Issuu on Google+

important works on paper

View Paintings of the Kingdom of Naples from the 18th and 19th centuries

Art

Pietro Fabris Giovanni Battista Lusieri Gabriele Ricciardelli Alessandro d’Anna Xavier (Saverio) della Gatta Glass Simone Pomardi Luigi Salvatore Gentile Camillo de Vito Francesco Zerilli Jacob Wilhelm Huber Anton Smink Pitloo Giacinto Gigante Achille Vianelli Raffaele Carelli Gonsalvo Carelli Gabriele Carelli

C o n s u lt i n g

BNB

Limited


Art

C o n s u lt i n g

BNB

Limited


Catalogue edited by Ermanno Bellucci Editorial coordination Milena Naldi Translation Michael Phillips Arabella Lawson Graphic desing Kuni Design Strategy - www.kuni.it Printed by Grafiche dell’Artiere, Bentivoglio, Bologna, Italy - www.graficartiere.com ŠBNB Art Consulting Limited - June 2011 Special thanks to Valeria Di Fratta for her collaboration in preparing the catalogue cards


important works on paper

View Paintings of the Kingdom of Naples from the 18th and 19th centuries

Art

importanti opere su carta

Vedute del Regno di Napoli fra il XVIII e XIX secolo

Exhibition from 1 July to 22 July 2011 - 13, New Burlington Street, London

C o n s u lt i n g

BNB

Limited


Scena di vita popolare alla Marinella; sullo sfondo una veduta di Napoli fino al Vesuvio

Pietro Fabris

Scena di vita popolare alla Marinella; sullo sfondo una veduta di Napoli fino al Castel dell’Ovo Veduta notturna dell’eruzione del Vesuvio

II Giovanni Battista Lusieri

La Reggia di Portici Veduta di Napoli dalla parte di Chiaia e Parte di rovine degli antichi tempi di Pesto *

Gabriele Ricciardelli Alessandro d’Anna

Veduta del golfo di Napoli con scena popolare

Xavier (Saverio) della Gatta

Mount Vesuvius. The Eruption of Cinders in ye Year 1794 *

VI VII

IX Glass

Torre del Greco distrutta dal Vesuvio il 1794 *

X XI

Le Lac d’Averno *

Simone Pomardi

Veduta di Nisita e sdrata de Vagnioli *

Luigi Salvatore Gentile

Veduta di Mergelina Riviera di Posilipo * Ceneri del Vesuvio Sortita Li 26 Xbre 1813 *

V

VIII

Divertimenti Napolitani *

italiano

III IV

Scena campestre

Napoli veduto da Capodimonte *

I

XII XIII XIV

Camillo de Vito

XV

Napoli da Posillipo

Francesco Zerilli

Veduta di Forio d’Ischia

Jacob Wilhelm Huber

La spiaggia del Carmine con gruppi di pescatori, una grande barca e il Vesuvio

Anton Smink Pitloo

Gruppo di donne che prendono l’acqua da una vasca a Mola di Gaeta

Giacinto Gigante

La strada del Carmine a Napoli

Achille Vianelli

XX

Zampognari, pescatori e un cane a Mergellina

Raffaele Carelli

XXI

Cattedrale di Taormina in Sicilia

Gonsalvo Carelli

XXII

Contadini nella piana dei templi di Paestum Un vicolo dei Camaldoli con il Vesuvio sul fondo

* titoli originali

XVI XVII XVIII XIX

XXIII Gabriele Carelli

XXIV


A scene from popular life at the Marinella; a view of Naples as far as Mount Vesuvius beyond

Pietro Fabris

A scene from popular life at the Marinella; a view of Naples to Castle dell’Ovo in the background Night view of the eruption of Vesuvius

II Giovanni Battista Lusieri

The Royal Palace of Portici Veduta di Napoli dalla parte di Chiaia e Parte di rovine degli antichi tempi di Pesto *

Gabriele Ricciardelli Alessandro d’Anna

A view of the Gulf of Naples with folk scene

Xavier (Saverio) della Gatta

Mount Vesuvius. The Eruption of Cinders in ye Year 1794 *

V VI VII VIII

Divertimenti Napolitani *

IX Glass

Torre del Greco distrutta dal Vesuvio il 1794 *

X XI

Le Lac d’Averno *

Simone Pomardi

Veduta di Nisita e sdrata de Vagnioli *

Luigi Salvatore Gentile

Veduta di Mergelina Riviera di Posilipo * Ceneri del Vesuvio Sortita Li 26 Xbre 1813 *

III IV

Rural scene

Napoli veduto da Capodimonte *

I

XII XIII XIV

Camillo de Vito

XV

Naples from Posillipo

Francesco Zerilli

View of Forio d’Ischia

Jacob Wilhelm Huber

The beach of Carmine with groups of fishermen, a large boat and Vesuvius

Anton Smink Pitloo

Group of laundresses at a fountain in Mola di Gaeta

Giacinto Gigante

Naples, the road of Carmine

Achille Vianelli

XX

Bagpipers, fishermen and a dog in Mergellina

Raffaele Carelli

XXI

Cathedral of Taormina in Sicily

Gonsalvo Carelli

XXII

Peasants on the plains of the temples at Paestum An alleyway of Camaldoli with Vesuvius in the background

* original titles

XVI XVII XVIII XIX

XXIII Gabriele Carelli

XXIV

s u m m a r y / S o m m a r i o

english


english

The use of paper was a constant element of paintings, in every country and for all time. But not all the time, nor in every place, was it equal to the consideration of the artistic works on paper. At least until the first half of the eighteenth century, in the vast majority of cases, paper was intended to accommodate notes, studies, mostly for sketches of works that subsequently found their final expression on canvas or other media that gave greater assurances of lasting time. And in this subordinate situation, therefore, it came to meet even the medium of painting on which paper was employed for elections. In the second half of the eighteenth century the situation began to change quickly. It was simplified and often intertwined for two reasons: business needs and artistic choices. When the journey of learning in Italy, which has much earlier and definite origins, turned into a Grand Tour, the numbers of enthusiastic and curious visitors eager to bring back a memory of their journey of a lifetime – in French, souvenir, which is etymologically more appropriate – their demands began to have a direct influence on the art market. It also obliged them to offer new choices.


Naples and surrounding areas, on paper Ermanno Bellucci

The first consequence: a dramatic increase of artists who devoted themselves to panoramic and landscape paintings. The second consequence: the cost and time of creating oil paintings became more costly and lengthy to make than a drawing or a watercolour on a sheet of paper. For buyers, there was also the obvious advantage of spending less: if ten paintings on canvas or board became an additional burden, being heavy and cumbersome to carry around for periods of years and often through dangerous territories (also including the necessary safeguards required), then ten sheets of paper, enclosed in a folder of durable parchment, certainly represented a minor problem. If we incorporate watercolour painting, with its two main variants: tempera and gouache, which provided a more efficient manner to illustrate the brilliance of the Mediterranean light, the reasons for a change of view and / or dissemination of works on paper is easily understandable. This becomes even clearer when we analyze the evolution of gender in relation to the Kingdom of Naples, then the Kingdom of Two Sicilies after restoration. There is no doubt that the first artist to matter in Naples since he arrived in 1756,

painting watercolour on paper in its variation of tempera, was Pietro Fabris. We still know too little about this extraordinary artist, but what little we can say from his accidental birth in London, Pietro Fabris artistically grew up in Venice, where he had the opportunity to acquire the technique of tempera practiced since the beginning of the eighteenth century by Marco Ricci. The first temperas of Fabris are dated 1771, but I have no doubt that among his papers there are many undated ones made at the beginning of the sixties. As is always, Fabris was the first to adopt other variants of watercolour: a gouache, Italianized as ‘guazzo’. However, despite some still ignoring it and many others neglecting it, they see little differences among tempera and gouache. Firstly, the adhesive used is from animals, while the second is vegetable based. And vegetable glue dries much faster than animal glue. These are significant consequences not so much on colour effects but on working time (although it is clear that the colours, when fixed more quickly retain a higher gloss). When Fabris was commissioned by Sir William Hamilton for the 54 colour


And when in 1792, now officially a court painter from 1786, Ferdinand commissioned four paintings for his own personal studio, Hackert fulfilled this in tempera, in at least two of these: the English Gardens of Caserta and the View of Capri Island, which in my opinion, are considered among his masterpieces. They show the German master plates engraved with aquatint of Campi Phlegraei (1776), is in his full swing painting ‘the real landscape’. he opts for the use of gouache: any reduction in working time The unique ability of being able to paint in watercolour while at the same is particularly important when it comes to colour, albeit with the help time making the most out of the southern landscape of a large group of employees – thousands of papers! – the clarity of detail of every single element generous in nature – Apart from that episode, Fabris’ choice of painting on paper, above all, was especially, well understood by the Swiss Abraham Louis Rodolphe demonstrates the artistic results he aimed to achieve. In this way, Ducros and Roman Giovanni Battista Lusieri. The two artists shared we can recognise this in his two paintings from London two characteristics: the use of exaggerated illustrations and true (catalogue card I and II) that reflect two very fine works of art. exclusivity in their entire works on paper. The success of watercolour painting is likely to upset the artistic career But while Ducros used in his paintings a complex mixture of elements, of a painter, as is the case of Alessandro d’Anna. Born in Palermo in 1746, he began working with his father Vito depicting religious subjects lavis, pure watercolour, tempera, gouache and even thin oils, Lusieri displays absolute fundamentalism of having used only pure in paintings and oil paintings for the churches in Palermo and Acireale. watercolour reinforced with thin layers of tempera. It certainly cannot Arriving in Naples in the late seventies of the eighteenth century, he found Pietro Fabris was at the height of his fame, wich, for the Palermo also be said that the choice of watercolour was motivated by a faster artist, was a superior and inspirational role. His first Neapolitan paintings, execution. It is noted that Lusieri drew notes on large sheets of paper after a first draft from the real subjects of a figure by using pencil for the whole signed and dated 1777, are a pendant pair of oils on canvas – view right down to the minutest detail; then, starting from the source, The encampments of the Court during a hunt and at break during a hunt (Royal Palace, Caserta). It was in this area of tempera and gouache began the applying colour, layered with glazes and thinning it down until he got the colouration of the charcters. paintings that D’Anna found the space and artistic success that began The net effect, if it is absolute perfection (but only for the difficulty to become crowded and highly competitive. of defining perfection in art), is a real close-up. Popular scenes, panoramic views of the most celebrated and urban Perhaps, the inaccessibility of his methods prevented Lusieri from having locations in the Kingdom, were all represented in tempera and gouache followers, or at least imitators. The only one who was able to work ad found enthusiastic buyers among the many ‘Milordi’ with similar efficacy or clarity for the atmosphere of his views is Xavier who came to Naples at that period. In short, during this period, working on paper was one more opportunity (or Saverio) della Gatta. There are few biographical details about him, but he was certainly trained as a Neapolitan painter during his long that let artists better express their feelings and to satisfy an increasingly career (1777 to 1824) and definitely only in Naples. The two tempera that diverse but also more demanding clientele. appeared recently in a sale at Sotheby’s in Paris (June 24, 2009) The four views of tempera made by Philipp Hackert at the request – The port of Granatello seen from Portici and The Royal Palace of Portici, of Ferdinand IV of Bourbon for his private apartments in the Royal Palace dated 1784 – re-ask the question of what was the relationship between of Caserta, representing the Royal Palace of Caserta, San Leucio, della Gatta and Lusieri. The two views are, quite evidently, re-workings the Piana del Sele and Persano, represent the perfect combination of two paintings, the largest, made by a Lusieri and dated 1783 of the customer’s curiosity and sensitivity. Hackert was fully aware and another 1784. So della Gatta had free access to the works of Lusieri that no tempera painting technique could achieve that atmosphere and it is assumed he worked with him. of light and colour contrasts of southern Italy.


The other interesting thing is that in the painting The port of Granatello seen from Portici, della Gatta places a group of characters in the painting absent in Lusieri’s painting, and which clearly derived from Pietro Fabris. With two models on that level, an absolute technical skill and an extraordinary ease and speed of painting, della Gatta appears to be the greatest interpreter of Neapolitan gouache. His trait d’union of eighteenth-century traditional painting was designed for high profile buyers, and the demands of a new middle-class clientele, and certainly less demanding, but definitely more substantial. The Grand Tour transformed into ‘tourism’. The producers of images adapted quickly, sacrificing quality for quantity. But there were pockets of resistance for the worst that came to be, represented by painters, still training in the eighteenth century, and who were able to create a good balance between production speed and the creation of a personal style. This was the case for Luigi Salvatore Gentile, Simone Pomardi, Camillo de Vito, Ferdinando Roberto, Giuseppe Scoppa. It was equally difficult to distinguish among the many ‘officials’ producing high numbers within the gouache printing industry as it was by the painting ‘workshops’. In my opinion, for example, sheets bearing the indication Chez Glass indicating the place where they were bought – characterized by prospective cuts – were never ordinary and had an accurate spreading of colour even for the eighteenth-century taste. They clearly distanced themselves from contemporary productions. A special case, then, is Francesco Zerilli from Palermo. In the first half of the nineteenth century, he restored the atmosphere and subtle lyrics from the landscape of Lusieri. Apart from this strong proximity with the master of Roman style, which was totally random and inspired only empathy, they were excluded from both direct and indirect relations between the two. Zerilli had no masters or artistic references. His extraordinary watercolours that finished in gouache, were exclusively the result of an artistic genius. Meanwhile, in the capital of the Kingdom, ‘murattiana’ returned after a parenthesis to the firm hands of the Bourbons and important things happened.

From Germany, a faithful observer of the ‘Hackert’ school, Jacob Wilhelm Huber arrived in Naples to open up an influential school of drawing in 1819. In the same year, always in Naples, the Dutchman Anton Smink Pitloo opened a school of painting. The young Giacinto Gigante and Achille Vianelli attended both schools, but only while at Huber’s did they acquire absolute mastery of graphic content. They received more fundamental teachings from Pitloo than from any other artistic techniques. It was a new way of looking at the world. Pitloo arrived in Naples with a considerable wealth of experience. After attending art school in Arnhem and the study of Van Ameron in 1808 he managed to obtain a senior position in Paris, entering the practice of Victor Bertin. In 1811 he arrived in Rome and joined a large group of young Dutch artists living in the city and had the opportunity of confronting these experiences with artists from all over Europe. But the final part, fundamental to his education was the encounter with the blinding glare and deep shadows of Naples, where the outlines of things lose weight and texture. People became spots in motion, animated by vitality and a child-likeness, often useless, but always amazing. It was necessary to be able to capture these moments, to be there where and when they occurred. In the economy of this modern way of painting, which included the need to work en plein air using light and compact sheets of paper, sudden stops and authentic emotions, it assumed a vital strategic importance. On the basis of these few simple principles and the stimulating honest comparisons of Pitloo with his young pupils between Gigante and Vianelli, and then, gradually, with so many other young painters: Raffaele Carelli, Gabriele Smargiassi, Teodoro Duclère, they were the foundation for the birth and development of an artistic movement that would succeed under the name of the ‘Posillipo School’. It was the last chapter and perhaps the only truly original one telling the story of the Neapolitan landscape.


italiano

L’utilizzazione della carta è una costante della produzione pittorica, di tutti i paesi e di tutti i tempi. Ma non i tutti i tempi, né in tutti i luoghi, è stata uguale la considerazione artistica delle opere su carta. Almeno fino alla prima metà del Settecento, nella grande maggioranza dei casi, la carta era destinata ad accogliere appunti, studi, al massimo bozzetti di opere che poi avrebbero trovato la loro espressione compiuta su tela o su altri supporti che davano maggior garanzia di durata nel tempo. In questa situazione di subalternità, di conseguenza, venivano a ritrovarsi anche i media pittorici di cui la carta era il supporto per elezione. Nella seconda metà del Settecento la situazione inizia velocemente a cambiare. Semplificando al massimo, per due ordini di motivi, spesso intrecciati fra loro: esigenze commerciali e scelte artistiche. Quando il viaggio di erudizione in Italia, che ha origini certamente e decisamente precedenti, diviene Grand Tour, i numeri dei curiosi ed appassionati visitatori, desiderosi di riportare in patria un ricordo – in francese, souvenir: etimologicamente molto più adeguato – del viaggio della vita, iniziano a divenire tali da condizionare le risposte del mercato dell’arte. E obbligano anche scelte nuove.


Napoli e dintorni, su carta Ermanno Bellucci

Prima conseguenza: un aumento vertiginoso degli artisti che si dedicavano al genere della pittura di veduta e di paesaggio. Seconda conseguenza: costi e tempi di realizzazione di dipinti ad olio sono decisamente più onerosi e lunghi di quelli per realizzare un disegno o un acquerello su un foglio di carta. E per gli acquirenti, a parte l’indubbio vantaggio a spendere di meno, se dieci dipinti su tela o su tavola diventavano un ulteriore bagaglio, pesante ed ingombrante (anche in ragione delle necessarie protezioni), da portare in giro per periodi anche di anni e spesso attraverso territori pericolosi, dieci fogli di carta, chiusi in una cartella di resistente pergamena, sicuramente rappresentavano un problema minore. Se a ciò si aggiunge che la pittura all’acquerello, con le sue due principali varianti, tempera e gouache, era in grado di restituire con maggiore efficacia la luminosità della luce mediterranea, le ragioni di un cambio di considerazione e/o diffusione delle opere su carta è facilmente comprensibile. Tutto ciò diventa ancor più chiaro se analizziamo l’evoluzione del genere relativamente al Regno di Napoli, poi Regno delle Due Sicilie dopo la restaurazione.

Non vi sono dubbi sul fatto che il primo artista che importa a Napoli, dove giunge nel 1756, la pittura all’acquerello su carta, nella sua variante della tempera, sia Pietro Fabris. Sappiamo ancora troppo poco di questo straordinario artista; ma quel poco ci permette di affermare che dopo la casuale nascita a Londra, Pietro Fabris si forma artisticamente a Venezia, dove ha la possibilità di acquisire la tecnica della tempera già praticata dall’inizio del Settecento da Marco Ricci. Le prime tempere datate di Fabris sono del 1771, ma non ho dubbi che fra i suoi fogli non datati ve ne siano molti realizzati già all’inizio degli anni Sessanta. Così come è sempre Fabris che adotta per primo l’altra variante dell’acquerello: la gouache, italianizzata in ‘guazzo’. Perché, nonostante qualcuno ancora lo ignori e molti lo trascurino, vi è una differenza di non poco conto fra la tempera e la gouache: nella prima, il collante utilizzato è di derivazione animale; nella seconda, vegetale. Ed il collante vegetale si essicca molto più velocemente di quello animale. Ciò comporta conseguenze significative non tanto sugli effetti cromatici (anche se è chiaro che i colori, fissandosi più velocemente, conservano una maggiore brillantezza), quanto sui tempi di lavorazione.


Hackert ha la piena consapevolezza che nessuna tecnica pittorica più della tempera è in grado di restituire le atmosfere luminose e i contrasti dei colori del sud dell’Italia. E quando nel 1792, ormai ufficialmente pittore di corte dal 1786, Ferdinando gli commissiona altri quattro dipinti per il proprio studiolo personale, Hackert li realizzerà ancora a tempera: almeno due di questi, il Giardino all’inglese di Caserta e la Veduta dell’isola Quando Fabris riceve l’incarico da Sir William Hamilton di colorare di Capri, a mio giudizio sono da considerarsi fra i capolavori assoluti le 54 tavole incise all’acquatinta dei Campi Phlegraei (1776), del maestro tedesco, nei quali la lezione del ‘Paesaggio dal vero’ opta per l’utilizzazione della gouache: ogni riduzione dei tempi trova il suo pieno svolgimento. La straordinaria possibilità della pittura di lavorazione è fondamentale se si tratta di colorare, seppur con l’aiuto all’acquerello di poter, al contempo, rendere al meglio la limpidezza di un folto gruppo di collaboratori, migliaia di fogli! dei paesaggi meridionali e il dettaglio di ogni singolo elemento di una natura A parte questo episodio, la scelta di Fabris di dipingere su carta attiene massimamente generosa, è ben compresa dallo svizzero Abraham Louis soprattutto ai risultati artistici che intende raggiungere: così quando cerca Rodolphe Ducros e dal romano Giovanni Battista Lusieri. I due artisti il riconoscimento della sua sapienza pittorica nell’ambiente londinese, condividono due caratteristiche peculiari: l’esasperata raffigurazione del vero realizza due disegni (scheda I e II) che hanno il peso di due finissimi dipinti. e l’utilizzo esclusivo, in tutta la loro produzione del solo supporto cartaceo. Il successo della pittura ad acquerello è tale da sconvolgere il percorso Ma mentre Ducros utilizza nei suoi dipinti un complesso impasto di elementi artistico di un pittore, come avviene del caso di Alessandro d’Anna. – lavis, acquerello puro, tempera, gouache e persino olio magro –, Nato a Palermo nel 1746, inizia a lavorare con il padre Vito realizzando soggetti sacri in affreschi e dipinti ad olio per le chiese di Palermo e Acireale. Lusieri dimostra un integralismo assoluto utilizzando esclusivamente l’acquerello puro, al più rinforzato con sottilissime stesure di tempera. Giunto a Napoli alla fine degli anni Settanta del Settecento, E non si può certo dire che la scelta dell’acquerello fosse motivata vi trova un Pietro Fabris all’apice della sua fama: per l’artista palermitano da una maggiore velocità di esecuzione: dopo un primo rilievo dal vero un modello vincente al quale ispirarsi. Se i suoi primi dipinti napoletani, dei soggetti da raffigurare, Lusieri riportava gli appunti presi su ampi fogli firmati e datati 1777, sono una coppia in pendant di olii su tela di carta, realizzando a matita l’intera veduta, fin nel più minuto dettaglio; – Gli accampamenti della Corte durante una battuta di caccia e Sosta poi, partendo dai fondi, iniziava la stesura del colore, con velature durante una battuta di caccia, (Caserta, Palazzo Reale) –, sovrapposte e sempre più sottili, fino ad arrivare alla coloritura delle figurine. è nella pittura a tempera ed alla gouache che d’Anna troverà spazio L’effetto finale, se non è la perfezione assoluta (ma solo per una difficoltà e successo in un ambiente artistico che inizia a divenire affollato di definire nell’arte la perfezione), vi arriva veramente molto vicino. ed estremamente competitivo. Scene popolari, vedute panoramiche Forse, proprio l’irraggiungibilità del modello impedì a Lusieri di avere seguaci dei luoghi più celebrati del Regno e squarci urbani, o, almeno, imitatori. L’unico che riesce a riproporre con simile efficacia tutti realizzati a tempera e gouache, troveranno entusiasti acquirenti la limpidezza delle atmosfere delle sue vedute è Xavier (o Saverio) fra gli ormai tanti ‘Milordi’ che giungevano a Napoli. della Gatta. Poche le notizie biografiche sul suo conto, ma di certo pittore In questo periodo, insomma, lavorare su carta è una possibilità in più di formazione napoletana che svolse la sua lunga attività (dal 1777 al 1824) che gli artisti hanno per esprimere al meglio i propri sentimenti e per soddisfare una committenza sempre più varia ma anche più esigente. certamente e solamente a Napoli. Le due tempere comparse di recente in una vendita Sotheby’s a Parigi (24 giugno 2009) Le quattro vedute a tempera realizzate da Philipp Hackert su richiesta – Il porto del Granatello visto da Portici e La Reggia di Portici, datate 1784 –, di Ferdinando IV di Borbone per i suoi appartamenti privati nella Reggia ripropongono la questione dei rapporti intercorsi fra della Gatta e Lusieri. di Caserta, raffiguranti la Reggia di Caserta, San Leucio, Le due vedute sono, in tutta evidenza, rielaborazioni di due dipinti, la Piana del Sele e Persano, rappresentano il perfetto connubio di maggiori dimensioni, realizzati da Lusieri e datate una 1783 e l’altra 1784. fra curiosità del committente e sensibilità dell’artista.


Quindi, della Gatta aveva libero accesso allo studio di Lusieri ed è lecito supporre che collaborasse con lui. L’altra cosa interessante è che nel dipinto Il porto del Granatello visto da Portici, della Gatta inserisce un gruppo di personaggi assente nel dipinto di Lusieri, derivati in tutta evidenza da Pietro Fabris. Con due modelli di tale livello, una abilità tecnica assoluta e una straordinaria facilità e velocità di pittura, della Gatta risulta essere il più grande interprete della gouache napoletana, il trait d’union fra la tradizione della pittura settecentesca, ancora realizzata per committenti di alto profilo, e le esigenze di una nuova clientela borghese, certamente meno esigente, ma decisamente più nutrita. Il Grand Tour si sta trasformando in ‘turismo’. I produttori di immagini si adeguano velocemente, sacrificando la qualità alla quantità. Ma restano sacche di resistenza al peggio che avanza, rappresentate da pittori, ancora di formazione settecentesca, che riescono ad operare una buona mediazione fra velocità di produzione e l’affermazione di uno stile personale. È il caso di Luigi Salvatore Gentile, Simone Pomardi, Camillo de Vito, Ferdinando Roberto, Giuseppe Scoppa. Così come è doveroso distinguere fra le tante ‘officine’ che lavoravano la gouache con numeri da industria tipografica più che da atelier di pittura. A mio giudizio, ad esempio, i fogli che recano nel loro bordo l’indicazione Chez Glass, ad indicare il luogo dove era possibile acquistarli, connotati da tagli prospettici mai banali e da accurate stesure di colore ancora di gusto settecentesco, si distaccano nettamente dalla coeva produzione. Un caso a parte, poi, è rappresentato dal palermitano Francesco Zerilli, che nella prima metà dell’Ottocento recupera la resa atmosferica e sottilmente lirica del dato paesistico propria di Lusieri. A parte questa forte vicinanza stilistica con il maestro romano, assolutamente casuale e solo empatica, visto che sono da escludersi sia rapporti diretti che indiretti fra i due, Zerilli non ha maestri né riferimenti artistici. I suoi straordinari acquerelli finiti alla gouache sono frutto esclusivo di genialità pittorica. Intanto, nella capitale del Regno, tornato dopo la parentesi ‘murattiana’ nelle salde mani dei Borbone, accadono cose importanti. Proveniente dalla Germania, fedele osservatore degli insegnamenti hackertiani, approda a Napoli Jacob Wilhelm Huber per aprirvi, nel 1819, una autorevole scuola di disegno. Nello stesso anno l’olandese Anton Smink Pitloo apre, sempre a Napoli, una scuola di pittura.

I giovanissimi Giacinto Gigante ed Achille Vianelli frequentano ambedue le scuole, ma mentre da Huber acquisiscono esclusivamente la padronanza assoluta del tratto grafico, da Pitloo ricevono un insegnamento più fondamentale di qualunque tecnica artistica: un nuovo modo di guardare il mondo. Pitloo arriva a Napoli con un bagaglio di esperienze notevole. Dopo aver frequentato la scuola d’arte ad Arnhem e lo studio di Van Ameron, nel 1808 riesce ad ottenere un pensionato a Parigi, entrando nello studio di Victor Bertin. Nel 1811 giunge a Roma e si aggrega al folto gruppo di giovani artisti olandesi residenti in città e ha l’opportunità di confrontarsi con le esperienze di artisti provenienti da tutta Europa. Ma la parte finale, fondamentale, della sua formazione è l’incontro con gli accecanti bagliori e le profonde ombre di Napoli, dove i contorni delle cose perdono consistenza e peso, le persone diventano macchie in movimento, animate da una vitalità pura e infantile, spesso inutile, ma sempre stupefacente. E bisogna saper cogliere questi momenti, trovarsi lì dove e quando si verificano. Nell’economia di questo modo nuovo di far pittura, che prevede la necessità di lavorare en plein air, l’utilizzo di leggeri e poco ingombranti fogli di carta, su cui fermare emozioni improvvise e autentiche, assume una importanza strategica fondamentale. Sulla scorta di questi pochi e semplici principi e nello stimolante e sincero confronto di Pitloo con i suoi giovani allievi Gigante e Vianelli, e poi, via via, con tanti altri giovani pittori – Raffaele Carelli, Gabriele Smargiassi, Teodoro Duclère –, si pongono le basi per la nascita e lo sviluppo di quel movimento artistico che andrà sotto il nome di ‘Scuola di Posillipo’, ultimo episodio, forse l’unico veramente originale, della storia del paesaggismo napoletano.


works opere Pietro Fabris Giovanni Battista Lusieri Gabriele Ricciardelli Alessandro d’Anna Xavier (Saverio) della Gatta Glass Simone Pomardi Luigi Salvatore Gentile Camillo de Vito Francesco Zerilli Jacob Wilhelm Huber Anton Smink Pitloo Giacinto Gigante Achille Vianelli Raffaele Carelli Gonsalvo Carelli Gabriele Carelli


A scene from popular life at the Marinella; a view of Naples as far as Mount Vesuvius beyond - Pencil heightened with white on paper, 9.8 x 15.4 in. Scena di vita popolare alla Marinella; sullo sfondo una veduta di Napoli fino al Vesuvio - Matita rialzata a biacca su carta, cm 24,9 x 39,1


I

II

Pietro Fabris (documented between 1754-1792)

A scene from popular life at the Marinella; a view of Naples to Castel dell’Ovo in the background - Pencil heightened with white on paper, 9.6 x 15.3 in. Scena di vita popolare alla Marinella; sullo sfondo una veduta di Napoli fino a Castel dell’Ovo - Matita rialzata a biacca su carta, cm 24,5 x 38,9


These two drawings compare closely to the pair of Pietro Fabris paintings (Private collection) depicting scenes of everyday life, signed and dated 1757 (see photo for comparison). In the first, the background landscape is essentially identical to the painting yet, with no alteration to the actual layout of the picture, there are several variations to the figures themselves. Most importantly, in the center of the painting the ‘mellonaro’ (melon seller) cart is replaced by a wine merchant on horseback and to the left is a group of acrobats with a dancing bear and a woman facing the balcony, which in the painting is otherwise empty. An earlier version of this drawing can be found in the Museo di San Martino in Naples, showing only an outline sketch of the people in the scene (see Nicola Spinosa, Pittura napoletana

del Settecento dal Rococò al Classicismo, Naples, Electa Napoli, 1987; plate 429, p. 416, no. 328, p. 165). In the second one, apart from the woman’s figure on horseback, which is inverted respect to the painting, the variations in the characters are minimal. More significant are those made to the landscape, which, compared to the painting, is drawn at a far closer range. This leads to a squashed depiction of both the pier at the port of Castel dell’Ovo and the Immacolatella at Castelnuovo and a clipped and only partial portrayal of the Certosa di San Martino and Castel Sant’Elmo. Usually it is the drawing that prefigures the painting, but in this case I believe it happened the other way round, not only because of the extraordinary and incredibly precise representation of the scenes, which it would be far more logical to find in a finished piece than in preparatory

sketches, but also because of one trivial objective observation: of the two paintings, the tufa stone paving is present only in that which has the view of Vesuvius; in the other it is absent. This flooring is however present in both of the drawings. We need to bear in mind that it was at precisely this time (between 1750 and 1759) that the restructuring work in and around the port commanded by Charles III prior to his departure for Spain came to completion. It is therefore likely that when Fabris executed his paintings, this work was not yet finished. It is reasonable to assume that this pair of drawings were made for an exposition in which Fabris participated in London in 1768 at the Free Society and the Society of Artists in 1772. The presence of the initials, with which William Esdaile used to mark works belonging to his collection of drawings, further supports this hypothesis.

Provenance: Coll. William Esdaile, London, sale Sotheby’s Parke Bernet, 11 December 1980; Private collection. Bibliography: Ermanno Bellucci, Pietro Fabris “English Painter“ 4 Masterpieces 2 Drawings 1 Discovery, Bologna, Grafiche dell’Artiere, 2010, fasc. IV-V. Exhibitions: London, Charles Beddington Ltd, 5-17 December 2010; London, BNB Art Consulting Limited, 10 January – 5 February 2011.


Pietro Fabris (documentato fra il 1754 ed il 1792)

Provenienza: Coll. William Esdaile; Londra, vendita Sotheby’s Parke Bernet, 11 dicembre 1980; collezione privata. Bibliografia: Ermanno Bellucci, Pietro Fabris “English Painter” 4 Masterpieces 2 Drawings 1 Discovery, Bologna, Grafiche dell’Artiere, 2010, fasc. IV-V. Esposizioni: Londra, Charles Beddington Limited, 5-17 Dicembre 2010; Londra, BNB Art Consulting Limited, 10 gennaio – 5 febbraio 2011.

La coppia di disegni è in stretta relazione con la coppia di dipinti di Pietro Fabris (collezione privata) con scene di vita popolare firmati e datati 1757 (vedi foto di confronto). Nel primo, lo sfondo paesaggistico è sostanzialmente identico al dipinto, mentre, pur senza alterare l’impaginazione grafica, vi sono diverse varianti nelle figure. Di maggior rilievo, al centro, la sostituzione del carretto del ‘mellonaro’ con un venditore di vino a cavallo e a sinistra un gruppo di saltimbanchi con un orso ammaestrato; una donna è affacciata al balcone che, nel dipinto, è invece vuoto. Di questo disegno è conservata nel Museo di San Martino, a Napoli, una redazione precedente, con una raffigurazione al tratto della sola scena popolare (cfr. Nicola Spinosa, Pittura napoletana del Settecento dal Rococò al Classicismo, Napoli, Electa Napoli, 1987;

tav. 429, p. 416; scheda 328, p. 165). Nel secondo, se si esclude la figura della donna a cavallo, che risulta capovolta rispetto al dipinto, le varianti nei personaggi sono minori. Più significative varianti vanno segnalate nel paesaggio, che, rispetto al dipinto, risulta più vicino al punto di ripresa della scena; ciò comporta uno schiacciamento del molo del Porto su Castel dell’Ovo e dell’Immacolatella su Castelnuovo e una veduta solo parziale, tagliata, della Certosa di San Martino e di Castel Sant’Elmo. Se solitamente il disegno anticipa il dipinto, in questo caso ritengo che sia avvenuto il contrario; e ciò non solo per la straordinaria e accuratissima definizione delle scene, più logica in opere ‘finite’ che in disegni preparatori, ma anche per una banale considerazione obbiettiva: nella coppia di dipinti la pavimentazione in pietra di tufo è presente solo nella veduta con il Vesuvio,

mentre nell’altro è assente. La pavimentazione è invece presente in ambedue i disegni. Bisogna tener conto che proprio in quegli anni – fra il 1750 ed il 1759 – venivano portati a termine i lavori di rifacimento della zona portuale voluti da Carlo III prima della sua partenza per la Spagna. È quindi probabile che quando Fabris eseguiva i dipinti, tali lavori non fossero ancora conclusi. È ragionevole ipotizzare che questa coppia di disegni sia stata realizzata in occasione delle esposizioni a cui Fabris partecipa, a Londra, nel 1768 presso la Free Society e nel 1772 alla Society of Artist. La presenza della sigla, che William Esdaile era solito apporre sulle opere della sua collezione di disegni, confermerebbe ulteriormente questa ipotesi.


His works on the eruption of Vesuvius as seen by night must have earned Lusieri great success particularly among his British clients, given there are five identified versions (albeit with slight variations) of the scene and at least one other pair recorded in old inventories but whose location is now unknown (Spirito 2003, pp.130-132). Out of all of them, this view is certainly the most autonomous and original of the series. The perspective is from the mouth of the Riviera di Chiaia using the rocky foothills at the base of the Posillipo hills as a backdrop. The scene is plausibly illuminated by both the light of the full moon and by that of the eruption, thus making clear every particularity of the scene portrayed: the details of the urban landscape of the Borgo di Chiaia and what appear to be its natural continuation,

the Castel dell’Ovo and the stocky silhouette of Mount Echia; boats anchored and at sea; the many figures spread out on the beach and on boats; the rugged ground where the three main characters are situated their foremost importance being to give a sense of scale and proportion to the entire scene. Two points worthy of particular observation: the first is the extraordinary ability of the artist to render such a detailed portrayal of mound in the foreground, in the darkest part of the painting, by effecting a perfect distribution of the shadows. The second is the artist’s genius in his depiction of the orange light streaked with red diffusing from the powerful volcanic explosion into the milky white moonlight, sweet and reassuring, conveying to the reader not the incumbent threat of danger, but the spectacular theatricality of the event.

Il tema della eruzione del Vesuvio vista di notte dovette riscuotere molto successo fra i committenti, soprattutto inglesi, di Lusieri, se è vero che, seppur con varianti, sono note cinque versioni della scena e almeno un altro paio sono citate in antichi inventari ma attualmente se ne ignora l’ubicazione (Spirito 2003, pp. 130-132). Certamente fra tutte, questa veduta è quella che ha una maggiore autonomia ed originalità rispetto alle altre della serie. Il punto di ripresa è posto alla fine della Riviera di Chiaia, utilizzando quale quinta scenografica le propaggini rocciose della base della collina di Posillipo. La veduta è rischiarata da una plausibile luce che, irradiandosi sia dalla luna piena che dai bagliori dell’eruzione, rende leggibili tutti i particolari della scena descritta: il dettaglio urbanistico del Borgo di Chiaia con quella che sembra essere la sua naturale continuazione, il Castel dell’Ovo,

e la tozza sagoma del Monte Echia; le barche alla fonda e in navigazione; le tante figurine distribuite sulla spiaggia e sulle barche; l’aspro primo piano con tre personaggi che hanno principalmente il compito di restituire all’intera descrizione una oggettiva scala metrica dimensionale. Due notazioni: è straordinaria la capacità dell’artista di dare una dettagliata lettura della massa rocciosa in primo piano, nella parte più scura del dipinto, grazie ad una perfetta distribuzione delle ombre; così come è geniale lo stemperamento dell’arancione venato di rosso della potente esplosione del vulcano nel bianco lattiginoso della luce lunare, dolcissima e rassicurante, in modo da trasmettere allo spettatore non l’incombenza di un pericolo, ma la spettacolare teatralità dell’evento.

Provenance: Sotheby’s sale in London March 28, 1990, lot 481; Rome, Raskovich collection; Private collection. Bibliography: Rossana Muzii, in C’era una volta Napoli. Itinerari meravigliosi nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, catalogue of exhibition by the Soprintendenza for the Polo Museale Napoletano, Naples, Electa Naples, 2002; card no. 32, p. 111. Fabrizia Spirito, Lusieri, Naples, Electa Naples, 2003; card no. 40, p. 131; coloured photo p. 79.

A visual summary of the revised categorisation of feelings to be used by travellers on the Grand Tour: horror that becomes sublime. The work is noted under D.L. n.42/2004.

Una sintesi visiva dell’aggiornamento delle categorie dei sentimenti ad uso dei viaggiatori del Grand Tour: l’orrore che diventa sublime. L’opera è notificata ai sensi del D.L. n.42/2004.

Exhibitions: C’era una volta Napoli. Itinerari meravigliosi nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, Naples, Museo Diego Aragona Pignatelli Cortes, 22 December 2002 – 1 giugno 2003.

Provenienza: Londra, vendita Sotheby’s, 28 marzo 1990, lotto 481; Roma, collezione Raskovich; collezione privata. Bibliografia: Rossana Muzii, in C’era una volta Napoli. Itinerari meravigliosi nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, catalogo della mostra a cura della Soprintendenza per il Polo Museale Napoletano, Napoli, Electa Napoli, 2002; scheda n. 32, p. 111. Fabrizia Spirito, Lusieri, Napoli, Electa Napoli, 2003; scheda n. 40, p. 131; foto a colori p. 79. Esposizioni: C’era una volta Napoli. Itinerari meravigliosi nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, Napoli, Museo Diego Aragona Pignatelli Cortes, 22 dicembre 2002 – 1 giugno 2003.


VIII III

Giovanni Battista Lusieri (Roma? 1755 ca. – Atene 1821)

Night view of the eruption of Vesuvius - Watercolour on paper, 14.8 x 19.7 in. - Signed and dated: ‘G.B. f. 1792’ Veduta notturna dell’eruzione del Vesuvio - Acquerello su carta, cm 37,5 x 50 - Siglato e datato: ‘G.B. f. 1792’


This work is clearly connected with one of Lusieri’s most significant experiments and probably used as a preparatory piece of study: The Royal Palace of Portici on the slopes of Vesuvius (21.7 x 35.4 in., signed and dated ‘Lusieri f. 1784’; cfr. Fabrizia Spirito, Lusieri, Naples, Electa Naples, 2003, tav. pp. 48-49). To confirm this hypothesis it must be noted that in the album of drawings acquired in 1824 by Lord Elgin from the heirs of Lusieri, there is a watercolour of the top of Vesuvius that Fabrizia Spirito assumed it was to study the great view of 1784 (Spirito, op. Cit., p. 153, n. 5) and that also seems to be our conclusion. The restoration of the composite architecture of the palace and surrounding buildings that sit at the foot of the volcano between an abundant vegetation – with extraordinary

detail and where even the plaster peeling facades of the buildings are visual characteristics. It indicates work that is just ‘finished’ and this is not surprising given the high pictorial quality that characterizes even the most ordinary of the roman sketches. This is a watercolour that was part of a broader landscape relief which is shown by the fact, that if, on the right, the view is interrupted by the description of Mount Somma, the left goes up to the outlay of the stables, except in the painting of 1784 . The construction of the Palace of Portici, which began in 1738 and completed in 1742, was commissioned by Charles III of Bourbon, who was fascinated by the resources of the place and wanted to make it one of the official residences of the royal dynasty. The small size of the new palace,

L’opera è in tutta evidenza in strettissima relazione con una delle prove più significative di Lusieri, Il Palazzo Reale di Portici alle falde del Vesuvio (cm 55 x 90, firmato e datato Lusieri f. 1784; cfr. Fabrizia Spirito, Lusieri, Napoli, Electa Napoli, 2003, tav. pp. 48-49), di cui è molto probabilmente uno studio preparatorio. A conferma di questa ipotesi va ricordato che nell’album di disegni acquistato nel 1824 da Lord Elgin dagli eredi di Lusieri è presente un acquerello della sommità del Vesuvio che Fabrizia Spirito ipotizza essere studio per la grande veduta del 1784 (Spirito, op. cit., p.153, n. 5) e che sembra essere la continuazione della nostra veduta. La restituzione della composita architettura della Reggia e delle costruzioni circostanti che si elevano alle falde del vulcano fra una rigogliosa vegetazione, con uno straordinario dettaglio perfino degli intonaci scrostati delle facciate dei palazzi,

conferiscono a questo appunto visivo le caratteristiche di un’opera ‘finita’; ciò non deve stupire considerata l’altissima qualità pittorica che caratterizza anche gli schizzi più banali dell’artista romano. Che l’acquerello facesse parte di un rilievo paesaggistico più ampio è dimostrato dal fatto che se, a destra, la veduta si interrompe alla descrizione del monte Somma, a sinistra si spinge fino alla descrizione dell’edificio della Cavallerizza, escluso nel dipinto del 1784. La costruzione della Reggia di Portici, iniziata nel 1738 e completata nel 1742, fu voluta da Carlo III di Borbone che, affascinato dall’amenità del luogo, volle farne una delle residenze ufficiali della dinastia reale. Le contenute dimensioni del nuovo palazzo, sorto su antiche dimore nobiliari preesistenti, indussero i nobili della corte,

Provenance: England, art market; Private collection.

built on existing ancient noble residences, encouraged the nobles of the court who could not find accommodations within the palace, to build houses and other buildings. The resulting grandeur of the place gave rise to the definition of place-names ‘Miglio d’Oro’, which was identified by the road that came up from Naples to Portici.

che non potevano trovare ospitalità all’interno della reggia, a costruire altre ville e palazzi, la cui magnificenza diede origine alla definizione toponomastica del “Miglio d’Oro”, con la quale era individuata la strada che da Napoli giungeva fino a Portici.

Bibliography: Ermanno Bellucci, in Rêve d’Italie. Paysages et caprices du XVIIe siècle au XIXe siècle, catalogue of exhibition by Maurizio Nobile, Laura Marchesini, Davide Trevisani, San Giovanni Val d’Arno, IGV, 2011; no. 16, pp. 74-75. Exhibitions: Rêve d’Italie. Paysages et caprices du XVIIe siècle au XIXe siècle, Parigi, Galerie Maurizio Nobile, 31 March – 21 May 2011.

Provenienza: Inghilterra, mercato antiquario; collezione privata. Bibliografia: Ermanno Bellucci, in Rêve d’Italie. Paysages et caprices du XVIIe siècle au XIXe siècle, catalogo della mostra a cura di Maurizio Nobile, Laura Marchesini, Davide Trevisani, San Giovanni Val d’Arno, IGV, 2011; n. 16, pp. 74-75. Esposizioni: Rêve d’Italie. Paysages et caprices du XVIIe siècle au XIXe siècle, Parigi, Galerie Maurizio Nobile, 31 marzo – 21 maggio 2011.


IV

Giovanni Battista Lusieri (Roma? 1755 ca. – Atene 1821)

The Royal Palace of Portici - Watercolour and tempera on paper, 8.1 x 15.4 in. La Reggia di Portici - Acquerello e tempera su carta, cm 20,7 x 39,1


While della Gatta was ‘popularising’ the painted fan (see section VII), it is true that there are previous examples of this particular production. The difference is between the subjects of the paintings: della Gatta’s equisite popular scenes confronted with his predecessors, and their canonical view of Naples. This is the past case with the fan at a sale in Christie’s, Rome (Old master paintings and drawings, June 15, 2005, lot 644; tempera on parchment), dated 1720, approximately, and attributed by Riccardo Lattuada, for the figures, to Teresa del Po, and by the writer, viewed from the bottom representing ‘Napoli vista da mare’, to Horace Grevenbroeck. It is also the case with this magnificent range, painted on both sides: on the one hand, a temple of Paestum, and on the other is a view of the final part of the Riviera di Chiaia, Pizzofalcone Hills, Castel dell’Ovo and Vesuvius in the background.

Parte di rovine degli antichi tempi di Pesto (back) - Ink on parchment, 6.5 x 20.1 in. Parte di rovine degli antichi tempi di Pesto (recto) - China su pergamena, cm 16,5 x 51

Se è vero che fu della Gatta il ‘divulgatore’ dei ventagli impreziositi con dipinti (vedi scheda VII), è pur vero che vi sono esempi precedenti di questa particolare produzione; la differenza è nei soggetti dei dipinti: in della Gatta gustose scene popolari, nei suoi predecessori, canoniche vedute di Napoli. È il caso del ventaglio passato in una vendita Christie’s di Roma (Dipinti e disegni antichi, 15 giugno 2005, lotto 644; tempera su pergamena), datato al 1720 ca. ed attribuito da Riccardo Lattuada, per le figure, a Teresa del Po e, da chi scrive, per la veduta di fondo raffigurante ‘Napoli vista da mare’, a Orazio Grevenbroeck. Ed è il caso di questo magnifico ventaglio, dipinto su ambedue le facce: da un lato un tempio di Paestum, dall’altro la veduta della parte finale della Riviera di Chiaia, con la Collina di Pizzofalcone, il Castel dell’Ovo e, sullo sfondo, il Vesuvio. L’attribuzione nasce dal confronto con il dipinto di Ricciardelli, Napoli da Ponente


This attribution is made based on a comparison of the painting by Ricciardelli, Naples from the west (cfr. L. Di Mauro, N. Spinosa, Neapolitan views of the eighteenth century, Naples, Electa Naples, 1989; sheet 87, p. 194; fig. 87, p. 260), executed around 1765. The decisive factor for this attribution is not so much in the comparison of urban description – which, although absolutely equal, could not be any other! – but the characters performing in the foreground of the drawing. The couple of players and the couple dancing are identical, albeit in a different position to those found in the painting. And the other figures that we find in the design which are not typically present in several other of his paintings are the two fishermen on the boat with the net on the right and the fisherman with a rod on the left. Still, note the fineness of the contemporary layout, with slats supporting chiseled ivory.

Gabriele Ricciardelli (documented between 1740-1780)

V

Provenance: Private collection.

(cfr. L. Di Mauro, N. Spinosa, Vedute napoletane del Settecento, Napoli, Electa Napoli, 1989; scheda 87, p. 194; fig. 87, p. 260), eseguita intorno al 1765. L’elemento decisivo per questa attribuzione non risiede tanto nel confronto della descrizione urbanistica – che, seppur assolutamente uguale, non poteva che essere quella! –, ma nei personaggi che agiscono nel primo piano del disegno – la coppia di suonatori e la coppia che balla –, identici, seppur in posizione diversa, a quelli presenti nel dipinto. E anche le altre figure che ritroviamo nel disegno – i due pescatori con la rete sulla barca a destra e il pescatore con la canna a sinistra –, non presenti nel dipinto, sono tipiche di Ricciardelli, utilizzate in vari altri suoi dipinti. Da segnalare ancora la finezza del montaggio, coevo, con stecche di supporto in avorio cesellato. Provenienza: collezione privata.

Veduta di Napoli dalla parte di Chiaia (front) - Ink on parchment, 6.5 x 20.1 in. Veduta di Napoli dalla parte di Chiaia (fronte) - China su pergamena, cm 16,5 x 51


Given the scant architectural elements visible (as seen from the corner of a building on the left and a stretch of wall on the far right of the painting), it is impossible to identify with certainty the place where the scene takes place, but certain elements such as the costume of the characters and the breed of the pig in the foreground allow us to reasonably assume that we are near the Royal Palace of Caserta, in one of the many Bourbon ‘places of delight’. It is certainly a day of celebration for the large group of farmers who have dedicated this occasion to one of the few recreational activities available to them: feasting. It is also clear that the scene takes places on a late summer afternoon, given that the typical Tarallo, a staple form of common diet, is accompanied with figs picked directly from the tree.

If the extraordinary accuracy in detailing the costumes comes from experience gained through a commission undertaken for the Royal Factory Ferdinandea (from 1782 – 1783) to conduct a survey in loco of typical costumes in order to gather reliable models for the decoration of ceramics, the overall composition undoubtedly owes a lot to the scenes of rural festivity composed only a few years earlier by Philipp Hackert and Pietro Fabris. The perfect state of conservation of the painting allows us to fully enjoy the elegance typical of the coloured tempera paintings – the skillful combination of greens and blues exhibited in all possible shades and colours gives the whole scene an extraordinary depth of vision.

È impossibile, dati gli scarsi elementi di architettura rintracciabili (lo spigolo di un edificio sulla sinistra ed il tratto di mura sul fondo a destra), definire con certezza il luogo in cui si svolge la scena; ma la lettura di alcuni elementi quali le vestiture dei personaggi e la razza del suino in primo piano ci permettono ragionevolmente di ipotizzare che ci troviamo nei dintorni della Reggia di Caserta, in uno dei tanti ‘luoghi di delizie’ borbonici. La certezza è che si tratta di un giorno di festa e il folto gruppo di contadini si dedica ad una delle poche attività ludiche loro concesse: mangiare. Un’altra certezza è che siamo in un pomeriggio di fine estate, considerato che, al tipico tarallo, alimento base della dieta popolare, si accompagnano i fichi colti direttamente dall’albero. Se la straordinaria accuratezza nella definizione delle vestiture deriva

dall’esperienza acquisita durante l’incarico svolto per la Real Fabbrica Ferdinandea dal 1782 al 1783 per il rilevamento in loco dei costumi tipici al fine di raccogliere modelli attendibili per la decorazione della produzione ceramica, la composizione d’insieme è indubbiamente debitrice delle scene di festa contadina realizzate solo pochi anni prima da Philipp Hackert e Pietro Fabris. Il perfetto stato di conservazione del dipinto ci consente di godere appieno delle eleganze cromatiche tipiche della pittura a tempera: il sapiente accostamento di verdi e azzurri declinati in tutte le possibili gradazioni e tonalità restituisce all’intera scena una straordinaria profondità di campo, mentre l’occhio viene catturato dai guizzi di colori accesi delle vesti, che accentuano la vivida presenza delle figure, soffermando la nostra attenzione sulle attività

Meanwhile, one’s eye is captured by the flashes of bright colours from the clothes, accentuating the vivid presence of the characters and focuses our attention on the activities in which each group is seen to be engaged, making us curious spectators, and at the same time, protagonists of this happy day of celebration.

in cui è intento ciascun gruppo di personaggi, rendendoci curiosi spettatori e, al contempo, protagonisti di questa lieta giornata di festa.

Provenance: Private collection.

Provenienza: collezione privata.


VI

Alessandro d ’Anna (Palermo 1746 – Napoli 1810)

Rural scene - Tempera on paper, 22 x 31.5 in. - Signed and dated lower left: ‘Alessandro d’Anna dip in napoli 1796’ Scena campestre - Tempera su carta, cm 56 x 80 - Firmato e datato in basso a sinistra: ‘Alessandro d’Anna dip in napoli 1796’


The viewpoint taken by della Gatta is on the coast of Cape Posillipo. The background shows the outline of Mount Somma and Vesuvius. The portrayal of the setting, however, in the overall design of the painting is irrelevant. All the painter’s attention is directed towards the depiction of the ‘Neapolitans entertainment’. From the left there appears in sequence – on a perfect scale which helps provide a profound depth to the view – a group of card players, two mandolin-players next to a supper table, two groups of tarantella dancers and other performers at the bottom. On the right, the solitary observer in this happy scene, a fisherman is busy smoking a pipe and lying supine on a moored boat. In this type of composition the danger, for the painter, is the temptation to create

a simple gathering of ‘types’ and ‘scenes’ already popular as individuals, and again, tested, pre-defined templates. In doing so, the depiction remains fragmented and random. The choice of della Gatta is instead to focus on the unity of action and, therefore, of representation. All the characters depicted here, were prepared with skill and balance as graphic images on a theater stage, each participating in the development of a complete story. Even the background landscape – from the building in the immediate background and the garden trees that you can imagine behind it, up until Mount Vesuvius in the background – is carefully defined because it becomes an essential element to a successful completion of the scene. The overall architecture of the composition, as well as each design of the characters,

brought to the fore a new style in those years, that existed between Fabris and della Gatta. And like Fabris – and others, at least in tempera painting – della Gatta manages to give life, movement and even precise definition to the most minute and distant figures. The particular shape and outlay of the painting on a thin sheet reveal the final destination of the work: a beautiful decoration for an admirer. It is to della Gatta that we owe the success of this idea, originally borrowed from the French tradition of embellishing ornaments with fine paintings of folk scenes, and verified by other known examples of painted admirers (see G. Alisio, P.A. De Rosa, P.E. Trastulli, Napoli com’era nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, Roma, Newton Compton Editori, 1990, no. 96, p. 238, nos. 97-98, p. 240).

Il punto di ripresa della veduta è posto da della Gatta sul tratto costiero del Capo di Posillipo. Sullo sfondo si staglia il profilo del Monte Somma con il Vesuvio. La definizione del luogo, però, nell’economia complessiva del dipinto è del tutto secondaria. Tutta l’attenzione del pittore è volta alla descrizione dei ‘divertimenti napoletani’: da sinistra appaiono in sequenza, in una perfetta scala dimensionale che contribuisce a fornire un efficace effetto di profondità alla veduta, un gruppo di giocatori di carte, due suonatori di mandolino accanto ad un tavolo imbandito, due gruppi di danzatori di tarantella ed altri suonatori in fondo. Sulla destra, solitario osservatore dell’allegra scena, un pescatore è intento a fumare la pipa, disteso supino su una barca ormeggiata. In questo tipo di composizioni il pericolo, per il pittore, è rappresentato dal cedere alla tentazione di operare un semplice

assemblaggio di ‘tipi’ e ‘scene’ popolari già singolarmente, e più volte, sperimentate, a modelli predefiniti. Nel fare ciò la descrizione resta frammentata, casuale. La scelta di della Gatta è invece quella di privilegiare l’unità di azione e, quindi, di rappresentazione: qui, tutti i personaggi raffigurati, disposti con sapienza ed equilibrio grafico come sul proscenio di un palcoscenico teatrale, partecipano per la propria parte allo sviluppo di un racconto unitario. Anche lo sfondo paesaggistico - dall’edificio nell’immediato secondo piano, agli alberi del giardino che si intuisce essere alle sue spalle, fino al Vesuvio sullo sfondo -, è accuratamente definito perché divenga un elemento indispensabile al corretto completamento della scena. L’architettura complessiva della composizione, così come il disegno dei personaggi,

denunciano la prossimità stilistica che, in quegli anni, esiste fra Fabris e della Gatta. E come Fabris - e forse più di Fabris, almeno nella pittura a tempera -, della Gatta riesce a dare vita, movimento e precisa definizione anche alla figurina più minuta e lontana. La particolare sagomatura e la redazione del dipinto su un sottilissimo foglio rivelano la destinazione finale dell’opera: una magnifica decorazione per un ventaglio. È proprio a della Gatta che dobbiamo il successo dell’idea, mutuata dalla tradizione francese, di impreziosire oggetti di ornamento con raffinati dipinti di scena popolare, come testimoniano altri esemplari noti di ventagli dipinti (cfr. G.Alisio, P.A. De Rosa, P.E. Trastulli, Napoli com’era nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, Roma, Newton Compton Editori, 1990; n. 96, p. 238; nn. 97-98, p. 240).

Provenance: Private collection.

Provenienza: collezione privata.


VII

Xavier (o Saverio) della Gatta (documented between 1777-1824)

A view of the Gulf of Naples with folk scene - Gouache and watercolour on paper, 5.5 x 20.1 in. - Signed and dated lower left: ‘Xav. Gatta f. 1786 / Nap’. Veduta del golfo di Napoli con scena popolare - Gouache e acquerello su carta, cm 14 x 51 - Firmato e datato in basso a sinistra: ‘Xav. Gatta f. 1786 / Nap.’


The subject of Vesuvius during an eruption is a particularly familiar one for della Gatta if you consider that it appears in his first known work, which included the sketch for the copper-plate engraving with the View of Vesuvius during an eruption in 1779 along with others of Pietro Fabris and Alessandro d’Anna in the Ragionamento storico intorno all’Eruzione del Vesuvio che cominciò il di 29 luglio del 1779 e continuò fino al giorno 15 del seguente mese di agosto by Gaetano De Bottis, and published on that same date by Royal Printing. The eruption shown here however, that of 1794, was considered one of the most destructive and memorable because the lava descended all the way to the sea, over-running in its path the city of the Greek Tower. In fact, this painting in pendant

Il soggetto del Vesuvio in eruzione è particolarmente familiare a della Gatta se si considera che esso compare nella sua prima opera nota, il disegno per l’incisione con la Veduta del Vesuvio durante l’Eruzione del 1779 inclusa, con altre di Pietro Fabris e di Alessandro D’Anna, nel Ragionamento storico intorno all’Eruzione del Vesuvio che cominciò il di 29 luglio del 1779 e continuò fino al giorno 15 del seguente mese di agosto di Gaetano De Bottis, edito a quella data dalla Stamperia Reale. L’eruzione qui raffigurata è, invece, quella del 1794, considerata una delle più distruttive e per questo memorabile poiché la lava giunse fino al mare, sommergendo nel suo passaggio la città di Torre del Greco. Questo dipinto è, infatti, in pendant con la veduta del Vesuvius with the town of Torre del Greek, after the Eruption 1794.

with the Vesuvius with the town of Torre del Greek, after the Eruption 1794. The English title was discovered on a contemporary label pasted on the back and bears the same date as della Gatta’s. It was probably first commissioned by August Phipps, because his name appears on both scrolls. Both paintings were made two years after that catastrophic event, in 1796. Much of the work concentrates on the high column of smoke, ash and lapillus that escapes violently from the cone of Vesuvius. The soft breeze that pushes sailboats on a calm sea is disturbed by the impending threat of the appalling and menacing clouds. The fishermen on the pier look horrified and shocked.

I titoli, in inglese, sono stati ritrovati su un cartiglio coevo incollato sul retro dei fogli e sono quelli dati o dallo stesso della Gatta o dal probabile primo committente, il cui nome è riportato sullo stesso cartiglio: August Phipps. Entrambi i dipinti sono stati realizzati due anni dopo il catastrofico evento, nel 1796. Buona parte del foglio è occupata dall’altissima colonna di fumo, cenere e lapilli che fuoriesce violenta dal cono del Vesuvio. La leggera brezza di vento che sospinge i velieri sul mare calmo è sconvolta dall’incombente minaccia della spaventosa nube ardente e i pescatori sul molo si voltano a guardarla atterriti ed increduli.

By showing the Bourbon flag with the coat of arms, fluttering towards the small sailing ship moored at the dock, he has undoubtedly accentuated its value. A night-time replica of the painting is part of an important European private collection.

Ha senza dubbio valore documentario la bandiera con lo stemma borbonico sventolante sul piccolo veliero ormeggiato presso la banchina. Del dipinto si conosce una replica notturna in una importante collezione privata europea.


Xavier (o Saverio) della Gatta (documented between 1777-1824)

VIII

Provenance: England, August Phipps; Private collection.

Provenienza: Inghilterra, August Phipps; collezione privata.

Mount Vesuvius. The Eruption of Cinders in ye Year 1794 - Tempera and gouache on paper, 29.9 x 21.3 in. - Signed and dated lower left: ‘Gatta p. [inxit] 1796’ Mount Vesuvius. The Eruption of Cinders in ye Year 1794 - Tempera e gouache su carta, cm 76 x 54 - Firmato e datato in basso a sinistra ‘Gatta p. [inxit] 1796’


If, in his panoramas of far-reaching perspective, we tend to recognize his dependence upon the best contemporary artists, particularly Lusieri and Fabris, della Gatta can be considered the undisputed master of the so-called ‘folk scene’, to which he devoted himself almost exclusively from the beginning of the nineteenth century until his death. In order to meet the needs of the growing number of travellers arriving in the capital of the Bourbon Kingdom in search of a ‘picturesque’ image, della Gatta documents, almost with affection, the customs and dress of the people of Naples, using pure watercolours and a simple, loose style to obtain the effects of spontaneity and immediacy, making him more convincing than any other contemporary artist of his time.

And even when, to meet the challenge posed by his own success, della Gatta adopts the pochoir* technique, thanks to his ever-vigilant use of colour, he manages to restore to his work an unquestionable character of originality. The work shown here is, to our knowledge, the only visual record of the characteristic ‘Running of the Donkeys’ – a sort of Palio di Siena of the rural community – which, since 1802, was held in the village of St. Anastasia, near Naples, near the Shrine of Our Lady of the Arch, clearly represented in the background. Also, in this minor example, della Gatta gives us a taste of his knowledge of composition by establishing a specific point of view of support – as defined in the foreground of the scene, decidedly in the shade – with two peasants and a dog as the spectator’s companion.

Se nelle vedute di ampio respiro è frequente verificare la sua dipendenza dai migliori artisti coevi, in particolar modo Lusieri e Fabris, della Gatta si può considerare il maestro indiscusso della cosiddetta ‘scena popolare’, alla quale si dedicò in modo quasi esclusivo dall’inizio dell’Ottocento fino alla sua morte. Per soddisfare le richieste dei sempre più numerosi viaggiatori che giungevano nella capitale del Regno borbonico alla ricerca del ‘pittoresco’, della Gatta documenta con una sorta di affettuosa partecipazione usi e costumi del popolo napoletano e, utilizzando l’acquerello puro, con uno stile sciolto e lieve, riesce ad ottenere effetti di una spontaneità e immediatezza decisamente più convincenti di qualunque altro artista suo contemporaneo. E anche quando, per far fronte al suo stesso successo, della Gatta adotta la tecnica del pochoir*, grazie alla sempre attenta colorazione, riesce

a restituire alle sue opere un incontaminato carattere di originalità. L’opera che qui si presenta è l’unica documentazione visiva a noi nota della caratteristica ‘Corsa degli Asini’ – sorta di Palio di Siena dei contadini – che, dal 1802, si svolgeva nel borgo di Sant’Anastasia, nelle vicinanze di Napoli, in prossimità del Santuario della Madonna dell’Arco, ben raffigurato nel fondo. Ed anche in questa prova minore, della Gatta ci da un saggio della sua sapienza compositiva, cogliendo l’esigenza di stabilire un preciso punto d’appoggio visivo, definito nella porzione del primo piano decisamente in ombra, con due contadini ed un cane a far da compagnia allo spettatore.

* This technique, otherwise known

as stencil design, is to create an underlying image of an object by adding pigment through holes of a sheet of material, which therefore leaves a copy of the original object underneath it.

*Questa tecnica consiste nel forare i contorni di un disegno ad intervalli regolari, e nello spargere sul disegno polvere di carbone in modo che si depositi, attraversando i fori, su un sottostante foglio. Unendo con una matita le tracce lasciate dalla polvere, si ottiene sul nuovo foglio una copia del disegno.

Provenance: Private collection.

Provenienza: collezione privata.


IX

Xavier (o Saverio) della Gatta (documented between 1777-1824)

Divertimenti Napolitani - Pencil and watercolour on paper, 5.9 x 8.7 in. - Signed and dated lower right: ‘Xavr della Gatta f. 1814’ Divertimenti Napolitani - Matita ed acquerello su carta, cm 15 x 22 - Firmato e datato in basso a destra: ‘Xavr della Gatta f. 1814’


Napoli veduto da Capodimonte - Gouache on paper, 10.8 x 15.9 in. (figurative range) - Signed bottom right: ‘chez Glass Napoli’ Napoli veduto da Capodimonte - Gouache su carta, cm 27,5 x 40,5 (campo figurato) - Segnato in basso a destra: ‘chez Glass Napoli’


X

XI

Off icina Glass (active between 1790-1840)

Torre del Greco distrutta dal Vesuvio il 1794 - Gouache on paper, 10.8 x 15.9 in. (figurative range) Torre del Greco distrutta dal Vesuvio il 1794 - Gouache su carta, cm 27,5 x 40,5 (campo figurato)


Both of these gouaches, in their entirety, come from the very first production of what we conventionally call ‘Officina Glass’. This is evident from the wire support and the absolute dominance of blues and browns, a standard use of colour that can be found in all the gouaches produced in the last decade of the XVIII century. In the first work, the painter takes advantage of a point of view half way between the hill of the Vomero and that of Capodimonte, and manages to capture all at once several of the most important works of architectural creations of the city: on the left, the Reggia di Capodimonte, on the right, in the distance, is Castel Sant’Elmo and the underlying Certosa di San Martino; in the center is the oldest part of the city surrounded by the Aragonese walls. In his depiction of this part of the scene, the unknown artist has made a very original choice: unable to show the whole urban landscape, he has decided to give precedence to the ‘sacred’ elements of the architecture, rendering them all with perfect clarity. Thus, calligraphic strokes of black and brown reveal domes and bell towers of churches emerging from the crowded urban environment. He does not however fail to pick out two works of civil architecture emblematic of Naples: Castelnuovo

Provenance: Private collection.

– its flag bearing the Bourbon insignia – and the port distinguished by the lighthouse and the masts of the ships at berth. The same attention is given to the representation of the surrounding landscape. Though, it is nonetheless possible to make out the ‘folds’ traced onto the slopes of Mount Somma and Vesuvius by the many lava flows, and highlighted by the quick strokes of white almost at the summit of Mount Somma, is the hermitage of Vesuvius, the present-day Vesuvius observatory, and on the hill dominated by the Greek Tower, the Camaldolese monastery of San Michele. In the work with Torre del Greco distrutta dal Vesuvio il 1794, the palette is even more basic and the picture more meticulous as if to underline the event portrayed. The eruption of 1794 was, together with

those of 1631, 1737 and 1861, one of the most violent and destructive: the lava, like a shining river, tearing down the Greek Tower and carrying it all the way to the sea where the lava itself formed a veritable platform on the water. The was almost totally destroyed, although there were only a dozen victims out of a population of about eighteen thousand inhabitants. Ferdinand IV tried to convince the people to abandon the town for good, promising to rebuild it in a safer location, protected from the threat of the volcano. However, they rejected the generous offer and, according to contemporary chronicles, they began to rebuild their city on the hot ashes. In addition to the indisputable artistic quality, our gouache has an extraordinary documentary value as visual evidence of this event. The openings from which the lava escaped on the side of the volcano

are clearly highlighted. It channeled through the valley of the hill of the Camaldoli – at the top of which is pictured the monastery of San Michele – and re-emerging close to the city at the point where the vegetation is shown burnt to a height of almost ten metres. From the steaming lava rocks emerge only a few buildings and the bell tower of the cathedral of Santa Croce. Of this same subject there is also a version in a portrait by della Gatta, which has been previously mentioned (see section 8), and a replica, exactly the same, also drawn by della Gatta (see G. Alisio, P.A. De Rosa, P.E. Trastulli, Napoli com’era nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, Roma, Newton Compton Editori, 1990, no. 75, p. 290).


Off icina Glass (attiva fra il 1790 ed il 1840)

Provenienza: collezione privata.

Questa coppia di gouaches appartiene ancora integralmente alla primissima produzione di quella che per convenzione possiamo definire ‘Officina Glass’. Lo testimoniano l’utilizzazione, come supporto, della carta vergellata e la dominanza assoluta degli azzurri e dei bruni, uno standard coloristico rintracciabile in tutte le gouaches eseguite nell’ultimo decennio del Settecento. Nella prima, sfruttando un punto di vista posto a metà fra la collina di Capodimonte e quella del Vomero, il pittore riesce a raccogliere in un solo sguardo alcune fra le più importanti emergenze architettoniche della città: sulla sinistra, la Reggia di Capodimonte, a destra, più in lontananza, il Castel Sant’Elmo

e la sottostante Certosa di San Martino; al centro, la porzione della città più antica, quella racchiusa dalle mura aragonesi. Nella descrizione di questa parte di territorio l’ignoto autore fa una scelta assolutamente originale: non potendo dar conto di tutto il complesso urbano, decide di privilegiare, rendendola perfettamente leggibile, l’architettura ‘sacra’. E così , dall’affollato contesto urbano emergono cupole e campanili delle chiese, evidenziati da calligrafici tocchi di nero e di bruno. Né peraltro trascura di evidenziare due elementi di architettura civili emblematici di Napoli, Castelnuovo – su cui sventola una bandiera con le insegne borboniche – ed il Porto, segnalato dal Faro e dagli alberi delle navi ormeggiate. Stessa puntuale attenzione è posta nella restituzione del dato paesistico. Seppur reso con una essenziale monocromia celeste, si leggono

perfettamente le ‘pieghe’ create sulle pendici del Monte Somma e sul Vesuvio dalle tante colate di lava e con veloci tocchi di biacca sono evidenziati, quasi alla sommità del Monte Somma, il Romitorio del Vesuvio, l’attuale Osservatorio Vesuviano, e sulla collina che domina Torre del Greco, il Monastero camaldolese di San Michele. Nel foglio con Torre del Greco distrutta dal Vesuvio il 1794 la tavolozza è ancora più essenziale e il disegno più rigoroso, quasi a voler sottolineare la drammaticità dell’evento raccontato. L’eruzione del 1794 fu, insieme a quelle del 1631, 1737 e 1861, una delle più violente e distruttive: la lava uscendo dalle bocche apertesi sul fianco del Vulcano investì, come un fiume incandescente, Torre del Greco e giunse fino al mare, dove formò una vera e propria piattaforma.

Torre del Greco fu distrutta quasi totalmente, anche se vi furono solo una quindicina di vittime rispetto ad una popolazione di circa diciottomila abitanti. Ferdinando IV cercò di convincere i Torresi ad abbandonare definitivamente la cittadina con l’impegno di ricostruirla in un luogo più sicuro e protetto dalla minaccia del vulcano, ma essi rifiutarono la generosa offerta reale e, come raccontano le cronache coeve, iniziarono a ricostruire la loro città sulle ceneri ancora calde. Oltre all’indiscutibile qualità artistica, la nostra gouache ha uno straordinario valore documentario e di testimonianza visiva dell’evento. Sul fianco del vulcano sono evidenziate le bocche da cui la lava era fuoriuscita, incanalandosi nel fondovalle della collina dei Camaldoli, sulla cui sommità, integro, è raffigurato il Monastero di San Michele. Il fiume di lava riemergendo a ridosso della città, nella zona dove la vegetazione è bruciata, copre il borgo costiero per una altezza di quasi dieci metri. Dalle rocce laviche ancora fumanti emergono solo pochi edifici ed il Campanile della chiesa cattedrale di Santa Croce. Di questo stesso soggetto esiste una versione, in verticale, di della Gatta, di cui abbiamo già precedentemente detto (vedi scheda VIII), ed una replica, assolutamente identica, realizzata sempre da della Gatta (cfr. G.Alisio, P.A. De Rosa, P.E. Trastulli, Napoli com’era nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, Roma, Newton Compton Editori, 1990; n. 75, p. 290).


Lake Avernus, which is a bleak stretch of water filling the elliptical shape of the crater it occupies. The volcano became inactive about 4000 years ago, and this is by far the most charming place in Campi Flegrei. Since the days of the early Greek settlers it has been seen as the door to the afterworld. It is defined as the entrance to Hades in the sixth book of Virgil. The Latin name Avernus is etymologically derived from the Greek meaning “without birds” because birds flying over the chasm died due to its sulfurous fumes, resulting from volcanic activity not yet ceased. In the last century BC, the Romans used it as one of the ports of Cumae, Port Julius, in addition to the other pre-existing port situated on the sea where Lake Lucrino is today. In this beautiful tempera Pomardi did not limit himself to a detailed depiction of the

lake and its banks - on which stand the ruins of the so-called Temple of Apollo – a spa in Roman times – alone: making full use of his vantage point, he takes into account the surrounding area: the front of Lucrino Lake and on the right, the headland of the Baia on top of which stands the silhouette of the solid building of Castello Aragonese, followed by the headland of Cape Miseno and finally, the island of Capri. The comprehensive perspective, with the big tree to the right acting as a scenic backdrop and the timely return of greenery, points directly to Hackert’s schooling and della Gatta’s soft atmospheric approach are evident here as several trials on the same subject confirm. It must be noted that the simulation of a preciously painted frame dominating the scene gives rise to elegant neo-classicism.

Il lago d’Averno, uno specchio di acque cupe dalla forma ellittica che occupa il cratere di un vulcano spentosi circa 4000 anni fa, è senz’altro il luogo di maggiore fascino dei Campi Flegrei. Fin dai tempi dei primi coloni greci fu considerato l’ingresso all’Oltretomba; e ingresso all’Ade lo definisce ancora Virgilio nel VI libro dell’Eneide. Il nome latino Avernus deriva dalla lingua greca ed etimologicamente significa “senza uccelli”, poiché gli uccelli che volavano sopra tale voragine morivano a causa delle sue esalazioni sulfuree, derivanti da una attività vulcanica ancora non sopita. Nell’ultimo secolo A.C., i Romani lo utilizzarono come uno dei porti di Cuma, il Porto Julius, in aggiunta all’altro preesistente che si trovava sul mare, ove è l’attuale lago di Lucrino. In questa splendida tempera Pomardi non si limita all’attenta descrizione dello spazio lacustre e delle sue sponde – sulle quali spiccano i resti del cosiddetto

Tempio di Apollo, in realtà uno stabilimento termale di epoca romana –; ma, sfruttando al massimo il punto di ripresa, da conto anche dei luoghi ad esso vicini: l’antistante Lago di Lucrino e, sulla destra, il promontorio di Baia sulla cui sommità si distingue la sagoma severa del Castello aragonese; a seguire, il promontorio di Capo Miseno e, a chiusura, l’isola di Capri. L’impostazione complessiva della veduta, con il grande albero sulla destra a fare da quinta scenica, e la puntuale restituzione della verzura, rimandano direttamente alla lezione di Hackert, addolcita dalle atmosfere chiare derivanti da della Gatta, di cui sono conosciute diverse prove con lo stesso soggetto. Va ancora segnalata la concessione al neoclassicismo dominante testimoniata dall’elegante decoro dipinto a simulare una preziosa cornice.

Provenance: Rome, Raskovich collection; Private collection. Bibliography: G. Alisio, P.A. De Rosa, P.E. Trastulli, Napoli com’era nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, Roma, Newton Compton Editori, 1990; no. 50, p. 134; tav p. 135.

Provenienza: Roma, collezione Raskovich; collezione privata. Bibliografia: G. Alisio, P.A. De Rosa, P.E. Trastulli, Napoli com’era nelle gouaches del Sette e Ottocento, Roma, Newton Compton Editori, 1990; n. 50, p. 134; tavola p. 135


VIII XII

Simone Pomardi (Monteporzio di Pesaro 1757 – Roma 1830)

Le Lac d’Averno - Tempera on parchment, 13.8 x 19.7 in. - Signed bottom left and dated bottom right: ‘A Rome 1800’ Le Lac d’Averno - Tempera su pergamena, cm 35 x 50 - Firmato in basso a sinistra e datato in basso a destra: ‘A Rome 1800’


Veduta di Nisita e sdrata de Vagnioli - Gouache on paper, 19.1 x 30.9 in. (figurative range) - Signed bottom left: ‘L. Gentile’ Veduta di Nisita e sdrata de Vagnioli - Gouache su carta, cm 48,5 x 78,5 (campo figurato) - Segnato in basso a sinistra: ‘L. Gentile’


XIII

XIV

Luigi Salvatore Gentile (documented between 1798-1837)

Veduta di Mergelina Riviera di Posilipo - Gouache on paper, 19.1 x 30.9 in. (figurative range) - Signed bottom left: ‘L. Gentile’ Veduta di Mergelina Riviera di Posilipo - Gouache su carta, cm 48,5 x 78,5 (campo figurato) - Segnato in basso a sinistra: ‘L. Gentile’


Provenance: Private collection.

The wide valley of Bagnoli is reached from Naples via the Grotto of Posillipo and welcomes travellers by offering one of the most extraordinary landscapes of the outskirts of the capital of the Kingdom: Nisida Island on the left and on the right is the Gulf of Pozzuoli, closed off from Capo Miseno. In the background, on the sea, is Procida Island, which is dominated by Ischia and the impending threat from the sharp cone of Mount Epomeo. Since the first known painting by Gentile (A Landscape with a lake in 1798) was placed in the study of Francis II in the Royal Palace besides a series of gouaches with views of the United made by Philipp Hackert for Bourbon, we cannot be surprised by its strong dependence on the lessons by the great German painter. This influence is above all evident from the scenic setting, with a big tree on the left as a backdrop for an opening.

Noteworthy is the depiction of the double curtain of trees on the road to Pozzuoli, which offered cool shade in summer and shelter from the rain in winter. They were described in contemporary guides – which also reported them being poplars and mulberry – but were rarely portrayed in the many paintings done of the exact same subject. The presence of a French uniform military here allows us to date this painting to the first decade of the nineteenth century. In the second image, pendant to the above, is depicted the small fishing village of Mergellina with a small marina and the church of the Friars at the foot of the Posillipo hills. This painting is particularly emblematic of the particular style of the artist. In sharp contrast with the other gouache contemporary painters, Gentile in his

drawings applies to both landscape and characters a touch that is pure and delicate, with a coating of transparent colour, almost impalpable. As a consequence, the preferred hues are as clear as possible. The final result is the return of an atmosphere of serene tranquility, flooded by an almost metaphysical bright light. This successful use of chromatic technique in frescoes is probably not so strange given that he practiced continuously with his father Pasquale (Peter Calà Ulloa, Pensées et souvenirs sur la littérature contemporaine du Royaume de Naples, 2 vols., Geneva 1858-59, p. 276).


Luigi Salvatore Gentile (documentato fra il 1798 ed il 1837)

Provenienza:collezione privata.

L’ampia vallata di Bagnoli si raggiungeva da Napoli attraverso la Grotta di Posillipo ed accoglieva i viandanti offrendo uno dei paesaggi più straordinari dei dintorni della capitale del Regno: l’isola di Nisida sulla sinistra e il golfo di Pozzuoli sulla destra, chiuso dal Capo Miseno; sullo sfondo, nel mare, l’isola di Procida sovrastata dall’incombente mole di Ischia con l’aguzzo cono del Monte Epomeo. Considerato che il primo dipinto noto di Gentile, un Paesaggio con lago del 1798, era collocato nello studiolo di Francesco II nella Reggia di Caserta e si confrontava con la serie di gouaches con vedute del Regno realizzate da Philipp Hackert per i Borbone, non ci possiamo stupire della sua forte dipendenza dalla lezione del grande pittore tedesco. Una dipendenza soprattutto evidente nell’impostazione scenografica della veduta, con il grande albero sulla sinistra a fare da quinta di apertura.

È da sottolineare la raffigurazione della doppia cortina di alberi sulla strada che portava a Pozzuoli, che offriva frescura in estate ed un riparo dalla pioggia in inverno, descritta nelle guide coeve – che riferiscono anche che si trattava di pioppi e di gelsi – ma raramente riportata nei tanti dipinti di identico soggetto. La presenza di un militare in divisa francese ci permette di datare questo dipinto al primo decennio dell’Ottocento. Nel secondo foglio, pendant del precedente, è raffigurato il piccolo borgo di pescatori di Mergellina, ai piedi della collina di Posillipo, con il piccolo porticciolo e la chiesa dei Frati. Questo dipinto è particolarmente emblematico della particolare cifra stilistica dell’artista. In netta controtendenza rispetto agli altri pittori alla gouache suoi contemporanei, Gentile adotta nel disegno, sia della veduta che dei personaggi

un tratto puro e delicato, con una stesura del colore trasparente, quasi impalpabile; di conseguenza, le tonalità cromatiche privilegiate sono le più chiare possibili. L’effetto finale è la restituzione di atmosfere di serena tranquillità, inondate da una luce nitida, quasi metafisica. Probabilmente non è estranea a questa modalità di stesure cromatiche la frequentazione della tecnica dell’affresco, praticata con continuità ed un certo successo insieme con il padre Pasquale (Pietro Calà Ulloa, Penseés et souvenirs sur la littérature contemporaine du Royaume de Naples, 2 voll., Genéve 1858-59; p.276).


The timing of the artist Camillo de Vito between the last decade of the eighteenth century and the 1930’s depended almost entirely on the timing of the eruption of Vesuvius, his favorite subject as noted on the bottom of his gouaches paintings. A further confirmation of the validity of this period of de Vito, can be seen by the recorded date. In 1796, the Neapolitan publisher Domenico Sangiacomo published the volume Gabinetto vesuviano del Duca Della Torre with a set of 22 illustrations engraved on copper plates from designs by leading and respected artists of that time: Fabris, d’Anna, della Gatta. In 1822, the publisher Gervasi republished this work, but with 28 works, and on one of the six additions only one new signature was found, that of Camillo de Vito.

Since the preparation of the illustrations were entrusted to the editor under strict terms, only painters with ‘expert eruptions’, it meant, that in 1822, De Vito had to be considered not only a highly ‘specialized’ artist in general, but also he should not bring disrepute to the best representatives of the gouache paintings of the late eighteenth century. The image demonstrated here with his usual skill, is dominated by a large plume of smoke rising from the volcano, exemplified by the changing colours of its charge. It affects the attitude of the characters that make up the crowds in the foreground: men and women, children and adults of different classes, all united by the same feeling of indifference to what is happening in front of them. An indifference that is not due to disinterest, but an ordinary daily event.

La collocazione temporale dell’attività artistica di Camillo de Vito fra l’ultimo decennio del Settecento e gli anni trenta dell’Ottocento dipende, quasi esclusivamente, dalle datazioni delle eruzioni del Vesuvio – il suo soggetto prediletto – riportate in calce alle sue gouaches. Una ulteriore conferma della validità di questa collocazione temporale dell’opera di de Vito, ci viene da un dato documentario certo. Nel 1796 l’editore napoletano Domenico Sangiacomo pubblica il volume Gabinetto vesuviano del Duca Della Torre con un corredo iconografico di 22 tavole incise su rame su disegni degli artisti più importanti e stimati di quel periodo, Fabris, d’Anna, della Gatta; nel 1822, l’editore Gervasi ripubblica l’opera, ma con 28 tavole, e fra le sei aggiunte si ritrova solo una firma nuova: quella di Camillo de Vito. Considerato che la redazione delle tavole era affidata, per stessa

dichiarazione programmatica dell’editore, solo a pittori ‘esperti di eruzioni’, ne consegue che nel 1822 de Vito doveva essere considerato non solo un artista altamente specializzato nel genere, ma anche in grado di non sfigurare al cospetto dei migliori rappresentanti della pittura alla gouache di fine Settecento. Nell’opera che qui si presenta, dominata dal grande pennacchio di fumo che si alza dal vulcano, definito nei colori cangianti delle sue spire con la consueta perizia, colpisce l’atteggiamento dei personaggi che compongono l’affollato primo piano: uomini e donne, bambini ed adulti, di ceti diversi, tutti uniti da un identico sentimento di indifferenza verso ciò che sta accadendo di fronte a loro. Una indifferenza che non è disinteresse, ma abitudine ad un evento ordinario, parte della vita di ogni giorno.

Provenance: Hill-Stone, Inc., New York; since 2008, private collection.

Provenienza: Hill-Stone, Inc., New York; dal 2008, collezione privata.


XV

Camillo de Vito (documented between 1793-1834)

Ceneri del Vesuvio Sortita Li 26 Xbre 1813 - Gouache on paper, 23.6 x 34.3 in. Ceneri del Vesuvio Sortita Li 26 Xbre 1813 - Gouache su carta, cm 60 x 87


Despite the high quality of his works, Francesco Zerilli still remains largely an unknown figure, except for a tiny enclave of educated merchants and courageous collectors who have been able to appreciate his extraordinary artistic talent. Still, I do not think there is any doubt about the fact that the author of this amazing view of Naples from Posillipo, well deserves attention and further study. Obviously we cannot pretend to do it justice in these few lines, but we can give it some food for thought. The clear pure light, and his accurate way of drawing, the effectiveness of the range of colours, and the bright but never crude contrasts, are just another indication to refer to Giovanni Battista Lusieri. Although, we can spot the difference in colour rendering between the works

of two artists, we cannot forget that Lusieri uses pure watercolours, with the result of softening the tones that, in the tempera and gouache palettes of Zerilli, regain vitality and brilliance. However, the enlightened approach of the concept ‘view’, characterized by a high level of attention to real detail, is found in exactly the same way for both artists and common in their works as seen by the perspective slant which is as broad as possible. An example for Zerilli, is his precise view of Naples. Taking the first point of a winding road leading up the Posillipo hills, the artist has the chance to widen the scene towards Mergellina, Vesuvius and the foothills of the Campana Apennines. What is impressive is not so much though, the perfect return to the architectural canon – the Riviera di Chiaia, the lush hills of San Martino dominated

by the impenetrable Castel Sant’Elmo, the promontory of Pizzofalcone looming on Castel dell’Ovo – but the exaggerated attention to detailed descriptions of each element in the view. These include the domes of the churches of Santa Maria degli Angeli and Santa Maria Egiziaca to Pizzofalcone and the fishermen on boats. We do not know if Zerilli ever came to Naples, but certainly his representation of the telegraph antenna put in place around 1834 on the terrace of Castel Sant’Elmo, is an argument in favor of the hypothesis that they were personally surveyed by the Sicilian painter. In this view there is a precedent – dated 1835 – in a reduced size (15.2 x 20.9 in.), in a private collection in Milan. These two temperas are the only works of Zerilli representing different places in Sicily.

Nonostante la qualità altissima delle sue opere, Francesco Zerilli resta ancora oggi un personaggio sostanzialmente poco noto, se si eccettua una sparuta enclave di colti mercanti e di coraggiosi collezionisti che ne hanno saputo apprezzare le straordinarie doti artistiche. Eppure, non credo vi siano dubbi sul fatto che l’autore di questa straordinaria veduta di Napoli da Posillipo meriterebbe ben altra attenzione e approfondimento di studi. Ovviamente non pretendiamo di farlo in queste poche righe, ma qualche spunto di riflessione possiamo contribuire a darlo. La luce tersa e pulita, il disegno accuratissimo, l’efficacia delle gamme cromatiche, i contrasti brillanti ma mai volgari, hanno solo un altro nome di riferimento: Giovanni Battista Lusieri. Certo, è evidente la diversa resa cromatica fra le opere dei due artisti; ma non possiamo dimenticare che Lusieri utilizza l’acquerello puro, con la conseguenza di un abbassamento

dei toni che, nella tavolozza a tempera e gouache di Zerilli, riacquistano vitalità e brillantezza. Tuttavia, l’approccio illuminista al concetto stesso di ‘veduta’, connotato da un altissimo livello di attenzione per il dato reale, è rinvenibile nella stessa identica maniera in entrambi gli artisti, così come è comune nelle loro opere la ricerca di un taglio prospettico quanto più ampio possibile. Ne è un esempio, per Zerilli, proprio questa veduta di Napoli. Ponendo il punto di ripresa sui primi tornanti della strada che sale sulla collina di Posillipo, il pittore ha la possibilità di far spaziare lo sguardo da Mergellina fino al Vesuvio e ai primi contrafforti dell’Appennino Campano; ma quello che impressiona non è tanto la pur perfetta restituzione delle emergenze architettoniche canoniche – la Riviera di Chiaia, la rigogliosa collina di San Martino dominata dalla mole severa del Castel Sant’Elmo, il promontorio

di Pizzofalcone incombente sul Castel dell’Ovo –, quanto la esasperata attenzione alla puntuale descrizione di ogni singolo elemento della veduta, siano essi le cupole delle chiese di Santa Maria degli Angeli e di Santa Maria Egiziaca a Pizzofalcone o i pescatori sulle barche. Non sappiamo se Zerilli sia mai venuto a Napoli, ma certo la raffigurazione dell’antenna del telegrafo ottico posta intorno al 1834 sul terrazzamento di Castel Sant’Elmo, è un elemento a favore dell’ipotesi di un rilievo dei luoghi eseguito personalmente dal pittore siciliano. Di questa veduta esiste un precedente – datato 1835 –, in formato ridotto (cm 38,5 x 53), in collezione privata milanese. Queste due tempere sono le uniche opere di Zerilli raffiguranti luoghi diversi dalla Sicilia.

Provenance: Zurich, art market; Private collection.

Provenienza: Zurigo, mercato antiquario; Collezione privata.


VIII XVI

Francesco Zerilli (Palermo 1797-1837)

Naples from Posillipo - Tempera, gouache and watercolour on paper, 26.8 x 40.2 in. - Signed and dated bottom left: ‘F/co Zerilli dip. in Palermo 1836’ Napoli da Posillipo - Tempera, gouache e acquerello su carta, cm 68 x 102 - Firmato e datato in basso a sinistra: ‘F/co Zerilli dip. in Palermo 1836’


This scene, of volcanic origin, is dominated by Monte Epomeo and protected by the impregnable Castle from the Aragonese period. It’s surrounded by lush greenery, not far from the coast and easily accessible thanks to the many sheltered bays. The island of Ischia has always exerted a strong fascination for painters and landscape painters of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Huber discovered it during his first trip to Naples in 1812, as evident from a watercolour dated to that year depicting the area of ‘Lacco Ameno’, it has already been in the Galleria Antonacci in Rome and another drawing with the Castello Aragonese in Naples is preserved in the Museo Nazionale di San Martino. It is plausible to think that on that same occasion the German artist also created this view of Forio, in which it is clear there is still

a strong influence from the school of Philipp Hackert. Apart from the traditional form of composition, with the two tall trees to act as a backdrop, we can find all the hallmarks of this ‘landscape as nature’ encoded by the great German master. In the description he pays close attention to the vegetation, the group of peasants in the foreground, who bring the scene to life more importantly, they represent a point of reference for the size, breadth and depth of view, where even the smallest and most distant component is perfectly focused. The most famous and important view of Forio by Hackert, is a large painting – 8.7 x 11 in. – created for the Bourbons in 1789 (Royal Palace, Caserta), with a viewpoint very similar to the one selected by Huber.

Di origine vulcanica, dominata dall’alto Monte Epomeo e protetta dall’inespugnabile Castello di epoca aragonese, immersa in una vegetazione lussureggiante, non lontana dalla costa e facilmente accessibile grazie alle tante baie protette, l’isola d’Ischia ha sempre esercitato un forte fascino sui vedutisti e paesaggisti del Sette e Ottocento. Huber la scoprì in occasione del suo primo viaggio a Napoli, nel 1812, come testimoniano un acquerello datato a quell’anno raffigurante la località di Lacco Ameno, già passato nella Galleria Antonacci a Roma e un disegno con il Castello Aragonese conservato a Napoli nel Museo Nazionale di San Martino. È plausibile pensare che in quella stessa occasione l’artista tedesco realizzasse anche questa veduta di Forio, nella quale è evidente quanto è ancora forte l’influenza della lezione di Philipp Hackert nella sua formazione.

A parte il tradizionale modulo compositivo, con i due alti alberi a fare da quinta scenografica, vi si ritrovano tutti gli elementi distintivi di quel ‘paesaggio secondo natura’ codificati dal grande maestro tedesco: l’estrema attenzione nella descrizione della verzura, il gruppo di contadini in primo piano, che rendono viva la scena e che, soprattutto, rappresentano un termine oggettivo di riferimento dimensionale, l’ampiezza e profondità della veduta, in cui anche il più piccolo e lontano elemento è perfettamente messo a fuoco. Proprio di Hackert, con un punto di ripresa molto simile a quello scelto da Huber, è la più nota ed importante veduta di Forio: un grande dipinto – cm 220 x 280 – eseguito per i Borbone nel 1789 (Caserta, Palazzo Reale).

Considering Huber’s expertise in graphics, he opened a school of drawing in Naples in 1819. Its success can be well understood since it welcomed two young students: Giacinto Gigante and Achille Vianelli.

Considerata la perizia grafica di Huber, si comprende bene il successo che ebbe la sua scuola di disegno, aperta a Napoli nel 1819, che accolse due giovanissimi Giacinto Gigante ed Achille Vianelli.

Provenance: Private collection.

Provenienza: collezione privata.


XVII

Jacob Wilhelm Huber (Düsseldorf 1787 – Zurigo 1871)

View of Forio d’Ischia - Pencil and watercolour on paper, 11 x 16.5 in. - Signed bottom right: ‘W.H.’ Veduta di Forio d’Ischia - Matita e acquerello su carta, cm 28 x 42 - Siglato in basso a destra: ‘W.H.’


Pitloo fully accomplishes his genius en plein air, especially on small-format paintings like oil on thin paper. This image shows a moment of daily life captured in the city with immediacy and sincerity: the curtain of the buildings shining white in the white sun, a reassuring Vesuvius in the background and a crowded foreground, cluttered with boats including moving agile characters. It’s completed with one stroke of the brush in forms of tiny grains of red, white and blue.

Soprattutto nei dipinti di piccolo formato, realizzati en plein air, ad olio magro su supporto cartaceo, Pitloo manifesta appieno la sua genialità. Un momento della quotidiana vita della città fermata su carta con immediatezza e sincerità totale: la cortina degli edifici, bianca nello splendente bianco solare, un rassicurante Vesuvio sullo sfondo e un affollato primo piano ingombro di barche fra le quali si muovono agili figurine, realizzate con un sol colpo di pennello, rese vitali da minutissimi grumi di bianco, di rosso e di azzurro. E una enorme barca ad occupare quasi un terzo dell’intera scena.

And there’s a huge boat to occupy almost one third of the whole scene. It would be a problem for any other painter, but not for Pitloo: the perspective of a perfect escape, disabled shadows, lightness of touch, simplicity in drawing, but the boat is where we all expect it is. It’s pure poetry because poetry is reality; the art of painting is the ability to grasp it.

Un problema per qualsiasi altro pittore, ma non per Pitloo: prospettiva di fuga perfetta, abili ombreggiature, leggerezza di tocco, essenzialità nel disegno, ed ecco che la barca è là dove tutti ci aspettiamo che sia. Poesia pura. Perché la poesia è nella realtà. L’arte della pittura, nella capacità di saperla cogliere.

Provenance: Private collection.

Provenienza: collezione privata


XVIII

Anton Smink Pitloo (Arnhem 1790 – Napoli 1837)

The beach of Carmine with groups of fishermen, a large boat and Vesuvius - Oil on paper, 4.7 x 6.7 in. - Signed bottom left: ‘Pitloo’ La spiaggia del Carmine con gruppi di pescatori, una grande barca e il Vesuvio - Olio su carta, cm 12 x 17 - Segnato in basso a sinistra: ‘Pitloo’


In a late summer afternoon four country people fill their jugs with water that has collected in a tank. We are at Mola di Gaeta, as Gigante tells us, present day Formia. He had a villa here and Marcus Tullius Cicero was here when he the killers of Anthony beheaded him. And again here, the place of the border post on the road Via Appia, the place of a decisive battle which determined the succession of rulers firstly, in the kingdom of vice-royalty, then Bourbon. A place rich in history and dramatic events, now tells a simple but not so trivial story. But Giacinto Gigante’s painting is never trivial. This is the time between 1855 and 1860, when Gigante, at the height of his artistic maturity, revised the landscape themes of Dahl and Turner, whom he met through the mediation of his master Pitloo.

In un tardo pomeriggio estivo quattro popolane riempiono i loro orci con l’acqua che si è raccolta in una vasca. Siamo a Mola di Gaeta, come ci dice lo stesso Gigante, l’odierna Formia. Qui aveva la sua villa Marco Tullio Cicerone e qui si trovava quando fu raggiunto dai sicari di Antonio e decapitato. Ed è sempre qui, luogo di confine posto sulla via Appia, che si svolgevano le battaglie decisive che determinavano l’alternarsi delle dominazioni nel viceregno prima e nel regno Borbonico poi. Un luogo carico di storia e di avvenimenti drammatici, dove ora si racconta una storia semplice ma non banale. Perché mai banale è la pittura di Giacinto Gigante. È il momento, fra il 1855 ed il 1860, in cui Gigante, nel pieno della sua maturità artistica, rielabora i temi paesaggistici di Dahl e di Turner, da lui conosciuti grazie alla mediazione del suo maestro Pitloo.

The atmosphere is dense, saturated, almost overwhelming. Without sacrificing his typical ‘methods’ during painting, he simply captured the essence by stretching the image. Gigante choose a palette dominated by strong and clear colours: full of dark reds, thick grays, greens enhanced by buoyant layers of tempera. It depicts a quiet scene of peasant life in a rough and untamed setting, as seen by the light of the setting sun that violently breaks over the woman standing on the rocks in the background, while threatening clouds exacerbate the colour contrasts and accentuates the conceptual ones.

L’atmosfera è densa, satura, quasi opprimente. Pur senza rinunciare nel disegno al suo ‘modo’ tipico, teso alla semplificazione del tratto per cogliere l’essenzialità, Gigante sceglie una tavolozza dominata da colori forti e decisi: bruni carichi di rosso, densi grigi, verdi rafforzati da vigorose stesure di tempera. E la luce del sole al tramonto che irrompe violenta sulla donna in piedi, sulle rocce in secondo piano, fra le nubi minacciose esaspera i contrasti cromatici ed accentua quelli concettuali: una tranquilla scena di vita contadina in una natura aspra ed indomabile.

Provenance: Private collection. Bibliography: Sergio Ortolani, Giacinto Gigante e la pittura di paesaggio a Napoli e in Italia dal ‘600 all’800, edited by Louise Martorelli, edition of book published posthumously in 1970 by Raffaello Causa, Napoli, Franco Di Mauro Editore, 2009, plate LXXVII.

Provenienza: collezione privata. Bibliografia: Sergio Ortolani, Giacinto Gigante e la pittura di paesaggio a Napoli e in Italia dal ‘600 all’800, a cura di Luisa Martorelli; riedizione del volume pubblicato postumo nel 1970 a cura di Raffaello Causa; Napoli, Franco Di Mauro Editore, 2009; tav. LXXVII.


VIII XIX

Giacinto Gigante (Napoli 1806 – 1876)

Group of laundresses at a fountain in Mola di Gaeta - Watercolour and gouache on paper, 6.9 x 12.2 in. - Signed bottom left: ‘Mola di Gaeta G. Gigante’ Gruppo di donne che prendono l’acqua da una vasca a Mola di Gaeta - Acquerello e tempera su carta, cm 17,5 x 31 - Segnato in basso a sinistra: ‘Mola di Gaeta G. Gigante’


A Parisian and son of an Italian diplomat at the French consulate, Achille Vianelli – or Vianelly as he signed his early work – reacted to an xenophilous quirk and reached Naples in 1819. He started working at the Royal Topographic Office and got to know Giacinto Gigante here, with whom he established a deep, professional understanding and friendly relationship. Together they started to attend Huber’s first school of drawing and then that of Pitloo’s painting school. They cooperated together to enrich the most important iconographic works printed from that period (it’s enough to mention the Viaggio pittorico nel Regno delle Due Sicilie, in three volumes, published in Naples, between 1829 and 1834, by Cuciniello and Bianchi). As a culmination of this intense relationship, Vianelli married Gigante’s sister.

Figlio di un italiano, diplomatico presso il consolato francese, e di una parigina, Achille Vianelli – o Vianelly, come firma le sue prime opere, cedendo ad un vezzo esterofilo – giunge a Napoli nel 1819. Inizia a lavorare presso il Real Officio Topografico e qui conosce Giacinto Gigante, con il quale si stabilisce una profonda intesa professionale ed umana. Insieme iniziano a frequentare prima la scuola di disegno di Huber e poi quella di pittura di Pitloo; insieme collaborano ad arricchire i corredi iconografici delle più importanti opere a stampa di quel periodo (basti citare il Viaggio pittorico nel Regno delle Due Sicilie, in tre volumi, pubblicato a Napoli, fra il 1829 ed il 1834, da Cuciniello e Bianchi); a coronamento di questo intenso rapporto, Vianelli sposa la sorella di Gigante. Pur nella sua assoluta versatilità artistica, non vi è dubbio che Vianelli

Even in his absolute artistic versatility, there is no doubt that Vianelli give his best in watercolour painting. At this stage, on his first term from 1820-1830 approximately, Pitloo’s influence is present by the particular way he signs his work as ‘Vianelly’ (as already mentioned above), especially in the rendering of an almost blinding, brilliant luminosity. It’s particularly noticeable in the layout, where people and things tend to lose physical substance in order to become diaphanous. Moreover, as already defined in his primary interest for detailed illustrations of popular life which are reflected in almost all his paintings, the characters who crowd the scene are not just there, but perform; telling us all about their lives.

dia il meglio di sé nella pittura all’acquerello. In questa prova, ascrivibile al suo primo periodo – dal 1820 al 1830 ca. – per la presenza della particolare firma, ‘Vianelly’, di cui si è già detto, si legge ancora fortissima l’influenza di Pitloo, soprattutto nella resa luministica brillante, quasi accecante, in cui, soprattutto nei fondi, persone e cose tendono a perdere consistenza fisica fino a divenire diafane. Peraltro, già è altrettanto definito il precipuo interesse per la dettagliata illustrazione della vita popolare: in questo, come nella quasi totalità dei suoi dipinti, i personaggi che affollano la scena non si limitano ad esserci, ma agiscono, raccontandoci della loro vita.

Provenance: Private collection.

Provenienza: collezione privata.


XX

Achille Vianelli (Porto Maurizio 1803 – Benevento 1894)

Naples, the road of Carmine - Watercolour on paper, 8.7 x 12.6 in. - Signed bottom left: ‘Vianelly’ La strada del Carmine a Napoli - Acquerello su carta, cm 22,6 x 32 - Firmato in basso a sinistra: ‘Vianelly’


Raffaele Carelli was the head of a family of artists that has deeply marked the history and ‘way’ of painting in Naples by the end of the eighteenth beginning of the early twentieth century. After an apprenticeship in his father’s shop, he was also a successful painter even if only local. Raffaele moved first to Bari and then to Naples in 1815. Here, after a short apprenticeship at the studio of the restorer Ciappa, he began attending Huber’s school of drawing, where he met the young Achille Vianelli and Giacinto Gigante, with whom he shared the experience of illustrating the Viaggio pittorico nel Regno delle Due Sicilie. While under the influence of his talented colleagues, Carelli was never able to fully to do justice to the new artistic movement that later went under the ‘Posillipo School’ – it being poised between

the late eighteenth-century rationalism and eighteenth century romanticism. The interesting watercolour presented here exemplifies this balance hinging between the old and new. In front of a makeshift shrine, which is simply created by a cross with two tree branches, two pipers play their Christmas novena for the sole benefit of two fishermen. Beyond the absolute originality of the scene, some notations can be made on the style. There may be some evidence his style, in a formal sense, is following the ‘posillipo’ schooling, such as: the glimpse of scenery behind the characters, and technically, the primarily medium of painting. Then, there’s the generous use of white; in the conduct of the theme Carelli undergoes the charm and influence of artists such as Xavier della Gatta and Gaetano Gigante

Raffaele Carelli fu il capostipite di una famiglia di artisti che ha segnato in modo profondo la storia e i ‘modi’ della pittura a Napoli dalla fine del XVIII all’inizio del XX secolo. Dopo un apprendistato nella bottega paterna, anch’egli pittore di un certo successo seppur esclusivamente locale, Raffaele si trasferì prima a Bari e poi a Napoli, dove giunse nel 1815. Qui, dopo un breve apprendistato presso la bottega di un restauratore, tal Ciappa, iniziò a frequentare la scuola di disegno di Huber, dove incontrò i giovanissimi Giacinto Gigante e Achille Vianelli, con i quali condivise l’esperienza di illustratore del Viaggio pittorico nel Regno delle Due Sicilie. Pur subendo l’influenza dei suoi geniali colleghi, Carelli non riuscì mai a fare completamente suoi i precetti di quel movimento pittorico totalmente innovativo che andrà sotto il nome di ‘Scuola di Posillipo’, restando in bilico fra il razionalismo della

fine del Settecento ed il romanticismo ottocentesco. Ma proprio ciò gli consentirà di svolgere la delicata funzione di cerniera fra il vecchio e il nuovo. Il divertente acquerello che qui si presenta esemplifica bene tutto questo. Davanti ad un improvvisato tabernacolo, rappresentato semplicemente da una croce ottenuta con due rami d’albero, due zampognari suonano la loro novena di Natale ad esclusivo beneficio di due pescatori. Al di là della assoluta originalità della scena, vanno fatte alcune notazioni sullo stile. Se è evidente l’adozione di alcuni elementi di chiara marca ‘posillipista’, formali – lo scorcio di paesaggio alle spalle dei personaggi – e tecnici – innanzitutto il medium pittorico utilizzato e poi il generoso utilizzo della biacca –, nello svolgimento del tema Carelli subisce ancora il fascino e l’influenza di artisti come Xavier della Gatta

(Giacinto’s father), in turn, ‘popularises’ the methods of Pietro Fabris. A final observation about the strange signature on the sheet: in 1830 the first son of Raffaele Carelli, Gonsalvo, participated in the Exhibition of Fine Arts – an annual exhibition commissioned by the Bourbons – with two monochrome drawings and achieved extraordinary success. In a gesture of humility uncommon in the art world, Raffaele began to sign his works ‘Carelli Padre’, wanting to emphasize the artistic prominence of his son and also in respect to himself.

e Gaetano Gigante (il padre di Giacinto), a loro volta ‘volgarizzatori’ della lezione di Pietro Fabris. Una ultima notazione sulla strana firma apposta sul foglio. Nel 1830 il primo figlio di Raffaele Carelli, Gonsalvo, partecipa alla Mostra di Belle Arti, l’annuale esposizione voluta dai Borbone, con due disegni monocromi, ottenendo uno straordinario successo. Con un gesto di umiltà non comune nell’ambiente artistico, Raffaele iniziò a firmare le sue opere ‘Carelli Padre’, a voler rimarcare la prevalenza artistica di suo figlio anche rispetto a sé stesso.

Provenance: Private collection.

Provenienza: collezione privata.


XXI

Raffaele Carelli (Monopoli 1795 – Napoli 1864)

Bagpipers, fishermen and a dog in Mergellina - Pencil, watercolour and raised white paint on paper, 9.8 x 14 in. - Signed and dated lower right: ‘Carelli padre/ f. [ecit] Napoli 184…’ Zampognari, pescatori e un cane a Mergellina - Matita, acquerello e rialzi a biacca su carta, cm 25 x 35,5 - Firmato e datato in basso a destra: ‘Carelli Padre/ f. [ecit] Napoli 184…’


Cathedral of Taormina in Sicily - Pencil, watercolour and raised white paint on brown paper, 8.1 x 11.7 in. - Title and signature on the back: ‘Cattedrale di Taormina in Sicilia/Gonsalvo Carelli’ Cattedrale di Taormina in Sicilia - Matita, acquerello e rialzi a biacca su carta bruna, cm 20,5 x 29,7 - Titolo e firma sul retro: ‘Cattedrale di Taormina in Sicilia/Gonsalvo Carelli


XXII

XXIII

Gonsalvo Carelli (Napoli 1818 – 1900)

Peasants on the plains of the temples at Paestum - Pencil, brown watercolour and raised white paint on brown paper, 11.8 x 18.2 in. - Signed at the bottom: ‘Gonsalvo Carelli/Napoli’ Contadini nella piana dei templi di Paestum - Matita, acquerello bruno e rialzi a biacca su carta bruna, cm 30 x 46,3 - Firmato in basso: ‘Gonsalvo Carelli/Napoli’


Gonsalvo was the eldest son of Raffaele Carelli and at 12 years old was already considered a talented artist. In 1833 his works were purchased by Isabella of Bourbon for her private collection and in 1835 his View of the Powder Tower at Posillipo was purchased by the King for the royal collections and exhibited at the Royal Palace. Court dignitaries, ambassadors, but also rich families, competed for his paintings. In short, the prospect of a peaceful and prosperous life for a successful artist opened up before Gonsalvo. But the extraordinary vitality of the man and his fierce artistic curiosity prevailed. In 1837 Gonsalvo moved to Rome with his brother Gabriel, tightening relations with the older generation of the French Academy and getting to know Bartolomeo Pinelli. At the end of 1841, thanks to a letter from Queen Isabella, Gonsalvo moved to Paris where, protected by the royal family, he exhibited at ‘Salons’ in 1842 and 1843, earning major awards and received numerous commissions for works from government ministries, for the Royal Palais and the Gallery of Versailles. On returning to Naples in 1845 he was commissioned by the Czar of Russia to execute the two paintings Naples from the Royal Gardens of Portici and Naples by Camaldoli, now in the Hermitage Museum of St. Petersburg.

Provenance: Private collection.

He was also politically active, and in 1848 worked at the ‘Cinque giornate’ in the city of Milan and Lombardy where he met Massimo D’Azeglio, a key political figure of the Renaissance but also a talented landscape painter. He never gave up painting, and merited an appointment as Honorary Professor to the Royal Institute of Fine Arts in Naples. In 1860 Carelli was still actively involved in the Risorgimento, participating in the battle of Volturno alongside Garibaldi’s troops. But without forgetting his work that same year he prepared an album of 150 images of the Kingdom for Napoleon III. It was illustrated by Alexander Dumas, a friend of his father with Viaggio da Napoli a Roma. After 1860, he was commissioned by the King Vittorio Emanuele II, to create a collection of sixteen designs involving individual incidents of banditry for a southern collection now housed in the Turin Royal Palace.

During the last decades of his work he took on more of the official role of artist of the newly united country. In addition to being awarded the Legion d’Honneur in 1869, he became master painter to Queen Margaret in 1874 and was nominated to the Academy of San Luca. He continued to work tirelessly until the last day of his life. Throughout a rich century of innovation in managing difficult figurative results Carelli Gonsalvo continuously improved through a series of different artistic experiences without ever betraying his original style. The two young watercolours, dating from the late forties showing the Cathedral Square of Taormina and the Plain of the Temples at Paestum partially attest to this. The first is obviously indicative of his posillipisti form, both evident of a ‘live action’ in its execution, with quick touches of white lead and colour to mark the angle of the

light and break the monochrome of brown stock. In the second, the design becomes more accurate, almost coy, depicting the scene perfectly designed and constructed. The march of the peasantry, their elegant movements, are not at all common. An elegance, that is to say, quite French. Inevitably, the reference to Robert Leopold and his Les massonneurs dans le Marais Pontins (The Return of the Harvesters in the Pontine Marshes), is considered one of his masterpieces, and was presented at the Paris Salon in 1831 and is now in the collection of the Louvre.


Gonsalvo Carelli (Napoli 1818 – 1900)

Provenienza: collezione privata.

Figlio primogenito di Raffaele, Gonsalvo Carelli già a dodici anni era considerato pittore di talento assoluto. Nel 1833 sue opere sono acquistate da Isabella di Borbone per la sua collezione privata e nel 1835 una sua Veduta con la Torre della Polveriera a Posillipo è acquistata dal Re per le collezioni reali ed esposta a Palazzo Reale. Dignitari di corte, ambasciatori, ma anche ricche famiglie borghesi, si contendevano i suoi dipinti. Insomma, si dischiudeva davanti a Gonsalvo la prospettiva di una tranquilla e agiata vita di artista di successo. Ma la straordinaria vitalità dell’uomo e la feroce curiosità dell’artista ebbero il sopravvento. Nel 1837 Gonsalvo si trasferisce a Roma con il fratello Gabriele, stringendo rapporti con i pensionati dell’Accademia di Francia

diviene maestro di pittura della regina Margherita e nel 1874 viene nominato Accademico di San Luca. E continuerà instancabilmente a lavorare fino all’ultimo giorno della sua vita. Gonsalvo Carelli attraversa un secolo ricco di innovazioni figurative riuscendo nel difficile risultato di migliorarsi attraverso un continuo confronto con esperienze artistiche diverse senza mai tradire il suo stile. Valgano a parziale esempio questi due acquerelli giovanili, databili alla fine degli anni quaranta, raffiguranti la piazza della cattedrale di Taormina e la piana dei templi di Paestum. alla pittura, tanto da meritare la nomina e conoscendo Bartolomeo Pinelli. Nel primo è evidente la piena adesione a Professore Onorario dell’Istituto Reale Alla fine del 1841, grazie ad una lettera ai moduli posillipisti, sia nella evidenza di Belle Arti di Napoli, Carelli nel 1860 di presentazione della Regina Isabella, di una ‘ripresa dal vero’ della scena è ancora impegnato attivamente nei moti Gonsalvo si trasferisce a Parigi dove, che nella sua esecuzione, con veloci risorgimentali, partecipando alla battaglia protetto dalla famiglia reale, tocchi di biacca e di colore a segnare del Volturno al fianco delle truppe espone ai ‘Salons’ del 1842 e 1843, l’incidenza della luce e rompere garibaldine; ma, senza dimenticare conseguendo importanti premi la monocromia del fondo bruno. il suo lavoro, nello stesso anno prepara e riconoscimenti e ricevendo numerose Nel secondo, il disegno si fa più accurato, un ‘Album’ di 150 vedute del Regno commissioni di opere per i Ministeri, quasi lezioso; la scena è perfettamente per il Palais Royal e per la Galleria di Versailles. per Napoleone III ed illustra il testo pensata e costruita; l’incedere dei del libro Viaggio da Napoli a Roma Rientrato a Napoli, nel 1845 riceve l’incarico contadini, le loro movenze, eleganti, di eseguire, per lo Zar di Russia, i due dipinti, dell’amico Alessandro Dumas padre. per nulla popolari. Dopo il 1860, su commissione del re Vittorio Una eleganza, viene da dire, tutta Napoli dai giardini reali di Portici e Napoli Emanuele II, realizza una raccolta di sedici dai Camaldoli, ora al museo dell’Ermitage francese. È inevitabile il riferimento disegni aventi per soggetto episodi di San Pietroburgo. a Leopold Robert ed al suo del brigantaggio meridionale, raccolta Impegnato anche politicamente, partecipa Les massonneurs dans le Marais Pontins oggi conservata nel Palazzo Reale di Torino. nel 1848 alle ‘Cinque giornate’ di Milano (Il ritorno dei mietitori nelle paludi Negli ultimi decenni della sua attività acquista pontine), considerato uno e nella città lombarda conosce Massimo D’Azeglio, personaggio politico fondamentale sempre di più il ruolo di artista ufficiale dei suoi capolavori assoluti, presentato del nuovo stato unitario: oltre ad essere del Risorgimento ma anche valente pittore al Salon di Parigi nel 1831 insignito della Legion d’Onore, nel 1869 di paesaggio. Senza mai rinunciare ed oggi nelle collezioni del Louvre.


The last-ranking representative of the so-called ‘School of Posillipo’, Gabriele Carelli, relies on the linearity of the brush stroke. He drafts highly contrasted colours, based on earthy and homogeneous ranges. The colour, especially in the foregrounds is ‘dragged’ with an almost dry brush, while the representation of real landscape becomes soft and unable to grasp even the most delicate tonal shift. The people who always liven up the places depicted, are made with a few brush strokes, in total absence of design. In this watercolour, dating from the mid-fifties, Carelli, looking for glimpses of great views without being exaggerated, is located on the Camaldoli hill (the highest peak in the immediate outskirts of Naples), in a rough alleyway between two buildings in the countryside. The unique position allows

him to create an optical cone of great beauty: from a first floor full of colour and things, the eye glides in an increasingly obscure atmosphere, passing to Vomero hill, dominated by the Castel Sant’Elmo, and stopping on the almost transparent shape of Vesuvius. The second son of Raffaele, Gabriele Carelli completed his first apprenticeship under the guidance of his father. But in 1837 he was with his older brother Gonsalvo in Rome, where, temporarily abandoning the landscape themes of his early training, he devoted himself to a work of technical perfection, portraying historic buildings, architecture and archaeological finds, which continued being compared with other artistic circles in Milan and Switzerland. Returning to Naples in 1845, during the traditional ‘Mostra borbonica di Belle Arti’, two of his

Ultimo rappresentante di rango della cosiddetta ‘Scuola di Posillipo’, Gabriele Carelli si affida alla linearità del tratto e a stesure cromatiche fortemente contrastate, basate su gamme terrose ed omogenee; il colore, soprattutto nei primi piani, è ‘stracciato’, steso con il pennello quasi asciutto, mentre, nella rappresentazione paesaggistica vera e propria, diventa morbido, in grado di cogliere ogni più delicato passaggio tonale. I personaggi, che sempre animano i luoghi rappresentati, sono realizzati con pochi colpi di pennello, in assenza totale di disegno. In questo acquerello, databile alla metà degli anni Cinquanta, Carelli, alla ricerca di squarci vedutistici non inflazionati, si trova sulla collina dei Camaldoli (il rilievo più alto negli immediati dintorni di Napoli), in un vicolo sterrato fra due edifici rurali.

La particolare posizione gli permette di creare un cono ottico di grande suggestione: partendo da un primo piano ricco di cose e di colore, lo sguardo scivola in atmosfere sempre più rarefatte, passando sulla collina del Vomero, dominata dal Castel Sant’Elmo, e fermandosi sulla sagoma quasi trasparente del Vesuvio. Figlio secondogenito di Raffaele, Gabriele Carelli fece il suo primo apprendistato sotto la guida del padre. Ma già nel 1837 fu con il fratello maggiore Gonsalvo a Roma, dove, abbandonando momentaneamente i temi paesistici della sua prima formazione, si dedicò ad un lavoro di perfezionamento tecnico, ritraendo edifici storici, architetture e reperti archeologici, che proseguì con il confronto anche con altri ambienti artistici, a Milano ed in Svizzera. Tornato a Napoli, nel 1845, in occasione della tradizionale ‘Mostra borbonica

paintings were bought by the King for his private collections. After a first trip to England in 1847, following the Duke of Devonshire, patron and protector of his family, Gabriele Carelli moved permanently to London in 1862, which became his second home. In 1874 he became a member of the Royal Society for watercolour painting. His works are at the Victoria and Albert Museum and at the Institute of British Architects in London. The final story of the life of Gabriele – the first ‘emigrant’ artist from Naples – is emblematic of the end of the ‘posillipo’ experience which, in turn, had represented the last high point in the evolution of landscape painting in Naples.

di Belle Arti’, due suoi dipinti furono acquistati dal sovrano per le sue collezioni private. Dopo un primo viaggio in Inghilterra, nel 1847, al seguito del Duca di Devonshire, protettore e mecenate della sua famiglia, Gabriele Carelli nel 1862 si trasferì definitivamente a Londra, che diverrà la sua seconda patria. Nel 1874 divenne membro della Royal Society per la pittura all’acquerello. Sue opere sono presso il Victoria and Albert Museum e all’Institute of British Architects di Londra. La vicenda conclusiva della vita di Gabriele – primo artista napoletano ‘emigrante’ – è emblematica della fine dell’esperienza ‘posillipista’ che, a sua volta, aveva rappresentato l’ultimo momento alto nell’evoluzione del vedutismo napoletano.


Gabriele Carelli (Napoli 1820 – Londra 1900)

XXIV

Provenance: London, BNB Art Consulting Limited.

Provenienza: Londra, BNB Art Consulting Limited.

An alleyway of Camaldoli with Vesuvius in the background - Watercolour on paper, 9.9 x 7 in. - Signed at the bottom: ‘Gab Carelli’ Un vicolo dei Camaldoli con il Vesuvio sul fondo - Acquerello su carta, cm 25,2 x 17,8 - Firmato in basso: ‘Gab Carelli’


ŠBNB Art Consulting Limited - printed: June 2011 / finito di stampare: giugno 2011


Art

C o n s u lt i n g

BNB

Limited

13, New Burlington Street, London W1S 3BG ph. +44 (0)207 2879055 e-mail: info@bnb-artconsulting.co.uk site: www.bnb-artconsulting.co.uk


IMPORTANT WORKS ON PAPER - Catalogue | Catalogo