cross-traffic) 10.03 Guideway: At-grade in mixed traffic 10.12 Track: Special (switches, turnouts) STATIONS, STOPS, TERMINALS, INTERMODAL (number) 20.01 At-grade station, stop, shelter, mall, terminal, platform SUPPORT FACILITIES: YARDS, SHOPS, ADMIN. BLDGS 30.02 Light Maintenance Facility SITEWORK & SPECIAL CONDITIONS 40.02 Site Utilities, Utility Relocation 40.07 Automobile, bus, van accessways including roads, parking lots 40.08 Temporary Facilities and other indirect costs during construction SYSTEMS 50.02 Traffic signals and crossing protection 50.03 Traction power supply: substations 50.04 Traction power distribution: catenary and third rail 50.06 Fare collection system and equipment ROW, LAND, EXISTING IMPROVEMENTS 60.01 Purchase or lease of real estate VEHICLES (number) 70.01 Light Rail PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (applies to Cats. 10-50) 80.01 Preliminary Engineering 80.02 Final Design 80.03 Project Management for Design and Construction 80.04 Construction Administration & Management 80.05 Professional Liability and other Non-Construction Insurance 80.06 Legal; Permits; Review Fees by other agencies, cities, etc. 80.07 Surveys, Testing, Investigation, Inspection 80.08 Start up UNALLOCATED CONTINGENCY FINANCE CHARGES Segment Totals (10-100)

3/24/2014

Linwood Boulevard

Cost estimate and conceptual drawings


80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

phase II Expansion plan

Estimate Developed by: RPB

90 100

SCC

Streetcar Expansion Project

2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019 2019

2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019

2019 (YR) YoE

Inflation Rate 3.00% Subtotal YoE $29,585,992 $0 $27,664,495 $1,921,497 $2,863,407 $2,863,407 $6,916,124 $6,916,124 $39,681,008 $10,941,229 $9,221,498 $19,518,281 $38,063,157 $4,344,090 $13,832,247 $19,365,146 $521,673 $1,498,493 $1,498,493 $38,326,852 $38,326,852 $35,132,906 $3,513,291 $9,368,775 $7,026,581 $7,026,581 $1,171,097 $2,342,194 $2,342,194 $2,342,194 $19,206,794 YoE Total $211,274,734

4 of 6

Prepared by HDR Engineering, Inc.

Current Year 2014 (YR) Subtotal $25,521,136 $0 $23,863,636 $1,657,500 $2,470,000 $2,470,000 $5,965,909 $5,965,909 $34,229,186 $9,438,000 $7,954,545 $16,836,641 $32,833,614 $3,747,250 $11,931,818 $16,704,545 $450,000 $1,292,614 $1,292,614 $33,061,080 $33,061,080 $30,305,954 $3,030,595 $8,081,588 $6,061,191 $6,061,191 $1,010,198 $2,020,397 $2,020,397 $2,020,397 $16,567,949 Current Year Total $182,247,442 Approximately $32 Million Per Track Mile (YoE) Item Cost Item Cont. $21,161,364 $4,359,773 $0 $0 $19,886,364 $3,977,273 $1,275,000 $382,500 $1,900,000 $570,000 $1,900,000 $570,000 $4,971,591 $994,318 $4,971,591 $994,318 $30,725,429 $3,503,758 $7,260,000 $2,178,000 $6,628,788 $1,325,758 $16,836,641 $0 $27,121,136 $5,712,477 $2,882,500 $864,750 $9,943,182 $1,988,636 $13,920,455 $2,784,091 $375,000 $75,000 $994,318 $298,295 $994,318 $298,295 $31,486,742 $1,574,337 $31,486,742 $1,574,337 $30,305,954 $0 $3,030,595 $0 $8,081,588 $0 $6,061,191 $0 $6,061,191 $0 $1,010,198 $0 $2,020,397 $0 $2,020,397 $0 $2,020,397 $0

Kansas City NextRail Study: Order of Magnitude Cost Back-Up

Streetcar Line Linwood (Main to Van Brunt) 6.6 Track Mile(s) Approximately $27 Million Per Track Mile (Current Year) SCC Sub Item # Item Description GUIDEWAY & TRACK ELEMENTS (Track Miles) 10.02 Guideway: At-grade semi-exclusive (allows cross-traffic) 10.03 Guideway: At-grade in mixed traffic 10.12 Track: Special (switches, turnouts) STATIONS, STOPS, TERMINALS, INTERMODAL (number) 20.01 At-grade station, stop, shelter, mall, terminal, platform SUPPORT FACILITIES: YARDS, SHOPS, ADMIN. BLDGS 30.02 Light Maintenance Facility SITEWORK & SPECIAL CONDITIONS 40.02 Site Utilities, Utility Relocation 40.07 Automobile, bus, van accessways including roads, parking lots 40.08 Temporary Facilities and other indirect costs during construction SYSTEMS 50.02 Traffic signals and crossing protection 50.03 Traction power supply: substations 50.04 Traction power distribution: catenary and third rail 50.06 Fare collection system and equipment ROW, LAND, EXISTING IMPROVEMENTS 60.01 Purchase or lease of real estate VEHICLES (number) 70.01 Light Rail PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (applies to Cats. 10-50) 80.01 Preliminary Engineering 80.02 Final Design 80.03 Project Management for Design and Construction 80.04 Construction Administration & Management 80.05 Professional Liability and other Non-Construction Insurance 80.06 Legal; Permits; Review Fees by other agencies, cities, etc. 80.07 Surveys, Testing, Investigation, Inspection 80.08 Start up UNALLOCATED CONTINGENCY FINANCE CHARGES Segment Totals (10-100)

3/24/2014

567


568


569

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


570


571

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


572


573

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


574


575

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


576


577

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


578


579

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


580


581

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


582


583

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


584


585

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


586


587

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


588


589

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


590


591

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


592

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

Estimate Developed by: RPB

90 100

SCC

2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019 2019

2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019

2019 (YR) YoE

Inflation Rate 3.00% Subtotal YoE $28,192,492 $2,655,792 $24,858,525 $678,175 $2,863,407 $2,863,407 $6,837,082 $6,837,082 $41,730,464 $11,805,274 $10,215,102 $19,710,088 $38,637,086 $5,297,417 $13,674,165 $19,143,831 $521,673 $1,481,368 $1,481,368 $37,888,831 $37,888,831 $35,478,159 $3,547,816 $9,460,842 $7,095,632 $7,095,632 $1,182,605 $2,365,211 $2,365,211 $2,365,211 $19,310,889 YoE Total $212,419,778

1 of 6

Prepared by HDR Engineering, Inc.

Current Year 2014 (YR) Subtotal $24,319,091 $2,290,909 $21,443,182 $585,000 $2,470,000 $2,470,000 $5,897,727 $5,897,727 $35,997,065 $10,183,333 $8,811,636 $17,002,095 $33,328,689 $4,569,598 $11,795,455 $16,513,636 $450,000 $1,277,841 $1,277,841 $32,683,239 $32,683,239 $30,603,772 $3,060,377 $8,161,006 $6,120,754 $6,120,754 $1,020,126 $2,040,251 $2,040,251 $2,040,251 $16,657,742 Current Year Total $183,235,167 Approximately $32 Million Per Track Mile (YoE) Item Cost Item Cont. $20,228,409 $4,090,682 $1,909,091 $381,818 $17,869,318 $3,573,864 $450,000 $135,000 $1,900,000 $570,000 $1,900,000 $570,000 $4,914,773 $982,955 $4,914,773 $982,955 $32,168,459 $3,828,606 $7,833,333 $2,350,000 $7,333,030 $1,478,606 $17,002,095 $0 $27,480,985 $5,847,705 $3,515,076 $1,054,523 $9,829,545 $1,965,909 $13,761,364 $2,752,273 $375,000 $75,000 $982,955 $294,886 $982,955 $294,886 $31,126,894 $1,556,345 $31,126,894 $1,556,345 $30,603,772 $0 $3,060,377 $0 $8,161,006 $0 $6,120,754 $0 $6,120,754 $0 $1,020,126 $0 $2,040,251 $0 $2,040,251 $0 $2,040,251 $0

Kansas City NextRail Study: Order of Magnitude Cost Back-Up

Streetcar Line Main St Plus (Pershing to UMKC) 6.6 Track Mile(s) Approximately $28 Million Per Track Mile (Current Year) SCC Sub Item # Item Description GUIDEWAY & TRACK ELEMENTS (Track Miles) 10.02 Guideway: At-grade semi-exclusive (allows cross-traffic) 10.03 Guideway: At-grade in mixed traffic 10.12 Track: Special (switches, turnouts) STATIONS, STOPS, TERMINALS, INTERMODAL (number) 20.01 At-grade station, stop, shelter, mall, terminal, platform SUPPORT FACILITIES: YARDS, SHOPS, ADMIN. BLDGS 30.02 Light Maintenance Facility SITEWORK & SPECIAL CONDITIONS 40.02 Site Utilities, Utility Relocation 40.07 Automobile, bus, van accessways including roads, parking lots 40.08 Temporary Facilities and other indirect costs during construction SYSTEMS 50.02 Traffic signals and crossing protection 50.03 Traction power supply: substations 50.04 Traction power distribution: catenary and third rail 50.06 Fare collection system and equipment ROW, LAND, EXISTING IMPROVEMENTS 60.01 Purchase or lease of real estate VEHICLES (number) 70.01 Light Rail PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (applies to Cats. 10-50) 80.01 Preliminary Engineering 80.02 Final Design 80.03 Project Management for Design and Construction 80.04 Construction Administration & Management 80.05 Professional Liability and other Non-Construction Insurance 80.06 Legal; Permits; Review Fees by other agencies, cities, etc. 80.07 Surveys, Testing, Investigation, Inspection 80.08 Start up UNALLOCATED CONTINGENCY FINANCE CHARGES Segment Totals (10-100)

3/24/2014

Main Street Plus

Cost estimate and conceptual drawings


80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

phase II Expansion plan

Estimate Developed by: RPB

90 100

SCC

Streetcar Expansion Project

2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019 2019

2019 2019 2019

2019

2019

2019 2019 2019

2019 (YR) YoE

Inflation Rate 3.00% Subtotal YoE $50,673,978 $11,845,673 $36,793,778 $2,034,526 $4,822,580 $4,822,580 $11,974,774 $11,974,774 $81,976,309 $22,543,050 $23,054,167 $36,379,091 $68,826,908 $10,443,757 $23,949,548 $33,529,368 $904,234 $2,594,534 $2,594,534 $66,360,207 $66,360,207 $65,482,365 $6,548,236 $17,461,964 $13,096,473 $13,096,473 $2,182,745 $4,365,491 $4,365,491 $4,365,491 $35,271,166 YoE Total $387,982,821

2 of 6

Prepared by HDR Engineering, Inc.

Current Year 2014 (YR) Subtotal $43,711,818 $10,218,182 $31,738,636 $1,755,000 $4,160,000 $4,160,000 $10,329,545 $10,329,545 $70,713,484 $19,445,833 $19,886,727 $31,380,924 $59,370,695 $9,008,877 $20,659,091 $28,922,727 $780,000 $2,238,068 $2,238,068 $57,242,898 $57,242,898 $56,485,663 $5,648,566 $15,062,843 $11,297,133 $11,297,133 $1,882,855 $3,765,711 $3,765,711 $3,765,711 $30,425,217 Current Year Total $334,677,389 Approximately $34 Million Per Track Mile (YoE) Item Cost Item Cont. $36,314,015 $7,397,803 $8,515,152 $1,703,030 $26,448,864 $5,289,773 $1,350,000 $405,000 $3,200,000 $960,000 $3,200,000 $960,000 $8,607,955 $1,721,591 $8,607,955 $1,721,591 $62,879,030 $7,834,455 $14,958,333 $4,487,500 $16,539,773 $3,346,955 $31,380,924 $0 $48,898,087 $10,472,608 $6,929,905 $2,078,972 $17,215,909 $3,443,182 $24,102,273 $4,820,455 $650,000 $130,000 $1,721,591 $516,477 $1,721,591 $516,477 $54,517,045 $2,725,852 $54,517,045 $2,725,852 $56,485,663 $0 $5,648,566 $0 $15,062,843 $0 $11,297,133 $0 $11,297,133 $0 $1,882,855 $0 $3,765,711 $0 $3,765,711 $0 $3,765,711 $0

Kansas City NextRail Study: Order of Magnitude Cost Back-Up

Streetcar Line Main St Plus (Pershing to South of 75th) 11.5 Track Mile(s) Approximately $29 Million Per Track Mile (Current Year) SCC Sub Item # Item Description GUIDEWAY & TRACK ELEMENTS (Track Miles) 10.02 Guideway: At-grade semi-exclusive (allows cross-traffic) 10.03 Guideway: At-grade in mixed traffic 10.12 Track: Special (switches, turnouts) STATIONS, STOPS, TERMINALS, INTERMODAL (number) 20.01 At-grade station, stop, shelter, mall, terminal, platform SUPPORT FACILITIES: YARDS, SHOPS, ADMIN. BLDGS 30.02 Light Maintenance Facility SITEWORK & SPECIAL CONDITIONS 40.02 Site Utilities, Utility Relocation 40.07 Automobile, bus, van accessways including roads, parking lots 40.08 Temporary Facilities and other indirect costs during construction SYSTEMS 50.02 Traffic signals and crossing protection 50.03 Traction power supply: substations 50.04 Traction power distribution: catenary and third rail 50.06 Fare collection system and equipment ROW, LAND, EXISTING IMPROVEMENTS 60.01 Purchase or lease of real estate VEHICLES (number) 70.01 Light Rail PROFESSIONAL SERVICES (applies to Cats. 10-50) 80.01 Preliminary Engineering 80.02 Final Design 80.03 Project Management for Design and Construction 80.04 Construction Administration & Management 80.05 Professional Liability and other Non-Construction Insurance 80.06 Legal; Permits; Review Fees by other agencies, cities, etc. 80.07 Surveys, Testing, Investigation, Inspection 80.08 Start up UNALLOCATED CONTINGENCY FINANCE CHARGES Segment Totals (10-100)

3/24/2014

593


594


595

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


596


597

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


598


599

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


600


601

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


602


603

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


604


605

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


606


607

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


608


609

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


610


611

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


612


613

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


614


615

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


616


617

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


618


619

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


620


621

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


622


623

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


624


625

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


626


627

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


628


629

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


630


631

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


632


633

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


634


635

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


636


637

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


638


639

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


640


641

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


642


643

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


644


645

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


646


phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project

Appendix 6: visual inventory

647


648


649

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


650


651

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


652


653

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


654


655

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


656


657

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


658


659

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


660


661

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


662


663

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


664


665

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


666


667

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


668


669

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


670


671

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


672


673

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


674


675

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


676


677

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


678


679

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


680


681

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


682


683

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


684


685

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


686


687

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


688


689

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


690


691

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


692


693

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


694


695

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


696


697

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


698


699

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


700


701

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


702


703

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


704


705

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


706


707

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


708


709

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


710


711

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


712


713

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


714


715

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


716


717

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


718


719

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


720


721

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


722


723

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


724


725

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


726


727

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


728


729

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


730


731

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


732


733

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


734


735

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


736


737

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


738


739

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


740


741

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


742


743

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


744


745

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


746


747

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


748


749

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


750


751

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


752


753

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


754


755

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


756


757

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


758


759

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


760


761

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


762


763

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


764


765

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


766


767

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


768


769

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


770


771

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


772


773

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


774


775

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


776


777

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


778


779

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


780


781

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


782


783

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


784


785

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


786


787

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


788


789

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


790


791

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


792


793

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


794


795

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


796


797

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


798


799

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


800


801

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


802


803

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


804


805

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


806


807

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


808


809

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


810


811

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


812


813

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


814


815

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


816


Appendix 7: glossary

Land Use: The function of land for different human purposes or economic activities. Typical categories for land use are dwellings, industrial use, transport, recreational use or nature protection areas LF: Linear Feet. A measure of length used for costestimating purposes. LOS: Level of Service; a measure of traffic flow effectiveness used by traffic engineers LPA: Locally Preferred Alternative LRT: Light rail transit LS: Lump Sum. A measure used in cost-estimating to indicate an item is budgeted as a whole. MAP-21: Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century; the most recent federal transportation bill MARC: Mid-America Regional Council; the Kansas City area’s Metropolitan Planning Organization and the lead transportation planning organization in the metropolitan area MARC NRI: Mid-America Regional Council Natural Resource Inventory MDNR: Missouri Department of Natural Resources Mixed-Traffic: A configuration in which the streetcar tracks are embedded in automobile lanes so that both streetcars and automobiles can share the lanes. MoDOT: Missouri Department of Transportation Multi-modal: Travel by various forms of transportation (bus/streetcar/train/bike/etc.) MUTCD: Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices NACTO: National Association of City Transportation Officials NEPA: National Environmental Policy Act New Starts / Small Starts: FTA’s major transit investment program for fixed guideway (rail and bus rapid transit) transportation improvements. NPDES: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System NRHP: National Register of Historic Places NWI: National Wetland Inventory

phase II Expansion plan

ACE: Advanced Conceptual Engineering; the phase of the streetcar expansion project that follows this initial planning effort ADA: Americans with Disabilities Act Alight: When a transit rider exits the vehicle when arriving at their destination or point of transfer ASTs: Above ground Storage Tanks BMPS: Best Management Practices BPR: Bureau of Public Roads BRT: Bus Rapid Transit, form of premium transit that combines the attractiveness of rail transit with the low cost of bus transit. Core Routes: The primary transit routes within a transit network. CCROW: Country Club Right-of-Way CTPP: Census Transportation Planning Products describing worker travel patterns used in the STOPS ridership forecasting model DU: Dwelling unit EA (in cost-estimating): Each. A measure used in cost-estimating to indicate items are budgeted in discrete numeric quantities (e.g., 10 poles). EDR: Environmental Data Resources EPA: Environmental Protection Agency FAR: Floor-to-Area ratio FEMA: The Federal Emergency Management Agency responsible for mapping 100-year and 500-year floodplains FTA: Federal Transit Administration GTFS: General Transit Feed Specification; an open source description of transit service locations and times KCATA: Kansas City Area Transit Authority; the primary transit operator in the Kansas City metropolitan area KCMO: Kansas City, Missouri KCUMB: Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences; a medical school located on Independence Avenue KDHE: Kansas Department of Health and Environment

Streetcar Expansion Project

The following terms and acronyms are used throughout this document. The project team has developed a list of definitions for these terms and acronyms in order to ensure clearest interpretation of the NextRail plan.

817


PCE: Perchloroethylene Ridership forecast: The projected average number of passengers on a future transit route based on a four step model that assesses socio-economic data, operating plans, and Census journey to work flows. Route-miles (RM): A measure of the extent of a streetcar system by the number of miles of route on which it runs. Often, a route contains tracks in both directions. ROW: Right-of-Way SCC: Standard Cost Categories used by the FTA for cost estimation Semi-Exclusive: A configuration in which streetcar tracks generally run in their own right-of-way (not shared with automobiles; for example, a median) except at infrequent intervals where they cross a street or intersection. SF (in economic impact calculations): Square Feet Social Equity: A state at which all people in a given society share the same status in a certain detail. It entails equal rights, opportunities, obligations as well as economic equity STOPS: Simplified Trips-on-Project Software; the FTA’s newly developed model for estimating ridership on fixed guideway transit systems TDD: Transportation Development District; a political subdivision formed to finance transportation projects TOD: Transit Oriented Development Through Route: a method of configuring and scheduling transit service wherein vehicles travel from the end of one route through a central area to the end of a second route. Track-miles (TM): A measure of the extent of a streetcar system by the number of miles of track. In a typical system, track-miles will be roughly twice the value of route-miles, because a route will typically have tracks in both directions. Transit Signal Priority: A transit priority measure that provides more green time for transit vehicles under specified conditions through an interface between the transit vehicle and traffic signal controller TRB: Transportation Research Board USDOT: United States Department of Transportation VMF: Vehicle Maintenance Facility VMT: Vehicle miles travelled V/C Ratio: Volume-to-capacity ratio; the measurement of the available capacity for a roadway where the volume on a roadway is divided by the theoretical capacity of the roadway YOE: Year of Expenditure; the expected year in which construction funds will be spent.

818


819

phase II Expansion plan

Streetcar Expansion Project


816.513.2659 | kcmo.org | ideas.nextrailkc.com | nextrailkc.com Š 2013 City of Kansas City | NextRail KC. All Rights Reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced without permission.

NextRail KC: Phase II Streetcar Expansion Plan (Book 3 of 3)  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you