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Advancing Excellence in Dentistry Newsletter

Issue 35 | June 2017

From Left to Right: 2017 William Howard Memorial University of Washington Student Case Presentation Winners for 2017 are the following: 1st Place Winner, David Primrose, 2nd Place Winner, Stephanie Y. Kim, Washington AGD Student Chapter Chairperson, Dr. Timothy Hess, 3rd Place Winner, Nataliia Garibov and 4th Place Winner, Nate McKenna!

4 Ways to Increase Your Production [pg 4] What’s on Your Technology Wish List [pg 10] Cancer Fact and Figures [pg 19]


BEFORE...

YOUR VISION DELIVERED

DR. ALICE CHEN, INSPIRED DENTISTRY

Washington | June C O2N S TA N T AGD I N ENewsletter BUILD E R2017 S .CO M


What’s in this Issue 4 Ways to Increase Your Production ................................................................................. 4 How to Respond to a Procrastinating Patient .......................................................... 6 Be Transparent about Expectations with Team Members .................................................. 7 LSU Health awarded $2.5 million .......................................................................................... 9 What’s on Your Technology Wish List? ............................................................................ 10 Trends in Dentistry ................................................................................................................ 12 A Step-by-step Guide Responding to Negative Reviews: ............................................ 13 AGD Member Savings & Offers ......................................................................................... 16 Pacific Northwest Dental Conference...............................................................................17 Tips for Talking about HPV at the Dentist .......................................................................18 Cancer Facts and Figures from the American Cancer Society ..................................... 19 The Best Digital Marketing Channels ................................................................................ 20 Successful Dental Medical Billing ................................................................................... 22 Successful Dental Medical Billing for the GP................................................................... 23 2017-2018 MasterTrack Program...................................................................................... 24 Atraumatic Extractions for the G.P ..................................................................................... 25 Fundamentals of Extraction Site Management ............................................................. 26 Predictable Treatment Options for Narrow Alveolar Ridge ..................................... 27 AGD Member Benefits ........................................................................................................ 28 Applying for PACE Approval ........................................................................................... 29 2017 AGD Membership Application................................................................................... 30 Cruising in Dental Sleep Medicine 2017 .......................................................................... 31 Continuing Dental Education Courses & Events Organization ...............................32-34 The Premier Meeting for General Dentistry AGD 2017....................................................35 Check us out on Facebook, Twitter & Linkedin!

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4 Ways to Increase Your Production by $100,000 By Jim Philhower

With insurance reimbursement falling and overhead rising, the average dentist has had difficulty being as profitable in the past five years. In fact, the average dentist’s income has fallen more than 5%. Far too many dental practices spend an inordinate amount of time and productivity trying to increase profitability by reducing expenses. If you could reduce overall variable costs by 10%, the net effect would be a less than 1% reduction in overhead and an increase in your net monthly cash flow of a few hundred dollars. But focusing on a few small changes to increase production can have a big impact on cash flow and profitability. In fact, once fixed costs are covered, every dollar of increased production and collections will net $.80- $.85. Let’s examine four areas to increase your production by $100,000 in 2016. 1. Maximize Hygiene Visits for Both Preventative and Therapeutic Patients Recare and periodontal appointments usually represent the largest potential for practice growth. The average solo GP practice will have between 1,500 to 1,750 active patients. If we agree those patients should come in at least twice per year for preventive care, we would see between 3,000 to 3,500 hygiene appointments at a minimum annually. Yet we rarely see more than 2,000 total hygiene appointments in a practice. This includes prophies, scaling and root planing, and periodontal therapy procedures. Multiply the missing appointments by your average prophy fee and the lost production is substantial. Then add in the loss of doctor production since 75% to 80% of the dentist’s restorative work typically comes from the hygiene department. Couple that with the fact that the office did not record a periodic exam or necessary radiographs on a visit that did not happen and the lost production number grows exponentially. 2. Balance Fees Every year we still see dentists leave tens of thousands of dollars on the table by not having their fees balanced to a given percentile. While the increase in PPO participation over the past few years has limited the amount of increase the average office may realize by balancing its fees in a higher percentile, we still see many offices submit fees below what insurance companies are willing to reimburse. By balancing your fees in a fair percentile and submitting those full fees to the insurance companies, you can capture the full amount of coverage purchased and allowed for the patient by his or her employer, along with any increases in coverage. Balancing fees should be done at least every two years to help ensure maximum profitability. 3. Review Radiography Protocols How often do you want your patients to receive X-rays? For bitewings, we almost always hear once a year. What about major films? Is it three years for a panoramic and five years for a full mouth series? If so, why? Once you have established a standard of care for radiography, it is much easier to articulate it to your team and patients. It’s simple, but it is one of the biggest reasons that offices do not take radiography to the doctor’s standard of care. Most dentists will agree that every new patient should receive a major film, yet rarely do the panoramic and full mouth series X-rays add up to the number of new patients seen in a given year – even when 4 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017

we factor in the new patients who brought a film with them. It adds up. Just one large film missed per day can equate to $25,000 annually. Without a protocol and focus, radiography can easily slip through the cracks. 4. Implement a Morning Huddle If someone were to ask me what is the best and least expensive way to increase productivity, profitability, and reduce stress in your practice, I would say, “Have a successful morning huddle.” Your morning huddle sets the tone and pace for the day, and is the best way to keep a team focused on patient care and production goals. The morning huddle agenda should consist of yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Yesterday, were all the patients called who required follow-up? Do we need to thank patients for referrals? Today, are we booked to goal? Where is the opportunity in the schedule for same-day dentistry? Who needs a radiograph? Which patients are seeing the doctor but are not current in hygiene? Tomorrow, what does the schedule look like for the doctor and hygiene team? Are we scheduled to goal? Are all the lab cases in? Once you get your morning huddle systems in place, the actual huddle should not take more than 15 minutes. The morning huddle is not a place for gripe sessions, new equipment purchase requests, or patient protocol changes. Save big-picture discussions for weekly team meetings. For help implementing these strategies, visit www.HenryScheinBusinessSolutions.com and request a Henry Schein Practice Analysis. Jim Philhower, a 28-year veteran of the dental industry, is the director of North America Dental Sales Leadership and Development for Henry Schein Dental. He teaches dental teams throughout the world techniques to help reach their practice goals. Contact him at (800) 372-4346 or send an email to jim.philhower@henryschein.com.


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How to Respond to a Procrastinating Patient By Don Deems, DDS, FAGD

How many times does your scheduling coordinator hear the response, “I will schedule treatment later” after asking a patient, “Do you prefer a morning or afternoon appointment?” Probably enough times to notice. Do patients who say this when they’re checking out at the front desk actually call later to schedule follow-up treatment? I doubt it. When a patient says, “I will schedule treatment later,” it used to mean that he or she didn’t understand the need for treatment, for the most part. But is this the only thing that “I will schedule treatment later” means? Absolutely not. It might also mean: 1. “I’m concerned about paying for treatment.” 2. “I’m not sure what my condition is or why I need treatment.” 3. “I want to do more research before I commit to treatment, and even get a second opinion.” 4. “I need to check my schedule. (And it’s difficult for me to get time away from work.)” 5. “Now’s not a good time for me to be receiving care.” 6. “I don’t want treatment.” 7. “I need to think about it.” Of course, the patient is not actually telling you any of these things. It would be much simpler if the true reason was provided up-front, wouldn’t it? However, for most people, it is hard to tell their truth. Maybe it’s embarrassing. Maybe they don’t want to appear foolish. Maybe they just don’t care (although I bet they do). Whatever the reason, it’s legitimate for them, whether we agree with them or not. How can we proactively take action to ensure that patients are scheduling follow-up care and treatment? Let’s discuss how best to respond to each response a patient could give while delaying the scheduling of treatment. 1. “I’m concerned about paying for treatment.” Rarely will a person tell you he or she has no money to spend on dental care. Consider scheduling the patient’s treatment in phases, if possible. You could ask, “Would it help to schedule just a portion of your treatment at this time?” Or, “We offer 6 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017

financing options.” If the patient still declines scheduling an appointment, a note should be made to contact him or her within a one- to two-week window following the date of diagnosis, reminding them of the next steps in their treatment plan. 2. “I’m not sure what my condition is or why I need treatment.” This is a failure to communicate while the patient was in the chair. What can be done when treatment is diagnosed? For one, during the appointment, the patient’s condition and treatment options should be clearly explained to them. Use educational handouts, either in the form of brochures, customized handouts, photos, radiographs, models or any number of informational aids. Don’t just give these things to them; review the materials with them each and every time to ensure understanding. Don’t assume that just because a patient has been with your practice for 20 years that he or she

will just take your word at face value and schedule an appointment for the placement of those crowns. Review the problem and the solutions, and address the patient’s concerns, questions and objections. Keep the conversation going until the patient feels he or she truly understands. Here are some questions you can ask while you are talking with the patient: “What questions do you have about the treatment needs that have been diagnosed?” “Before we proceed, what questions for you have about your condition?” Whenever asking a question, pause afterward to allow time for the patient to formulate a response. 3. “I want to do more research before I commit to treatment, even get a second opinion.” The proactive approach to this is much like in No. 2 — ensure understanding. As you are reviewing (continued on page 8)


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Be Transparent about Expectations with Team Members By Amy Kinnamon, RDH, EFDA, BAS As dental professionals, we cannot escape expectations, even though many a literary figure has warned against it. Our patients rely on our knowledge and expertise and expect us to provide excellent treatment. Without expectations, there is a potential for a breakdown in communication, treatment acceptance, outcomes and, ultimately, the health of our patients. As patients have expectations of the dentist, so do the dentist’s team members of the dentist, and vice versa. For example, a dentist employing a hygienist or a team of hygienists has unavoidable expectations; the dental hygienist is a licensed member of the team and as such is expected to be competent to perform the delegable duties under his or her respective state dental board. Conversely, the hygienist or team of hygienists has expectations of his or her employer; they expect the dentist to be competent in performing the duties that he or she has been licensed to perform as well. Unfortunately, competency under licensure is not enough to have a successful team relationship. Expectations are the cornerstone of the practice philosophy. Effectively managing those expectations in a dental practice is equally important as clearly verbalizing those expectations that may seem superfluous. Mismanagement of expectations can lead to an unhealthy relationship that can negatively affect not only the dentist/dental hygienist relationship, but also the entire team dynamic. Expect Your Dental Hygienist to Align with Your Clinical Philosophy Every expectation in the dental practice begins with a clinical philosophy. Having a team in place whose members’ clinical philosophy aligns with yours is crucial to the success of the practice. During the job interview process, too many times, the focus is on hours, salary and clinical skill. What the hiring dentist may not realize is that this is the time to get an in-depth view of a dental hygienist’s ideal practice environment and his or her own philosophy about patient care. A quick-to-hire, slow-to-fire approach may leave the dentist with a hygienist who is averse to the expectations that the dentist has in place to achieve optimum treatment, or the dental hygienist may have a completely different view of what acceptable treatment may be. When clinical philosophies are aligned, the dental hygienist will anticipate your diagnosis and recommendations for a seamless conversation among the patient, dentist and him or herself. The patient will hear and see the same message presented from both professionals. This will solidify the patient’s trust with the dental team and increase case acceptance. In return, the dental hygienist will expect the dentist to support his or her clinical findings and recommendations. Expect Standardization of Care Dental hygienists come from a multitude of backgrounds and may have varying bases in research, education, knowledge and experience. For example, some perform a cancer screening at every recare appointment, while others do this yearly or not at all; some only use an ultrasonic scaler, while others selectively polish. Employing more than one hygienist in a practice requires a standardization of care. Patients should receive the exact same preventive treatment in the exact same way in accordance with the most up-to-date protocols that suit the practice. Patients notice when treatment varies. The evaluation and maintenance appointment that is guided by clear protocols (expectations) provides a calibrated experience and establishes treatment standards that are met for every patient every time. In exchange, the hygienist will expect up-to-date equipment and consideration when exploring the addition of technology to benefit the dental practice. Standardizing care across the hygiene department can eliminate confusion about processes and elevate the patient experience.

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ARTICLES (continued from page 6) a patient’s condition and treatment needs, check in with him or her along the way to ensure understanding. Ask: “Mrs. Smith, does this make sense to you?” Again, pause after asking the question, and give the patient time to respond. Much like a person who is reading a sentence and comes across a word he or she doesn’t understand, if a patient encounters something that’s confusing and doesn’t gain clarification, they may not understand anything after that. 4. “I need to check my schedule.” It is true that most people’s lives are busy. To proactively deal with this so the patient doesn’t “slip through the cracks,” simply state, “Mr. Jones, we’ll call you in two weeks if we haven’t heard from you. What is the best number to call?” Notice I am not asking for their approval or permission. If the patient says, “Do not call me,” well, do not call! Make sure that a note is immediately made somewhere where it will not get lost, so that the patient is called as promised. 5. “Now’s not a good time for me to be receiving care.” What proactive step can you take here? Try saying: “Mrs.

Jones, it sounds like now is not the right time for you to schedule necessary treatment. When would be a better time?” Remember, then be silent. Let the patient answer. Then, determine the next step. 6. “I don’t want treatment.” This is an interesting one, since the patient came to your office for care and obviously has shown interest in self-care. As we know, some patients put off care — unless they hurt — for years. Personally, I have done more endo in my practice over the past few years than ever before, for people who have simply neglected receiving care or did not follow through with receiving a simple filling. How can you get someone to move off the spot they are on? One effective way is to draw from your own life experiences when talking with a patient. What is something you knew you should do, but you procrastinated on doing? Consider talking with your patient about your own experiences with things such as exercising, dieting or servicing your vehicle, for example. As dentists, we know the risks of leaving an infection untreated, and we should even be more cognizant of the impact that it makes on our general health. Does your patient understand

that, too? If not, take the time to help him or her understand. 7. “I need to think about it.” At the core of this is mostly a lack of knowledge; thus the reason the patient may seek out information on the internet, from friends or even from other dentists. You can avoid this by striving to never let the patient leave the treatment or consult room without ensuring the patient has all the information he or she needs to make an informed decision about care. You don’t want the patient feeling like a second opinion or more details are needed. In a dental scenario, it is morally and ethically advisable to make sure the patient understands the consequences of lack of treatment. Do your part by taking all the time that is necessary to ensure patients understand the prescribed course of action and elect to follow it on their path to dental wellness. Don Deems, DDS, FAGD, known as The Dentist’s Coach®, is a trained professional, personal and business coach, and a practicing dentist. To comment on this article, email impact@ agd.org.

(continued from page 7) Expect Participation in Lifelong Learning Dentistry is changing, and advanced knowledge is necessary to competently treat patients. Successfully addressing oral-systemic considerations requires knowledge of not only dental health, but whole-body health as well. In order for dentists to differentiate the practice, highly educated dental hygienists are needed. I am not suggesting advanced degrees; rather, the expectation of constant learning to increase critical-thinking skills and optimize patient education and preventive treatment. Hygienists who are vested in their education provide competent case presentation with the verbal skills to accurately educate the patient and increase acceptance. Openness to change is an added benefit of relying on research in today’s constantly changing health care environment. In accordance with expecting the dental hygienist to evolve his or her education, the dental hygienist will expect an investment in that education that may not necessarily be monetary. Looking for ways to encourage dental hygienists to increase their knowledge base is a win for the practice. Managing expectations is an undervalued leadership skill. In order to manage expectations, there have to be concrete expectations in place. Do not presume that your team knows what is expected beyond clinical competency. Have the expectations of your practice been clearly verbalized? Amy Kinnamon, RDH, EFDA, BAS, has 21 years of experience in the dental industry, including clinical practice, research, clinical education, marketing, writing and speaking. To comment on this article, email impact@agd.org.

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LSU Health awarded $2.5 million grant to develop better dental filling materials LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER New Orleans, LA - The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health has awarded LSU Health New Orleans’ School of Dentistry an R01 grant in the amount of $2,465,297 over five years to develop stronger, longer-lasting dental filling materials with antibacterial properties to inhibit recurrent cavities and extend the life of the restoration. Xiaoming Xu, PhD, Professor and Head of the Division of Biomaterials, is the principal investigator on the grant. Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic oral disease. The treatment for cavities, known medically as caries, is to remove the decayed tooth tissues and restore teeth with filling materials such as dental composites. Currently, composite restorations have a limited service life - about five to seven years -- and their replacement accounts for 60% of dental operations.

DR. XIAOMING XU IS PICTURED. CREDIT: LSU HEALTH NEW ORLEANS SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY

“The leading cause for the failure of composite restorations is the development of secondary caries caused by bacterial biofilms at the restoration margin,” notes Dr. Xu, who is also Director of Biomaterials Research at LSU Health New Orleans School of Dentistry.”Another cause is bulk fractures due to the weakness of the material.”

A bacterial biofilm is a slimy layer or film containing colonies of bacteria and the sticky, substance they excrete, which allows them to attach to a surface. Biofilms are more resistant than ordinary bacteria because they contain different kinds of bacteria that stick together, and the substance they excrete also forms a protective barrier around them. The biofilms on teeth are known as dental plaque. Dental plaque uses the food and drinks people consume to produce acids that break down tooth enamel leading to decay. Although much effort has been directed towards the development of dental materials that can inhibit bacterial biofilms and reduce secondary cavities, most have had either poor mechanical properties or an unacceptable, dark shade, such as silver-containing materials. Dr. Xu’s group has been developing a series of novel antibacterial fluoride-releasing materials (dental composites, bonding agents and sealants) that have shown enhanced fluoride-releasing and recharge capabilities, promising antibacterial effect, and good mechanical properties or bonding strength. This new grant will support further development of these promising materials. The researchers will test a combination of new technologies that will release antibacterial agents in response to the presence of acids. These materials may also be used in sealants, crowns and cement, as well as other dental applications. “Our long-term goal is to develop a new generation of dental materials that have a high efficacy to inhibit oral biofilm formation as well as excellent physical and mechanical properties,” says Xu. “We expect that the novel dental materials developed in this project will have significantly longer service life and will be excellent candidates for future clinical trials.” LSU Health New Orleans Co-investigators include Dr. Zezhang Wen, Dr. Thomas Lallier at the School of Dentistry and Dr. Qingzhao Yu at the School of Public Health, along with Dr. Hyun Koo at the University of Pennsylvania.

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What’s on Your Technology Wish List? By Timothy Kosinski, DDS, MAGD

Dentistry is changing so fast. It seems as though every month, there is something new in the marketplace that is supposed to make us work faster or better in providing treatment for our patients. But how do we determine which technology tools are the most effective and profitable to buy? Which items provide an appropriate return on investment? What will benefit our patients the most? These questions are not so easy to answer. To figure them out, we talk with our peers about the newest and best materials and products on display at dental meetings. Exhibitors allow us to evaluate their wares. Colleagues often tell us that they purchased this or that and how this new purchase has changed the way they practice. As dentists, we love these new gadgets. And oftentimes, patients are drawn to “modern” dental practices that have the latest techniques, instruments or equipment that will make their visits easier, faster and more comfortable. Because of this, the worst thing we can do is become so enamored with products that we purchase them without considering how (or if) they will improve the patient experience and what our return on investment will be. The most important aspect in this evaluation of new products is to determine the initial cost, the ongoing costs to maintain the tool and how much profit you’ll receive from using it. This may equate to cost savings in dentist time, laboratory costs, staff time and efficiency. Another consideration is the end treatment result. We may feel better about the final restorations or tissue healing. We may feel more confident in our diagnosis and treatment planning. These are valuable issues to be aware of when making a purchase — because the last thing you want is for your shiny, new tool to become an expensive clothes

hanger. I am an advocate of making sure that what we buy can be used on a daily basis to make us better practitioners. Here is a snapshot of technologies that I’ve seen, in my 32 years of experience, become the new mainstays in the contemporary dental practice. Crown and Bridge Fabrication Tools such as CERAC laboratory equipment allow the dentist to fabricate crown and bridgework chairside. The patient doesn’t need to wear a transitional appliance and will leave the office with the final restoration. It is an expensive piece of equipment but certainly is valuable when used to its potential. Many are drawn to the imaging systems where digital scanning and milling are done through a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). High-quality surgical guides and transitional restorations can be fabricated within the office. Microscopes The use of microscopes in the endodontist office has become commonplace. They allow for better visualization of the prepared canals. As more generalists are providing endodontic care, we see more microscopes being sold. They work well for close inspection of restorations and crown margins. They allow us to see caries in detail and help us in die trimming. Lasers Lasers (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) are all the rage and have been used by dentists for a couple of decades. Lasers such as the Erbium, Nd:YAG, diode and CO2 allow us to prepare teeth, reshape gingiva and remove bacteria in our periodontal therapy; complete relatively noninvasive biopsies; retract without using a cord; and incise and uncover our dental implants seamlessly. Diode lasers can even be used in our in-office tooth-whitening (continued on page 11)

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ARTICLES (continued from page 10) procedures. Nd:YAG, diode and CO2 dental lasers are used primarily on soft tissue. Erbium lasers can cut tooth structure and are used to prepare for restorations. These are great time-saving products when used to maximize our efforts. It does take a bit longer for the surgical procedures, but our patients are often more comfortable after treatment. Time is money in our offices, but positive patient perception of technology and postoperative comfort are valuable to a successful practice, too. A content patient is an excellent referral source, and a positive patient experience is worth every dime. Digital Impressions Digital impressions can impress our crown, bridge and even denture preparations. They allow for an extremely accurate intraoral image, which can then be electronically sent directly to our dental laboratory, or the restoration can be created right in our offices. When sent to the lab, the turnaround time is fast, about three days or so. This is an impressive technique for our patients, who find this to be “high-tech.” There is certainly a learning curve involved in the process, but when done properly, this technology is worthwhile to investigate. Certainly as improvements are made, digital impressions will become the standard technique. Dental CBCT Analysis Dental CBCT is probably the newest and greatest asset to the general practice and every dental specialty. It provides superior diagnostic, quality radiographs in three dimensions. The radiation is low-dose. Anatomy is evaluated and better understood. Bone anomalies are better visualized. CBCT analysis has become a standard in endodontics and implant dentistry surgical procedures. We can now visualize our cases before ever touching the patients. Our implants can be virtually placed, and even restoration can be simulated. Radiographs We started using the NOMAD™ portable X-ray head in our practice. This is actually a very productive tool. It is a handheld unit that allows us to make our radiographs without repositioning our patients to the head of the mounted wall units. It is effective with sedated patients, in that we do not need to move them around to make a radiograph. It is also less expensive than a wall-mounted unit. Along these lines, digital radiography keeps improving, which indeed makes us better diagnosticians. We can see things we never could before with our digital X-rays. The VELscope® oral cancer screening device is a diagnostic tool that potentially helps us visualize unusual intraoral tissue. Patients appreciate the effort, and this device does allow us to be a bit more cautious in evaluating potential lesions and abnormalities. Dental Implants As well-trained general dentists, we are providing many services to our patients, from prosthetics, to endodontics and orthodontics and periodontics, to dental implants. Dental implants have come a long way in protocol and material composition. Our integration successes are remarkable. Important parts of implant dentistry are the techniques of atraumatic extractions and socket preservation and grafting. There are many grafting materials and membranes available for our use today. One exciting technique to create autogenous (from the patient) graft material is the KometaBio tooth/root dentin grinder. Dentin is similar to bone, as far as its chemical and biological composition.1 It is the ultimate scaffold for bone formation. We are now able to simply and cost-effectively take an extracted tooth free of decay and restorations and grind it into particle-size that is easily used in our grafting procedures. No endodontic teeth are used. The material is processed with sodium hydroxide and ethanol and washed with phosphate buffered saline. Our patients’ response is always positive because we are using material from their own mouths. This is a safe protocol, effective material and exciting technology. In Conclusion There are many other new and dynamic tools available to us as dental practitioners. The challenge is to spend our hard-earned dollars properly. When we can become better diagnosticians and practitioners, technology is valuable and worth the financial investment. Timothy F. Kosinski, DDS, MAGD, is AGD’s associate editor. To comment on this article, email impact@agd.org. Reference 1. Binderman, I, Hallel, G. et al. “A Novel Procedure to Process Extracted Teeth for Immediate Grafting of Autogenous Dentin.” J. Interdiscipl Med Dent Sci, 2014, 2-6. 2014.

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TRENDS IN DENTISTRY Authored by Rodney D. Johnston, MBA, CMA In the investing world, there is a saying that says “the trend is your friend”. If you know where the market is trending, you will improve the returns on your investments. Go against the trend and you end up broke. In this article, we will take a look at the dental industry and how it has changed from year 2000 to where we are today. We start by looking at the demographic of the average dentist in the United States. In 2000, 75% of dentists were under the age of 55. Dentists’ average retirement age was 62 years old. Approximately 98% of all dental practices were solo practices. The corporate practice concept was in its infancy at the beginning of this century. Within the dental practice itself, the average patient spent $200 per year on dental treatment. Digital x-rays were not common in a practice and crown milling machines like cerec and E4D were in their infancy and not too reliable. Fast forward to the year 2017, we have 50% of dentists over the age of 55. The average retirement age is up to 68. Solo practices make up 83% of all practices with corporate

practices growing steadily. There are approximately 7,000 practices that are classified as group practices. On a local note, Washington State has been working on legislation to allow non-licensed dentists to own dental practices. If this passes, corporate practices will continue to grow. Another interesting trend is that in 2016 there were 5,000 retiring dentists across the United States. Also, in 2015, there were 4,000 students who graduated from dental school. Average school debt has gone from $140,000 in 2000 to nearly $260,000 in 2016. Of the graduating dental students, 51% were female. According to an ADA poll of dental students, approximately 50% of female students said they do not want to work full time as a dentist throughout their entire dental career. Another statistic found that 60% of dentists under the age of 44 are female. Taking a look at practice and profitability trends, we find that practice gross production is up since 2000, collections are down and overhead has gone up. Much of this can be attributed to insurance reimbursements going down. (continued on page 13)

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12 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017


September 30, 2017

Walk for Awareness - Washington (continued from page 12)

The average dental patient now spends $351 per year on dental treatment. Technology has greatly improved with reliable milling machines, digital x-rays and practice management systems. On a more positive note, if you are a graduating dentist, the job outlook is excellent. Especially with the number of dentists now reaching retirement age. Also, practice values are at an all-time high with low interest rates and not many practices currently on the market. Studying these and other trends will help you in growing your practice. Knowing which way certain trends are going will also help you in making career decisions whether you are a new graduate, early career dentist, or nearing retirement. Rodney D. Johnston, MBA, CMA Omni Practice Group 6513 132nd Ave NE #200 | Kirkland, WA 98033 | Office: 206-979-2660

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A Step-by-step Guide: Responding to Negative Reviews for Dentists By Wendy Hensley, WEO Media You’ve worked hard to build a successful practice. You pride yourself on great service, excellent care, the best technology, and many satisfied patients. But there’s that one patient that wasn’t happy and took to social media (Google+, Facebook, Yelp, Healthgrades, etc.) to share with the world how unhappy they’ve been with their experience. Does that one review have the power to ruin your practice? Take a deep breath. No, it doesn’t. And here’s why. If you have several other recent positive reviews, the one negative review won’t carry as much weight and can in fact authenticate the other reviews. We know that sounds strange but the truth is that people reading reviews online know that not everyone is going to be happy with your services and if you have too many happy patients with no negative experiences, the reviews might be discounted as fake. So, if the majority of reviewers are happy, that’s what matters. Try to think of the negative review as an opportunity to publicly showcase your conflict resolution skills and customer service policy. You will likely not change the reviewer’s mind or convince them to remove the review, but you can respond back and in that response appeal to a potential patient reading the discourse. Try to speak to them instead of diving into the muck with the reviewer. Here’s a step-by-step guide to responding to those reviews as well as what actions you can take to turn the negative into a positive.

Step 2: Read. Reread. Then Read Again. The first time you read the review, your emotions might take over and you might not digest all of the reviewer’s comments. This is particularly true if the review is long. So, read it again. Then, when you’ve read it a second time, read it a third time. Make sure you read each word and try to understand the point the reviewer is trying to make. Even if you don’t agree with their opinion, digesting the entire review helps you identify and understand the situation. Step 3: Research While you’re taking time, check in with your staff regarding the review. Did they have an interaction with the reviewer? What was their experience? Perhaps there’s a tidbit of information they have that would shed some light on what happened. Knowing the background might lessen the emotional blow a review can have. Some people like to leave negative reviews and have a history of doing so. But others have legitimate complaints that can and should be addressed internally.

Step 4: Formulate a Response It’s best to keep it simple. Although it’s tempting to point-by-point address the reviewer’s comments, it’s far better to be more general and professional. Getting into too much detail can marginalize your response and actually get you into legal trouble. Be mindful of HIPAA. You can’t provide any details about the treatment, actual work provided, etc. for that patient.

Step 1: Take Time Even though it’s tempting to fire off a heated response to the review, it’s far better to stay calm, give yourself time to formulate a plan, and therefore not respond out of emotion. Emotional responses seem petty and will only encourage and validate the reviewer. After you’ve read the review for the first time, step away from the computer (or your phone as the case may be) and take a deep breath … or three!

14 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017

And finally, offer an apology. Gulp. As hard as that may be to do, saying “I’m sorry” can go a long way in patient relations. Here are a few simple responses you can use: I’m sorry you had a dissatisfactory experience in our office. We pride ourselves on providing excellent patient care and a wonderful experience for everyone. We’d appreciate the opportunity to discuss this with you offline. Please contact our office at your convenience.


ARTICLES

A Step-by-step Guide: continued . . . I’m sorry you feel there was a miscommunication about our cancellations policies. We strive for clear communication with all our patients. Please check our website for our full policies or contact our office for clarification.

a demo today by calling 1-888-246-6906 or emailing sales@weomedia.com.

We are generally punctual with our appointments but there are times when we can get behind schedule due to other patients’ unexpected needs. All our patients receive the same quality of care, which on occasion, may require additional time. We’re proud to say that we are almost always on schedule though and our patients time is very important to us. We’re sorry that this wasn’t your experience while at our office.

If you’re getting consistent comments about one aspect of your practice such as confusion on insurance, time delays, or staff interactions, it’s time to review your practice and make any necessary changes. If a few people are vocal about the issue, making a change to your communication, policies, or staff can prevent future issues. Although not all feedback you get will be cause for change, consistent feedback on one issue is a sure sign good indication you need to do something to cure the problem.

Because of HIPAA and our adherence to strict patient confidentiality standards, we’re unable to comment on the details of the statements made in this review. However, we’d like to discuss this situation with you privately. Please call us at 999-999-9999 or email us at office@youroffice.com at your convenience. Step 5: Gather More Reviews Nothing combats the negative review quite as well as more positive reviews. Ask your patients to leave online feedback and encourage them to leave the feedback on the site where your negative review lives. The more positive reviews you have, the more that negative review will get buried and become irrelevant. Also, don’t forget to respond to positive reviews as well. Show your appreciation for their time in writing that glowing review. Simple responses can go a long way to show you’re truly invested in your patients and their feedback.

Step 6: Examine your practices

WEO Media (www.weodental.com) is a “Best of Class” award winning dental marketing company based in Portland, Oregon, and is endorsed by the Oregon Dental Association. WEO Media offers discounts to Washington AGD Members. Please inquire directly with WEO Media for more information. Call Sasha Bachtold at 206- or email at info@weomedia.com.

Aldrich Dental Business Services Run a Better Dental Practice

Example: “Thank you for your positive feedback. We appreciate the time taken to write this and of course, our goal is for every patient to have an exceptional experience in our practice.” In summary, know that every practice faces this at some point or another. How you deal with the negative review is what will set you apart and draw more patients to your office. WEO Media offers an Online Review Generation / Reputation Management service that makes gathering online reviews a breeze. With a full analytic dashboard, ability to handle multiple locations, text and email options, and the ability to embed positive reviews into your website our service can boost your ratings and help grow your practice. Schedule

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aldrichadvisors.com/dental

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New Graduate Professional Liability Insurance Coverage, Compliments of the AGD

Available Exclusively to Qualified AGD Member Dental School Graduates and Residents* As you look ahead to completing your dental education program and entering practice, now is the time to start thinking about how to protect your professional and financial future. Fortunately, the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) has you covered. Enroll today in AGD New Graduate Professional Liability Insurance Coverage to receive up to 12 months of coverage at no cost to you*—simply visit www.agd.org/NewGrad to sign up! Coverage is available through Dentist’s Advantage, an AGD Member Savings & Offers program participant and Lead Corporate Sponsor. Program benefits include: • Unparalleled financial security • Comprehensive risk management support • A legal team specialized in dental malpractice • A dedicated claims consultant • Personalized claims management • Possible premium credits beyond your first year of practice Visit www.agd.org/NewGrad today to secure the professional protection and financial savings you should have for your first year of practice!

888.778.3981

Not an AGD member yet? Join today at www.agd.org/ DA2017 to take advantage of this exclusive offer, as well as the AGD’s many other member benefits. *The cost of coverage is assumed by the AGD. Policy coverage is effective May 1, 2017, through April 30, 2018, for qualified applicants who enroll by April 30, 2017; for those who sign up after this date, coverage applies from the enrollment date through April 30, 2018. Qualified applicants must graduate from an accredited U.S. or Canadian dental school or complete an accredited U.S. or Canadian general dentistry residency program between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2017; be entering their first year of licensed dental practice in the U.S.; be an active AGD member at the time of enrollment; and maintain active AGD membership through Dec. 31, 2017. Dentist’s Advantage is a division of Affinity Insurance Services, Inc. (AR 244489); in CA & MN, AIS Affinity Insurance Agency, Inc. (CA 0795465); in OK, AIS Affinity Insurance Services Inc.; in CA, Aon Affinity Insurance Services, Inc., (0G94493); Aon Direct Insurance Administrators and Berkely Insurance Agency; and in NY, AIS Affinity Insurance Agency.

16 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017


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Tips for Talking about HPV at the Dentist Although dentists and hygienists know the importance of oral cancer screenings and the role HPV vaccination plays in cancer prevention, it can be difficult to know how to talk about it. HOW DO I START THE CONVERSATION? “Did you know that your pediatrician recommends a vaccine that can prevent HPV, and that HPV can cause cancer? Your child is the right age to be vaccinated. It’s time to ask your pediatrician about it.”

YOUR ANSWER… PARENTS MAY ASK… What is HPV?

PARENTS MAY ASK… How common is HPV and HPV-related cancer?

PARENTS MAY ASK…. Why is it important now?

PARENTS MAY ASK… Is the vaccine safe?

PARENTS MAY ASK… Is the vaccine effective?

PARENTS MAY ASK… Who needs the vaccine and how much does it cost?

For more information about HPVrelated cancers and cancer prevention, contact Team Maureen.

18 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017

HPV (human papillomavirus) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the USA. It can cause genital warts and many types of cancer, including oropharyngeal and cervical.

YOUR ANSWER… Nearly everyone will have HPV in their lifetime, usually with no symptoms or treatment needed. But HPV does cause 31,000 cancer cases each year in the USA, about 11,000 of which are oropharyngeal cancers.

YOUR ANSWER… If administered before age 15, the immune response is so strong that boys and girls only need a 2 shot series. After age 15, they need 3 shots to have the same response and protection.

YOUR ANSWER…. Over 170 million doses of the HPV vaccine have been given and no serious safety concerns identified. The most common side effect is soreness at the injection site.

YOUR ANSWER…. The vaccine protects against the types of HPV that cause oral cancers. Studies show that the majority of cervical and anal cancers and up to 90% of genital warts can be prevented with the vaccine.

YOUR ANSWER…. All boys and girls ages 11-12 should be vaccinated. Like other vaccines for children in Massachusetts, it is universally covered regardless of insurance.

TeamMaureen.org info@TeamMaureen.org PO Box 422, N. Falmouth, MA 02556

HPV-RELATED CANCER


ARTICLES

Cancer Facts and Figures from the American Cancer Society Authored by Cynthia Eichner In the 2017 edition of Cancer Facts and Figures from the American Cancer Society, it is estimated 1,120 people will be diagnosed and 250 people will die in Washington from oropharyngeal cancers. Of those new cases, 70% of these cancers are linked to the HPV virus. Washington Dentists can play a critical role in talking with parents and young adults about the importance of getting vaccinated for HPV-related cancers. Recommended ages for HPV vaccinations is between 11-12 and is usually accompanied by vaccinations for Tdap and MenACWY. Currently the HPV vaccination rates for children 11-12 who have completed the series of HPV vaccinations hovers between 30-40%. Some populations within the state have significant lower rates; with vaccination rates significantly lower among boys than girls. As dentists and hygienists, it’s likely that children and young adults spend more time at your office and in your chairs than at a doctor’s office – making your communication about HPV vaccination even more important. To help you get started, we encourage you to review this tip sheet specifically developed for dentists. We are partnering with the American Cancer Society as part of our commitment to Oral Cancer Awareness to provided additional resources and training. Contact Cynthia Eichner for more information about their HPV Cancer program. Please save the date for the 2017 Washington AGD Membership Appreciation “Mad Hatter’s Gala”, Saturday, October 7, 2017 at the Four Seasons. We are currently seeking Gala volunteers as well as silent and live auction items. Sponsorship opportunities are available. Please contact Washington AGD, Executive Director, Valerie Bartoli at washingtonagd1@yahoo. com for more information We look forward to seeing all our members at next year’s event! Email: Cynthia.eichner@cancer.org

We are proud to support the Washington AGD and its members.

900 - 1st Ave. S. Ste. 208 Seattle, WA 98234 P: 206-682-2887 | F: 266-682-1218 INFO@MAXTECHSEATTLE.COM

|

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The Best Digital Marketing Channels for Your Practice By Jackie Ulasewich

You’ve been reading about digital marketing for months now. Maybe you’ve even attempted to implement some of the suggestions you feel comfortable with, such as posting more frequently to Facebook. That’s a great start, but knowing exactly which channels work best for you and understanding how they work can take your dental practice to the next level. The following information not only will help you to focus your marketing efforts on what is best for you and your practice, but also will offer tips that you or a team member can do today. Why Digital Marketing Is Important At work or at play, your patients probably are “glued” to their devices. At work, they may often spend breaks checking personal email, looking at their Facebook news-feed and browsing the internet. At home, they may have a tablet or smartphone within reach at all times. Your practice and marketing efforts need to be where your patients live in the digital world. An Overview of Digital Marketing Channels You’re probably familiar with the digital channels that you use regularly in your personal time, but do you understand how they function in the marketing world? Here, you will find a breakdown of the most effective digital marketing channels and how they can work for you. Pay Per Click When you run a Google search for something — let’s say, for example, plumbers — you may notice that toward the top of the page, the search results have the word “ad” next to them. These companies have invested in pay-per-click (PPC) ads to increase the probability that you will actually click their link before clicking on a result farther down on the page. With a PPC campaign, you only pay when someone engages with you by clicking your ad (and yes, people do actually click on these ads). You have total control: You determine the keywords, you write the ad, and you set the price per click. AdWords is Google’s version of PPC and is the preferred PPC source for several reasons. With an estimated 1.6 billion visitors each month, Google continues to be the most popular search engine in the United States. Additionally, Google makes learning AdWords easy, with brief online tutorials and user-friendly instructions that are accessible even to those who would consider themselves to be technologically challenged. Review Campaigns Whether they are referred to you by a friend or simply came across your website, potential patients are going to look at your online reviews before making an appointment. Review campaigns give you an organized method for soliciting patient reviews: You select the time frame and platform, you contact the patients whom you’ve recently seen, and you respond promptly to all reviews — both positive and negative — so patients know that you appreciate their feedback. (To ensure patient privacy, when responding to reviews, give a general reply so that you don’t disclose any information about the patient or acknowledge that the reviewer is a patient of yours.) Beware of using specialized review sites. While they may focus on one particular market, they are useless if the reviews go unseen. Stick to websites you know your patients visit, such as Yelp or Facebook. Remarketing You may have noticed that when you click on a link for a product, ads for the product appear on your newsfeed long after you’ve left the original website. This is an example of remarketing. Remarketing helps your potential patients get back on track and click your ad. Here is an example of how remarketing works: Alex is watching the NCAA® Final Four basketball tournament with friends and casually mentions that he’s looking for a new dentist. Melanie suggests your practice, so Alex picks up his phone to search for more information about it. He’s on your homepage when, all of a sudden, someone banks a half-court shot and wins the game, ending Alex’s search. Because you use remarketing, however, when Alex gets back on his phone to watch a replay, your ad will reappear as a reminder that his friend Melanie referred you. Even better? You only pay for the advertisement when Alex actually clicks on it. Facebook Facebook is an all-around invaluable resource. It is not only essential in helping you gain brand awareness, but also in helping you to maintain a relationship with your current patients. The beauty of Facebook is in its limitless possibilities: You can post video to show off new equipment, post pictures of new staff members or live stream a community event. You also can create your own events, such as a lunch and learn, and invite your patients to attend. Best of all, if you or a team member currently use

20 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017


ARTICLES Facebook for personal networking, then you already possess the know-how to make it work for your practice. Facebook also provides you with easy-to-read analytics that let you know how many people have viewed your page, how many people you have reached and how well you’ve engaged your audience, all of which help you optimize your marketing efforts. Keep in mind that all of your social media efforts, whether on Facebook or another platform, need to be HIPAA compliant. Email Email is the key to personalization. Each message you send is written from your perspective and serves as a reminder to your patients that you are there for them beyond their semiannual appointments. Emails can educate them about new trends in dentistry, remind them of the importance of regular cleanings, or even offer holiday specials to get them back in your office for cosmetic or restorative treatments. Even more effective are targeted email campaigns, which focus on patients who have inquired about treatments but have not followed through. Sometimes, all they need to get onboard is more information or a mere reminder of the services you offer. Blogging Blogging is a way to establish yourself as an expert in your field. When you regularly remind patients that you stay aware of the latest research, know about trends in the industry or have just acquired new equipment that will benefit them, then they know that you take their care and your business seriously. Blogging also allows you to educate your patients. Worried that they’re damaging their enamel with acidic food and drinks or that they need help selecting the least harmful candy at Halloween? Tell them through your blog posts. Sharing your vast knowledge of dentistry with your patients not only reinforces their faith in you, but also serves as a reminder that you are available for much more than deep cleanings and fillings — you’re also a resource. Campaign Integration Whether you use some or all of the digital marketing channels above, they are most effective when they work together. For example, your website will invite people to “like” your Facebook page or read your latest blog post; Facebook, PPC ads and remarketing direct patients to your website; and emails can contain direct links to your blog, Facebook page and platform where they can post reviews (which can all redirect viewers to your website). Individually, each channel is accessible and will improve the visibility of your practice. When integrated, however, these channels will both help you grow your practice and allow you to forge stronger relationships with your patients. Jackie Ulasewich is cofounder of My Dental Agency, a marketing company specializing in dental practice. To comment on this article, email impact@agd.org.

REALOGICS SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY WELCOMES GABRIELE HUGO TO THE BROKERAGE! As a client looking to purchase or sell in the Greater Puget Sound real estate market, you may rely on Gabriele Hugo to always conscientiously apply herself in order to make your real estate dreams come true. Through her professional and personal approach, she takes great care in providing in-depth local market knowledge and delivering a wealth of real estate expertise. Realogics Sotheby’s International Realty is one of the largest and fastest growing real estate brokerages in our state and a noted think-tank leader within the Sotheby’s International Realty® global brand. Gabriele is excited to be aligned with a local brand known for innovation, local and international reach, creative marketing, and who is at the forefront of the evolving real estate market in Seattle.

GH

Gabriele Hugo | Real Estate Broker 206.953.1870 | Gabriele.Hugo@rsir.com GabrieleHugo.rsir.com Realogics Sotheby’s is proud of our exclusive marketing partnerships

Each office is Independently owned and operated.

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CONTINUING EDUCATION

Dentc:11 Medicc:111 Billing for the G.P" SPEAKERS:

Speaker: Chris Farrugia, DDS

DATE:

Friday, June 9, 2017

TIME:

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

TUITION:

AGD Member Dentist: $350, Non-AGD Dentist: $500, Military Dentist: $315 AGD Member Staff with Dentist $299.00 Non AGD Member Staff with Dentist $450.00 Staff without Dentist (AGD Member or Non-Member) $450.00

CREDITS: LOCATION:

6 Hours Lecture/Workshop, 1 Hour Video Review SubJect Code: 550 Practice Management Washington AGD Educational Center

19415 International Blvd, #410, SeaTac, WA 98188

Course Outline lncludes: Dental Medical Billing for the G.P., Dr. Chris P. Farrugia is a speaker,

teach­er, and leader in digital dentistry. He trains dentists nationwide to advance their practices

using med­ical benefits. This course will focus on adding dental medical billing to your practice and

navigating the dental medical billing world.

Success with medical claims requires more than codes on a claim. Successfully accessing medical benefits requires the dental office to step out of their "dentocentric" view of their practice and into a medical view. In this course, dental practices will learn to separate the medical portion of their services from the dental, narrow the claims filed to medically necessary services, and submit a properly documented claim with. The results? Prompt payment of medical claims. The doctor plays an important role in the claims process and his/her attendence is HIGHLY encouraged. Staff only registrations are accepted but it is best for all who will have a part in the claims process in the office to attend. Discounts on the book Successful Medical Billing I: FUNDAMENTALS are available at the time of registration for this course. (Light Breakfast, Lunch, Parking & all materials included with Registration) * 10 days prior to the course you will receive an email with instructions how to access pre-course video content and course materials. The pre-course video content should be reviewed prior to the course by ALL participants. *Discounts on the Successful Medical Billing book series are available to registered participants!

For more information please contact: Valerie Bartoli Washington AGD Executive Director 19415 International Blvd, STE #410 SeaTac, WA 98188 Office 253-306-0730

22 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017

Academy

o{Gcncml Dentistry�

Washington AGO Approved PACE Program Provider #219331 FAGD/MAGD Credit Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry, AGO or WAGD endorsement. Washington AGO PACE Provider 6/1/2014-5/31/2018)

PACE

Program Approval for Continuing Educatio n


CONTINUING EDUCATION Washington AGD Educational Center 19415 International Blvd, #410 SeaTac, WA 98188 Office: 253-306-0730 Fax: 206-212-4969

Advanced Dental Medical Billing for the GP and Team Speaker: Chris Farrugia, DDS Saturday, June 10, 2017 TIME: 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM TUITION: AGD Member Dentist: $350, Non-AGD Dentist: $500, Military Dentist: $315 AGD Member Staff with Dentist $299.00 Non AGD Member Staff with Dentist $450.00 Staff without Dentist (AGD Member or Non-Member) $450.00 CREDITS: 6 Hours Lecture/Workshop, 1 Hour Video Review Subject Code: 550 Practice Management Course Prerequisites: Successful Medical Billing: Fundamentals OR claim experience/proficiency. SPEAKERS: DATE:

LOCATION:

Washington AGD Educational Center 19415 International Blvd, #410, SeaTac, WA 98188

Course Outline Includes: Dental Medical Billing for the G.P., Dr. Chris P. Farrugia is a speaker, teacher, and leader in digital dentistry. He trains dentists nationwide to advance their practices using medical benefits. This course will focus on adding dental medical billing to your practice and navigating the dental medical billing world.

Once dental practices are fundamentally sound in the claims process, medical claims may be success-fully submitted for "beyond the basics" services. This is the ultimate in-depth coding course for surgeries, appliances, and trauma claims plus more! (Basic medical billing concepts are not covered in this course. A working knowledge of the medical claim form and the claims process is a prerequisite for registration. This course is not appropriate for practices with little or no medical claims experience.)

(Light Breakfast, Lunch, Parking & all materials included with Registration) *10 days prior to the course you will receive an email with instructions how to access pre-course video content and course materials. The pre-course video content should be reviewed prior to the course by ALL participants. *Discounts on the Successful Medical Billing book series are available to registered participants!

For more information please contact: Valerie Bartoli Washington AGD Executive Director 19415 International Blvd, STE #410 SeaTac, WA 98188 Office: 253-306-0730

Washington AGD Approved PACE Program Provider #219331 FAGD/MAGD Credit Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry, AGD or WAGD endorsement. Washington AGD PACE Provider 6/1/2014-5/31/2018).

(Light Breakfast, Lunch, Parking & all materials included with Registration)

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CONTINUING EDUCATION Washington AGD Educational Center 19415 International Blvd, #410 SeaTac, WA 98188 Office: 253-306-0730 Fax: 206-212-4969

2017-2018 MasterTrack Program

Dedicated to providing you with a first-class continuing dental education in a setting that is friendly, warm, and supportive. Our program is for those dentists that seek a well-balanced interdisciplinary post graduate education.

Dates: September 21-24, 2017, November 16-19, 2017, January 25-28, 2018 & April 26-29, 2018 Time: Are always Thursday-Saturday 8:00 AM-5:00 PM and Sunday 8:00 AM-12:00 PM-Lecture AM & Hands-On PM.

Tuition: $5000 AGD Member Dentist & $6000 Non-AGD Member Dentist "Early Bird Discount" before April, 24, 2017. After April, 24, 2017 $5500 for AGD Member Dentists & $6500 for Non-AGD Member Dentists. *Tuition includes all Four MasterTrack Sessions, Light Breakfast, Lunch, Parking and all Hands-On materials

Credits: CE Credits: 104 Location: Washington AGD Educational Center, 19415 International Blvd, #410, SeaTac, WA 98188 Speaker Line-Up: For 2017-2018: Thursday, September 21, 2017 (Subject Code: 340) "Dental Materials Everyday Dentistry": Speaker: Dr. George Holzer Friday, September 22, 2017 (Subject Code: 070) "Learning from My Endodontic Failures", Speaker Dr. Rodrigo Cunha Saturday, September 23, 2017 (Subject Code: 070) "Simplifying Endodontics", Speaker Dr. Rodrigo Cunha Sunday, September 24, 2017-Master Case Presentation "To assist in achieving the necessary credits for Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry, you will be asked to present a documented dental procedure to the Mastership class. Session #2 Thursday, November 16, 2017 (Subject Code: 780) "Esthetics & Function in all Ceramics and Composites", Speaker, Dr. Joyce Bassett Friday, November 17, 2017 (Subject Code: 250) "Mastering Posterior Bulk Full & Direct Composite Veneer", Speaker, Dr. Joyce Bassett Saturday, November 18, 2017 (Subject Code: 740) "Pathology & Trauma, Dr. Jasjit Dillion Sunday, November 19, 2017-Master Case Presentation "To assist in achieving the necessary credits for Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry, you will be asked to present a documented dental procedure to the Mastership class. Session #3 Thursday, January 25, 2017 (Subject Code: 690) "Confident Implant Placement Through Digital Planning", Speaker, Dr. Armen Mirzayan Friday, January 26, 2018 (Subject Code: 130) "Growth Opportunities for your Dental Practice", Speaker, Dr. Armen Mirzayan Saturday, January 27, 2018 (Subject Code: 490) "Soft Tissue Concepts for the General Dentist", Speaker, Dr. Gordon Fraser Sunday, January 28, 2018-Master Case Presentation "To assist in achieving the necessary credits for Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry, you will be asked to present a documented dental procedure to the Mastership class. Session #4 Thursday, April 26, 2018 (Subject Code: 430) "Practical Pediatric Dentistry for the General Practitioner", Speaker-Dr. Carla Cohn Friday, April 27, 2018 (Subject Code: 550) "The Walletectomy: Embezzlement in the Dental Office", Speaker-Dr. Pat Little Saturday, April 28, 2018 (Subject Code: 200) "Assessment & Diagnosis of Oral Facial Pain" Speaker-Dr. Henry Gremillion Sunday, April 29, 2018-Master Case Presentation "To assist in achieving the necessary credits for Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry, you will be asked to present a documented dental procedure to the Mastership class.

For more information please contact: Valerie Bartoli Washington AGD Executive Director 19415 International Blvd, STE #410 SeaTac, WA 98188 Office #253-306-0730

(Light Breakfast, Lunch, Parking & all materials included with Registration)

24 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017

As a Non-Profit entity, Washington AGD does not endorse, partner or solely support companies, products or speakers, but rather recognizes speakers, products and sponsors for their services to our Washington AGD educational programs. The views and opinions of the speaker expressed during the educational program, do not necessarily state or reflect those of the Washington AGD. Washington AGD Approved PACE Program Provider #219331 FAGD/MAGD Credit Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry, AGD or WAGD endorsement. Washington AGD PACE Provider (6/1/2014-5/31/2018).


CONTINUING EDUCATION Washington AGD Educational Center 19415 International Blvd, #410 SeaTac, WA 98188 Office: 253-306-0730 Fax: 206-212-4969

ATRAUMATIC EXTRACTIONS FOR THE G.P. SPEAKERS: DATE: TIME: TUITION: CREDITS: LOCATION:

Speaker: Dr. Steven Rasner Friday & Saturday, August 25 & 26, 2017 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM $895 AGD Member Dentist, $995 Non-AGD Member Dentist and Active Military Dentist: $805.50 CE Credits: 16 Subject Code: 310 Washington AGD Educational Center 19415 International Blvd, #410, SeaTac, WA 98188

Is it possible to master in two days multiple surgical procedures that you're currently referring out? The answer is a resounding yes. This action-packed two day class, with two hands-on model course, will provide a step-by-step blueprint for success at a wide array of oral surgical procedures. It will be a question-inviting atmosphere. From pre-op patient preparation to scheduling to post-op instructions, you will leave prepared to return to your practice and immediately provide these procedures. Course Description: The course has been carefully designed to integrate didactic, audio and visual aides, and extensive hands-on attendee participation with a wide range of exodontia procedures for each individual. During the (Model) Hands-On, each doctor will: Determine and utilize appropriate flap design. Remove teeth in various clinical scenarios, such as teeth broken to the gingiva; teeth adjacent to "delicate" teeth (ie, anterior crowns); teeth in lingual version; and teeth in crowded dentition. Select and demonstrate proficient use of appropriate armamentarium (Elevators, Physics Forceps vs. conventional) to remove sectioned teeth. Determine and demonstrate case-appropriate suturing technique (Light Breakfast, Lunch, Parking & all materials included with Registration)

For more information please contact: Valerie Bartoli Washington AGD Executive Director 19415 International Blvd, STE #410 SeaTac, WA 98188 Office: 253-306-0730

Washington AGD Approved PACE Program Provider #219331 FAGD/MAGD Credit Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry, AGD or WAGD endorsement. Washington AGD PACE Provider 6/1/2014-5/31/2018).

(Light Breakfast, Lunch, Parking & all materials included with Registration)

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CONTINUING EDUCATION

11"

FUNDAMENTALS OF EXTRACTION SITE MANAGEMENT (RIDGE PRESERVATION VS IMMEDIATE IMPLANT PLACEMENT) Date: July 21, 2017 AGD CODE: 310, 490, 690 Time: 9:30AM – 5:30PM CE: 7 AIC Lecture Location: 1201 Pacific Ave. #C5, Tacoma, WA 98402 (Courtyard Level Conference Room #C5)

Course Overview

Course Instructor

After extraction, the alveolar ridge goes through bony remodeling. Therefore, it is important to know how to manage the extraction site to preserve the hard and soft tissue. Without this knowledge, implant surgery can be much more challenging, which may lead to complications and an unfavorable clinical outcome. In an extracted site, there are frequent questions about whether graft it or place an implant. Immediate Implant placement surgery in an extracted socket frequently requires bone grafting to augment the ridge, which can be somewhat challenging to the doctors. Immediate implant placement is one of the techniques that can be utilized in this scenario to achieve a predictable outcome. This lecture-based course is intended for dentists who already place implants and are looking to expand to more advanced techniques. The instructor will demonstrate some hands-on techniques for these topics. Lecture Topics to be Covered 1. Fundamentals of alveolar ridge remodeling after the extraction 2. Flapless vs flap extraction: Which is better? 3. Grafting vs Immediate placement: Which is better? 4. How to manage a tooth with poor soft tissue with swelling and fistula? 5. When is ridge preservation/bone grafting indicated and contra-indicated? 6. Rationale for ridge expansion 7. Indications and contra-indications for immediate placement 8. CBCT evaluation for selecting ideal case for immediate placement

By the end of this course doctors will be able to:

Dr. Jone Kim. DDS, MS

Course Director

Dr. Jone Kim did his undergraduate study at UCLA and received his D.D.S. from UCLA School of Dentistry in 1994. He also received Master of Science (M.S.) in oral biology from UCLA Graduate School and completed his oral & maxillofacial surgery training from University Medical Center Fresno – UCLA in 1998. Dr. Kim then went on to do a fellowship in orthognathic and facial reconstructive surgery at The Center for Corrective Jaw Surgery in Santa Barbara, California. Currently, he is a lecturer and part-time faculty at UCLA Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery and enjoys working with the surgical residents and dental students. Dr. Kim also maintains a private practice in Southern California focusing on the surgical aspect of implant surgery and he is a Diplomate and board certified oral & maxillofacial surgeon by the American Board of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery. He has lectured on implant related topics in US, including at 2014 and 2016 American Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons Annual Conferences and internationally. Just recently, Dr. Kim was asked to write an article titled “Posterior Immediate Implant Placement with Simultaneous Crestal Approach Maxillary Sinus Bone Graft and Flapless Extraction” for Selected Readings in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery (selectedreadingsoms.com), which was published in early 2017. In 2017, Dr. Kim is speaking at several major dental conferences around the world, such as in Canada, Mexico, China, Kazakhstan, Cambodia, Kyrgyzstan, South Korea and US, including at 2017 American Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons Annual Conference in San Francisco. The instructors for this course have no relevant financial relationships to disclose but are receiving reasonable honoraria for this presentation. Instructor honoraria is provided by Hiossen Implant.

• Determine the best case criteria to perform bone grafting vs immediate implant placement • Manage the extraction socket when faced with periapical infection and sinus infection • Extract a tooth with minimal trauma to the alveolar ridge • Preserve soft tissue at the time of extraction • Establish techniques for successful immediate implant placement in extracted area • Determine appropriate tissue/flap and suture management for immediate placement • Establish how to extract a tooth related to Sinus or IAN • Determine contraindication and medication for before/after procedure • Analyze types of graft material, membrane and suture needed, depending on case type

Register online at www.aiceducation.com or complete the registration form below and mail or fax to: Tuition: $600 HIOSSEN, INC. – AIC EDUCATION 1375 NW. MALL STREET #6 Tuition includes: • All course materials ISSAQUAH, WA 98027 Branch Contact: Benjamin H. Bae

Tel: 425-961-0951

Email: northwest@hiossen.com

Name: AGD Member #: Dental License #:

AIC Education is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. AIC Education designates this activity for 7 continuing education credits.

“AIC - Hiossen, Inc. / Advanced Dental Implant Research & Education Center (AIC) is designated as an Approved PACE Program Provider by the Academy of General Dentistry. The formal continuing dental education programs of this program provider are accepted by the AGD for Fellowship, Mastership and membership maintenance credit. Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry or AGD endorsement. The current term of approval extends from 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020. Provider ID #318822

Mailing Address: City

State

Phone: Email: Sales Representative Name: MasterCard __

Visa __

Amex __

Discover __

Credit Card #

Registration / Cancellation / CE Credits The number of registrations is limited for each course, and registration is accepted on a first come, first serve basis. Full tuition payment must accompany all registration forms. Upon receipt of this registration form and tuition fee, AIC Education will send you written confirmation. Confirming registrants who are unable to attend the course can obtain a refund by notifying AIC Education in writing no later than 14 days prior to the course date. Cancellations past that date will be subject to an additional penalty. AIC Education reserves the right to cancel a course no later than 14 days prior to the course date. Please be aware that AIC Education is not responsible for reimbursement of a non-refundable airline ticket or any other travel expenses in the event that a course is canceled. Continuing education credits awarded in the United States for participation in the CE activity may not apply toward license renewal in all states, countries or provinces. It is the responsibility of each participant to verify the requirements of their state, country or province.

Expiration Date: Zip on Statement: CVN#:

Total Amount: $

Authorized Signature

For more information about dental implant education please visit www.aiceducation.com Sponsored by 26 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017

8.5"

Zip


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CONTINUING EDUCATION

PREDICTABLE TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NARROW ALVEOLAR RIDGE (RIDGE EXPANSION VS SPLITTING)

Date: July 22, 2017 AGD CODE: 310, 490, 690 Time: 9:00AM – 5:00PM CE: 7 AIC Lecture Location: 1201 Pacific Ave. #C5, Tacoma, WA 98402 (Courtyard Level Conference Room #C5)

Course Overview

Course Instructor Dr. Jone Kim. DDS, MS

After tooth extraction, the alveolar ridge naturally undergoes remodeling, which will lead to horizontal and vertical bone loss. Therefore, implant surgery in the narrow alveolar ridge is still one of the challenging scenarios that surgeons face today. Various surgical techniques have been utilized to treat narrow alveolar ridge. One of the techniques is ridge expansion, which has several advantages over other traditional bone grafting techniques. This lecture will present rationales and show surgical cases of ridge expansion.

Course Director

Dr. Jone Kim did his undergraduate study at UCLA and received his D.D.S. from UCLA School of Dentistry in 1994. He also received Master of Science (M.S.) in oral biology from UCLA Graduate School and completed his oral & maxillofacial surgery training from University Medical Center Fresno – UCLA in 1998. Dr. Kim then went on to do a fellowship in orthognathic and facial reconstructive surgery at The Center for Corrective Jaw Surgery in Santa Barbara, California. Currently, he is a lecturer and part-time faculty at UCLA Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery and enjoys working with the surgical residents and dental students. Dr. Kim also maintains a private practice in Southern California focusing on the surgical aspect of implant surgery and he is a Diplomate and board certified oral & maxillofacial surgeon by the American Board of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery. He has lectured on implant related topics in US, including at 2014 and 2016 American Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons Annual Conferences and internationally. Just recently, Dr. Kim was asked to write an article titled “Posterior Immediate Implant Placement with Simultaneous Crestal Approach Maxillary Sinus Bone Graft and Flapless Extraction” for Selected Readings in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery (selectedreadingsoms.com), which was published in early 2017. In 2017, Dr. Kim is speaking at several major dental conferences around the world, such as in Canada, Mexico, China, Kazakhstan, Cambodia, Kyrgyzstan, South Korea and US, including at 2017 American Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons Annual Conference in San Francisco.

Course Outline • Fundamentals of alveolar ridge remodeling after the extraction • Expansion vs Splitting: Which is better? • How to perform ridge expansion and splitting using a surgical kit • When is ridge preservation/bone grafting indicated and contra-indicated? • Indications and contra-indications for ridge expansion • Indications and contra-indications for simultaneous implant placement • Rationale for ridge expansion • CBCT evaluation for selecting ideal case for ridge expansion • Perform ridge expansion and implant placement on typodont model in class

The instructors for this course have no relevant financial relationships to disclose but are receiving reasonable honoraria for this presentation. Instructor honoraria is provided by Hiossen Implant.

By the end of this course doctors will be able to:

Register online at www.aiceducation.com or complete the registration form below and mail or fax to: Tuition: $600 HIOSSEN, INC. – AIC EDUCATION 1375 NW. MALL STREET #6 Tuition includes: • All course materials ISSAQUAH, WA 98027

• Determine the best case criteria to perform ridge modification • Perform ridge expansion using a surgical kit • Perform ridge splitting using a surgical kit • Manage narrow alveolar ridge cases that will benefit from simultaneous implant placement • Apply techniques for tissue/flap and suturing for the narrow alveolar ridge • Assess and resolve complications that can arise from narrow alveolar ridge surgery

Branch Contact: Benjamin H. Bae

Tel: 425-961-0951

Email: northwest@hiossen.com

Name: AGD Member #: Dental License #:

AIC Education is an ADA CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. AIC Education designates this activity for 7 continuing education credits.

“AIC - Hiossen, Inc. / Advanced Dental Implant Research & Education Center (AIC) is designated as an Approved PACE Program Provider by the Academy of General Dentistry. The formal continuing dental education programs of this program provider are accepted by the AGD for Fellowship, Mastership and membership maintenance credit. Approval does not imply acceptance by a state or provincial board of dentistry or AGD endorsement. The current term of approval extends from 1/1/2017 to 12/31/2020. Provider ID #318822

Mailing Address: City

State

Zip

Phone: Email: Sales Representative Name: MasterCard __

Visa __

Amex __

Discover __

Credit Card #

Registration / Cancellation / CE Credits The number of registrations is limited for each course, and registration is accepted on a first come, first serve basis. Full tuition payment must accompany all registration forms. Upon receipt of this registration form and tuition fee, AIC Education will send you written confirmation. Confirming registrants who are unable to attend the course can obtain a refund by notifying AIC Education in writing no later than 14 days prior to the course date. Cancellations past that date will be subject to an additional penalty. AIC Education reserves the right to cancel a course no later than 14 days prior to the course date. Please be aware that AIC Education is not responsible for reimbursement of a non-refundable airline ticket or any other travel expenses in the event that a course is canceled. Continuing education credits awarded in the United States for participation in the CE activity may not apply toward license renewal in all states, countries or provinces. It is the responsibility of each participant to verify the requirements of their state, country or province.

Expiration Date: Zip on Statement: CVN#:

Total Amount: $

Authorized Signature

For more information about dental implant education please visit www.aiceducation.com Sponsored by

8.5"

washingtonAGD.org

27


CONTINUING EDUCATION

AGD Member Benefits The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) is the only organization that exclusively represents the interests and serves the needs of the general dentist. Start taking advantage of our member benefits today—join the AGD by visiting www.agd.org or calling 888.AGD.DENT (888.243.3368).

Continuing Education

Discover quality continuing education (CE) opportunities—at both the local and national level, and in a variety of formats—to help you provide the best patient care, learn about the latest technologies and procedures, and emerge as the educated voice of general dentistry. Plus, you can submit CE to the AGD in a variety of convenient ways—via the Web, email, mail, or fax—and we’ll track your courses with our members-only CE transcripts.

Achievement Awards

Stand out among the competition, gain instant credibility in your profession, and establish your commitment to lifelong learning and quality patient care with the prestigious AGD Fellowship and Mastership awards, the only achievement-based awards in general dentistry.

Advocacy and Representation

Join the organization that serves as the voice of general dentistry. The AGD ensures that general dentists and supporters of the profession can speak up when it matters most, helping members unite their voices on legislative and regulatory activities affecting their right to practice within the United States.*

Annual Meeting

Take advantage of discounted registration to the AGD’s annual meeting, where you can earn CE, checkout the latest products and technology, and network with your colleagues.

Practice Tools

Access a variety of tools to help you manage your practice more efficiently: Check the AGD Product Review Directory before you buy, download sample consent, employee, and practice policy forms from the AGD’s Practice Management Library, and get personalized assistance with third party payer problems, as well as free insurance contract analysis.

888.AGD.DENT

28 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017

Career Tools

Take advantage of the AGD Marketplace & Career Center, where dental connections are made. Search available job listings, buy a practice or equipment, post your own résumé at no cost, and find additional resources to help you plan for your next career move.

Patient Resources

Get enrolled in the Find an AGD Dentist directory, which is searchable by prospective patients through KnowYourTeeth. com, the AGD’s consumer-facing website. You also may direct your current patients to learn more about their oral health through www.2min2x.org, an educational website created by the Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives—of which the AGD is a proud member—and the Ad Council. Plus, offer educational reading materials in your waiting room with AGD oral health fact sheets, which cover a range of topics and are customized with your practice information.

Publications and Media

Stay informed on the latest general dentistry news and research with complimentary subscriptions to the AGD’s awardwinning print publications, AGD Impact and General Dentistry, along with extra content available exclusively in the digital editions. You also can listen to the AGD Podcast series and read our blog, The Daily Grind.

Member Savings

Receive immediate access to the AGD Member Savings & Offers program, which provides you with exclusive savings and special offers on the personal and professional products and services you need most. *Canadian dues rates reflect limited advocacy benefits.

membership@agd.org

www.agd.org


CONTINUING EDUCATION Washington Academy of General Dentistry PACE Approval Representative: Linda Edgar, DDS 220 292nd Street, Federal Way, WA 98023 Office: 206-940-6112 Fax: 253-517-8766 Email: drlinda@edgardds.com

Applying for PACE Approval Approval for CE Credits from the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) Program Approval for Continuing Education (PACE) was created to assist members of the AGD and the dental profession in identifying and participating in quality continuing dental education (CDE). PACE approves program provider organizations, not speakers or specific courses. The program provider approval mechanism is an evaluation for the educational processes used in designing, planning, and implementing CE. Approval by the AGD does not imply endorsement of course content, products, or therapies presented, nor does this approval imply that a state or provincial board of dentistry will accept courses. Approved program providers are expected to comply with all relevant state and federal laws. CE offered by approved program providers will be accepted by the AGD for Fellowship/Mastership credit.

Get the Application Go to www.agd.org Click on the Education tab and then PACE Apply/Renew Tab to get the application. To qualify for PACE approval, all organizations should have offered a planned program of CDE activities for at least 12 months. Note: If your organization has not offered a planned program of continuing dental activities during the 12 months immediately preceding the application date, you may apply for a maximum of one year approval.

FEE AGD Members: If you are an AGD Member or Associate Member (Specialists are Associates) the FEE is $195 for 4 years. Please make your check out to Washington AGD. AGD Members do have access to the AGD membership database Non-AGD Members: If you are NOT an AGD Member or Associate Member the FEE is $595 for 4 years. Please make your check out to Washington AGD. Non-AGD Members do not have access to the AGD membership database. If you would like to become an AGD member, please submit the enclosed membership application along with the membership dues of $486. Please make your check out to the AGD.

Your PACE Application Two (2) copies of your PACE Application must be mailed to me along with One (1) copy of your membership application with the appropriate checks.

Mail to: Linda Edgar, DDS Washington AGD PACE Approval Representative 220 292nd Street Federal Way, WA 98023 washingtonAGD.org

29


CONTINUING EDUCATION Promotional code:_______________________

2017 AGD Membership Application

Referral Information If you were referred to the AGD by a current member, please note his or her information below:

For more information: Join online at www.agd.org. Call us at 888.243.3368 or 312.440.4300.

Member’s name

City, state/province, or U.S. Federal Services branch

Member Information

First name

MI

Last name

Designation (e.g. DDS, DMD, BDS)

Date of birth (mm/dd/yyyy) Required for access to the members-only sections of the AGD website

Do you currently hold a valid dental license in your country of practice? q No q Yes: ____________________________________________________________________________________________ License number State/province Country Date renewed (mm/yyyy) Type of membership (See back page for definitions.): (Check one.) ❑ Active general dentist ❑ Associate (dental specialist) ❑ Resident ❑ Dental student ❑ Affiliate If you are not in general practice, please indicate your specialty: _______________________________ Current dental practice environment: (Check one.) ❑ Solo ❑ Associateship ❑ Group practice ❑ Hospital ❑ Resident ❑ Corporate ❑ Other____________________________ ❑ Faculty _________________________________________________________________ Please indicate institution

❑ U.S. Federal Services ___________________________________________________________________ Please indicate branch

If you are a member of the Canadian Forces Dental Service, please indicate your preferred constituent: ❑ U.S. military counterpart ❑ Local Canadian constituent

Contact Information

Your AGD constituent (local chapter) is determined by your business address, unless one is not available.

Preferred billing/mailing address: ❑ Business ❑ Home Preferred method of contact: ❑ Email ❑ Mail ❑ Phone

Business address

State/province

ZIP/postal code

Phone

Fax

State/province

ZIP/postal code

City

Name of business (If applicable)

Home address

City

Phone

Primary email

Educational Information

Country

Country

Website address

Are you a graduate of an accredited* U.S./Canadian dental school? ❑ Yes ❑ No ❑ Currently enrolled

Dental school

State/province

Country

Date of graduation (mm/yyyy)

Are you a graduate of (or resident in) an accredited* U.S. or Canadian postdoctoral program? ❑ Yes ❑ No ❑ Currently enrolled Type: ❑ AEGD ❑ GPR ❑ Other ________________________ *See back of form.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Postdoctoral institution State/province Country Start date (mm/dd/yyyy) End date (mm/dd/yyyy)

Stay Social With the AGD!

Optional Information

Search “Academy of General Dentistry” to connect with us on:

Gender ❑ Male ❑ Female Ethnicity ❑ American Indian ❑ Asian ❑ African-American ❑ Hispanic ❑ Caucasian ❑ Other I am interested in participating in the AGD Mentor Program as a: ❑ Mentor ❑ Mentee

Dues Information

Payment

Please check membership type applying for:

U.S./

Canada

Puerto Rico

❑ Active General International (in Canadian dollars) Dentist ..................... $386 ..................$427 ................ $324 ❑ Associate ..................... 386 ....................427 .................. 324 ❑ Affiliate ....................... 193 ....................214 .................. 162 ❑ Resident ....................... 77 ......................86 .................... 65 ❑ 2016 Graduate ............. 77 ......................86 .................... 65 ❑ 2015 Graduate ........... 154 ....................171 .................. 130 ❑ 2014 Graduate ........... 231 ....................256 .................. 194 ❑ 2013 Graduate ........... 308 ....................341 .................. 259 ❑ Dental Student .............. 17 ......................22 .................... 17

❑ Check (enclosed) ❑ Visa ❑ MasterCard

❑ American Express

Note: Payments for Canadian members can only be accepted via Visa, MasterCard, or check.

_____/________

___________________________________

Expiration date (mm/yyyy) Please print name as it appears on the card. I hereby certify that all of the above information is correct, and that by signing this application agree to all terms of membership, including completion of 75 hours of continuing education every three years for active general dentist and associate members.

1. AGD Headquarters Dues: ............................. _________ 2. AGD Constituent Dues: ............................... _________ Please refer to back side for constituent dues.

Signature

Date

Total Amount Enclosed: ............................. _________

Return this application with your payment to: Academy of General Dentistry, 560 W. Lake St., Sixth Floor, Chicago, IL 60661-6600, USA.

Dues rates effective through Sept. 30, 2017.

If paying by credit card, fax to 312.335.3443.

30 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017


CONTINUING EDUCATION

Advancing in Dental

Sleep Medicine and


Continuing the Journey!

PLEASE JOIN


The Academy of General Dentistry Region 11,
 Dr. John Tucker and OSA University for a 
 
week cruise to ALASKA on July 28 ’17!

COME CRUISE with us to ALASKA on 7/28 - 8/4, 2017 & bring your team! 
 SIGN UP TODAY: (800) 422-0711 — OR — registrar@ContinuingEducation.NET Here’s What Participants Learn

CE Tuition

SUBJECT CODE: 162 (Lecture & Participation)

Non-AGD Dentist: $1395 AGD Member Dentist Staff with DDS: $395

— 20 Continuing Education Credits —

Cruise Ship

(Not Included with Cruise Price)

Royal Caribbean Explorer of the Seas

AGD Member Dentist: $995

“Dynamic” calibration of oral appliances

Topics involving vertical dimension

Non-AGD Dentist Staff with DDS: $795

Measuring patient compliance with
 new technology

Registration

Treating the PAP intolerant edentulous
 and partially edentulous patient

3D Imaging: new understanding of the airway

A deeper understanding of appliance
 selection, including when to use what

Establishing/maintaining relationships
 with sleep physicians and sleep labs

Marketing strategies for your dental
 sleep medicine practice

Involving your team members to ensure
 success and building a complete Dental
 Sleep Medicine Practice.

Bite registration for oral appliances using the patient’s physiology — Heart Rate Variability

Beyond the AHI

“TMJ” treatment and appliance selection

Vitamin D3 and its relationship to sleep

The role of CBCT in sleep

Cruise Pricing: (based on double occupancy) Interior room (L): $1,190.61 Ocean View (I): $1,640.61

Balcony over Ocean (E3): $2,040.61

Balcony over Ocean (D1): $2,120.61

(Course & Cruise)

Junior Suites w/ Balcony over ocean: $2,440.61

800-422-0711 OR

FOR MORE INFO:

registrar@ContinuingEducation.NET

http://www.continuingeducation.net/ Region11Cruise

Faculty — Dr. John H. Tucker


Cruise Port: 


Diplomat American Board of Dental Sleep Medicine

Seattle, WA

Dr. Tucker maintains a private practice in Erie, PA. Dr. Tucker has a special interest in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea 
 and has been actively treating patients for the past ten years. He’s a Diplomat of the American

Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine and a member of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Nearest Airport to Cruise Port: Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

Course Days/Times at Sea: Sat., July 29: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM

Sun., July 30: 8:00 AM-12:00 PM Wed., Aug. 2: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM

Cruise Itinerary DAY

PORT OF CALL

Fri., July 28 Sat., July 29 Sun., July 30 Sun., July 30 Mon., July 31 Tues., Aug 1 Wed., Aug 2 Thurs., Aug 3 Fri., Aug 4

Seattle, WA At Sea Alaska Inside Passage Juneau, Alaska Skagway, Alaska Tracy Arm Fjord At Sea Victoria, BC Seattle, WA

ARRIVE

DEPART 4pm

7am 12 Noon 12 Noon 9pm 7am 8:30pm 7am 12pm 9am 6pm 9am 6pm 6am

washingtonAGD.org

31


CONTINUING EDUCATION

Continuing Dental Education Courses & Events Organization JUNE 2017 June 2-3: “Innovative Composite Restorations”, Dr. David Clark Washington AGD June 2-3: “Diode Laser Practice Refinement with Optional 2nd Day Hands-On Clinical Simulation Workshop” Ms. Janet Press

UWSOD

June 9: “Washington AGD Orthodontic Hands-On Program”, Dr. Binh Tran

Washington AGD

June 9: “Dental Medical Billing for the G.P. & Staff, Dr. Chris Farrugia

Washington AGD

June 10: “Advance Medical Billing for the G.P. & Staff, Dr. Chris Farrugia

Washington AGD

June 15-17: “Pacific Northwest Dental Conference (Bellevue)

WSDA

JULY 2017 July 14: “Washington AGD Orthodontic Hands-On Program”, Dr. Binh Tran Washington AGD July 12-15: AGD Annual Meeting (Las Vegas)

AGD

July 28-August 4: “Advance Dental Sleep Training”, CE at Sea” 7 Night Alaska Cruise, Dr. John Tucker Region 11 AGD

AUGUST 2017 ORGANIZATION August 4: “Washington AGD Orthodontic Hands-On Program”, Dr. Binh Tran Washington AGD August 25-26: “Oral Surgery for the G.P.”, Dr. Karl Koerner

UWSOD, Washington AGD

SEPTEMBER 2017 September 8: “Washington AGD Orthodontic Hands-On Program”, Dr. Binh Tran Washington AGD September 15: Clinical Records Prevent Criminal Records: Do Dentistry, Not Time”, Dr. Roy Shelburne

Henry Schein Dental & Washington AGD

September 20: “Medical Management of Dental Caries”, Dr. Joel Berg

SCDS

September 21: “Dental Materials”, Dr. George Holzer

Washington AGD

September 22: “Learning from My Endodontic Failures”, Dr. Rodrigo Cunha (Day 1)

Washington AGD

September 23: “Simplifying Endodontics”, Dr. Rodrigo Cunha (Day 2)

Washington AGD

September 23: “Dental Materials”, Dr. George Holzer

Washington AGD

September 22-23: “Ultrasonics “Olympic Gold” in Patient Health & Wellness Workshop” Ms. Janet Press September 29: “Update in Pharmacology” Dr. Hal Crossley September 29: “Medical Billing for the GP”, Dr. Chris Farrugia September 30: “Street Drugs – What the Dentist Needs to Know” Dr. Hal Crossley

UWSOD

UWSOD PCDS, SKCDS & UWSOD UWSOD

OCTOBER 2017 October 3-8: “Oral Surgery for the General Dentist” Dr. Maria B. Papageorge, Destination Iceland UWSOD

REGISTER ONLINE: WASHINGTONAGD.ORG OR CALL: 253-306-0730 (continued on page 31) 32 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017


CONTINUING EDUCATION

Continuing Dental Education Courses & Events Organization October 6: “Washington AGD Orthodontic Hands-On Program”, Dr. Binh Tran

Washington AGD

October 7: “Washington AGD Membership Appreciation Gala” Mad Hatter’s Ball

Washington AGD

October 18: Avoiding Anesthesia & Sedation issues, malpractice suits”, Dr. Fred Quarnstrom

SCDS

October 19-24: “ADA National Conference—Atlanta”

ADA

October 27: “BLS for Healthcare Providers & First Aid Courses, Everett

SCDS

NOVEMBER 2017 November 3: “Washington AGD Orthodontic Hands-On Program”, Dr. Binh Tran Washington AGD November 3: “Business & Communication – How to Produce a Memorable Daily Show and Whole Health: The Mouth and Its Messages: An Oral & Systemic Health Review” Dr. Lisa Knowles WSDHA & UWSOD November 4: “SKCDS Auction & Gala”

SKCDS

November 10-11: “Revolutionary Prevention Protocols” Dr. Brian Novy

Oregon AGD

November 16: “Esthetics & Function in all Ceramics and Composites”, Dr. Joyce Bassett

Washington AGD

November 16: Annual Social & Foundation Fundraiser, team building, dinner & entertainment

SCDS

November 17: “Mastering Posterior Bulk Full & Direct Composite Veneer”, Dr. Joyce Bassett

Washington AGD

November 18: “Pathology & Trauma”, Dr. Jasjit Dillon

Washington AGD

DECEMBER 2017 December 1: “Washington AGD Orthodontic Hands-On Program”, Dr. Binh Tran Washington AGD December 1: “Topic TBD”

PCDS & Washington AGD

JANUARY 2018 January 12: “Washington AGD Orthodontic Hands-On Program”, Dr. Binh Tran Washington AGD January 25: “Confident Implant Placement Through Digital Planning”, Dr. Armen Mirzayan

Washington AGD

January 26: “Growth Opportunities for your Dental Practice”, Dr. Armen Mirzayan

Washington AGD

January 27: “Soft Tissue Concepts for the General Dentist”, Dr. Gordon Fraser

Washington AGD

January 26-27: “Pediatric Dentistry and Patient Behavior” Dr. Gregory Psaltis Oregon AGD FEBRUARY 2018 February 2: “Washington AGD Orthodontic Hands-On Program”, Dr. Binh Tran Washington AGD February 21: SCDS General Meeting, TBA

SCDS

MARCH 2018 March 9: Annual Seminar at Lynnwood Convention Center, TBD SCDS, UWSOD, SKCDS March 21: SCDS General Meeting, TBA

SCDS

(continued on page 32) washingtonAGD.org

33


CONTINUING EDUCATION

Continuing Dental Education Courses & Events Organization APRIL 2018 April 13: Stay out of Jail: Avoid Coding Errors & Excel in Insurance Administration, Dr. Charles Blair Henry Schein Dental & Washington AGD April 18: SCDS General Meeting, TBA

SCDS

April 26: “Practical Pediatric Dentistry for the General Practitioner”, Dr. Carla Cohn

Washington AGD

April 27: “The Walletectomy: Embezzlement in the Dental Office”, Dr. Pat Little

Washington AGD

April 27: BLS for Healthcare Providers & First Aid Courses, Everet

SCDS

April 28: “Assessment & Diagnosis of Oral Facial Pain”, Dr. Henry Gremillion

Washington AGD

April 28: “The Walletectomy: Embezzlement in the Dental Office”, Dr. Pat Little

Washington AGD

May 2018 May 16: SCDS General Meeting, TBA SCDS May 18: Topic TBA “William Howard Memorial Lecture

SKCDS, UWSOD & Washington AGD

September 2018 September 19: SCDS General Meeting, TBA SCDS OCTOBER 2018 October 6: “Washington AGD Membership Appreciation Gala” Washington AGD October 17: SCDS General Meeting, TBA

SCDS

October 26: BLS for Healthcare Providers & First Aid Courses, Everett

SCDS

Organization Contacts Contact: Henry Schein Dental: 253-395-8039 Contact: Oregon Academy of General Dentistry (Oregon AGD) Phone #503-228-6266 Contact: Pierce County Dental Society (PCDC) #253-274-9722 Contact: Region 11 Academy of General Dentistry #253-306-0730 Contact: Seattle-King County Dental Society (SCKDS) # 206-448-6620 Contact: Snohomish County Dental Society (SCDS) #360-419-7444 Contact: University of Washington School of Dentistry (UWSOD) #206-543-5448 Contact: Washington Academy of General Dentistry (Washington AGD) #253-306-0730

34 Washington AGD Newsletter | June 2017


THE PREMIER MEETING FOR GENERAL DENTISTRY

AGD2017

LAS VEGAS JULY 13 TO 15, 2017 WWW.AGD2017.ORG

“These are world-renowned speakers that we get the opportunity to spend time with, talk to, and listen to their experiences in the dental field. It’s pretty amazing.” Shailain Patel, DMD Sacramento, CA Member since 2013

THE MATERIALS TO SUCCEED Education tailored to your needs Exhibitors vital to your practice Networking events exclusive to you

washingtonAGD.org

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Constituent of the Academy of General Dentistry Valerie A. Bartoli, Executive Director 19415 International Blvd, #410, SeaTac, WA 98188 p 253-306-0730 | f (206) 212-4969

Pre-Sorted Standard U S Postage PAID Portland, OR Permit #243

Washington AGD Mission: “The Washington AGD provides its membership professional development through quality education for comprehensive patient care.�

www.washingtonAGD.org

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Washington Academy Of General Dentistry Spring Newsletter  

Washington Academy Quarterly Newsletter Spring 2017