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Architectural Portfolio Benjamin Nelson 602.319.5059 bnelson.arch@gmail.com


contents: Canal Life Re*Cover PHX VMC Aquatic Center Adaptation FourOverFive Seed House Slabtown Square History on Burnside St. Naturlig lys 21 Ave. Public Library

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Supplementary

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Canal Life

Institute, Rejuvenation, and Research Phoenix, Arizona Graduate 2nd year, thesis studio Instructor: Gerald Gast Awarded 2014 summer thesis display

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salt river valley restoration for habitat and recreation

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salt river + srp gle gle end e dalle d sc scott c ttsdale s

tempe em e

mesa m s

Phoenix, Arizona is often credited with being among the world’s least sustainable cities. Sprawl, seas of asphalt parking, and an ever growing urban heat island are a few of the major issues. Ideas of pedestrian zones and twenty-minute communities are hard to come by. A car is the major means of transportation and essentially all development responds to that reality. There is a rich history to Phoenix, especially around the need for water in the desert; water to drink, irrigate, and enjoy. Phoenix through out its history has supported an elaborate canal system tracing back to the Ancient Hohokam, to the pioneers, to modern day. Many of which were built upon the footprints of the canal before it. The modern canals today are primarily used for utility, with simple greater phoenix metropolitan pedestrian paths along each edge. Some developments have turned their eye toward the canal and engaged the view to the water. Others are more park-like, but for the most part they are “back-of-house” with literally miles of potential. As a result of the modern canal infrastructure and reservoirs, the Salt river Valley has lost its natural flow cycles within the city limits and lies as a dry river bed devoid of its original natural habitats. The Canal Life Project investigates the history, present, and future of Phoenix’s canals. Understanding their utility, aesthetic, environmental potentials, and how the Salt River Valley, and the canal shores could become public open spaces to host many civic amenities; which would provide focus points for developing or rehabilitating communities. These are places where strands of the urban fabric of Phoenix could start to morph into denser walk able nodes for people to live, work, and play.

salt river rejuvenation with growth of urban nodes c.l. urban node

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The Papago Park Center is owned by SRP (Salt River Project), they’re the managers of the Phoenix canals and reservoirs. The neighboring sites along the Salt River Valley are owned by the cities of Phoenix and Tempe. This offers a huge opportunity for the collaboration of these entities to work together for the future development of this area. Other patrons include Arizona State University, being one of the nation’s top schools for research, along with Papago Park, and its amenities such as the botanical gardens. All these entities will be involved in this effort to re-configure this node of the urban fabric from a regional scale, the ecology of the rivers and canals, to an urban scale, the new places to live, work, and play. This collaboration will form the Canal Life Institute and Research Park that will house the ecological and environmental research in the pursuit to revitalize the Salt River Valley, Papago Park Center, and life along the canals for all its species.

0

200’


to downtown Phoenix

shared subsurface parking developments

to downtown Tempe

Grand Canal freight line 202 freeway alt River Valley Salt

transportation

context sustainable services plant mixed use lab + office Grand Can Canal n

residential

Salt alt R River Valley

building types

c.l. institute site

Grand Canal

alt River Valley Salt

open + green spaces


research laboratory spaces

7 0

15’

lab axon


a8 b7

a5

Open To Below

b6

h

b5

Offices

g

a2 f

a1

b4

Lecture Space e

Light Control Labs

b3

b2 d

Study Lounge

b1

Open To Below

c

Lab Write Up Ref. Library

a6

b

Laboratory Spaces

Open To Below

a4

a

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

a3

level 2 a8 b7

a5

Lounge b6

h

g

Plaza Cafe

Garden Labs

b5

a2 f

a1

b4

e

Demonstration Labs

b3

b2 d

Open Air Corridor

b1

c

Lab Write Up Ref. Library

a6

b

a5

Laboratory Spaces a4

a

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

a3

0

30’

level 1

passive air ventilation e

d

c

b

a

Summer 15,600 sqft solar collection

Level Roof 3 60' - 0"

test beds + green house labs

Level Roof 2 55' - 0"

rain + condensate collection

Level Roof 1 48' - 0"

Level 4 44' - 0"

venting + lab systems Level ev 3 32' - 0" 32

Winter

Level 2 16' - 0"

water recycling Level 1 0' - 0"

0

15’

section


RE *COVER

PHX

Phoenix, Arizona AIA Competition submission: Arid City Synergy 2014 Team members: Lightvox Studio Benjamin Mullings, NCARB, LEED AP Riley A. Neal, LEED AP Benjamin Nelson, Assoc. AIA Karin Santiago, AIA, LEED AP BD+C Milagros Zingoni, Assoc. Professor ASU

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The Arid City Synergy competition for Phoenix, Arizona focused on three major priorities: Enhancing the urban condition by creating elements of a walking city; creating a strong identity; and a progression toward net zero water in the desert. A major component on the site is the array of shade structures that cover the site and neighboring civic space. The canopy provides shade during the harsher seasons, and open fully to collect water when it rains. The site neighbors an important public park in downtown and opens its plaza toward it. The plaza hosts small scaled follies that can transform to house a variety of small businesses. The market acts as a food source for downtown residents and an anchor for the businesses within the plaza. The hostel to the north of the site works to complete the street edge. The hostel has a hybrid of systems working within it to encourage public transit and bike riding including a place for visitors to rent a bike. The 25 foot tower provides the density toward a walkable city. Primarily housing, the tower also provides spaces for work, along with urban farms paired with the water recycling system, and acts as a large cistern for the harvested and recycled water.


0

30’


closed folly

bar/restaurant

retail

stage/performance

skate park


site program

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Veteran’s Memorial Coliseum Aquatic Center Adaptation Portland, Oregon Graduate 1st year, 3rd quarter Instructor: Suzanne Zuniga and Jean Von Bargen

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Portland’s Rose District is home to the Veteran’s Memorial Coliseum, a Modern era arena building, in essence, it’s a concrete bowl within a glass box. The project adapts this building to bring back functionality and a contemporary vision to this community and its jewel. The new facility is a bath house and aquatic center in partner with a water treatment component. The underlying idea is to orient the site towards the river by creating a concourse that spans from the east plaza to the proposed park along the river. Stations of program reside along this concourse as well as connections to the different vertical levels happening at the VMC and the Park. An inner wall of glass insets from the original curtain wall to create a double skinned facade. The concrete structure of the bowl is repurposed to support components of the building program like the running track and fitness studios.


running track and studios

level 2 memorial pedestrian bridge

REC POOL

LAP POOL

SKATE LOUNGE

ICE SKATING RINK

WATER TREATMENT & PUMP ROOMS

AQUATIC ENTRY

CONVENTION PLAZA

CONVENTION SPACE

ICE ENTRY

STAFF

SECTION

DIVE POOL

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bath house

50’

level 1

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Portland, Oregon AIA Competition submission: Stitch 2014 Team members: John Maternoski Benjamin Nelson Tim Niou Awarded one of top ten shortlist

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The Stitch Competition is a proposal to cap a portion of the 405 freeway running through Portland as a way to help “stitch� the two parts of the city back as one. The FourOverFive approach is to make a network of continuous stitches. These caps would offer connected public open spaces along with the filling in of development to recapture the street. The new parks and squares will strengthen the existing network of civic spaces within Portland by a system of streets as links to one another. The Competition site (Morrison Square) is treated as the prototype and kick start offering the community living room as the stitch.


Seed House Phoenix, Arizona Undergrad 3rd year, 1st semester Instructor: Philip Horton Awarded 2009 Fall Design Excellence

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Seed House is a prototypical approach for contemporary and economic housing in Phoenix’s Harmon, Grant and Central Park neighborhoods. These areas of the city are predominately low income single and multifamily housing and are speckled with a variety of vacant lots. The studio studied and explored alternative ways to build here, while keeping the important cultures of these neighborhoods intact.

1. Two modular seeds that contain the utility needs for the living spaces are “planted.”

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2. A canopy develops that allows for the flexibility of indoor and outdoor spaces.

3. Phase one builds up to the canopy acting as a starting point for future phases to follow as needed.


0

Phase 1

Twin Canopies

Alley

Street

Future Phases

10’

Efficiency Space

Seed Modules

0

10ft 0

10’

images of 1/2in scale framing model

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Slabtown Square Portland, Oregon Graduate 1st year, 1st quarter Instructor: Don Genasci and Sean Cho

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21st ave.

pedestrian street

Slabtown’s proposed Square, Library, and Park reside in the heart of a large part of Portland undergoing redevelopment from industrial to commercial and residential space. The form and character generated here will be the model for the surrounding future development.

public square

neighborhood park

The library building becomes iconic piece for the square, pedestrian street, and park.

pettygrove st.

The library is divided into two pieces. The northern piece is a reading pavilion within a free formed object, while the southern piece hold the functional components for the library.

0

29

30’


TRANSPARENT GLASS FRITTED GLASS B

A

B.75

C

D

LUMBER SKIN

SKYLIGHT

Level 3 27' - 0"

Level 2 15' - 0"

ENTRY

LIFT Level 1 0' - 0"

public square

0

1

2

3

4

15’

n/s section

5

D

C B.75 B

A

reading pavillion

level 2 1

2

3

4

5

D

C B.75 B

A

park and pedestrian street face

0

15’

level 1


History of Burnside St. Portland, Oregon Graduate 1st year, 2nd quarter Instructor: Don Genasci

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Burnside is a street full of Portland history, and is a major path from the west suburbs to the central city. Unloved however, the street has developed into a fast track and vehicle oriented route leaving the pedestrian experience in peril. This proposed urban plan will slow traffic and create cycles of connected pedestrian experience through public open space and wide walkable pathways. The museum building resides in the axis of these open spaces. The form responds to the transition of scale and atmosphere between Burnside and the public square.

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viewing terrace

0

30’

east elevation

7

7 DN UP

6

6 UP DN

HIST. REF. LIBRARY

OPEN TO BELOW

UP

DN

HIST. REF. LIBRARY

DN DN

4

4 GALLERIES

DN

GALLERIES

LOBBY

DN UP

DN DN DN

3

3 UP

DN

a-3 OPEN TO BELOW

2

a-3

OPEN TO BELOW

DN UP

SPECIAL EXHIBIT

a-2

a-1 a-b

a-b c

d

1

a-a a-1

b

a-2

1

a-a

a

2

UP DN

e

f

a

g

0

30’

b

c

d

e

f

g

ground level

level 2

bunside corridor

7 DN UP

7

6

6 UP DN

PRESERVATION LABS

STAFF OFFICES 4

4

DN

GALLERIES

DN

GALLERIES

3

3

UP

UP

a-3

2

a-2

SPECIAL EXHIBIT

a-1

a-b d

e

f

a-b g

a

level 3

museum entry

1

a-a a-1

c

a-2

1

a-a

b

2

UP DN

OPEN TO BELOW

a

a-3

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

DN UP

b

c

d

e

f

g

level 4

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Naturlig Lys [Natural Light] Bodo, Norway Competition submission for town hall Team members: Donald Genasci John Maternoski Benjamin Nelson

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Our proposed design of the Bodo City Hall addition and remodel of existing buildings emphasizes the use and quality of Norway’s natural light. The design enables natural light to reach all public and working spaces in the building, reducing the need for electrical lighting. Each work station will feature its own task light, further reducing the need for ambient light. The quality of all the light sources is very important. Artificial lighting will mainly be in the skylights to provide a constant source of light. Each major element of the building is made more prominent by being framed by light.

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east elevation

north elevation

n/s section

e/w section

level 1

level 2

level 3

level 4

northern perspective

DN

0

50’

council hall

main public level

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21st Avenue Public Library Portland, Oregon Graduate 2nd year, 1st quarter Instructor: Donald Genasci

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the parish of st mark

21st Avenue is a street in Portland that has a very specific quality and character. The street edge is built up by a variety of different buildings from medium to low density; many have cycled through alternative uses in their lifespan. The success of the street comes from this urban, and comfortable scale. The challenge is to design a relatively large public building and to maintain the character of the neighborhood and scale of the street. The building is primarily a public library with assembly, social services, and commercial spaces. The library is comprised of a series of large rooms surrounded by the book stacks and smaller study spaces. These rooms form around a central reading courtyard. As building’s street faces react to the fragmented nature of 21st by breaking into many pieces at the exterior to control the scale of the building .

21st ave

lovejoy st

kearney st

0

50’


21st ave. elevation

section 21st ave. and lovejoy st.

staff

young adult

courtyard

library lobby

public room

open to below

reading room

children's library

community office

community assembly

social service

bookstore

entry lobby

cafe

courtyard

14' - 10"

level 2 main reading room

down to parking

level 1 30’ 0


Lightvox Studio At Lightvox Studio, along with the Arid City Synergy Competition, I worked on the Hilton Swagel Wootton Eye Center offices addition (above), and other projects’ site analysis and conceptual documentation.

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Donald B Genasci & Associates I generated concept drawings for Rainier, Oregon showing possible changes and development as the city conceived of a new street condition and public square.

UofO Practicum Sean Cho Working with Sean offered unique experience as we studied options and concepts for the development of an aquatic center in or around downtown Portland. Exploring two different sites I worked to find site data, program with cost estimates, and conceptual massing with digital 3D models.

Cannon Design At Cannon Design I worked on a variety of project pursuits and interviews offering graphics, models, and ideas at both Phoenix and Los Angeles offices. I also worked with the project teams for the University of Colorado Denver Health and Wellness Center (pictured right), and extensively on documentation, renderings, and research for the Utah Valley University Student Life Center (next page).


supplementary Cannon Design Internship 2010-2012 Phoenix, Arizona

Los Angeles, California

Sean Cho UofO Practicum 1st year 3rd quarter Portland, Oregon

Donald B Genasci & Associates 2013-2014

Portland, Oregon

Lightvox Studio Internship Summer 2014 Phoenix, AZ

photo by Bill Timmeman

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This 162,000sf facility encompasses student interaction by hosting student government, reflection, administration, and a large diversity of fitness and sport faculties. The form bridges over a busy campus corridor displaying activity within. Major rooms and spaces are expressed with daylight while offering views toward the surrounding mountain ranges. Design Architect: Cannon Design Architect of Record: GSBS Architects

photos by Bill Timmeman


Utah Valley University Student Life Center Orem, Utah Cannon Design Internship 2010-2012

Architectural Portfolio Benjamin Nelson  

Works from Undergrad study at Arizona State University and Graduate study at University of Oregon. Graduation for Masters Degree of Archite...

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