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Clark County Fair History Credits and Acknowledgments

The Clark Country Fair Association wishes to acknowledge the hardwork and contributions of so many individuals and groups throughout these 150 years. We would like to recognize the following for preparing this historic book - Friends of the Fair - Darren & Becky Conerly, Media Matrix Digital Center - Clark County Historical Society - Sharon A. Marble, Clark County Fair Board, Project Coordinator Copyright Š 2018 Friends Of The Fair Ridgefield, Washington No part of this book may be reproduced or copied in any form with written permission of this publisher

Mission Statement It is the mission of the Clark County Fair Association to successfully promote a first class fair The emphasis is on presenting programs in agriculture, education, entertainment, the arts, commerce and recreation in a fiscally sound and environmentally conscientious manner for the benefit of all.


The Beginning of Fairs As early as 500 B.C. the Phoenicians organized fairs around commerce with surrounding countries. The Greeks held fairs to promote commerce and added events honoring their various gods. Later the Roman Empire connected its vast domains with fairs focusing on commerce and events honoring their gods. Fairs disappeared after the fall of the Roman Empire. Around the 13th to 14th century A.D. communities started to organize local fairs in Europe and the Middle East. These events were established to promote a specific product. The fairs included entertainment by fire-eaters and tight rope walkers. Records show the Incas also held fairs in the 15th century A.D. In 1620 Dutch settlers held the first fair in New Amsterdam. It was decided there should be two fairs held each year. The first fair was held in October for the sale of cattle and the second in November for the sale of hogs. The market fairs were similar to the kermis fairs of Holland. They included entertainment of clowns and acrobats and games such as pulling the goose, where young men tried to catch a goose covered in grease. After the War of Independence, agricultural societies were formed to promote agricultural production to secure economic independence from Europe. The first agricultural societies were formed in 1785 in Charleston, South Carolina and Philadelphia. In 1808 Elkanah Warson exhibited two Merino sheep in the village green of Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He hoped to interest local farmers in growing the sheep to supply raw wool for U.S. woolens factory manufacturers. In 1810 Mr. Watson convinced other local farmers to hold a livestock exhibition, entries include 386 sheep, 109 oxen, 9 cows, 7 folds, 3 heifers, 2 calves and 1 boar. This event led to the foundation of the Berkshire Agricultural Society. The fair of 1813 offered $70 in prizes for the best livestock. Women were encouraged to display domestic skills of cloth production. The fair closed with an “agricultural ball� featuring homemade fashions. As the migrations spread to the west and settlements were established, county fairs brought communities together. Fairs of the 1840’s were showcases for inventions improving agriculture. Today, the tradition continues in North America with more than 3,200 county fairs held each year.

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Volunteer of the Year Criteria used in selecting the Volunteer of the Year. A) It may be an individual and/or an organization B) Length of service C) What the individual or organization’s commitment has been to the fair. D) Outstanding or significant contributions to the fair.

1994 1995

John & LouEd Gorman Ellen Klineline Rita Sederberg

1996

Cal & Pearl Relyea Ed Linnett

1997 1998

Southwest Washington Hospital Clark County Fair Mounted Patrol Lost Children’s Booth

1999

Imogene Woodside Clark County Dairy Wives

2000

Doug Shattuck Columbian Newspaper

2001 2002 2003

Earl Kadow Clark County 4-H Association Bob & Donna McNeal Ft. Vancouver Antique Equipment

2004 2005 2006 2

Gerald Lutje Richard Streissguth Bob & Nancy Peck

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Elrita Mansford John Morrison Jim & Judith Youde Janet Bellcoff Maxine Osborn Louise Owen Sharon Marble Mary Ann Morrison Roy Garrison Kan & Nancy Bisbee Special Kids Rodeo Boyd & Terri Johnson


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Of Forward by Fair Manager John Morrison

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Proclamations by Local and State Representatives

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150 Years of History (1868-2018)

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How The Grounds Have Grown

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Fair Court Royalty

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Forward by Fair Manager John Morrison

Welcome to the Clark County Fair and the celebration of our 150th Anniversary. I am very proud of all the work our staff, Fair Board and Volunteers have put in to making the Fair a very special event for families in this region. That was especially the case this year as we recognize 150 years of our agricultural heritage. For years, Fairs have been the gathering place for generations of families and friends to meet and put their best skills on display or show the animals and crops they have spent the past year caring for and raising. Fairs became the annual celebration of accomplishment.

Across the country, Fairs are facing an increasing challenge to stay relevant to their mission in the face of fewer family farms every year. The expectations of youth and families in 2018 are considerably different than what they were in 1868. Striking a balance that recognizes both the mission and the need to stay current is one that the Clark County Fair has done very well. Our recognition as one of the top Fairs in the Country, twice in the past few years, is testimony to that. This year is no exception. We have planned a great event for this anniversary celebration with agriculture and you in mind. Please enjoy your visit and take advantage of all the educational, recreational, shopping and dining opportunities the Fair has right at your fingertips. Again, welcome and thank you for attending the Fair.

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1868 - 2018

150 Years of Farm, Fun & Family Traditions On July 25, 1868 a group of men formed an organization to celebrate and promote agriculture and mechanical

advancements in the county. The founding members wished to share the accomplishments of their county. The best way to achieve this was to host a county fair and give the citizens of the community an opportunity to display their talents and ingenuity with the county and state. The first fair was a success, made possible with the work of many individuals, local organizations and businesses. The history of Clark County can be seen through the history of its fair. Today that spirit is alive with the 32 volunteer member fair board and various associations that work each year to produce a fair that is ranked number one in the state and recently in the top 10 in the nation.

On October 21, 1868

The first Clarke County Fair was held in Esther Short Park. The Clarke County Agricultural and Mechanical Society sponsored the event. Everyone in the community was encouraged to participate to make the event a success. Prizes went to M. Shea for best trotting horse, Miss Ella Stoughton for a lamp mat and Mr. Tolley for his huge squash.

On March 19, 1881

The Agriculture and Mechanical Society trustees incorporated with $5,000 in capital and nine trustees. They purchased 28 acres of the Durgan farm on Harney Hill for a fair site. Improvements were made, a 40x60 foot pavilion was built and race track set up. The fair was held on October 11th.

1889

The Washington Territory becomes the 42nd State in the United States of America.

1910

The Fair name was changed to the Harvest Show. It was held at Esther Short Park. Exhibits were housed in buildings and sixteen tents. One of the highlights of the fair was a stump burning demonstration. 8


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1911

On March 15th the Clarke County Harvest Show Association reorganized and became the Clarke County Fair Association. There were 12 trustees and 3 county commissioners were “ex-officio” members. One of the Association’s missions was “to promote and further the advancement of all agricultural, stock raising, horticulture, mining, mechanical and industrial pursuits of Clarke County.”

1912

Clarke County students were encouraged to participate in arithmetic, penmanship and grammar competitions sponsored by the Fair.

1913

To ensure a good turn out for the 1913 Fair, Vancouver businesses closed so families could attend. Even the saloons cooperated and closed at noon.

1914

The Fair was renamed the Columbia River Interstate Fair. Opening day crowds numbered 10,000. The fair was held in conjunction with the 90th anniversary of the founding of Vancouver by the Hudson’s Bay Company. The celebrations featured a Wild West show and Washington Gov. Lister was the principal speaker.

1915

The name of the Fair was changed to the Clarke County Fair and Dahlia Show.

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1916-1927

No fairs were held during these years because B.J. Bagley purchased the Fair site for a dairy farm. However, Mr. Bagley decided to continue the use of a portion of the property for a race track.

1925

Until this time all documents referring to Clark County spelled Clarke with the “e” added due to a typographical error in the 1860’s. The “e” was removed by an act of the Legislature.

On August 30th, 1928

The Fair was held in Battle Ground. Between 3,000 and 4,000 people attended the opening day. A special event held was a “Maggie” contest to see which woman could throw a rolling pin the farthest. KGW radio broadcasted the speeches of Homer T. Bone, a Candidate for Congress and Kenneth MacIntiosh, a Candidate for U.S. Senate.

1929

The Fair was held at Bagley Park. Although 15,000 attended, the Fair incurred debt. The community stepped in and the Pomona Grange and Vancouver Chamber of Commerce convinced the Fair’s creditors to reduce the debt by one third. Fundraising efforts by the community paid off the remaining balance.

1930

The county Fair was cancelled. It was felt that the Pacific International Livestock Exposition filled the need for a large fair and the county Potato Show in Ridgefield filled the need for a small show.

1931-1932

4-H clubs sponsored fairs for members in Washougal, Orchards, Sara and Battle Ground.

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1933

No Fairs were held because the Extension Office was closed in May of that year.

1934-1940

4-H continues to sponsor fairs at Bagley Park. In 1938 and 1939 the Breed Association’s Dairy Show joined with the 4-H to sponsor the fairs. Then in 1940 the Fair was moved to Battle Ground.

1941

The Fair Association reorganizes and purchases a permanent site in Battle Ground. The fair was held September 11-13 and the price of a ticket was 25 cents or $1 for a season ticket. Time capsules in the shape of eggs were to be placed under the corner stone of the dairy and livestock building. Eggs were chosen because it was the third biggest business in the county. Three eggs were made of aluminum. A special dispensation was obtained for materials because of the war. The eggs were made from some of the first aluminum poured from the Alcoa plant. Local boys being trained for skilled work at the Boeing airplane factory fabricated the eggs. These boys were students of Clark County’s national defense training school. The Saturday dedication began with the coronation of the “Queen of Calico”, Miss Ann Watzig, the master of ceremonies R.S. Durkee from Battle Ground introduced delegates from Washougal, Camas, Ridgefield and Vancouver as they placed documents into the egg. The grand finale was the fly by and dropping of a good will bouquet over the fair grounds. The pilot of the plane was Miss Myrtle Boys of La Center, a recent graduate of Clark Junior College.

1942

The Fair was cancelled due to World War II. There were dim-out restrictions and rationing problems. Work did continue on buildings and other improvements.

1943 – 1945

Victory Fairs replaced the county fair during World War II. They were held at McLoughlin Heights.

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1946

The Clark County Fair was held at McLoughlin Heights. During the three-day event 12,000 people attended.

On August 25th, 1947

The Clark County Fair joined with the Battle Ground Community Fair to stage a mutual Fair. There were 275 adult exhibitors, 262 4-H and 27 Future Farmers of America.

1948

On August 27th the Fair was held in Battle Ground with 725 exhibitors participating in the three day event.

1950

Until the 1950’s the fair featured horse races in Esther Short Park and Bagley Park.

1952

The Fair had outgrown the site in Battle Ground. Two locations were considered. The first site was 40 acres offered by John McGillivary located near Fisher Road and Duback. The second offer was by William Wineberg; the site was the Arthur Moulton farm north of Vancouver.

1953

On August 3rd the Fair Board voted to accept the McGillivary site. But after protest of the Grange concerning racing and pari-mutuel betting the board reversed their vote.

On March 28, 1954

Fire destroys the buildings at the Battle Ground site. On August 26th the fair opened for the last time in Battle Ground.

December 20, 1954 Mr Wineberg deeds 20 acres to the Fair. In August of 1955

The Fair opens at its new location north of Vancouver. It was the biggest tent show held at that time with a total of ten tents to house exhibits.

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1957

The “E” Livestock Building was built. It was accomplished through the efforts of the community. Alcoa aluminum plant furnished the plans and materials. Through the generous donations of dairy groups, individuals and stock sales, $12,456.65 was collected. Also, donations were collected from returned fair premiums. A large group of volunteers helped in the construction.

1958

An excerpt from the December 23rd Columbian stated, “In four short years the fairgrounds were assessed at $161,096.” This was achieved by the hard work of many. The article states, “Somewhere along the way, though, something a lot more important than money has happened to the Clark County Fair. This is the wide spread support it has won.”

1959

The Dairy Women’s booth was built. The building was about the size of a phone booth. Two dairy families borrowed the money to buy a milk shake machine. In 1959 there were 200 dairy families in the county.

1961

Attendance record set for the Fair in 1961, with 26,935 for the entire event.

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1962

The horse barn was built with the help of 4-H and adult volunteers. The posts were salvaged from the Stebco sawmill and boards for the siding were salvaged from the H.R. Ward feed store in Camas.

1963

Vancouver Fire Fighters built a 65 ft. tower for the 1963 Fair. The firefighters demonstrated difficult rescue stunts, jumping through windows into nets below.

1964

Attendance record was 36,562 and the Fair placed 11th in the state of Washington for attendance.

1965

In a July letter to the Columbian Mr. W.C. Walnack writes, “With the 24 active Fair board members representing organizations throughout Clark County and with so many helping and supporting our Fair, it has grown at the present site from a cow pasture to the present fine buildings and grounds in just 10 short years. County support is the prime factor in achieving our rating.”

1966

On January 13th a special grant was received from the State Fairs Commision to construct the home economics building. According to State Agriculture Director Donald W. Moos, “The Clark County Fair has made remarkable progress since moving to it’s new location north of Vancouver 11 years ago. Eleven major buildings and fourteen auxiliary buildings have been constructed, the grounds have been completely fenced and roadways and building entrances have been paved. The Fair has shown steady progress in exhibits and attendance.”

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1968

The one hundred year celebration of the Fair began with the theme “One Hundred Years’ Experience…A Thousand Years of Vision”. The Fair site was expanded with the purchase of 23 acres adjoining Wineberg property. Special entertainment for the Fair was Eddie Albert and Hoosier Hot Shots. Also featured events at the Fair were an antique auto parade, a beard-growing contest, and threshing machine demonstrations.

1972

Churches, individuals and 17 businesses contributed materials and labor to build a chapel designed by Rev. Palmer Hanson. Playland employees, Paul Graff and Linda Durham, were the first to marry in the chapel. The Fair Association reorganizes operating the Fair. Public funds from the state could not be allocated to a private organization. The sum of $88,000 plus interest would have to be reimbursed to the state of Washington. No monies would be issued from the state until this matter was resolved. The matter was resolved by deeding the property to the county and the Fair Association would operate the Fair as an independent corporation for $30,000 a year for 10 years, with the right for renewal.

The site was enlarged again with the lease of 80 acres through negotiations with the Department of National Resources. Clark County Fair Mounted Patrol was formed to provide security in the parking lots and patrol the fences.

1973

The Fair was rated third in the state. Attendance soared to 106,000. The horse barn was built with the help of 4-H and area saddle clubs. A construction company installed posts and volunteers nailed and painted walls.

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Attendance continued to climb with 131,986 participating in the Fair. The theme for 1975 was “Our Heritage, The American Fair.” The Fair Board, Pomona Grange and the Central Labor Council donated scholarship monies. Washington State Rep. Mike McCormick was invited to award scholarships.

1976

The U.S. Centennial celebration theme for the Fair was “America the Greatest Fair on Earth.” A total of 9,000 exhibits were displayed at the Fair. To celebrate pioneer history Alvin Pietz built a log cabin from Douglas fir trees felled in eastern Clark County. The cabin was built in the old style, using pegs. Betty Ford sends her regrets that she and President Ford cannot attend due to other commitments.

1977

Annual attendance continued breaking records. In 1977 the total attendance was 189,140. Donna McNeal developed the wool show and spinning demonstrations.

1978

Construction continued with a new 4-H demonstration kitchen and covered area for old time machine displays. The scholarship fund for 4-H and FFA amounted to $1,100. Worden Reality sponsors the Wenatchee Youth Circus for $10,000.

1979

The Fair continued to provide family entertainment and also attract personalities like Billy Carter and in 1979 a three-hour visit by Gov. Ray of Washington. Billy Carter gave each Fair Board member an autographed can of Billy Beer.

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1980-1981

Pearl Relyea is elected first woman president of the Clark County Fair Board in it’s 25th year.

1982

Of the 83 fairs in the state of Washington, Clark County Fair is voted number 1, with a total of 1,981 out of 2,200 points. The fairs are judged on the quality of their grounds, exhibits and concessions.

1983

New computer programmed for the fair books. Gering Construction donated small portable show rings. New commercial building is built at the west end of the fairgrounds. Rich Cooper and his students from Mt. View High School build four sets of bleachers. A land swap between Department of National Resources and the county increases the Fair by 80 acres. Ray Charles plays to a standing room only crowd and a packed fairground. As a result the Fair Board decides to build a larger grandstand.

1984

Aug. 6-12, the Fair was expanded to seven days. A new covered grandstand is built seating 8,200. The grandstand with the grassy bowl area will hold 11,000. The old grandstand is turned into an 18,000 sq.ft. commercial building. This building has space for 93 exhibitors. With the construction of the new FFA exhibit hall the old FFA barn is converted to cat and dog shelters for 4-H. Additional space is used for horticulture and demonstrations. Asphalt floor is laid in the small animal barn. New show rings for beef and dairy animals. Evergreen Forest Products donate a small barn. This is the first year for split shows for animals. Open class and 4-H share the barns but take turns displaying their animals. The first half of the fair is open class and second half is 4-H.

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A Day At The Fair

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A Day At The Fair

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1985

Aug. 3-11, the Fair was expanded to 9 days. The midway is paved. Construction on the new horse arena begins on May 1. The Fair sold $4,000,000 in bonds. Clark County loaned $200,000 to the Fair. The state provided $42,000 and the local horse council raised $100,000. SW Washington Arabian Council held a raffle for a trip to Hawaii. They also held a benefit auction on April 13. Executive members of the Clark County Horse Council used personal finances as collateral to guarantee the building of the horse arena. The arena is 200x350’ with a 132x220’ stable. The Executive Horse Council members built 160 stalls saving the fair $60,000. Men, women and children volunteered 258 hours. They worked evenings 5:30 to 8:30 and all day on Saturdays. The area was dedicated on August 3rd.

1986

The Fair was extended to 10 days. Improvements to the grounds were a new front gate, donated by Corwin Beverage Company, and the installation of a Memorial Park next to the Equestrian Building. Space exhibit was displayed in the equestrian building. Mercury and Gemini space capsules were featured. Samples of moon rocks were among the items on view for the public. The exhibit was dedicated in the memory of the Challenger astronauts. Battle Ground science teacher Mike Murray worked to make this possible. Mr. Murray was a flight finalist in the space program.

1987

SW Washington Hospitals, Columbia Health Service and Clark County Medical Association agreed to donate $15,000 for 30 shows to feature local talent.

1988

Washington State Grange celebrated 100 years as an organization. The Grange was organized Sept. 10, 1889 in a room above Aenaes McMasters store at Third and Columbia Streets in Camas (now part of the Georgia Pacific Paper Mill). 20


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1989

The Clark County Fair is named the Centennial Fair in honor of Washington State’s Centennial. The fair received a 90% rating from the state. The scholarship fund was increased to $150,000. Dividends totaling $85,000 were received from AGCO stock, following AGCO’s bankruptcy. The board awarded $7,500 in scholarships to local youth. The first Friday free pancake breakfast and admission was established with the following sponsors: Safeway, KPDX TV and KISN radio. The first year, 14,000 attended the event from 8:00am to 11:00am.

1991

Don Nelson of Playland Shows donated $50,000. The funds were to be used to build a new mini farm. In return Playland will store equipment for free for the year. Edith Evan and Sue Schurman donated $7,000 to be used in the remodeling of the National Resource Building. Dave Pittman retired after 21 years as Fair manager.

1992

C-Tran offered free transportation to the Fair.

1992-1993

John Gorman served as interim manager of the Fair.

1994

Tom Musser was hired as Executive Director of the Clark County Fair Association.

1995

Oct. 18, the Fair Board approved $61.7 million plan for fairground improvements.

1996

June 2, $11,500 in scholarships was awarded to local high school graduates.

1997

The Clark County Fair Association decided to go forward with the amphitheater project, which was completed in 2003. The board hopes that revenues from the amphitheater will pay for renovations. 21


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The Pleasant View Nazarene Church has been at the Fair for 24 years. Over 40 volunteers search for lost children and stay with them until their parents can be found.

1999

Willie Nelson performed at Fair, and in the audience is Sheila Hall. Forty-Two years earlier Sheila started Willie’s first fan club when he was a disc jockey in Vancouver.

2000

Mr. Kadow donated $60,000 for the building of an agricultural museum to be located on the fairgrounds.

2001

Earl Kadow was voted volunteer of the year. Mr. Kadow served as a member of the board for over 50 years.

2002

On August 12th Hoffman Construction began construction on 18,000 seat amphitheater, designed by Houston architect Abram Sustaita. New York based Q Prime was selected to build the amphitheater. Q Prime agreed to build and then leased the property back from Clark County. Over a 25-year period the county will receive $20 million in rent from Q Prime. Rents received will go toward improvements at the fairgrounds. As a result of the new amphitheater there were improvements made to the surrounding fields used as parking lots and road access. Q Prime paid to widen the I-5 off-ramp at NE 179th Street as well as 179th street itself. Delfel Road was reconfigured to provide room for queuing 150 to 175 cars. They also paved the fields that serve as parking lots.

2003

The Amphitheater was completed and opened July 10. The opening act was John Mayer and the Counting Crows. Clark County commissioners approved a $36.5 million plan for improvements at fairgrounds. The plan calls for a 330,000 sq. ft. of buildings. Proposed projects are a 100,000 sq. ft. north exhibit hall with office and meeting space, 66,000 sq. ft. livestock building, 25,000 to 30,000 sq. ft. south exhibit hall that could also house livestock and a stall barn. December 6, demolition began for space for the new exhibition hall. The first building to be removed was the community center. In all nine buildings will be removed. Coffman Excavation of Oregon bid the tear down contract for $460,000. Elder Demolition was hired to tear down and salvage buildings. Fair staff recycled and salvaged materials before the demolition began.

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2004

Construction continued on exhibit hall. Funds for new building came from rental payments from the amphitheater and state sales tax credit for 2003-2004.

2005

The grand opening of the exhibition hall was on March 15. In 2005 Clark County implemented a contract with the Fairgrounds Site Management Group to manage the property year-round. Clark County Fair Association manages the Clark County Fair, not the site. The hall is 112,000 sq. ft. or the size of two football fields. It can be divided into three small sections for smaller shows. During the fair it can accommodate 540 vendor booths. The final cost of construction was $18.5 million.

2008

C-Tran ridership dramatically dropped by 47% from its 2007 level due to the introduction of a $1 charge in 2007 and an increase to $2 for each rider in 2008.

2009

The Fair hosted the National Romney Show and Sale which is put on every two years by the American Romney Breeders Association. Over 170 Romney sheep were on site for the event. Sheep came from New Jersey, Colorado, California, Oregon and Washington.

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2010

Turnover of the food vendors in the food court is very rare, however, in 2010 the Fair had four new vendors: Hula Boy – Island fare; Summerland Catering – Italian food; American Pizza Co. – wraps and salads; and Greek Quisina – Greek food. The Fair began using the Clark County Amphitheater for it’s Concert Lineup

2011

The Clark County Fair was recognized as a top ten Fair nationally by Livability.com magazine in 2011.

2012

Record high temperatures on 4 of the 10 days of the 2012 Fair resulted in the lowest attendance in 20 years.

2013

Butler Amusements experienced a record year, exceeding the previous year gross revenue by 10%. FairCon was introduced at the Fair bringing a pop-culture experience that included a video game tournament, film festival, CosPlay contest and Magic The Gathering card game tournaments. The Fair was recognized for it and asked for the first time to present an exhibit at I.A.F.E.

2014

Attendance was 272,667. It was the highest attended Fair in the last eleven years. The Fair moved free concerts back to the Grandstands and C-Tran returned to offering a free shuttle to the Fair.

2015

Attendance again broke a record with 281,629 attendees.

2016

The Clark County Fair was chosen as one of the best State/County Fairs in the United States by American Towns Media where we ranked 5th nationally.

2017

Attendance of 250,973 was down by over 15,000 from the previous year due primarily to the excessively hot weather during the first seven days.

2018

A fire destroyed two long time food booths on the midway in April of 2018. The Chicken Shack and The Malt Shoppe were lost in the fire.

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Construction was carried out by people of all walks of life. Volunteers were/are the backbone of making the fair what it is today.

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Aerial views of the fair showing progress as buildings were constructed over the years. The “E� building is easily recognizable from the air.

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The Horse Track was a large part of the fair during it’s beginning years at it’s current location. It was later replaced with the horse arena and the horse barns.

The Midway before being paved.

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The horse stables being constructed and after completion.

Many features of the Fair from when it was first built (at it’s current loation) still exist today and you can see the growth around them as the fairgrounds progress into more modern facilities.

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The food court, home to an array of incredible Fair food over the years, has continually offered Fair goers a great selection of what fair food is all about.

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A depiction of old and new. Some of the original buildings at these Fairgrounds on the left along side the newer Event Center.

The carnival and rides area has grown tremendously with new attractions such as the Giant Slingshot.

The grandstands are the entertainment hub of featured attractions at the Fair. From concerts, to bull riding, to motor sports, every large event can be enjoyed by thousands here.

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Some of the Fair Court Royalty throughout the years. It has transitioned from more Dairy Cattle backed to an Equestrian backed currently.

Coronations of the Queens and Princesses.

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Fair Royalty has always been active in the community. Parade participation has been a tradition.

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The Fair also has visiting royalty such as The National Honey Bee Queen that visits every year during Fair. (Two Below)

Of course they are always having fun at the Fair.

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CLARK COUNTY FAIR 150 YEARS 1868-2018  

AUGUST 3-12, 2018 150 YEARS CELEBRATING FARM • FUN • FAMILY TRADITION VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON

CLARK COUNTY FAIR 150 YEARS 1868-2018  

AUGUST 3-12, 2018 150 YEARS CELEBRATING FARM • FUN • FAMILY TRADITION VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON

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