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2016–2017

Annual Report CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL


The story of the front cover This year’s hero story belongs to the Southern Tanami Kurdiji Indigenous Corporation (STKIC), previously known as Yuendumu Mediation and Justice. Kurdiji is a Warlpiri word meaning ‘shield’, which describes the purpose of the group, to shield families and the community from bad influences. Mediation Team Leader and Yuendumu Traditional Owner, Enid Gallagher, adds ‘kurdiji (shield) is made from Yirnirnti (bean tree) wood which is light when dry and stronger’. In this context, kurdiji means both protection for and strengthening of family alliances for a common purpose. Southern Tanami Kurdiji Indigenous Corporation (STKIC) exists to mediate in times of trouble. Trained local mediators use a restorative justice model to bring victim and offender together in addressing conflict. Their work focuses mainly on family and domestic violence, young people before the court and the visiting elders’ program. STKIC mediators work with other stakeholders in community to bring the offenders face-to-face with the victim with the aim of developing understanding and forgiveness. ‘We get the offenders to say sorry to the victims’ to whom they have caused damage or hurt. ‘We also talk to them (the offender) about what the Magistrate will say (if they are found guilty)’. Once both parties have faced each other, often the offender agrees to do community work and the victim agrees to write a letter of support (for the offender) to be presented to the Magistrate at the time of sentencing. This can lead to reduced sentences for young offenders and a shared understanding for all. Yirri-yirri Maninja-Kurlangu means solving problems carefully and slowly. ‘We get a person to tell their story from the start to end, as we are also listening to the story yirri-yirrirli. When all has been sorted out we get those who are involved to come together, which is yalarla-yirrarni’. Everything is sorted between the parties. ‘No more trouble.’ Since the program began in Yuendumu in 2006, Indigenous control has been identified as the vision. In April 2017, STKIC was delivering a comprehensive service model in both Yuendumu and Willowra, with 100% Indigenous mediators. STKIC is currently supported by Central Desert Regional Council. In March 2017, the Council contracted an independent consultant to work with the STKIC board to assist with their transition to independence. It is anticipated that the transition will be complete and STKIC will be independently running community safety services by July 2018.

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This assisted transition is a living example of the Council’s vision of ‘two ways one outcome :: Indigenous and non-Indigenous people working together’.

Southern Tanami Kurdiji Indigenous Corporation provides mediators to the NT Government’s Elders’ Visiting Program. Above are Yuendumu mediators Lotty Robertson, Marlette Ross, Angeline Tasman and Nellie Wayne on a visit to the Alice Springs Correctional Centre.

LIST OF ALTERNATIVE PLACE NAMES Gazetted name Alternative name/s Anmatjere Ti Tree Atitjere Harts Range Engawala Alcoota Station Laramba Napperby Lajamanu Hooker Creek Nyirripi N/A Willowra Wirliyajarrayi Yuendumu N/A Yuelamu Mount Allan, Alpirakina Pmara Jutunta Six Mile Nturiya Station Wilora Stirling

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ASIST CAYLUS CDP CDRC CDU CEO ESO EVP GMAAAC ICT KPI LTIFR MAGIQ v8.5 NDRRA NT NTG NVC PCBUs RIPIA SDC STKIC WHS

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training Central Australian Youth Link Up Service Community Development Program Central Desert Regional Council Charles Darwin University chief executive officer essential services officer Elders’ Visiting Program Granites Mine Affected Area Aboriginal Corporation information and communications technology key performance indicator lost time injury frequency rate an electronic records management system Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements Northern Territory Northern Territory Government Non Violence Communication person conducting a business or undertaking Remote Indigenous Public Internet Access Service Delivery Centres Southern Tanami Kurdiji Indigenous Corporation work health and safety


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

Contents President’s Welcome

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Chief Executive Officer’s Report

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Our People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 ACHIEVEMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Our Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

OUR VISION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

OUR MISSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

STAFF PROFILE

OUR VALUES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

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31

WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 STAFF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Our Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELECTED MEMBERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Our Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

APPOINTED MEMBERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

SERVICE DELIVERY SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 MUNICIPAL SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Our Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 AREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 POPULATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

ANMATJERE ATITJERE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

COMMUNITY SERVICES

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

CORPORATE SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 ESSENTIAL SERVICES CONTRACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 OTHER SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

ENGAWALA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Our Finances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

LAJAMANU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

FINANCIAL SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

LARAMBA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 NYIRRIPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Financial Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FS–1

WILLOWRA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 YUELAMU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 YUENDUMU

Our Performance

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Service Delivery Centres and Community Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inside back cover

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 GOAL 1: SOCIAL AND CULTURAL

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

GOAL 2: PHYSICAL ASSETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 GOAL 3: ECONOMY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 GOAL 4: ENVIRONMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 GOAL 5: MANAGEMENT AND GOVERNANCE . . . . . 26 COUNCIL MEETINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 LOCAL AUTHORITY MEETINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

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President’s Welcome I

am pleased to present our annual report for the year 2016–17. Council has worked hard to represent all our communities and provide good services to those communities. For the term of this Council, Cathryn Hutton was our CEO and she worked hard to develop the organisation’s identity, to build a cohesive team and develop strong, routine business and governance practices and reporting tools. On behalf of Council, I thank Cathryn for her leadership and service. Council has been very pleased with the impact of and advice received from our Local Authorities. This model means we have more local people having a say in projects that are important to the community. We talk about some of these stories later in this report. A highlight for Council this year was the launch of the Family Wellbeing Strategy – this is a very important plan for the Council as it establishes our roadmap to keeping our communities strong. We have also significantly progressed the quality of our landfills through our partnership with MacDonnell and Barkly Regional Councils, where we share a skilled resource who provides practical advice and guidance to our teams. Other highlights include the sporting prowess of Central Desert communities; as you read this report you’ll see our communities represented in both Central Australian and the NT competitions. Sport is an excellent way to keep our youth engaged. Our Council has worked hard to support all areas, to look after people, look after the environment, to consult with the people and to provide leadership, to help maintain culture and to deliver services to the best of our ability. I look forward to what comes next for Central Desert Regional Council.

Cr Adrian Dixon President

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CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

Chief Executive Officer’s Report I

t is my pleasure to take on the role of CEO from Cathryn Hutton who was the CEO of Central Desert Regional Council, and provided leadership from 2010. I would like to commend Cathryn for the work she has done and in leaving a strong base for me to build on. Cathryn’s achievements include increasing Indigenous employment, endorsing projects that improved lifestyle and wellbeing, a strong focus on employee training and development, and expansion of our municipal services. Thank you Cathryn for your leadership and hard work. I grew up in Alice Springs and have worked across a number of local councils around the country, including MacDonnell Shire Council. I am very happy to be back in the Centre and to be able to work with all peoples of the Central Desert area so together we can continue to improve our services, our communities and our opportunities. In compiling this annual report, one of my observations is we need to improve how we measure our results, you’ll see in the ‘Our Performance’ section that we don’t formally measure some of the key performance indicators (KPIs) we have in place. As this report forms year three of the current strategic plan and our annual actions are already set for 2017–18, we will be focussing on our next strategic plan (2018–2022) and ensuring we match goals, strategies, KPIs and annual actions. We will also be working on our service plans where we will define performance indicators against our ‘business as usual’ activities; and ensure our key performance indicators are for the focus areas that will significantly progress our goals. Our annual report provides the chance for Council to talk about the progress it has made in meeting its objectives and aspirations outlined in the Strategic Plan and the Regional Plan. We are highlighting our successes and our achievements. Thank you to all communities, Councillors and staff who have played a role and for their hard work during the year.

Diane Hood Chief Executive Officer

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Our Vision Our Vision Two Ways – One Outcome Indigenous and non-Indigenous people working together. Eastern Arrernte :: Atherrele ularreke – ularre anerremele mpwaretyeke. Anmatjere :: Atherr ankwerr - anyent arrarteme. Warlpiri :: Yapa manu kardia jintangka nyinawyjaku.

Our Mission To work together in one spirit, guided by strong leadership and good management to provide high quality services across the Central Desert region. Eastern Arrernte :: Apurte – irretyeke utnenge anyente arntearnte aremele iwerre arratentyele imperne anthurre ampere ahelhe anteke nhenhe arnte alkentye shire nhenhe areyenge.

Anmatjere :: Inkerrek le kwerrenhe le nwerne mpwaretyeke. Tyerretye purte le pmwaretyeke arnte arnte aremele anthemele rlkarlhe services Central Desert Shire. Warlpiri :: Jukurrpala kirda manu kurdungurlu Warrijarrinyijaku jungu ngurrangka.

Our Values RESPECT: for each other, culture, language, community and environment. STRONG AND GOOD LEADERSHIP: applied courageously and uniformly across the organisation, constantly seeking organisational improvement. TEAMWORK: all working together towards accomplishing common goals. ACCOUNTABILITY: all taking personal responsibility for decisions and actions to achieve agreed outcomes and standards. INTEGRITY: taking responsibility for honesty, trust and openness in all our actions.   4


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

Our Members Elected Members The Central Desert Regional Council (CDRC) is made up of 12 members who are elected by the constituents from the four Wards that make up the Central Desert region. The Council is charged with carrying out duties under the provisions of the Local Government Act and Regulations. It is a decision and policy making body with CDRC staff being the means by which these decisions and policies are carried into effect. A President and a Deputy President are elected by the members of the Council. Throughout 2016–17 Council has been represented by a mix of men and women with 10 of the 12 Councillors being Indigenous. As a Council, most of these men and women have worked together since March 2012 with this being their final year before elections in August 2017.

PRESIDENT ADRIAN DIXON

DEPUTY PRESIDENT NORBERT JAMPIJINPA PATRICK

Anmatjere Ward PO Box 137 ALICE SPRINGS NT 0872 P 8956 8455 F 8956 8341 adrian.dixon@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Northern Tanami Ward CMB Lajamanu KATHERINE NT 0852 P 8975 0886 F 8975 0988 norbert.patrick@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

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OUR MEMBERS

Elected Members

COUNCILLOR ELIZABETH BIRD

COUNCILLOR SANDRA PECKHAM

COUNCILLOR WILLIAM JAPANANGKA JOHNSON

Akityarre Ward PO Box 8045 ALICE SPRINGS NT 0871 P 8956 9779 indiana@reachnet.com.au

Akityarre Ward PMB 86 ALICE SPRINGS NT 0872 P 8956 9787 F 8956 9917 sandra.peckham@centraldesert. nt.gov.au

Northern Tanami Ward CMB Lajamanu KATHERINE NT 0852 P 8975 0886 F 8975 0988 willy.johnson@centraldesert. nt.gov.au

COUNCILLOR BENEDY BIRD COUNCILLOR JAMES JAMPAJIMPA GLENN Anmatjere Ward

COUNCILLOR MARLENE TILMOUTH

COUNCILLOR CECILIA ALFONSO

PMB 180 ALICE SPRINGS NT 0872 P 8956 9989 F 8956 9976 benedy.bird@centraldesert. nt.gov.au

Anmatjere Ward PMB 180 ALICE SPRINGS NT 0872 P 8956 9989 F 8956 9976 marlene.tilmouth@centraldesert. nt.gov.au

Southern Tanami Ward LBO ALICE SPRINGS NT 0872 P 8956 4000 F 8956 4070 cecilia.alfonso@centraldesert. nt.gov.au

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Anmatjere Ward PMB 256 Via ALICE SPRINGS NT 0871 P 8956 9933 F 8956 9730 james.glenn@centraldesert. nt.gov.au

COUNCILLOR APRIL MARTIN

COUNCILLOR GEORGINA WILSON

COUNCILLOR JACOB SPENCER

Southern Tanami Ward PMB 224 ALICE SPRINGS NT 0872 P 8956 4820 F 8956 4920 april.martin@centraldesert. nt.gov.au

Southern Tanami Ward LPO ALICE SPRINGS NT 0872 P 8956 4000 F 8956 4070 georgina.wilson@centraldesert. nt.gov.au

Southern Tanami Ward PMB 16 ALICE SPRINGS NT 0872 P 8956 8720 F 8956 8739 jacob.spencer@centraldesert. nt.gov.au


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

Local Authority Appointed Members Council supports nine Local Authorities that were introduced on 1 July 2014. This includes providing support to 72 appointed members (local community members) and 12 elected members (Ward councillors) – 84 positions in total when all positions are filled. Together, these members make up the Central Desert Region’s nine Local Authorities, one for each major service centre. Strong Local Authorities ensure that Central Desert communities are engaged in council decision making to directly shape the management and development of local government service delivery in line with community aspirations. In terms of overall representation, this equates to one in every 45 adult residents being a representative of a community. Local Authorities provided input into various local community projects over the year, as well as making direct decisions about how to spend Local Authority project funds granted by the Department of Local Government and Community Services. Council has delegated decision making on local authority project funding to Local Authorities. During 2016–17 a wide variety of projects were undertaken, thus empowering Local Authorities to directly impact and improve community life.

Local Authority lights up Lajamanu

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uring a recent community planning process, the Lajamanu community spoke about lights being an important investment for the community. The Local Authority listened and decided to channel some of their Local Authority grant money towards the project. Three new solar lights were purchased and installed at the new playground, the Holy Ground and the Sorry Camp. The lights were installed exclusively by the Works crew with the electrical work being done by a contractor. The lights are an appropriate and sustainable source of power that will increase community safety. The NT Department of Housing and Community Development grants some $500,000 to our nine Local Authorities each year. Each Local Authority has autonomy over how that money is spent. On almost every occasion, projects generate local jobs with input from Council’s Works crew and where appropriate, they also provide opportunities for job seekers from the Community Development Program (CDP) to learn new skills whilst being paid. There are many varied projects going on all over the desert year round; from lights to parks to playgrounds, sports infrastructure, road upgrades, traffic management, shade and much more. Central Desert Regional Council thanks the NT Department of Housing and Community Development for its very valuable contribution.

The whole Lajamanu Works crew installed solar lights at Sorry Camp. Pictured are Matthew Patterson, Travis Alum, Russell Sampson, Michael Erglis, Anthony Johnson and Hector Patterson.

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Our Community Area The Central Desert Regional Council covers an area of approximately 282,093 km². The map below shows our nine service delivery centres grouped by electoral wards.

Location of Central Desert Regional Council within the Northern Territory

Population The total estimated resident population in the Central Desert Region is 3,677. The estimated resident population of the major localities within the Regional Council is shown in Table 1 below.

TABLE 1: ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION AS AT AUGUST 2016 (ABS CENSUS) GAZETTED NAME

ALTERNATIVE NAME

POPULATION

Anmatjere

Ti Tree

477

Nyirripi

Atitjere

Harts Range

224

Pmara Jutunta

Six Mile

179

Engawala

Alcoota Station

154

Willowra

Wirliyajarrayi

301

Laramba

Napperby

239

Yuelamu

Mount Allan, Alpirakina

220

Lajamanu

Hooker Creek

606

Yuendumu

Nturiya

Station

86

Estimated Resident Population by Urban Centre/Locality (UC/L) (a)

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GAZETTED NAME

ALTERNATIVE NAME

POPULATION 236

Total population in LGA of Central Desert

759 3677


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

ANMATJERE NUMBER OF STAFF = 47 / INDIGENOUS STAFF = 77%

The Anmatjere office provides services to Anmatjere town (Ti Tree), Nturiya, Pmara Jutunta, Wilora, Alyuen and smaller outstations, collectively referred to as the Anmatjere region.

WARD COUNCILLORS Cr Adrian Dixon, Cr Benedy Bird, Cr James Glenn, Cr Marlene Tilmouth

LOCAL AUTHORITY Dean Pepperill (Chairperson), Rodney Baird (Deputy Chairperson), April Campbell, Betty Carter, Hannes Rosslee, Harry More, Kumunjaye Haines, Mark Pepperill, Trevor Cook, Wayne Scrutton Jnr (resigned Feb 2017) above right: Anmatjere Activity Centre mural. below: Ti Tree’s Cowboys basketball team at Tennant Creek in December 2016.

COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS zz A focus on improving waste services has seen upgrades to all four landfills, and many tonnes of car bodies and other metals recycled. zz Anmatjere improved its amenity during this year scoring well in the Keep Australia Beautiful competition, planting 50 trees. zz No dog attacks were reported. zz Improvements to our overnight respite services were completed including the installation of a fire safety system. zz Ti Tree represented the region in the Imparja Cup Cricket Carnival. zz The Community Development Program activity centre was expanded from one central location (Ti Tree) to four centres (Ti Tree, Pmara Jutunta, Nturiya and Wilora) making it easier for participants to meet their daily activity requirements.

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OUR COMMUNITY

ATITJERE NUMBER OF STAFF = 18 / INDIGENOUS STAFF = 78%

WARD COUNCILLORS Cr Liz Bird, Cr Sandra Peckham

LOCAL AUTHORITY

zz Improvements to waste services with the separation of waste into individual bays and improved signage. zz Additional rubbish bins were put into the recreation hall park to assist in litter control.

Anthony Petrick (Chairperson), Peppi Drover, Barbara Petrick, Edward Duffill, Joseph Web, Raymond Webb

COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS zz A kerbing and traffic management project for a major intersection is 90% completed (and will be finalised by October 2017) improving the safety for residents and visitors. zz Irrelirre’s solar power system substantially upgraded to provide more power to residents. zz At Foxalls Well and Mount Eaglebeak bush light solar systems were refurbished, continuing Council’s aim to improve power security and lighting across the region. zz Recognition of the Community Safety Patrol by Alice Springs Police who requested their assistance at several AFL games and the Alice Springs Show. zz Commencement of Aged and Disability services in October 2016 with all clients receiving a new blanket and mattress.

The Variety Bash visited Atitjere.

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Atitjere’s Aged and Disability staff preparing meals.


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

ENGAWALA NUMBER OF STAFF = 17 / INDIGENOUS STAFF = 71%

WARD COUNCILLORS Cr Adrian Dixon, Cr James Glenn, Cr Benedy Bird, Cr Marlene Tilmouth

LOCAL AUTHORITY Audrey Inkamala (Chairperson), Sarah Williams (Deputy Chairperson), Elizabeth Dixon, Dianne Dixon, Maryanne Tilmouth, Mary Tilmouth, Margot Nott

COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS zz Installation of the new microwave system improving internet and computer services. zz A great effort in municipal services with additional work load due to high rainfall. zz Fire breaks and the airstrip were well maintained. zz Purchase of solar lights. zz Upgrades to the community laundry facility. zz Purchase and planting of fruit trees. zz Extension to shade areas and improving cooking pits at the Kangaroo cooking area. zz Reorganisation of the waste pit system generating significant savings and extending the lifespan of the pits by four to five years.

Improvements to Engawala’s airstrip were made in time for increased demand.

zz Construction of a larger parking apron at the airstrip to accommodate six aircraft, installation of a new warning circle and windsock. zz Community Safety Patrol added two female patrollers which has increased support for women and girls in community. zz Opening of Engawala Playgroup.

Engawala playgroup opens its doors!

T

here has been plenty happening in Children’s Services in the Central Desert region over the year with families embracing the services as a safe place where children can learn and play. High attendance rates attest to the value families place on these services. In order to meet the growing need, Central Desert Regional Council was proud to announce the opening of the new playgroup service on 1 August 2016. Playgroup differs from childcare as it is a chance for parents to come along and attend the service with their children and participate in activities together. Children’s Services employs local early childhood educators to create and run a variety of stimulating, engaging, and educational activities catered to local community groups.

Community members, Councillors and staff opening the Engawala playgroup service

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OUR COMMUNITY

LAJAMANU NUMBER OF STAFF = 25 / INDIGENOUS STAFF = 72%

WARD COUNCILLORS Cr Norbert Patrick, Cr William Johnson

LOCAL AUTHORITY Robert George (Chairperson), Joe Marshall (Deputy Chairperson), Andrew Johnson, Doris Lewis, Sheree Anderson, Elizabeth Ross, Tracie Patrick, Josias Dixon, Jenny Johnson

COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS zz Parks adjacent to the store have been upgraded, including replacement of old bollards and removal of soil contaminated by weeds. zz Undertaking of a fencing program to replace and/or install fencing around 24 community houses. zz Upgrade to Lul-tju outstation to facilitate uninterrupted water supply. zz Upgrade to signage at the landfill and a new garbage compactor ensuring safer rubbish collection. zz Installation of solar lights at the Sorry Ground and at Holy Ground Park.

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above: Lajamanu’s play equipment at the recreation hall. below: Plant operator training at Lajamanu.


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

LARAMBA NUMBER OF STAFF = 33 / INDIGENOUS STAFF = 82%

WARD COUNCILLORS Cr Adrian Dixon (Deputy Chairperson), Cr Benedy Bird, Cr James Glenn, Cr Marlene Tilmouth

LOCAL AUTHORITY Irene Floyd (Chairperson), Ron Hagan, Deb Williams, Peter Stafford, Huckitta Lynch, Caroline Stafford, Billy Briscoe

COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS zz Upgrades to Central Park including traffic management initiatives and the installation of a community BBQ. zz Installation of 12 solar lights to improve safety. zz Upgrades to Aged and Disability Services with a new washing machine and a new bed, blanket and mattress for all clients. zz High participation in the Laramba softball team with wins in the Central Desert Regional Completion and the NT Championships in Darwin, where they were runners-up. zz Participation by Community Development Program (CDP) participants in several courses, including chainsaw usage, Certificate I and II in Business, Whitecard and driver training.

Caesar Tilmouth, Mervyn Andrews and Timothy Glenn erecting a shed at Laramba Child Care.

top to bottom: Laramba’s Reconciliation Day display; Laramba CDP gourds growing; school principal Deb Williams with CSP staff member Stephen Briscoe working together to get kids to school.

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OUR COMMUNITY

NYIRRIPI NUMBER OF STAFF = 10 / INDIGENOUS STAFF = 60%

WARD COUNCILLORS Cr Jacob Spencer, Cr Georgina Wilson, Cr April Martin, Cr Cecelia Alfonso

LOCAL AUTHORITY Ben Gallagher (Chairperson), Lance Turner (Deputy Chairperson), Alice Henwood, Duncan Jangala, Kathy Satour, Lee Wayne, Christine Curtis

COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS zz Aged and Disability clients received a new washing machine and new blankets and mattresses. zz The softball field was enhanced with back nets purchased through Local Authority funding. zz Extensions to the landfill area to accommodate a storage facility for disused vehicles. zz The purchase of a new rubbish truck which greatly assisted in the collection of rubbish. zz A major environmental win with the planning and commencement of the Nyirripi solar farm which will come into operation in August 2017. zz Increased focus on training for community-based staff with cross-cultural awareness, essential services officers (ESO) familiarisation, first aid, writing effective minutes, and computer course being conducted.

Jeffrey Gallagher is a fan of the new Nyirripi entrance sign.

Christmas at Nyirripi: staff Burton Spencer, Marshall Poulson, Chris Kassman and Abraham Langdon bring the community some festive cheer.

Nyirripi football team receive new jerseys through Local Authority funding.

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CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

WILLOWRA NUMBER OF STAFF = 29 / INDIGENOUS STAFF = 79%

WARD COUNCILLORS Cr Jacob Spencer, Cr Cecilia Alfonso, Cr Georgina Wilson, Cr April Martin

zz Relocation of a dumped community grader from bushland to the community entrance creating an interesting feature. zz Formation of the Willowra Justice and Mediation team.

LOCAL AUTHORITY Harold Ross (Chairperson), Kathy Walker (Deputy Chair), Justin Forrest, Jeanie Presley, Lillian Long, Freddy Williams, Justina Forest

COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS zz Installation of a 20 m path using Community Development Program (CDP) participants extending from the Council Office to the community store to improve access for community members, including disability clients. zz Construction of a three bedroom donga to be used as visitors’ accommodation, generating commercial income. zz Construction of a concrete wash down station for maintaining plant and equipment. zz Installing 1 km of traffic control bollards increasing safety of pedestrians. zz Installing eight solar street lights improving safety of residents. zz Following the devastating rain event in late in 2016, vehicle access was reinstated to the Lander River crossings. zz Upgrades to the sorting and locked storage areas at the landfill site to meet licensing standards. zz A second hard-waste trailer was purchased to meet community demand for hard waste collection. zz Installation of a public water bubbler outside the Council office.

top: Lander River in flood in January. above: Willowra Aged Care clients Lilly Long, Peggy Martin and Kaye Williams with Police Sergeant Trent Berry.

Willowra’s CDP team conduct their regular community clean up.

15


OUR COMMUNITY

YUELAMU NUMBER OF STAFF = 24 / INDIGENOUS STAFF = 79%

Yuelamu provides services to the surrounding area including Pulardi, Garden Bore and 10 Mile outstations.

WARD COUNCILLORS Cr Adrian Dixon, Cr James Glenn, Cr Benedy Bird, Cr Marlene Tilmouth

LOCAL AUTHORITY David McCormack (Chairperson), David Stafford (Deputy Chairperson), Norman Hagen, Mack Murphy, Billy Stafford, Cliffy Tommy, Noel Kunoth

COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS zz Installation by the Works crew of new signage for the Northside and Southside parks painted by CDP participants. zz Planting of new trees and landscaping in both parks. zz Improved communications for community members with the installation of a satellite link. zz Participation in a community litter action plan. zz Redesign and restructure of the landfill area with new bays and establishment of a community area. zz Improvements to the tyre changing area to increase safety. zz Installation of a four bedroom donga for visitor’s accommodation, generating a commercial income.

16

above: Yuelamu’s oval has new fencing. below: Yuelamu community members and Council staff meeting to discuss restorative justice and alternatives to sentencing.


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

YUENDUMU NUMBER OF STAFF = 72 / INDIGENOUS STAFF = 78%

WARD COUNCILLORS Cr Cecilia Alfonso, Cr April Martin, Cr Jacob Spencer, Cr Georgina Wilson

LOCAL AUTHORITY Jimmy Langdon (Chairperson), Ormay Gallagher, Francis Kelly, Dianne Martin, Francis Penhall, Otto Sims, Brian Wilson, Jennifer Wendy Baarda (appointed March 2017), Robert Robertson (appointed March 2017), Enid Gallagher (removed September 2016)

COMMUNITY ACHIEVEMENTS zz Completion of three community parks: Central West Camp, North Camp and South Camp. zz Winner of Northern Territory Tidy Town award for water conservation. zz Successful completion of first aid certificate by the Works team. zz Major improvements in waste management with new compactor rubbish truck streamlining waste collection. zz Roll out of the very successful ‘Put it in a Bin’ campaign. zz Removal of old car bodies. zz Rotation of skip bins to community houses to assist with clean ups. zz 6000 litres of used motor oil removed from the community for recycling. zz 1429 kg of recyclable materials diverted from landfill. zz Installation of seating under shade at the cemetery.

Yuendumu CDP sorting lavender for sachets and oil. (Photo: Michelle Perry)

Yuendumu’s new welcome sign.

CDR participants painting coffee tables.

Yuendumu Roads Leading Hand, Brian Wilson, receiving an award for long service.

17


Our Performance Key Performance Indicators KPI

RESULT

Percentage of Corporate Plan Actions achieved within designated timeframes

79%

INDICATOR

A lesson learnt from the first three years of our strategic plan and subsequent corporate plans is that planning for a large number of actions has resulted in less than optimum results with this KPI. We have also included ‘business as usual’ actions within our corporate plans, instead of including them in our service plans. The actions completed and progressed do further our strategic goals, however we have not achieved what was planned. For our next strategic plan, and then the next set of annual corporate plans, a more focussed approach will be taken to ensure clarity around key performance indicators and that performance indicators for our services will be included in service plans – this is where the ‘business as usual’ activities need to be defined. There is one more year in our current strategic plan (2017–18) which will focus on ensuring the achievement of key performance indicators are maximised. There are five goals under our strategic plan, each with specific KPIs which are linked to the corporate plan.

Lights at Lajamanu oval were upgraded using Local Authority funds.

18


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

GOAL 1: SOCIAL AND CULTURAL MAINTAIN AND IMPROVE THE HEALTH, CULTURE AND WELL BEING OF THE COMMUNITY.

KPI

TARGET

RESULT

Community services 100% delivered in accordance with the grant conditions

100%

Reduction in complaints related to Council service delivery

Decreasing year on year

Not measured

Increase in overall satisfaction rating of community services – data gathered from community surveys

Improving year on year

INDICATOR

These KPIs need stronger focus going forward. It is our intention to introduce a measurement on the two KPIs above during 2017– 18 with a view to determining a base line. A majority of Council’s services address this goal, these are:

Not measured

 

While the latter two KPIs are not formally measured, and no formal community satisfaction rating has been undertaken, the orange rating is given on the basis of the fact that, anecdotally, there were reduced complaints and a high satisfaction as informally reported through community members and the Local Authorities. Also, while there is not an overall satisfaction survey for community services, there are complaints registers for Aged Care and Children’s Services.

ORGANISATION FIT (DIVISION)

SERVICE

Community Services

Aged and Disability Services Early Childhood School Nutrition Community Safety Domestic Violence and Mediation Library Services Youth, Sport and Recreation

Municipal Services

Animal Management Cemetery Management Council Service Management Centrelink Environmental Health Homelands and Outstations Management Post Office Agency Street Lighting

During 2016–17 the Youth and Communities team conducted the first client satisfaction survey with the data provided to Central Australian Youth Link Up Service (CAYLUS) for analysis by the Australian National University. The results, when available, will form the baseline going forward for this service.

Council’s road map for strong and healthy families

M

any individuals and families across the Central Desert are working to create and sustain family wellbeing in their lives and communities. As a whole of life organisation, Council delivers culturally appropriate support services that complement the efforts of our families. This mandate has led to Council’s Family Wellbeing Strategy, launched in October 2016 in Lajamanu and Alice Springs. The Family Wellbeing Strategy has, at its foundation, five key outcomes of the Council’s Corporate Plan; that is, a commitment to: zz community services that are accessible, meet the needs of residents and promote wellbeing of the community zz a positive living environment for our youth zz communities that are safe for residents and visitors zz celebrating and respecting tradition and culture zz community involvement in cultural, civic and sporting events. The strategy documents Council’s goals for service delivery across early childhood services, parenting programs, youth services, aged and disability care, community safety and employment programs to enable families to become, and remain, strong and healthy. The strategy is a roadmap for the future of our region. The Strategy is available from Council’s website or call 08 8958 9529 for a paper copy.

19


OUR PERFORMANCE

Youth Patrol ready for duty

T

he Community Safety Patrol in Yuendumu has started a partnership with the Community Development Program (CDP) to deliver Youth Community Safety Patrols in Yuendumu during the evenings. The program invites under-18 CDP participants to volunteer with Community Safety Patrol staff, patrolling at night and responding to the safety needs of the community. Youth patrollers learn about reporting, attending to disputes and making sure kids get home at night. On busy nights, youth patrollers act as a second set of eyes and ears during youth program – they are each equipped with a walkie talkie and backup help is never far away! As well as learning good job skills, youth patrollers have their foot in the door for a job once they turn 18. There are also plans to expand the initiative to count as a CDP activity, meaning more people from the community can get involved in making Yuendumu a safer and happier place.

Youth Patrol ready for duty: Reilly White and Isaiah Fisher with CSP team member Mel Langdon.

Congratulations to Yuendumu for getting this great initiative underway.

A number of key initiatives and achievements occurred in 2016– 17: The Family Wellbeing Strategy was officially launched on 6 October at the Council meeting in Lajamanu. It was then rolled out at Local Authority meetings in all communities. The Family Wellbeing Strategy is a plan based on five pillars: zz our communities zz our elderly and aged zz our children zz our youth zz our adults and leaders. The Strategy has, at its foundation, five key outcomes of the Council’s Corporate Plan: zz community services that are accessible, meet the needs of residents and promote wellbeing of the community zz a positive living environment for our youth zz communities that are safe for residents and visitors zz celebrating and respecting tradition and culture zz community involvement in cultural, civic and sporting events. Going forward, Aged Care, Community Development Program, Children’s Services and Youth and Communities are all required to report against actions to ensure that services are being delivered effectively across all nine communities. The Strategy aims to help reduce family and community violence, improve safety for all including the most vulnerable such as children and the elderly and raise awareness of the impact of drugs, alcohol and gambling on a community. Already, Council has rolled out training in Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST), Accidental Counsellor Training, Working with Intoxication and Youth Mental Health First Aid, which addresses our corporate actions under this goal.

20

Other actions under this goal included updating and expanding the Aged and Disability program which provides culturally appropriate services to support the elderly and people with a disability. Services are now provided in Anmatjere (including Wilora), Yuelamu, Engawala, Atitjere, Laramba, Nyirripi, Lajamanu and Willowra. The Council commenced the delivery of services to Atitjere in October 2016 and during the year has focused on improving assessment and care plans for clients and working towards an increased range of services. All services have expanded the range of activities and bush trips available to clients. In conjunction with the expansion of activities the Council have purchased fire guards (to protect clients around fires) for all services, and aids and equipment to assist with activities. Accredited and non-accredited training was delivered to staff including Certificate II in Community Services, Certificate IV in Ageing Support, First Aid and Dementia training. Across five communities of Atitjere, Engawala, Anmatjere, Yuelamu and Laramba, Youth and Community services continue to deliver high quality combination of after-school hours care, sport and recreation, and art and cultural activities including weekend, public holiday and vacation care services for youth between the ages of five and 24 years. Youth and Communities delivered regional competitions in softball, basketball and cricket. Laramba were once again victorious in the regional softball and went on to represent Council in the NT Championships, finishing runners-up for the second year in a row. Council also sent a team from Nyirripi who proved themselves to be serious contenders. Engawala women and Laramba men participated in the Central Australia Basketball Championships in Tennant Creek. Council also supported Yuendumu women to attend. The Anmatjere Cup Cricket Competition was severely hampered by the Christmas/New Year rain event in Central Australia. Ti Tree were


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

nominated to participate in the Imparja Cup where they acquitted themselves well.

service (Adopt a Pedigree Camp Dog) which assists in managing dog numbers and finding homes for dogs.

Community Safety Patrols continued to operate in 11 locations consisting of 13 crews across the region in Lajamanu (2), Yuendumu (2), Willowra, Nyirripi, Yuelamu, Laramba, Wilora, Nturiya (Station), Pmara Jutunta (Six Mile), Engawala and Atitjere. Crews have been operating at least five patrols per week. It is estimated that there were 18,000 Community Safety Patrol assistance activities carried out across the region. These ranged from supporting youth to go home at night, assisting injured people attend the clinic or intervening in violent incidents.

Council is funded to provide assistance to 15 homelands for municipal services and housing repairs and maintenance. Major achievements included carpentry upgrades at Alyuen, Woods Camp, Petyale and Adelaide Bore using Homelands Extra Allowance funding.

Community Safety Patrol crews from Ti Tree, Yuendumu and Lajamanu provided support to police for a number of community events held in Alice Springs. Events included sporting weekends and cultural occasions where Central Desert residents were either active participants, or highly represented.

Bushlight solar battery replacements took place at Irrerlirre, Foxalls Well and Mt Eaglebeak, to ensure ongoing reliable solar power, as well as generator installations at Mt Eaglebeak and Adelaide Bore to provide power to 8 houses. Power system upgrades at Irrerlirre including additional solar panels, new batteries and increased power quota per house alleviated power shortages in the homeland.

Within our Domestic Violence and Mediation service, following an extensive governance training and awareness program, a business consultant was appointed to work with the Indigenous provider, STKI, to advance them toward independence. The proposed migration toward independence is on schedule to commence on 1 July 2018. STKIC has intervened and worked proactively by conducting numerous mediations that have helped maintain peace and wellbeing in Yuendumu. There is a mediation presence with the school in Yuendumu which is now formalised with Charles Darwin University (CDU). The Elder’s Visiting Program (EVP) has also led to valued outcomes through engagement with the correctional services system with visits by members of the Yuendumu mediation team to prisons. STKIC has also assisted in issues impacting on Nyirripi and Yuelamu. The Mediation and Justice program in Willowra (Willowra Peace Working Group) is now operating with a coordinator and a mediation team having received an operating grant from Granites Mine Affected Area Aboriginal Corporation (GMAAAC). They are also working closely with the Willowra Community Safety Patrol and are very active in successfully maintaining peace. Council continues to implement its Animal Management Strategy. Dog numbers are stable or dropping in all communities due to active de-sexing programs strongly supported by community members, and by the passing of some older residents who had large dog numbers. Dog health continues to remain very good due to regular treatment for ticks, mange and other parasites. The hero story is the introduction of an adoption

Engawala Crows looking great in their new green and white softball uniforms.

21


OUR PERFORMANCE

GOAL 2: PHYSICAL ASSETS WELL MANAGED AND MAINTAINED PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE.

KPI

TARGET

RESULT

Roads maintained – Greater compliance with CDRC than 90% 5 Year Roads Plan

90% – internal roads

Plant and vehicles serviceable – number of plant and vehicles in operation as a percentage of the establishment

95%

Greater than 90%

30% – connector roads

Increase the overall Increasing Not measured community satisfaction year to year rating for community townscapes and facilities

INDICATOR

   

The results were very strong for internal community roads and for plant and vehicles, unfortunately due to the December/ January floods the connector roads are not to an acceptable standard. These roads have been made trafficable (some safety issues remain that require driving with care), and need major works undertaken before the roads are deemed to comply with Australian Standards and AusRoads requirements. An application has been forwarded to the NTG under the Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements (NDRRA) grant provisions. As with goal one, there is no formal measurement around community satisfaction, the orange rating is based on anecdotal

input from communities and Local Authorities. A baseline survey will be introduced during 2017–18. Council’s services which address this goal are: ORGANISATION FIT (DIVISION)

SERVICE

Municipal Services

Airstrips Internal Road Maintenance

Infrastructure Services

Asset Management and Planning Facility Management Fleet and Plant Management Infrastructure Projects Local Road Network Upgrade and Construction Traffic Management on Local Roads Visitors Accommodation

The hero story for this goal is the improved traffic management, including a median strip, for the Yuendumu Central Business District. The upgraded amenity and improved traffic flows have greatly enhanced the look and feel, and usage of the main street. Council manages a road network of 1,800 km, which is predominantly unsealed roads between serviced communities and sealed roads within communities. Council operates a mostly Indigenous road crew that is based in Yuendumu. The crew maintains traffic management hardware and performs scheduled road maintenance on all Council roads across the region. In 2015 Council suffered substantial damage to its unsealed road network after heavy rains, and Council secured funds to conduct repairs during 2016–17. Unfortunately, in 2016–17 another storm and flood event impacted our roads, resulting in a further application for funding to restore the roads to the relevant standards. Council’s road plant currently consists of 4 graders, 1 twentytonne excavator, 2 rollers, 1 tipper truck, 1 water cart, 1 float trailer, 1 loader, 1 fuel/water dog trailer, 1 silver bullet accommodation, 1 service truck, 1 support 4WD and a dedicated Road Depot, Yard and road office at Yuendumu. The existing Indigenous crew has a mix of experience ranging from 30 years on a grader to just entering the profession. Barring emergency events, the aim is for Council to undertake its own upgrades and construction in future. Council has access to ongoing Roads to Recovery funding and other limited funding sources, and has every expectation that the crew will continue to operate at a high level. There is the opportunity to contract for external work in future.

Glenn Marshall, Rodney Baird, Cathryn Hutton and Peter Van Heusen inspect the new road at Nturiya.

22

Improvements in fleet and plant management include the Council’s Alice Springs Depot to assist employees in efficiently cleaning and maintaining these important assets. A digital tyre pressure gauge has also been installed allowing staff to perform an important routine maintenance check whilst at the Depot.


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

Yuelamu access road was severely damaged in the 2017 floods.

zz new goal posts installed at Atitjere and Wilora football ovals.

Council continues to improve its parks and open spaces, including upgrading our sporting facilities in line with Australian standards:

Council continues to develop new parks around our communities and upgrade existing playground equipment, lighting, shade and seating, with a major achievement being the installation of three community playgrounds in Yuendumu.

zz Laramba softball back net and homerun fence installed zz Yuelamu football oval boundary fence installed zz Pmara Junta new basketball court constructed zz Nyirripi football change rooms upgraded

Bush internet speeds to rival Alice Springs

C

ouncil is very excited to have been awarded $165,000 from the NT Government to upgrade internet connectivity in Laramba, Willowra, Yuelamu and Nyirripi. This comes on the back of an upgrade in Atitjere and Engawala in late 2016 and a forthcoming upgrade by Telstra in our remaining three communities of Ti Tree, Yuendumu and Lajamanu. The $165,000 will be combined with a CDP grant from Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet, also intended for telecommunication upgrades. Council’s Works staff will work with CDP participants to build the infrastructure necessary to house the satellite dishes. It is anticipated that by 1 July 2017 all of Council’s facilities in all of our communities will have internet speeds equivalent to Council’s Alice Springs head office. The improvements promised by these upgrades will change the way Council does business, with a number of innovations in the wings that should see increased efficiencies. Distant Curve installing a new satellite facility on the Plenty Highway in 2016.

As a medium to long term vision, Council is also working on ways to make its bandwidth available to the wider community after hours – a move that is bound to be very popular.

23


OUR PERFORMANCE

GOAL 3: ECONOMY A DYNAMIC AND GROWING ECONOMY WITH STRONG LOCAL EMPLOYMENT.

KPI

TARGET

Indigenous employment

Greater than 70%

RESULT

INDICATOR

69%*

*average during the year at CDRC The KPI has been interpreted as Indigenous employment within Central Desert Regional Council. However, the desired outcomes of this goal are more general and refer to overall Indigenous employment. There is a mismatch between our goal, strategies and the KPI. When moving into the next strategic planning cycle, discussion will need to occur to better define Council’s role in this area, what Council can impact, and what are the measures that will indicate success or failure. Council’s services which address this goal are: ORGANISATION FIT (DIVISION)

SERVICE

Community Services

Economic Development and Tourism Community Development Program (CDP)

Corporate Services

Human Resource Management

Council’s Indigenous Employment Strategy 2016–19 is the cornerstone for human resources recruitment, development and retention. The deliverables were implemented and continue to be implemented across all the Regional Council’s directorates. The above KPI measures its effectiveness as not yet at the desired levels. This will be a key focus for 2017–18. A much more strategic focus has been taken by Council with effort attributed to projects that will have a broader impact across the region over the longer term. With the financial support of the NT Government, Council entered into a contract with Matrix on Board to develop a culturally appropriate workshop to explain to people in the bush exactly how business in Australia is conducted. This project will be piloted in Yuendumu in October 2017 and will be delivered in Warlpiri language. In response to the NT Government’s deferral of the development of the Alcoota Mega Fauna Fossil Dig, Council entered into a partnership with Tourism Central Australia to pursue a Plenty Highway and Eastern MacDonnell Ranges Tourism Master Plan. This involves bringing together traditional owners, pastoralists, existing business and tourism operators and the various levels of Government to ensure that the best possible advantage is taken of tourism opportunities identified in that part of our region, including capitalising on the sealing of the Outback Way. Council hopes to see outcomes of this partnership in the 2017–18 year and onwards. The Community Development Programme (CDP) is the Commonwealth Government’s remote employment program with

24

Lindy Woods of Anmatjere CDP was part of a group making toys and items for sale at Christmas 2016.

a focus on job readiness and employment placement services, primarily for Indigenous residents. Council is contracted until June 2018 to provide services to Yuendumu, Yuelamu, Willowra, Anmatjere and Laramba. Council has 713 participants enrolled across its five sites, each participating in work-like activities designed to transition them to the work place. Activities include construction, horticulture, waste management, health and nutrition, administration and driver training. Council works collegiately with community stakeholders to place participants into work experience, a win-win scenario for both the potential employer and the potential employee. The program has also had a positive impact on community with many activities focused on community facilities; football ovals and softball pitches have been upgraded with shade and seating, new fences erected and repaired, shade structures and playgrounds built, sandpits constructed, paths laid, grass cut, fire breaks maintained, litter collected, trees and vegetable gardens planted. While numerous benefits have flowed to Indigenous people wanting to join the workforce, CDP targets have not been fully met. Council is working hard to meet targets into the future.


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

GOAL 4: ENVIRONMENT A REGION THAT RESPECTS, PROTECTS AND LOOKS AFTER ITS NATURAL AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT.

KPI

TARGET

RESULT INDICATOR

Waste management – Service Delivery Centre compliant with Council Waste Management Strategy*

Greater than 90%

93%

Fire breaks – meet service level standards

Greater than 90%

90%

As per Regional Plan This goal is addressed by the following Council services: ORGANISATION FIT (DIVISION) SERVICE Municipal Services

Essential Services Contract Local Emergency Services Vegetation and Fire Hazard Reduction Waste Management

A major achievement at Nyirripi was supporting the construction of the solar farm which will come into operation later in 2017 – the intent is that the solar farm offsets by 15% diesel fuel usage at the community. As part of a project undertaken in conjunction with the Australian Government’s Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency, Council has completed a legacy asbestos mapping project to ascertain if asbestos is present in some of its communities and outstations. Communities

surveyed included Yuendumu, Lajamanu, Laramba, Willowra, Nturiya (Station) and Atitjere. Yuendumu community members expressed an interest in developing a campaign to educate the community and visitors to put rubbish in the bin. Council identified 21 litter hot spots in the community then gained funding via the Northern Territory EPA Environment Grant from which the community developed their ‘Put it in a Bin’ campaign. Thanks to the NT Government’s Special Purpose Grants program, the Council took delivery of two new garbage compactors for Yuendumu and Lajamanu. The new compactors, which have replaced older, smaller and less efficient trucks, have streamlined operations with less trips to the landfill, more bins picked up per shift and reduced operating costs. Compactor trucks have major benefits for waste management in communities as they enable rubbish to be compacted down to small volumes, meaning less room is taken up in the landfill, in turn allowing the landfill to be used for longer periods and saving Council resources. Recycling and hazardous waste drop-off areas have been upgraded across all service delivery centres. Council continues to recycle tyres, batteries, scrap metal, car bodies and waste oil into Alice Springs, and will soon be adding electronic waste. The Council continues to work collaboratively with MacDonnell and Barkly Councils to roll out the Central Australian Waste Management Strategy.

Streamlined garbage collection in Yuendumu

T

hanks to the NT Government’s Special Purpose Grants program the Council took delivery of a new garbage compactor for Yuendumu in late 2016. The new compactor, which replaced an older, smaller and less efficient truck, has already streamlined operations with less trips to landfill, more bins picked up per shift and reduced operating costs. Depot staff travelled from Alice Springs to hand over the exciting new acquisition and to provide training to local staff on the hydraulic operations.

Yuendumu Works crew celebrate the arrival of their new garbage compactor.

Field officers are thoroughly enjoying their new, more comfortable and extremely well air conditioned vehicle and can often be seen showcasing its ‘mod cons’ with pride.

25


OUR PERFORMANCE

GOAL 5: MANAGEMENT AND GOVERNANCE GOOD LEADERSHIP, EFFECTIVE ADVOCACY AND HIGH QUALITY SERVICES SUPPORTED BY GOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES.

KPI

TARGET

RESULT INDICATOR

Number of Local Authority Each of the 9 local meetings conducted in the 9 Authorities Service Delivery Centres (SDC) meeting at least 6 times a year (54 in total).

31

98%

Staff turnover – total number Less than 35% of voluntary staff separations divided by the total number of staff employed

15.8%

Health and safety – Lost time Lower than injury rate calculated as the previous year total number of hours lost (0.08%) through injury over the total number of labour hours

0.67%

Statutory and legislative requirements – items identified as part of the compliance review are actioned and resolved

100%

Performance Management Reviews are undertaken in a timely manner

Greater than 90%

100% of items rectified within prescribed timeframe

There are also financial KPIs under this goal which are reported on within the Financial Statements later in this Annual Report.

Councillors Dixon, Glenn and Patrick at Parliament House, Canberra.

It is noted that: zz The target for staff turnover arguably is low given the definition of voluntary staff separations, for the next strategic plan this will be reviewed to determine the best measure that reflects the success of this goal. zz While Council set a target of each of the Local Authorities meeting at least six times a year, the statutory requirement is four times a year. On the statutory measure, Council was closer to the target of 36 in total. Council also improved year on year with only 28 meetings conducted in 2015–16. The measure will be adjusted in 2017–18 to match the statutory requirement. zz The measure for Health and Safety has been retained year on year, and the result for this year is disappointing at 0.67% which is considerably worse than the previous year’s result of 0.08%. This increase is due to an increase in incidents, including a dislocated shoulder at a basketball match. Safe Work Australia calculates the lost time injury frequency rate (LTIFR) using a different formula: Number of lost time injuries in accounting period

5 = Total hours worked in accounting period 346,565.58

Using tools provided on the Safe Work Australia website, Council’s LTIFR for 2016–17 is 14.42, compared to the current industry standard of 12.8.

26

The services which are included under this goal are: ORGANISATION FIT (DIVISION)

SERVICE

Corporate Services

Governance Support Administration of Local Laws Community Planning Council, Local Authority and Members Support Financial Management and Reporting Human Resource Management Information and Communication Technology Support Public and Corporate Relations and Civic Events Records Management Revenue Growth Risk Management Work Health and Safety

CEO and Executive Management

Advocacy and Representation on Local and Regional Issues Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement

The hero story for this goal in 2016–17 is the improvement in internet speeds achieved in community offices. This has substantially improved productivity of our remote staff. Council’s information services are provided by fully owned subsidiary CouncilBiz. This entity was formed by all regional councils in


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

2008 to provide IT support. The annual financial statements for CouncilBiz are available form the Council’s website. During 2016–17 Council’s notable achievements include: zz improved business connectivity to all Council Services Offices via CouncilBIZ network zz upgraded ICT infrastructure, including at CDP sites, with a shared project focus. In the first half of 2017, community plans for 2017–18 for each of the nine Local Authority areas were reviewed and updated in consultation with the Local Authorities. The next suite of full community consultations will be prior to the next strategic plan. This consultation is key to steering Council in the direction set by community members for the next financial year and information compiled will be publically available in Council’s Regional Plan.

Council Meetings The Council continued to schedule its ordinary Council meetings bi-monthly, rotating the location of the meetings between the Alice Springs office and our larger remote services delivery centres. During 2016–17 meetings were held in Alice Springs, as well as Lajamanu in October, 2016 and Yuendumu in May 2017. A scheduled remote meeting in Atitjere, July 2016, was rescheduled and relocated to Alice Springs due to a lack of accommodation in the community. Council held 6 Ordinary Council meetings, 3 Special Council meetings, 6 Finance Committee meetings, 4 Audit and Risk Committee meetings and 3 Professional Development training days in 2016–17.

MEETING

ABSENT WITH NO APOLOGY

zz increased awareness of recordkeeping obligations with all staff involved in administration and management roles completing the introductory recordkeeping training zz improved access to recordkeeping policy and procedures, training guides and manuals available on the Council intranet zz upgrading of the electronic records management system to MAGIQ v8.5 zz working with business areas to increase registration of corporate records zz increased electronic record creation and management zz final draft of the Local Authority Disposal Schedule submitted to NTG.

COUNCILLORS

ABSENT WITH APOLOGY

Key achievements in improving Council’s recordkeeping in 2016– 17 included:

ATTENDED

All scheduled Council Audit and Risk Committee meetings were held. The committee continues to monitor and advise on risks associated with the Council’s business.

Cecelia ALFONSO

Ordinary

5

1

-

Special

3

-

-

Ordinary

2

2

2

Special

-

1

2

Ordinary

5

1

-

Special

2

1

-

Ordinary

6

-

-

Special

3

-

-

Finance Committee

6

-

-

Audit and Risk Committee

4

-

-

Ordinary

6

-

-

Special

3

-

-

Finance Committee

6

-

-

Audit and Risk Committee

4

-

-

Ordinary

4

-

2

Special

-

1

2

Finance Committee

4

-

2

Ordinary

3

1

2

Special

1

1

1

Norbert PATRICK

Ordinary

6

-

-

Special

3

-

-

Sandra PECKHAM

Ordinary

3

2

1

Special

-

-

2

Ordinary

5

-

1

Special

2

-

1

Finance Committee

5

-

1

Benedy BIRD

Liz BIRD

Adrian DIXON

James GLENN

William JOHNSON

April MARTIN

Jacob SPENCER

Marlene TILMOUTH Georgina WILSON

Community Services teams setting their priorities for the coming year.

Ordinary

4

1

1

Special

2

1

-

Ordinary

4

1

1

Special

2

1

-

27


OUR PERFORMANCE

Councillors and executive management team following a Council meeting.

Local Authority Meetings In line with the Northern Territory Government’s Guideline 8 – Regional Councils and Local Authorities (effective 29 January 2016), each Local Authority was required to hold four meetings for the 2016–17 year. This figure does not include special meetings that may have been called for individual Local Authorities. Results of the annual meeting targets as at 30 June 2017 are displayed in the table below.

LOCAL AUTHORITY MEETINGS FROM 1 JULY 2016 TO 30 JUNE 2017

LOCAL AUTHORITY

PLANNED MEETINGS

MEETINGS HELD

LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENT ACHIEVED?

Atitjere

5

2

No

Laramba

5

5

Yes

Anmatjere

5

5

Yes

Willowra

5

3

No

Lajamanu

4

3

No

Nyirripi

4

3

No

Engawala

5

4

Yes

Yuelamu

5

3

No

Yuendumu

4

3

No

Cr Patrick catches up on events in the Central Desert News.

28


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

Appendices

29


APPENDICES

OUR PEOPLE THE REGIONAL COUNCIL CONTINUED TO FOCUS ON BEING AN EMPLOYER OF CHOICE FOR BOTH INDIGENOUS AND NON-INDIGENOUS EMPLOYEES.

Achievements zz leadership program for emerging leaders carried out by Australian School of Applied Management in 2016 for the executive management team and regional managers zz Industrial Relations workshop carried out for communitybased coordinators and supervisors in Yuendumu, Yuelamu, Nyirripi, Ti Tree, Willowra and Engawala zz Council’s employment policies reviewed zz 2016 –19 Enterprise Agreement successfully negotiated.

Recruitment and Retention Council continues to strive to be the employer of choice in the region with the following strategies in place: zz promoting flexibility in employment contracts zz ensuring a comprehensive induction process zz cross-cultural awareness training zz offering employee training and development opportunities to motivated staff zz promotion of a safe and healthy workplace zz actioning feedback from exit interviews zz implementing the Indigenous Workforce Development Strategy.

Linkz volunteers Jazmine Wozney and Monica Enriquez helping out with Youth, Sport and Recreation’s school holiday program in Laramba.

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL EMPLOYMENT

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

JUNE AUG NOV DEC JAN MAR MAY JULY SEPT NOV JAN MAR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN

2014–15

2015–16 REPORTING PERIOD

30

2016–17 % Indigenous employment


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

Organisational Structure In 2016–17 Council had three directorates, each with specific service delivery responsibilities. Council resolved to move to four directorates in 2017–18 and onwards, to provide a concentrated focus in the areas of municipal works and infrastructure.

LOCAL AUTHORITIES �9 COMMUNITIES�

COMMUNITY

STANDING COMMITTEES �FINANCE, AUDIT AND RISK,

COUNCIL

CEO PERFORMANCE�

STAKEHOLDERS CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY • Overall Management • Lobbying and Advocacy • Community Engagement

DIRECTOR FINANCE & CORPORATE SERVICES

DIRECTOR WORKS & INFRASTRUCTURE

DIRECTOR COMMUNITY SERVICES

AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY • Financial Management • Financial Reporting • Payroll • Governance • HR Management • Risk Management and Internal Audit • Information Technology • Records Management • Customer Service • Corporate Planning and Reporting • Civic Ceremonies and Functions

AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY • Animal Welfare & Control • Street Lighting • Cemetery Management • Local Emergency Services • Maintenance of Council-controlled Facilities • Parks & Gardens • Municipal Services • Roads & Traffic Management • Waste Management • Weed & Fire Hazard Reduction • Centrelink Delivery • Outstations • Asset Management (including Fleet) • Commercial Contracts (including Airstrips and Power & Water) • Capital Projects

AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY • Library & Cultural Heritage • Aged & Disability Services • Arts & Culture • Vacation & After School Care • Early Education & Child Care • School Nutrition • Domestic Violence & Mediation • Community Safety • Sport and Recreation • Youth Programs • Community Development

Staff Profile As at 30 June 2017

TOTAL STAFF = 331 (308.34 FTE)

COUNCIL STAFF: LOCATION OF USUAL PLACE OF WORK

ALICE SPRINGS OFFICE STAFF = 58 (17% OF TOTAL STAFF) REGIONAL STAFF = 273 (82% OF TOTAL STAFF) As of June 30 2017 of the total Council workforce: zz 66% identified as Indigenous, and zz 82% were based in one of Council’s nine major service delivery centres (communities).

Main office Community

31


APPENDICES

Staff Training and Development Commitment to be a continuously learning organisation was witnessed across all directorates as employees underwent relevant training and development. Managers and the executive underwent leadership training and development with the Australian School of Applied Leadership and professional development was also delivered during the managers’ meetings.

EMPLOYEE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITY

CDP participant, Ezekiel Egan learning how to weld.

Work Health and Safety While the Work Health and Safety (WHS) results were disappointing, there were some key achievements aimed at improving future results: zz training on Council’s WHS policy delivered to safety critical position holders (PCBUs) to comply with the Act zz recommendations from Council’s accidents/incidents and near-miss forms assessed and actioned as appropriate zz workstation hazard identification audits carried out zz safe work method statement templates developed zz fire wardens, first aid officers and bullying and harassment contact officers in place in all communities zz WHS information and training offered to staff during toolbox sessions zz regular consultation between staff and management.

32

NO. OF STAFF TRAINED/ DEVELOPED

1

4WD Awareness Training

3

2

Diploma of Early Childhood Education and Care

4

3

Certificate III in Aged Care

2

4

Provide First Aid

5

Safe Working at Heights

3

6

Conduct Civil Construction

4

7

Defensible Documentation Made Easy & Coaching and Mentoring

9

8

Certificate IV Ageing Support

14

44

9

Working With Disability Remote

10

Accidental Counsellor

7

11

Suicide Prevention

1

12

Resilient Self-care for Remote Health Professionals

4

13

Better Practice 2017: Rethinking Aged Care

2

14

E-Tools and Change Management Meeting

3

15

Education & Childcare First Aid

5

16

White Card

6

17

Certificate III of Early Childhood Education and Care

1

18

Diploma of Local Government

1

19

Certificate IV in Training and Assessment

6

20

Certificate III Community Night Patrol

68

21

Certificate II Sport and Recreation

25

22

Certificate III Sport and Recreation

23

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST)

11

24

Working with Intoxication

16

25

Youth Mental Health First Aid

25

26

Cross-Cultural Awareness

1

27

Frontline Leadership (1-day course at CDU)

2

28

Basic Restorative Practices (4-day workshop)

3

29

Non Violence Communication (NVC) training

3

30

Certificate II Rural Operations

31

Power Water Corporation familiarisation course

32

Heavy Machinery Operation

4

33

Certificate III in Local Government

4

34

Writing Effective Minutes

6

35

Microsoft Excel 2010

6

15

6

4 12


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

OUR SERVICES THE RANGE OF SERVICES OFFERED BY COUNCIL IN OUR NINE SERVICE DELIVERY CENTRES IS LISTED BELOW.

Service Delivery Summary ANMATJERE

ATITJERE

Population

477

224

154

Workforce

47

18

17

Distance from Alice Springs

ENGAWALA LAJAMANU

LARAMBA

NYIRRIPI

WILLOWRA

YUELAMU YUENDUMU

239

606

236

301

220

759

25

25

10

29

24

72

192

240

181

1298

203

454

337

280

290

Municipal Services

Essential Services (power, water and sewerage)

Airstrips

Animal Control

Outstations

Centrelink

Community Safety Patrol

Aged and Disability

Early Childhood

School Nutrition

Youth Sport and Recreation

Libraries

CDP

Waste Management

Post Office Agency

Family Mediation

Builder-trainer program

A

t present Council has a shortage of housing in many of its communities, including housing to accommodate CDP staff. As such, some staff are required to travel from Alice Springs on a weekly basis. With thanks to the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, this issue is about to be alleviated slightly in two of Council’s nine communities. Council’s builder-trainer has been working with CDP participants in Willowra to assemble a three-bedroom flatpack house which is now complete. This initiative means fewer Council staff on the roads between communities, reduced operating costs, increased face-to-face contact time with job seekers and has facilitated on-the-job training for six CDP participants. A win-win scenario all round.

Kitchen and living space in the new CDP staff housing facility at Willowra.

A second house is being constructed in Ti Tree with seven job seekers. Unfortunately, a third builder-trainer house did not proceed due to a lack of suitable serviced lots and water in target communities.

33


APPENDICES

Cr Dixon and Scott McConnell MLA opening the Nyirripi road just one week before it was washed away by extensive flooding.

Municipal Services SERVICE DELIVERY CENTRES The following municipal services are provided in all communities: zz rubbish collection/landfill and waste management (including litter reduction) zz maintenance and upgrade of Council-controlled parks, ovals, reserves and open spaces zz cemetery management zz electricity, water and sewerage operation and maintenance zz landscaping, dust control and firebreaks zz support of Local Authorities zz companion animal welfare and control zz local emergency recovery management zz local road maintenance, including over 1770Â km of roads zz traffic management zz fire hazard reduction and weed control.

New roadworks at Atitjere.

We also provide a Centrelink service centre and postal agency services in eight communities.

HOMELANDS Council is contracted by the Northern Territory Government to assist 15 occupied homelands, with 78 houses located at the homelands. The following municipal and essential services and housing management services are provided: zz repair and maintenance of housing zz electricity, water and sewerage operation and maintenance

34


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

zz internal road maintenance zz landfill facilities zz landscaping, dust control and fire breaks zz management of infrastructure and municipal services zz environmental health activities zz dog control. Reliable water and power supplies are a priority for Council. Capital upgrades are undertaken as needed, and routine sixmonthly repairs and maintenance visits are done by plumbers, electricians and carpenters. Bushlight solar power supplies are in place for the majority of homelands, the others having diesel generators. Local Indigenous field officers provide most of the municipal services such as slashing grass and rubbish clean up.

Blankets donated to Council’s Aged and Disability Services just in time for the cold desert winter.

Community Services The following community services are provided on behalf of other government agencies on a grant or contract basis:

CHILDREN’S SERVICES zz early childhood childcare centres in Laramba and Yuendumu zz playgroup in Yuendumu, Engawala and the Anmatjere region zz School Nutrition programs in Engawala, Laramba, Nyirripi, Willowra, Wilora and Yuelamu.

AGED CARE AND DISABILITY SERVICES zz service delivery in Atitjere, Engawala, Laramba, Lajamanu, Nyirripi, Willowra, Yuelamu and Anmatjere (including Wilora): –– meals –– domestic assistance –– personal care –– centre-based respite care –– social inclusion activities –– social support –– transport services. zz meals, social inclusion activities, domestic assistance, social support and limited aged care support in Willowra and Atitjere.

Willowra Aged Care Services bus.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM zz service delivery in Anmatjere, Laramba, Willowra, Yuendumu and Yuelamu: –– assisting eligible job seekers to secure meaningful employment –– facilitating education and training opportunities to improve work readiness –– partnering with other Council programs and services to provide on-the-job work experience and to build community capacity.

YOUTH AND COMMUNITIES zz Community Safety program in Anmatjere, Atitjere, Engawala, Lajamanu, Laramba, Nyirripi, Willowra, Yuelamu and Yuendumu: –– working collaboratively to contribute to the safety and wellbeing of individuals and families in community

Community Services staff members Joy Turner and Patsy Tilmouth participating in team building activities.

35


APPENDICES

Heavy rains impact entire Council area

M

any of Council’s services were put under strain and / or interrupted as a result of the heavy rain that fell in December and January across the entire region. All of Council’s roads were closed at some stage, which is unprecedented in Council’s eight-year history. Council’s Works staff worked long and challenging hours to ensure road safety by assessing and monitoring road damage and closing and reopening roads. Nyirripi, Laramba and Engawala offices were closed briefly with Council staff stuck on the other side of swollen rivers. Similarly, staff and volunteers across all services were grounded in either Alice Springs or their home communities, unable to visit clients or deliver services. Some services faced food shortages with the store truck unable to access community. Council staff purchased food in Alice Springs and, with the assistance of a local aviation company, arranged for it to be flown to communities. Thankfully, whilst the roads were impassable, most airstrips remained undamaged, meaning food was able to get in and stranded staff out.

Mt Wedge Road (above) and Nyirripi Road (left) after the Christmas 2016 floods.

The demand for Council services, post-rain, also increased with a focus on assisting with fire, vermin and snake management by cutting grass and reinstating firebreaks. Of course, the rains also bought amazing sunsets, flowing rivers, beautiful birdlife and stunning wildflowers.

–– support the Council’s School Attendance Strategy by assisting youth to return home at night and get to school in the morning –– assist people at risk to return home or receive care including intoxicated people, juveniles, victims of violence and the homeless –– working collaboratively with other Council programs to get young people home in the evenings. zz Youth, Sport and Recreation programs delivered across Anmatjere, Atitjere, Engawala, Laramba and Yuelamu: –– providing a youth diversion service to encourage young people to make good choices, –– supporting, facilitating and running inter-community sporting competitions in conjunction with other service providers in the region –– after-school hours care, sport and recreation, art and cultural activities that are supported, stimulating,

36

meaningful and relevant five days a week, including public holidays –– Vacation Care program during school holidays for young people aged five and 24. zz Mediation and Justice program in Yuendumu and Willowra; –– maintain peace in community through engaging community mediators in utilising cultural authority and traditional practices in conflict resolution to achieve mala mala (proper sorry).

LIBRARY SERVICES zz delivering library services in Anmatjere and Lajamanu in conjunction with NT Libraries zz internet access provided through the Remote Indigenous Public Internet Access (RIPIA) program in Willowra CDP, Ti-Tree Library, Lajamanu Library, Atitjere internet café and Yuendumu CDP.


CDRC ANNUAL REPORT 2016–17

Corporate Services COMMUNITY EVENTS Council support for a range of community and civic events including: zz Aileron Bush Carnival Rodeo zz annual Central Desert Regional Softball Competition zz annual Central Desert Regional Women’s Basketball Competition zz Anmatjere Cup Cricketing Competition and pathways to Imparja Cup held in Alice Springs zz community-based sports weekends across the region zz Harts Range Races and Bush Sports Weekend zz Yuendumu Sports Carnival.

Other Services zz maintenance of airstrips and support for emergency evacuations zz housing upgrade and construction (commercial contract through Territory Housing Department) zz delivering ‘Room To Breathe’ public housing program with the NT Government’s Remote Housing Program ‘Our Community, Our Future, Our Homes’ zz fencing and other minor capital works.

Other corporate services which enable and support our external services include Finance, Human Resource Management, Business Services (including IT and Communications, administration), Public Relations and Governance.

Essential Services Contracts zz maintenance of power support and generators for all communities apart from Laramba, Lajamanu and Wilora where it is provided by other contractors zz maintenance of water supply and water quality for all communities apart from Laramba, Lajamanu and Wilora where it is provided by other contactors zz maintenance of sewage treatment facilities. Fire preparedness training at Laramba.

Some of the Anmatjere All Stars celebrate their participation in the Imparja Cup.

Play equipment installed by the Works team in Yuendumu.

37


APPENDICES

OUR FINANCES Financial Summary Three-year comparison from audited financials: 2016 grant revenue was revised due to the Council adopting AASB 1004, see Note 16 in the audited financial report for more details. 2016 grant revenue prior to adopting AASB 1004 was $20.35 million, and $27.4 million following adoption. 2015 $’000,000

2016 $’000,000

2017 $’000,000

INCOME Rates and Charges

1.96

2.20

2.45

User Charges and Fees

0.42

0.96

2.42

Interest

0.37

0.36

0.24

Grants

19.79

27.40

24.18

Other Operating Revenue

5.82

12.33

8.55

Gain from Disposal of Assets

0.13

0.01

0.05

28.49

43.26

37.89

15.34

17.22

17.13

Materials and Contracts

6.87

10.06

13.16

Depreciation

1.39

1.73

2.45

Other Expenses

3.37

3.15

3.36

26.97

32.16

36.10

1.52

11.10

1.79

Income from ordinary activities EXPENDITURE Employee Costs

Expenses from ordinary activities Surplus (Deficit) for the Year Gain on revaluation assets

3.03

Building write-off

-22.07

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

-20.56

14.13

1.79

NOTE: While the results seem healthy with a surplus for 2017 of $1.79 million, it should be noted the summary includes capital revenue, but does not include capital expenses. Council’s cash balance and total assets decreased. The total liabilities also decreased, and some grants were repaid to the funding body, impacting the cash flow. It is recommended that the financial statements be read in their entirety.

REVENUE BY TYPE 2016–17 Gain from Disposal of Assets $0.05 m

EXPENDITURE BY TYPE 2016–17 Expenditure by Type

Rates & Charges $2.45 m User Charges & Fees $2.42 m Interest $0.24 m

Depreciation $2.45 m

Other Expenses $3.36 m

Other Operating Revenue $8.55 m Employee Costs $17.13 m Materials & Contracts $13.16 m Grants $24.18 m

38

Revenue by Type


Financial Statements

CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

FS–1


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

FS–2 • Financial Statements


Financial Statements • FS–3


CONTENTS

PAGE

Independent auditor’s report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Chief executive officer’s certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Statement of comprehensive income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Statement of financial position

...........................................7

Statement of changes in equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Statement of cash flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Notes to and forming part of the principal financial statements . . . . 10

FS–4 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER’S CERTIFICATE FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

Financial Statements • FS–5


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Notes

2017 $

2016 $

INCOME Rates

2

2,451,002

2,204,990

User charges

2

2,421,852

957,326

Grants, subsidies and contributions

2

24,179,544

16,491,492

Investment income

2

242,265

358,860

Other Income

2

8,546,191

12,329,070

Gain on Disposal of Assets

4

53,764

15,858

37,894,618

32,357,596

Total Income EXPENSES Employee costs

3

17,128,329

17,225,161

Materials, contracts & other expenses

3

13,160,798

10,057,807

Depreciation, amortisation & impairment

3

2,450,334

1,731,229

Other operating expenses

3

3,368,803

3,153,407

36,108,264

32,167,604

OPERATING SURPLUS / (DEFICIT)

1,786,354

189,992

NET SURPLUS / (DEFICIT)

1,786,354

189,992

Gain on revaluation of infrastructure, property, plant & equipment

3,033,271

Total Other Comprehensive Income

3,033,271

1,786,354

3,223,263

Total Expenses

Other Comprehensive Income Amounts which will not be reclassified subsequently to operating result

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes.

FS–6 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 30 JUNE 2017 Notes

2017 $

2016 $

ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents

5

5,058,441

6,301,985

Investments

5

10,637,817

10,291,895

Trade & other receivables

5

1,063,251

1,401,123

16,759,509

17,995,003

18,764,039

19,070,275

789,867

1,587,993

19,553,906

20,658,268

36,313,415

38,653,271

Total Current Assets Non-current Assets Infrastructure, property, plant & equipment

6

Work in progress – Fixed assets Total Non-current Assets Total Assets LIABILITIES Current Liabilities Trade & other payables

7(a)

1,553,936

2,257,378

Provisions

7(c)

1,413,588

1,503,918

Unexpended grants

7(b)

1,618,967

5,010,407

4,586,491

8,771,703

389,805

330,804

389,805

330,804

4,976,296

9,102,506

31,337,119

29,550,765

4,406,290

2,781,437

Total Current Liabilities Non-current Liabilities Provisions

7(d) Total Non-current Liabilities

Total Liabilities NET ASSETS EQUITY Accumulated surplus Unexpended grant reserves

8

7,212,226

7,050,725

Asset revaluation reserve

8

17,648,351

17,648,351

Other reserves

8

2,070,252

2,070,252

31,337,119

29,550,765

TOTAL EQUITY

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes.

Financial Statements • FS–7


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Accumulated Surplus $

Unexpended Grant Reserve $

Asset Revaluation Reserve $

Other Reserves $

TOTAL EQUITY $

Balance at 1 July 2016

2,781,437

7,050,725

17,648,351

2,070,252

29,550,765

Net Surplus / (Deficit) for Year

1,786,354

1,786,354

Transfers from unexpended grants reserve to accumulated funds

(161,501)

161,501

Balance at end of period

4,406,290

7,212,226

17,648,351

2,070,252

31,337,119

252,718

14,615,080

550,000

15,417,798

10,909,704

10,909,704

Balance at 1 July 2015 (restated)

252,718

10,909,704

14,615,080

550,000

26,327,502

Net Surplus / (Deficit) for Year (restated – see note 16)

189,992

Notes 2017

2016 Balance at 1 July 2015 (as previously reported) Adjustments (see note 16)

Gain on revaluation of infrastructure, property, plant & equipment Transfers from unexpended grants reserve to accumulated funds Transfers between reserves Balance at end of period

3,033,271

3,033,271

3,858,979

(3,858,979)

1,520,252

2,070,252

29,550,765

(1,520,252) 2,781,437

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes.

FS–8 • Financial Statements

189,992

7,050,725

17,648,351


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Notes

2017 $

2016 $

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts Receipts from other activities

14,356,677

16,835,501

242,265

358,860

24,640,596

27,863,309

Employee costs

(17,128,328)

(17,225,161)

Materials, contracts and other costs

(17,843,400)

(11,640,999)

(3,873,222)

(12,194,925)

394,588

3,996,585

(1,115,540)

(4,864,537)

Payments for Work In Progress (WIP)

(262,090)

(1,211,612)

(Payments)/Receipts from investments

(345,924)

(254,860)

85,422

121,732

(1,638,132)

(6,209,277)

(1,243,544)

(2,212,692)

6,301,985

8,514,677

Interest received Grants and contributions Payments

Other operating payments Net Cash provided by (or used in) Operating Activities

9(b)

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Payments for property, plant & equipment

Proceeds on sale of assets Net Cash provided by (or used in) Investing Activities CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES Receipts Proceeds from borrowings Payments Repayments of borrowings Net Cash provided by (or used in) Financing Activities Net Increase (Decrease) in cash held Cash & cash equivalents at beginning of period Net cash assets transferred on restructure Cash & cash equivalents at end of period

– 9(a)

5,058,441

6,301,985

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes.

Financial Statements • FS–9


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 NOTE 1 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial report are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated.

1. BASIS OF PREPARATION 1.1 Compliance with Australian Accounting Standards This general purpose financial report has been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards as they apply to not-forprofit entities, other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board, and relevant Northern Territory legislation. The financial report was authorised for issue by certificate under clause 16 of the Local Government (Accounting) Regulations dated (insert date).

1.2 Historical Cost Convention Except where stated below, these financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the historical cost convention.

1.3 Critical Accounting Estimates The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Australian Accounting Standards requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates, and requires management to exercise its judgement in applying Council’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements are specifically referred to in the relevant sections of this Note.

1.4 Rounding All amounts in the financial statements have been rounded to the nearest dollar.

2. THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT REPORTING ENTITY Central Desert Regional Council is incorporated under the NT Local Government Act and has its principal place of business at 1 Bagot Street, Alice Springs NT 0870. These financial statements include the Council’s direct operations.

3. INCOME RECOGNITION Income is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Income is recognised when the Council obtains control over the assets comprising the income, or when the amount due constitutes an enforceable debt, whichever first occurs. Where grants, contributions and donations recognised as incomes during the reporting period were obtained on the condition that they be expended in a particular manner or used over a particular period, and those conditions were undischarged as at the reporting date, the amounts subject to those undischarged conditions are disclosed in these notes. Also disclosed is the amount of grants, contributions and receivables recognised as incomes in a previous reporting period which were obtained in respect of the Council’s operations for the current reporting period. In recent years the payment of untied financial assistance grants has varied from the annual allocation as follows: Cash Payment Received 2014/15

$1,758,291

Annual Allocation $1,744,972

Difference +

$13,319

2015/16

$1,823,933

$1,819,627

+

$4,306

2016/17

$1,765,356

$1,767,283

($1,927)

Because these grants are untied, the Australian Accounting Standards require that payments be recognised as income upon receipt. Accordingly, the operating results of these periods have been distorted compared to those that would have been reported had the grants been paid in the year to which they were allocated. The Operating Surplus Ratio disclosed in Note 13 has also been calculated after adjusting for the distortions resulting from the difference between actuals grants received and the grants entitlements allocated. The actual amounts of untied grants received during the reporting periods (including the advance allocations) are disclosed in Note 2.

4. CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS Cash Assets include all amounts readily convertible to cash on hand at Council’s option with an insignificant risk of changes in value with a maturity of three months or less from the date of acquisition.

FS–10 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 1 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES continued Receivables for rates and annual charges are secured over the subject land, and bear interest at rates determined in accordance with the Local Government Act 1999. Other receivables are generally unsecured and do not bear interest. All receivables are reviewed as at the reporting date and adequate allowance made for amounts the receipt of which is considered doubtful.

5. INVENTORIES Inventories held in respect of stores have been valued by using the weighted average cost on a continual basis, after adjustment for loss of service potential. Inventories held in respect of business undertakings have been valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

6. INFRASTRUCTURE, PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT 6.1 Land under roads Council has elected not to recognise land under roads acquired prior to 1 July 2008 as an asset in accordance with AASB 1051 Land under Roads. Land under roads acquired after 30 June 2008 has not been recognised as in the opinion of Council it is not possible to reliably attribute a fair value, and further that such value if determined would be immaterial.

6.2 Initial Recognition All assets are initially recognised at cost. For assets acquired at no cost or for nominal consideration, cost is determined as fair value at the date of acquisition. Cost is determined as the fair value of the assets given as consideration plus costs incidental to the acquisition, including architects’ fees and engineering design fees and all other costs incurred. The cost of non-current assets constructed by the Council includes the cost of all materials used in construction, direct labour on the project and an appropriate proportion of variable and fixed overhead. All non-current assets purchased or constructed are capitalised as the expenditure is incurred and depreciated as soon as the asset is held ‘ready for use’. Capital works still in progress at balance date are recognised as other non-current assets and transferred to infrastructure, property, plant & equipment when completed ready for use.

6.3 Subsequent Recognition Certain asset classes are revalued on a regular basis such that the carrying values are not materially different from fair value. Additions acquired subsequent to a revaluation are recognised at cost until next revaluation of that asset class. Further detail of existing valuations, methods and valuers are provided at Note 7.

6.4 Depreciation of Non-Current Assets Other than land, all infrastructure, property, plant and equipment assets recognised are systematically depreciated over their useful lives on a straight-line basis which, in the opinion of Council, best reflects the consumption of the service potential embodied in those assets.

6.5 Impairment Assets that have an indefinite useful life are not subject to depreciation and are reviewed annually for impairment. Assets carried at fair value whose future economic benefits are not dependent on the ability to generate cash flows, and where the future economic benefits would be replaced if Council were deprived thereof, are not subject to impairment testing. Other assets that are subject to depreciation are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount (which is the higher of the present value of future cash outflows or value in use). Where an asset that has been revalued is subsequently impaired, the impairment is first offset against such amount as stands to the credit of that class of assets in Asset Revaluation Reserve, any excess being recognised as an expense.

7. PAYABLES 7.1 Goods & Services Creditors are amounts due to external parties for the supply of goods and services and are recognised as liabilities when the goods and services are received. Creditors are normally paid 30 days after the month of invoice. No interest is payable on these amounts.

7.2 Payments Received in Advance & Deposits Amounts (other than grants) received from external parties in advance of service delivery, and security deposits held against possible damage to Council assets, are recognised as liabilities until the service is delivered or damage reinstated, or the amount is refunded as the case may be.

Financial Statements • FS–11


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 1 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES continued

8. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 8.1 Salaries, Wages & Compensated Absences Liabilities for employees’ entitlements to salaries, wages and compensated absences expected to be paid or settled within 12 months of reporting date are accrued at nominal amounts (including payroll based oncosts) measured in accordance with AASB 119. Liabilities for employee benefits not expected to be paid or settled within 12 months are measured as the present value of the estimated future cash outflows (including payroll based oncosts) to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. Present values are calculated using government guaranteed securities rates with similar maturity terms. Weighted average discount rate

2.18% (2016, 1.73%)

Weighted average settlement period

1.82 years (2016, 1.61 years)

No accrual is made for sick leave as Council experience indicates that, on average, sick leave taken in each reporting period is less than the entitlement accruing in that period, and this experience is expected to recur in future reporting periods. Council does not make payment for untaken sick leave.

8.2 Superannuation The Council makes employer superannuation contributions in respect of its employees to the Statewide Superannuation Scheme. No changes in accounting policy have occurred during either the current or previous reporting periods.

9. LEASES Lease arrangements have been accounted for in accordance with Australian Accounting Standard AASB 117. In respect of finance leases, where Council substantially carries all of the risks incident to ownership, the leased items are initially recognised as assets and liabilities equal in amount to the present value of the minimum lease payments. The assets are disclosed as assets under lease, and are amortised to expense over the period during which the Council is expected to benefit from the use of the leased assets. Lease payments are allocated between interest expense and reduction of the lease liability, according to the interest rate implicit in the lease. In respect of operating leases, where the lessor substantially retains all of the risks and benefits incident to ownership of the leased items, lease payments are charged to expense over the lease term.

10. GST IMPLICATIONS In accordance with Interpretation 1031 ‘Accounting for the Goods & Services Tax’: zz Receivables and Creditors include GST receivable and payable. zz Except in relation to input taxed activities, revenues and operating expenditures exclude GST receivable and payable. zz Non-current assets and capital expenditures include GST net of any recoupment. zz Amounts included in the Statement of Cash Flows are disclosed on a gross basis.

11. COMPARATIVE INFORMATION Comparative information has been reclassified to be consistent with the current year disclosure of equivalent information. The comparative amounts in the Statement of financial position, Statement of changes in equity and the Statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income have been restated. Refer to Note 16.

12. PENDING ACCOUNTING STANDARDS Certain new accounting standards and interpretations have been published that are not mandatory for the 30 June 2017 reporting period: Financial Instruments – Disclosures zz AASB 7 Financial Instruments zz AASB 9 zz AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers zz AASB 16 Leases zz AASB 1058 Income for Not-for-Profit Entities zz Standards containing consequential amendments to other Standards and Interpretations arising from the above – AASB 2010-7, AASB 2014-1, AASB 2014-3, AASB 2014-4, AASB 2014-5, AASB 2014-6, AASB 2014-7, AASB 2014-8, AASB 2014-9, AASB 2014-10, AASB 2015-1, AASB 2015-2, AASB 2015-3, AASB 2015-4, AASB 2015-5, AASB 2015-6 and AASB 2015-7.

FS–12 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 1 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES continued Other than AASB 16 and AASB 1058 Council is of the view that none of the above new standards or interpretations will affect any of the amounts recognised in the financial statements, but that they may impact certain information otherwise disclosed. Accounting Standard AASB 16 Leases may have a material effect on the amounts disclosed in these reports, particularly in relation to Infrastructure, Property, Plant & Equipment, but does not commence until the 2019/20 financial period, and it is not Council’s intention to adopt this Standard early. Accounting Standard AASB 1058 Income for Not-for-Profit Entities may have a material effect on the amounts disclosed in these reports, particularly in relation to revenue from Grants & Subsidies, but does not commence until the 2019/20 financial period, and it is not Council’s intention to adopt this Standard early.

NOTE 2 – INCOME Notes

2017 $

2016 $

RATES General Rates Residential Farmland Mining Business

1,187,266

1,078,151

24,561

24,855

17,804

9,276

103,758

89,846

1,333,389

1,202,128

118,976

116,513

118,976

116,513

998,637

886,349

Special Rates Animal Management Annual Charges Waste Management Service

998,637

886,349

2,451,002

2,204,990

774,067

630,029

1,647,785

327,297

2,421,852

957,326

USER CHARGES Accommodation Charges Equipment Hire Income INVESTMENT INCOME Interest on investments Banks & other

27,674

87,389

Term Deposit

214,591

271,471

242,265

358,860

Agency Fees

5,273,742.00

5,142,583.00

Contract fee income

1,561,174.00

5,842,883.00

OTHER INCOME

Fuel Tax Rebate

29,842.00

27,489.00

Reimbursements

378,903.00

80,440.00

Service fee income Creditor write off Other Income

1,026,327.00

896,829.00

275,353.00

337,052.00

850.00

1,794.00

8,546,191

12,329,070

10,408,510

9,906,935

619,960

804,864

GRANTS, SUBSIDIES AND CONTRIBUTIONS Commonwealth government – Operational grant Commonwealth government – Capital grant

Financial Statements • FS–13


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 2 – INCOME continued

Notes

2017 $

2016 $

Northern Territory government – Operational grant

8,076,305

7,481,663

Northern Territory government – Capital grant

1,780,027

1,416,691

Other

394,129

1,475,488

21,278,931

21,085,641

Add: Unexpended Grants prior year

5,010,407

1,189,426

Less: Unexpended Grants repaid

(490,827)

(773,168)

(1,618,967)

(5,010,407)

24,179,544

16,491,492

Anmatjere Playgroup – Prime Minister & Cabinet

200,000

200,000

Atitjere Jet Creche – Dept Education and Training

39,923

CDP Performance payment – Prime Minister & Cabinet

250,000

Total Grants recorded as Income

Less: Unexpended Grants this year Grant sources Commonwealth Government – operation Grant

Centrelink

668,020

662,139

Community Home Support Program (CHSP) – Dept of Health

1,027,592

611,469

Community Safety Patrols – Prime Minister & Cabinet

3,401,770

3,401,770

Flexible Aged Care – Dept of Health

644,673

633,923

Home Care Packages (HCP) – Dept of Health

812,546

589,979

Laramba Childcare – Dept Education and Training

326,324

289,559

Laramba Childcare additional funding – Dept Education and Training

5,000

Mediation and Community Justice Yuendumu – Prime Minister & Cabinet

435,000

311,000

Northern Territory Jobs Packages – Dept of Health

618,462

303,751

29,893

Outside School Hours care – Anmatjere – Dept Education and Training

119,223

105,910

Outside School Hours care – Yuelamu – Dept Education and Training

120,335

107,009

Nyirripi Jet Creche – Dept Education and Training

Remote Community Legacy Asbestos Mapping Project School Nutrition Program (SNP) – Prime Minister & Cabinet

15,000

543,604

543,604

Service system development – Dept of Health

15,000

Six Mile/Yuelamu basketball upgrade

258,300

847,010

847,010

37,753

Youth Development Sport & Recreation – Prime Minister & Cabinet Yuelamu Jet Creche – Dept Education and Training Yuendumu Childcare and playgroup Yuendumu Childcare and playgroup – Prime Minister & Cabinet

4,992

643,951

643,951

10,408,510

9,906,935

Commonwealth Government – Capital Grant Establishment of an office in Atitjere Community – Dept of Health Roads to Recovery funding – Dept of Infrastructure, Transport and Reg Dev

15,000

604,960

804,864

619,960

804,864

Northern Territory Government – Operation Grant CHSP Nursing Program – NT Primary Health Network

25,000

44,380

Community Litter Monitoring APP – NTEPA

21,000

Consultancy appointment – rehabilitation legacy waste facility – LGANT

3,636

29,560

28,872

Community Champions Program – Dept of Chief Minister

Disability in Home Support Service – Dept of Health

FS–14 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 2 – INCOME continued Notes

2017 $

2016 $

FAA Generals – NT Grants Commission*

1,429,859

992,516

FAA Roads – NT Grants Commission*

1,246,962

831,417

Homelands Extra Allowance – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

440,000

358,800

Homelands Jobs Program – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

242,916

242,916

Housing Repair and Maintenance – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

279,587

264,174

Indigenous Jobs Development – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

631,000

631,000

Indigenous Response Program (VET activities) – Dept of Trade Business and Innovation

30,240

Local Authority – Atitjere – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

27,986

27,986

Local Authority – Engawala – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

21,365

21,365

Local Authority – Lajamanu – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

93,360

93,360

Local Authority – Laramba – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

38,267

38,267

Local Authority – Nyirripi – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

32,065

32,065

Local Authority – TiTree – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

114,651

114,651

Local Authority – Willowra – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

34,322

34,322

Local Authority – Yuelamu – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

31,061

31,061

103,941

103,941

30,000

646,767

596,359

Local Authority – Yuendumu – Dept of Local Government and Community Services Men’s Shed – Dept of Chief Minister Municipal and Essential Services – Dept of Local Government and Community Services Municipal and Essential Services (SPG) – Dept of Local Government and Community Services Northern Territory Jobs Packages – Dept of Health NT Operational Subsidy – Dept of Local Government and Community Services Public Library Program – NT Library Regional Waster Coordinator – LGANT Remote Sport and Recreation Program – DTC – Sport and Recreation Division Support Minor of Sport and Rec – DTC – Sport and Recreation Division Yuendumu Childcare and playgroup – Dept of Education

217,250

303,750

2,210,633

2,091,311

87,981

87,981

37,500

214,000

214,000

25,000

15,402

12,163

8,076,305

7,481,663

Upgrade roads and infrastructure in the Yuendumu CBD – Dept of Transport

323,122

MES SPG – Replace water main from Ti Tree to Woods Camp and Petyale

Northern Territory Government – capital Grant 110,000

MES SPG – Single house solar systems with batteries at Spotted Tiger

85,000

MES SPG – Replace reticulation main at Spotted Tiger

15,000

MES SPG – Feasibility assessment for CDRC Homelands

30,000

MES SPG – Purchase and install an inverter

26,182

MES SPG – Battery replacement program based on CAT assessment – Mt Eaglebeak

230,000

MES SPG – Battery replacement program based on CAT assessment – Akaye

180,000

– –

Financial Statements • FS–15


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 2 – INCOME continued

Notes MES SPG – Upgrade septic systems – various locations

2017 $

2016 $

210,000

MES SPG – Telemery system

90,000

MES SPG – Repair and replace water tanks install compound/tanks

40,000

Solar lights Atitjere Community – SPG – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

36,000

Solar lights Laramba Community Parks – SPG – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

50,109

Garbage Truck Lajamanu Community – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

– –

39,032

Rubbish Truck Nyirripi Community – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

150,582

Improve business connectivity to Council offices – Dept of Local Government and Community Services

165,000

Litter & recycling Hots Spot – NTEPA

15,000

MES SPG – Install header tanks and fenced compound – Irrerlirre

40,600

MES SPG – Install remote telemetry and back up generator – Irrerlirre

66,730

MES SPG – Replace/upgrade dysfunctional batteries – Irrerlirre

154,000

SPG – Skid steer loaders and trailer – Engawala

51,550

SPG – Skid steer loaders and trailer – Nyirripi

51,550

SPG – Lajamanu oval lights

547,188

Laramba Shade structure and water projects

12,558

SPG – Compactor truck – Yuendumu

194,017

Upgrade roads and infrastructure in the Yuendumu CBD

258,498

SPG – Lajamanu Dog Enclosure Other Grants

25,000

1,780,027

1,416,691

394,129

1,475,488

394,129

1,475,488

* Includes $452,024 and $486,441 2017/18 advance payment for FAA Roads and FAA General purpose respectively Conditions over grants & contributions

Grants and contributions which were obtained on the condition that they be expended for specified purposes or in a future period, but which are not yet expended in accordance with those conditions, are as follows: Unexpended at the close of the previous reporting period

12,061,132

13,197,560

(14,983,558 )

(16,043,305 )

(490,827 )

(773,168 )

Less: Expended during the current period from revenues recognised in previous reporting periods Amount recognised as liabilities in current reporting period due to obligation to pay back to the funding body. Prior year unexpended grants repaid to the funding bodies. Plus: amounts recognised as revenues in this reporting period but not yet expended in accordance with the conditions Surplus balances at the close of current reporting period

12(b)

Net increase (decrease) in assets subject to conditions in the current reporting period

12,244,446

15,680,045

8,831,193

12,061,132

(3,229,939 )

(1,136,428 )

1,618,967

5,010,407

Split of surplus balance Unexpended grant liability Unexpended grant reserve

FS–16 • Financial Statements

8

7,212,226

7,050,725

8,831,193

12,061,132


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 NOTE 3 – EXPENSES Notes

2017 $

2016 $

EMPLOYEE COSTS Salaries and Wages

13,166,322

12,993,551

Employee leave expense

2,284,724

2,222,514

Superannuation – defined contribution plan contributions

1,388,734

1,406,993

13,153

28,083

227,127

527,476

48,269

46,544

17,128,329

17,225,161

329

361

154,512

248,794

Fringe benefit tax Workers’ Compensation Insurance Other Total Operating Employee Costs Total Number of Employees (Full time equivalent at end of reporting period) OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES Advertising Auditor’s Remuneration – Auditing the financial reports – Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

40,800

50,595

Bad and Doubtful debts

58,390

162,883

Bank Fees Elected Member Allowances Local Authority Allowances

6,298

6,955

319,865

314,524

25,297

27,869

Insurance

437,899

364,127

IT expenses (network and internet)

459,035

234,393

Membership or Subscriptions

71,101

55,696

Postage, Freight and courier

62,316

113,086

Sundry Expenses

21,825

89,173

Telephone

261,914

270,734

Training and Conference Expenses (Job Seekers)

524,745

581,667

Travelling and accommodation Subtotal – Other operating Expenses

924,806

632,911

3,368,803

3,153,407

MATERIALS, CONTRACTS & OTHER EXPENSES Consulting Fees

229,403

171,807

Contract Labour

2,384,958

Contract Materials and Labour

6,822,823

1,547,041

Fuel and Oil

538,428

602,449

Materials Food

630,627

529,570

Materials Other

596,187

1,112,437

Minor Asset Purchases

156,387

236,569

Motor Vehicle expenses

696,413

642,337

Operating Lease

194,722

320,213

Printing and Stationary

132,699

108,729

Protective Clothing and uniforms

86,341

70,143

2,164,703

1,359,571

Software and business systems

347,726

439,552

Utility expenses

564,339

532,431

13,160,798

10,057,807

Repairs and Maintenance

Financial Statements • FS–17


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 3 – EXPENSES continued 2017 $

2016 $

Buildings

620,340

291,926

Infrastructure

495,789

255,153

Plant and Equipment

588,254

494,745

Vehicles

722,950

666,385

20,234

20,246

Notes DEPRECIATION, AMORTISATION & IMPAIRMENT Depreciation

Furniture & Fittings Leasehold Improvements

2,767

2,774

2,450,334

1,731,229

2017 $

2016 $

NOTE 4 – GAIN ON DISPOSAL OF ASSETS Notes INFRASTRUCTURE, PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT Assets renewed or directly replaced Proceeds from disposal

85,422

121,732

(31,658)

(105,874)

Gain (Loss) on disposal

53,764

15,858

NET GAIN (LOSS) ON DISPOSAL OR REVALUATION OF ASSETS

53,764

15,858

Less: Carrying amount of assets sold

NOTE 5 – CURRENT ASSETS Notes

2017 $

2016 $

Cash at Bank

9

5,054,685

6,298,298

Cash on Hand

9

CASH & EQUIVALENT ASSETS

3,756

3,687

10,637,817

10,291,895

15,696,258

16,593,880

Rates – General & Other

648,691

590,570

Accrued Revenues

190,761

20,135

GST Recoupment

49,354

100,350

Trade Receivable

174,445

871,704

1,063,251

1,582,759

(181,636)

1,063,251

1,401,123

Short Term Deposits & Bills, etc TRADE & OTHER RECEIVABLES

Total Less: Allowance for Doubtful Debts

FS–18 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 NOTE 6 – INFRASTRUCTURE, PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT VALUATION OF ASSETS General Valuation Principles Assets at deemed cost – At 1 July 2004 upon the transition to AIFRS, Council elected pursuant to AASB 1.19 to retain a previously established cost under GAAP as its deemed cost. With subsequent additions at cost, this remains as the basis of recognition of nonmaterial asset classes. Accounting procedure – Upon revaluation, the current new replacement cost and accumulated depreciation are re-stated such that the difference represents the fair value of the asset determined in accordance with AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement: accumulated depreciation is taken to be the difference between current new replacement cost and fair value. In the case of land, fair value is taken to be the current replacement cost. Highest and best use – For land which Council has an unfettered right to sell, the ‘highest and best use’ recognises the possibility of the demolition or substantial modification of some or all of the existing buildings and structures affixed to the land. Much of the land under Council’s care and control is Crown land or has been declared as community land. Other types of restrictions also exist. For land subject to these restrictions, the highest and best use is taken to be the ‘highest and best use’ available to Council, with a rebuttable presumption that the current use is the ‘highest and best use’. The reason for the current use of a large proportion of Council’s assets being other than the ‘highest and best use’ relates to Council’s principal role as the provider of services to the community, rather than the use of those assets for the generation of revenue. For buildings and other structures on and in the land, including infrastructure, ‘highest and best use’ is determined in accordance with the land on and in which they are situated. Transition to AASB 13 – The requirements of AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement have been applied to all valuations undertaken by individual asset classes below.

Land under Roads Council being of the opinion that it is not possible to attribute a value sufficiently reliably to qualify for recognition, land under roads has not been recognised in these reports. Land acquired for road purposes during the year is initially recognised at cost, but transferred to fair value at reporting date, effectively writing off the expenditure.

Land & Land Improvements (Alice Springs & Ti Tree) Fair value hierarchy level 2 valuations – Certain land, and the buildings and structures thereon, are shown above as being based on fair value hierarchy level 2 valuation inputs. They are based on prices for similar assets in an active market, with directly or indirectly observable adjustments for specific advantages or disadvantages attaching to the particular asset. Fair value hierarchy level 3 valuations of land – Valuations of Crown land, community land and land subject to other restrictions on use or disposal, shown above as being based on fair value hierarchy level 3 valuation inputs, are based on prices for similar assets in an active market, but include adjustments for specific advantages or disadvantages attaching to the particular asset that are not directly or indirectly observable in that market, or the number and / or amount of observable adjustments of which are so great that the valuation is more fairly described as being based on level 3 valuation inputs. These assets were valued as at 30 June 2016 valuation by Mr. Graham Martin, Certified Practising Valuer, Maloney Field Services (National Valuation and Land Access Solutions).

Buildings & Other Structures, Infrastructure and other assets shown as fair value hierarchy level 3 There is no known market for these assets and they are valued at depreciated current replacement cost. This method involves: zz The determination of the cost to construct the asset (or its modern engineering equivalent) using current prices for materials and labour, the quantities of each being estimated based on recent experience of this or similar Councils, or on industry construction guides where these are more appropriate. zz The calculation of the depreciation that would have accumulated since original construction using current estimates of residual value and useful life under the prime cost depreciation method adopted by Council. This method has significant inherent uncertainties, relying on estimates of quantities of materials and labour, residual values and useful lives, and the possibility of changes in prices for materials and labour, and the potential for development of more efficient construction techniques.

Financial Statements • FS–19


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 6 – INFRASTRUCTURE, PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT continued Buildings & Other Structures These assets were valued as at 30 June 2016 valuation by Mr. Graham Martin, Certified Practising Valuer, Maloney Field Services (National Valuation and Land Access Solutions).

Capitalisation Thresholds Capitalisation thresholds used by Council for a representative range of assets are shown below. No capitalisation threshold is applied to the acquisition of land or interests in land. Office Furniture & Equipment Other Plant & Equipment Buildings – new construction/extensions Park & Playground Furniture & Equipment Road construction & reconstruction

$1,000 $1,000 $10,000 $2,000 $10,000

Paving & footpaths, Kerb & Gutter

$2,000

Drains & Culverts

$5,000

Reticulation extensions

$5,000

Sidelines & household connections

$5,000

Artworks

$5,000

Estimated useful lives Plant, Furniture & Equipment Office Equipment

5 to 10 years

Office Furniture

10 to 20 years

Vehicles and Road-making Equip

5 to 8 years

Other Plant & Equipment

5 to 15 years

Building & Other Structures Buildings – masonry

50 to 100 years

Buildings – other construction

20 to 40 years

Park Structures – masonry

50 to 100 years

Park Structures – other construction

20 to 40 years

Playground equipment

5 to 15 years

Benches, seats, etc

10 to 20 years

Infrastructure Sealed Roads – Surface

15 to 25 years

Sealed Roads – Structure

20 to 50 years

Unsealed Roads

10 to 20 years

Bridges – Concrete

80 to 100 years

Paving & Footpaths, Kerb & Gutter

80 to 100 years

Drains & Culverts

80 to 100 years

Flood Control Structures

80 to 100 years

Dams and Reservoirs

80 to 100 years

Bores

20 to 40 years

Reticulation Pipes – PVC

70 to 80 years

Other Assets Library Books

10 to 15 years

Artworks

indefinite

FS–20 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 6 – INFRASTRUCTURE, PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT continued 2016 $ Fair Value Level

AT FAIR VALUE

ACCUM DEP’N

AT COST

Land

3

751,750

Buildings

2

4,926,661

4,314,091

585,325

4,115,975

Furniture & Fittings

1,172,210

Plant & equipment

Leasehold Improvements

Motor Vehicle

Infrastructure

TOTAL PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT

ACCUM DEP’N

AT COST

(221,951)

9,018,801

4,926,661

(636,451)

4,064,849

585,325

(1,135,043)

37,167

5,720,070

(2,434,753)

3,285,317

348,208

(345,441)

2,767

5,527,946

(3,618,322)

6,263,736

21,198,500

(8,391,961)

751,750

AT FAIR VALUE 751,750

CARRYING AMOUNT

CARRYING AMOUNT 751,750

2016 $

Land

2017 $

751,750

4,314,091

(842,291)

8,398,461

5,176,192

(1,132,241)

4,629,276

1,172,210

(1,155,278)

16,932

6,448,302

(2,956,844)

3,491,458

348,208

(348,208)

1,909,624

5,615,958

(4,139,796)

1,476,162

19,070,275

6,263,736

23,074,961 (10,574,658)

18,764,039

CARRYING AMOUNT MOVEMENTS DURING THE YEAR $ New/Upgarde

CARRYING AMOUNT

Disposals

2017 $

Depreciation

Adjustment

CARRYING AMOUNT

751,750

Buildings

9,018,801

(620,340)

8,398,461

Infrastructure

4,064,849

1,060,216

(495,789)

4,629,276

Furniture & Fittings

37,167

(20,234)

(1)

16,932

Plant & equipment

3,285,317

796,236

(588,254)

(1,841)

3,491,458

Leasehold Improvements Motor Vehicle TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURE, PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT

2,767

(2,767)

1,909,624

319,304

(31,658)

(722,950)

1,842

1,476,162

19,070,275

2,175,756

(31,658)

(2,450,334)

18,764,039

NOTE 7 – LIABILITIES (a) TRADE & OTHER PAYABLES

Notes

Trade Creditors

2017 $ Current

2016 $ Current

281,979

Accrued Expenditure

1,868,624

1,271,957

388,754

1,553,936

2,257,378

(b) UNEXPENDED GRANTS Grant received in advance Unexpended grant

– 12(a)(i)

1,618,967

5,010,407

1,618,967

5,010,407

1,041,743

1,140,441

(c) PROVISIONS CURRENT Annual leave – Current Long Service Leave – Current Salary And Wages Audit Fees, FBT and Other Section 19 Leases

14,996

15,613

317,650

267,620

39,199

80,244

Financial Statements • FS–21


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 7 – LIABILITIES continued

(a) TRADE & OTHER PAYABLES

2017 $ Current

Notes

2016 $ Current

1,413,588

1,503,918

(d) PROVISIONS NON-CURRENT Long Service Leave – Non Current

389,805

Movements in Provisions – 2017 year only (current & non-current)

330,804

Annual Leave

Opening Balance

Long Service Leave

1,140,441

Additional amounts recognised (Less) Payments

346,417

1,195,850

74,054

(1,193,021)

(23,002)

(101,527)

Unused amounts reversed Add (Less) Remeasurement Adjustments Closing Balance

7,332

1,041,743

404,801

NOTE 8 – RESERVES UNEXPENDED GRANT RESERVES

Notes

1/7/16 $

Net Increments (Decrements) $

Transfers, Impairments $

30/6/17 $

Unexpended grant reserve

7,050,725

161,501

7,212,226

TOTAL

7,050,725

161,501

7,212,226

201,077

201,077

16,861,949

16,861,949

585,325

585,325

17,648,351

17,648,351

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE Land Buildings Infrastructure TOTAL

OTHER RESERVES

1/7/16 $

Transfers to Reserve $

Transfers from Reserve $

30/6/17 $

Fleet and Plant replacement reserve

250,000

250,000

Facilities Reserve

200,000

200,000

Waste Management Reserve

133,395

133,395

Leave Reserve

1,486,857

1,486,857

TOTAL OTHER RESERVES

2,070,252

2,070,252

PURPOSES OF RESERVES

Unexpended Grant Reserves The unexpended grant reserve is used to record unspent grants as at 30 June that does not meet the AASB 1004 criteria to be recognised as unexpended grant liability. Asset Revaluation Reserve The asset revaluation reserve is used to record increments and decrements arising from changes in fair value of non-current assets and available-for-sale financial assets. Fleet and Plant replacement reserve The fleet and plant replacement reserve is used to maintain or replace Council fleet and plant. Facilities Reserve The Facilities reserve is used to repair or maintained the Council properties. Waste Management Reserve The waste management reserve is used to maintain or replace Council waste facilities. Leave Reserve The Leave reserve held for the purposes of discharging leave liability.

FS–22 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 NOTE 9 – RECONCILIATION OF CASH FLOW STATEMENT (a) Reconciliation of Cash Cash Assets comprise highly liquid investments with short periods to maturity subject to insignificant risk of changes of value. Cash at the end of the reporting period as shown in the Cash Flow Statement is reconciled to the related items in the Statement of Financial Position as follows: Notes

2017 $

2016 $

5

5,058,441

6,301,985

5,058,441

6,301,985

1,786,354

189,992

2,450,334

1,731,229

(53,764)

(15,858)

4,182,924

1,905,363

468,513

(129,192)

Increase (Decrease) in payables

(602,414)

(844,888)

Increase (Decrease) in provision for doubtful debts

(181,636)

157,110

Total cash & equivalent assets Balances per Statement of Cash Flow

(b) Reconciliation of Change in Net Assets to Cash from Operating Activities Net Surplus (Deficit) Non-cash items in Income Statement Depreciation, amortisation & impairment Net (Gain) Loss on Disposals Add (Less): Changes in Net Current Assets (Increase) Decrease in receivables (Increase) Decrease in inventory

Increase (Decrease) in employee leave entitlements Increase (Decrease) in unexpended grants Net Cash provided by (or used in) operations

(81,358)

185,642

(3,391,441)

2,722,550

394,588

3,996,585

NOTE 10 – FUNCTIONS The activities relating to Council functions are as follows:

General Public Services Administrative, legislative and executive affairs, financial and fiscal affairs, general research and general services; also includes Natural Disaster relief.

Public Order & Safety Fire protection; local emergency services; animal control and impounding; control of public places; control of signs, hoardings and advertising, community policing and probationary matters.

Economic Affairs General economic, agriculture and forestry, fuel and energy, other labour and employment affairs, CDEP and transport and other industries, saleyards and tourism.

Environmental Protection Waste management, pollution reduction, protection of biodiversity and landscape and protection and remediation of soil, ground water and surface water.

Housing & Community Amenities Housing, housing and development, water supply and street lighting.

Recreation, Culture and Religion Facilities and venues, recreation parks and reserves, culture and religion services, museums and libraries.

Social Protection Outlays on day care services, family day care, occasional care and outside school hours care, aged service, shelter protection, drug and alcohol treatment programs; also includes relief from man-made disasters.

Financial Statements • FS–23


FS–24 • Financial Statements

Transfers from unexpended grants reserve to accumulated funds

ACTUAL 2016 $

BUDGET 2017 $

ACTUAL 2017 $

ACTUAL 2016 $

15,858

1,987,187

738,136

358,860

99,212

14,112

– 124,803

47,650 1,250,245

12,263

962,141

279,346

294,255

350,166

952,700

979,581

36,011

145,653

ACTUAL 2017 $

(885,921)

1,177,719 (5,845,711)

267,995

879,057

356,801

(168,585) 1,439,381

953,272

(73,215)

173,319

TOTALS

508,710

275,146

9,268,003 4,425,536 3,886,247 3,437,633 8,903,134 7,512,629 1,994,686 1,151,754

252,178 1,530,490 1,961,735

729,192

703,289

6,294,032 8,953,644

997,674

17,564

702,317 6,574,854 4,562,650

756,784

Total

(94,652) 1,015,868

1,960

433,819

988,244

(1,513,318) (1,482,057)

344,312

797,790

Other operating expenses

1,706,910

2,137,466

5,518,279 3,065,356 2,452,794 2,465,574

173,417

208,000

6,179,792

3,943,098

BUDGET 2017 $

3,141,378

ACTUAL 2016 $

57,145

230,541

7,029,412 10,748,352

5,687,817

ACTUAL 2017 $

HOUSING & COMMUNITY

69,738

109,678

897,008

(85,373)

1,249,961

9,080,929

1,987,412

2,544,356

4,549,161

1,388,277

3,565

5,032,205

4,443,382

2,956,391

3,252,842

9,817,983 10,867,429

2,273,650

3,277

3,570,524

3,970,532

991,051 10,330,890 12,774,374 14,120,271

877,255

14,999

98,797

ACTUAL 2016 $

987,828 1,076,424

104,441

152,771

730,616

8,382,082 4,693,531 4,765,304 3,794,434 8,734,549 8,952,010 2,947,958 1,078,539 1,161,245

114,048

15,000

125,839

BUDGET 2017 $

2,445,097

2,312,199 2,328,788

Materials & contracts

ACTUAL 2017 $

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Depreciation & amortisation

5,495,151 5,661,816

Employee costs

OPERATING EXPENSES

BUDGET 2017 $

ECONOMIC AFFAIRS

5,282,041 4,564,483 4,651,980 3,734,521 7,359,501 7,710,523 2,303,537

ACTUAL 2016 $

– (3,858,979)

53,764

7,471,751 3,107,933

137,500

Profit on disposal of assets

Total

609,141

242,265

(615,634)

ACTUAL 2017 $

1,647,071 2,818,397

136,752

Other operating revenues

Rates, User charges & fees

260,000

5,290,428

Interest

Grants Revenue

OPERATING REVENUES

BUDGET 2017 $

PUBLIC ORDER & SAFETY

REVENUES, EXPENSES AND ASSETS HAVE BEEN DIRECTLY ATTRIBUTED TO THE FOLLOWING FUNCTIONS & ACTIVITIES

GENERAL PUBLIC SERVICES

Note 10 – FUNCTIONS continued

CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 10 – FUNCTIONS continued RECREATION, CULTURE & RELIGION BUDGET 2017 $

ACTUAL 2017 $

SOCIAL PROTECTION

ACTUAL 2016 $

TOTAL

BUDGET 2017 $

ACTUAL 2017 $

ACTUAL 2016 $

BUDGET 2017 $

ACTUAL 2017 $

ACTUAL 2016 $

5,496,871

6,521,574

4,377,106

28,562,849

24,179,544

20,350,471

260,000

242,265

358,860

OPERATING REVENUES Grants Revenue

1,782,629

1,461,461

1,413,091

Interest Other operating revenues

13,811

13,541

Rates, User charges & fees

(10,996)

(41,213)

Profit on disposal of assets

Transfers from unexpended grants reserve to accumulated funds

1,782,629

1,464,276

1,385,419

Total

657,500

564,358

451,613

7,113,847

8,546,191

12,329,070

(32,626)

(233,359)

4,172,064

4,872,854

3,162,316

137,500

53,764

15,858

(3,858,979) 6,154,371

7,053,305

4,595,360 40,246,260 37,894,618 32,357,596

OPERATING EXPENSES Employee costs

904,649

542,672

730,251

3,183,111

2,781,655

2,413,883

18,698,507

17,128,329

17,225,161

Materials & contracts

506,695

272,443

228,441

1,326,839

1,839,803

1,118,508

13,884,401

13,160,798

10,057,807

3,190

2,450,334

1,731,229

777,782

4,675,927

3,368,803

3,153,407

Depreciation & amortisation Other operating expenses Total

371,286

330,481

251,374

1,110,870

566,708

1,782,630

1,145,596

1,210,066

5,620,820

5,188,166

(1)

318,680

175,353

533,551

1,865,139

TOTALS

4,313,363 37,258,835 36,108,264 32,167,604 281,997

2,987,425

1,786,354

189,992

Note: As per AASB 1004 unspent funds to be recognised as unexpended grant liability must meet the following criteria: 1. Multi-year agreements that have expired at 30 June 2. Single year agreements where there is a clause in the agreement that specifically requires repayment, i.e. says ‘must be repaid’ and not that the Department ‘may request repayment’ 3. Funding committed for expenditure at 30 June

After reviewing the funding agreements for funding bodies with unspent funds as at end of 2015–16 financial year no funding agreements stated that unspent funds ‘must be repaid’. However, there are some commitments of expenditure for the following programs: Programs Six mile Basketball court upgrade (Pmara Jutunta) Six mile Basketball court upgrade (Pmara Jutunta) – 4-1ZRGBZ3

Amount 65,000 176,599

Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements

4,768,808

Unexpended grant liabity as a resulting of adopting AASB 1004 Note 12(b)(i)

5,010,407

The effect of above adjustment The Unexpended Grant liability as 30 June 2016 Less: Unexpended grant liability as a resulting of adopting AASB 1004 Total Unexpended Grant reserves

$12,061,132 5,010,407 $7,050,725

Financial Statements • FS–25


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 NOTE 11 – FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS Accounting Policies Bank, Deposits at Call, Short Term Deposits

Accounting Policy: Carried at lower of cost and net realiseable value; Interest is recognised when earned. Terms & conditions: Short term deposits have an average maturity of 30 days and an average interest rates of 1.75% (2016: 30 days, 1.9%). Carrying amount: approximates fair value due to the short term to maturity.

Receivables – Rates & Associated Charges (including legals & penalties for late payment)

Accounting Policy: Carried at nominal values less any allowance for doubtful debts. An allowance for doubtful debts is recognised (and re-assessed annually) when collection in full is no longer probable.

Receivables – Fees & other charges

Accounting Policy: Carried at nominal values less any allowance for doubtful debts. An allowance for doubtful debts is recognised (and re-assessed annually) when collection in full is no longer probable. Terms & conditions: Unsecured, and do not bear interest. Although Council is not materially exposed to any individual debtor, credit risk exposure is concentrated within the Council’s boundaries. Carrying amount: approximates fair value (after deduction of any allowance).

Liabilities – Creditors and Accruals

Accounting Policy: Liabilities are recognised for amounts to be paid in the future for goods and services received, whether or not billed to the Council. Terms & conditions: Liabilities are normally settled on 30 day terms. Carrying amount: approximates fair value.

LIQUIDITY ANALYSIS 2017

Due < 1 year $

Due > 1 year; < 5 years $

Due > 5 years $

Total Contractual Cash Flows $

Carrying Values $

Financial Assets Cash & equivalents Term Deposits Receivable

5,058,441

5,058,441

5,058,441

10,637,817

10,637,817

10,637,817

823,136

823,136

16,519,394

16,519,394

1,553,936

1,553,936

1,553,936

Current Borrowings

1,618,967

Non-Current Borrowings

1,553,936

3,172,903

6,301,985

6,301,985

6,301,985

10,291,895

10,291,895

10,291,895

1,462,274

1,462,274

1,462,274

18,056,154

18,056,154

1,868,624

1,868,624

1,868,624

Total

823,136 16,519,394

Financial Liabilities Payables

Total

1,553,936

2016 Financial Assets Cash & equivalents Term Deposits Receivable Total

18,056,154

Financial Liabilities Payables Current Borrowings Non-Current Borrowings Total

– 1,868,624

All financial instruments are categorised as loans and receivables. Note: Statutory receivables, such as rates, have been excluded from the above tables.

FS–26 • Financial Statements

1,868,624

1,868,624


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 11 – FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS continued 30 June 2017 Weighted Average Interest Rate %

30 June 2016 Weighted Average Interest Rate %

Carrying Value $

Overdraft

0.00%

0.00%

Other Variable Rates

0.00%

0.00%

Fixed Interest Rates

0.00%

Carrying Value $

0.00% –

Net Fair Value All carrying values approximate fair value for all recognised financial instruments. There is no recognised market for the financial assets of the Council.

Risk Exposures Credit Risk represents the loss that would be recognised if counterparties fail to perform as contracted. The maximum credit risk on financial assets of the Council is the carrying amount, net of any provision for doubtful debts. In accordance with regulations, all Council investments are made with authorised deposit taking institutions. Except as detailed in Notes 5 & 6 in relation to individual classes of receivables, exposure is concentrated within the Council’s boundaries, and there is no material exposure to any individual debtor. Market Risk is the risk that fair values of financial assets will fluctuate as a result of changes in market prices. All of Council’s financial assets are denominated in Australian dollars and are not traded on any market, and hence neither market risk nor currency risk apply. Liquidity Risk is the risk that Council will encounter difficulty in meeting obligations with financial liabilities. Liabilities have a range of maturity dates based on cash inflows. Council also has available a range of bank overdraft and short-term draw down facilities that it can access. Interest Rate Risk is the risk that future cash flows will fluctuate because of changes in market interest rates. Most of Council’s financial instruments – both assets and liabilities – are at fixed rates. Any such variations in future cash flows will not be material in effect on either Council incomes or expenditures.

NOTE 12 – COMMITMENTS Notes

2017 $

2016 $

12(a) Capital Commitments Land

Buildings Infrastructure Plant & Equipment

121,311

39,367

34,500

194,017

195,178

194,017

195,178

194,017

These expenditures are payable: Not later than one year Later than one year and not later than 5 years Later than 5 years

195,178

194,017

39,185

65,000

176,599

12(b) Unexpended Grant 12(b)(i) Unexpended Grant liability Six mile Basketball court upgrade (Pmara Jutunta)

Central Land Council

Six mile Basketball court upgrade (Pmara Jutunta) – 4-1ZRGBZ3

Prime Minister & Cabinet

Upgrade roads and infrastructure in the Yuendumu CBD

Dept of Transport (NT)

557,582

Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

826,246

4,768,808

Financial Statements • FS–27


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 12 – COMMITMENTS continued Notes Outstations Homelands Extra Allowance

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

2017 $

2016 $

195,954

1,618,967

5,010,407

12(b)(ii) Unexpended Grant reserves Remote Community Legacy Asbestos Mapping Project

Asbestos Safety & Eradication Agency

70,257

Youth Sport and Recreation

CAYLUS

3,847

7,138

Youth Sport and Recreation – early release

CAYLUS

59,579

77,761

Willowra Community Park Playgroup

Central Land Council

1,500

1,500

Community Safety School Program – Yuendumu

Charles Darwin University

5,683

After School Care Ti-Tree

Dept Education & Training

29,875

7,748

After School Care : Yuelamu

Dept Education & Training

17,495

3,914

Anmatjere Outside School Care Program Additional funding

Dept Education & Training

5,000

Laramba Child Care Centre

Dept Education & Training

12,018

Laramba Child Care Centre – Additional funding

Dept Education & Training

5,000

Yuelamu Outside School Care Program

Dept Education & Training

5,000

RAAS–Vacation Program Engawala

Dept Health NT

529

529

RAAAS AOD Abuse – Atitjere

Dept Health NT

3,310

3,310

Community Champions Program

Dept of Chief Minister

22,190

Men’s Shed, Establish a men’s shed

Dept of Chief Minister

30,000

NTECS subsidy

Dept of Education

11,335

Home Care Packages

Dept of Health

521,159

169,375

Northern Territory Jobs Package

Dept of Health

87,934

70,632

Aged Care Service Improvement & Healthy

Dept of Health

14,369

116,624

Flexible Aged Care

Dept of Health

307,734

395,414

DOHA Community Care Laramba/Lajamanu/Nyirripi 2008/9

Dept of Health

64,794

75,900

NT HAAC

Dept of Health

80,364

80,364

Community Home Support Program

Dept of Health

445,405

171,001

Community Home Support Program

Dept of Health

29,194

Home and Community Care Engawala

Dept of Health

6,689

6,689

Home Care Packages Unexpended – upgrade Aged care building

Dept of Health

33,465

Disability In Home Support Service

Dept of Health (NT)

Roads to Recovery

Dept of Infrastructure, Transport & Reg Dev

3,440

7,229

447,898

159,854

HMP Fencing – Shire

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

187,579

337,858

Outstation Municipal Essential Services/HMS/Jobs

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

199,896

219,570

Outstations Homelands Extra Allowance

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

108,743

Outstation Capital Projects

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

1,273,526

796,680

Laramba Basketball court Lighting Repairs

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

482

482

SPG – Lajamanu Oval Upgrade

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

39,735

334,929

SPG – install 8 solar lights Atitjere

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

36,000

FSFE Solar light for Laramba Parks

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

9,028

SPG – Skid Steer Loader/Trailer grants – Nyirripi

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

150,582

SPG – Yuendumu Waste Compactor

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

194,017

SPG Waste Management Lajamanu

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

15,000

Laramba Shade Structure and Water Project; RJCP

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

186

FS–28 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 12 – COMMITMENTS continued Notes

2017 $

2016 $

LA Strengthening Funds

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

11,334

Improve Connectivity to Council’s Remote Communities

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

79,324

20,000

30,240

247,946

Indigenous Response Funding

Dept of Trade Business & Innovation

Upgrade roads and infrastructure in the Yuendumu CBD

Dept of Transport (NT)

Remote Sport and Recreation Program

Dept Tourism & Culture – Sport & Recreation division

38,627

53,081

Support Minor of Sport and Rec

Dept Tourism & Culture – Sport & Recreation division

1,470

20,760

Local Authority Project Funding–Atitjere

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

56,897

28,911

NTG Local Authority Project Funding Engawala

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

24,224

27,984

NTG Local Authority Project Funding– Lajamanu

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

85,031

3,248

NTG Local Authority Project Funding Laramba

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

37,246

21,665

NTG Local Authority Project Funding–Nyirripi

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

21,925

18,772

NTG Local Authority Project Funding Ti Tree

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

128,641

45,362

NTG Local Authority Project Funding– Willowra

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

34,322

9,747

NTG Local Authority Project Funding – Yuelamu

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

32,580

38,113

NTG Local Authority Project Funding Yuendumu

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

114,131

46,829

Lajamanu Dog Enclosure

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

25,000

25,000

Nyirripi Territory Housing upgrade/Maintenance

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

410,157

CTG Strengthening Local Authorities Funding

Dept of Local Government & Community Services

Nyirripi 2017 Aged care Bus Purchase

GMAAAC

20,258

76,096

Nyirripi Cemetery & church Improvement

GMAAAC

22,429

Yuelamu Cemetery Landscaping project

GMAAAC

214

214

Yuelamu Oval upgrade

GMAAAC

6,534

Yuendumu Cemetery & Funeral Equipment

GMAAAC

4,442

4,442

Upgrade Toilet block– Holy Ground Park, Lot 358

GMAAAC

982

982

Lajamanu Accommodation Units Project Management

GMAAAC

18,691

Lajamanu S&R vehicle R&M

GMAAAC

2,698

Lajamanu Oval Upgrade

GMAAAC

4,801

6,567

Lajamanu Water Park Feasibility study

GMAAAC

4,690

4,801

Lajamanu Street light project

GMAAAC

24,000

Engawala Playgroup

Jesuit Social Services

26,460

Waste Management Co-ordinator

LGANT

48,004

Public Library Program

Northern Territory Library

51,340

24,696

Litter & recycling Hots Spot

NT Environmental Protection (NTEPA)

1,195

1,195

6,382

Community Litter Monitoring APP

NT Environmental Protection (NTEPA)

Northern Territory Environment Protection Authority – Litter

NT Environmental Protection (NTEPA)

4,814

FAA Roads

NT Grants Commission

246,437

FAA General purpose Grant – early release 2017/18

NT Grants Commission

486,441

FAA Roads Grant – early release 2017/18

NT Grants Commission

425,024

CHSP Nursing Program

NT Primary Health Network

15,955

23,566

Domestic Violence : Yuendumu

Prime Minister & Cabinet

34,812

34,812

Employment &Training (CDEP) : Shire

Prime Minister & Cabinet

38,442

38,442

CDP Structured Activities (Builder Trainer

Prime Minister & Cabinet

199,339

676,869

Financial Statements • FS–29


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 Note 12 – COMMITMENTS continued 2017 $

Notes

2016 $

CDP – Performance payment

Prime Minister & Cabinet

75,599

250,000

IAS – Anmatjere Playgroup – 4-1G2Y3ZV

Prime Minister & Cabinet

54,534

58,662

IAS – Yuendumu Childcare/Playgroup – 4-1G2X4O8 (Excluding deficit B/Fwd.)

Prime Minister & Cabinet

3,353

IAS – Community Safety Patrols – 4-3K9KTZN

Prime Minister & Cabinet

326,116

455,820

IAS – Community Safety Patrols – 4-1G2TZJ0

Prime Minister & Cabinet

392,647

238,266

IAS – Mediation and Justice –4-1G2VTQV(Excluding deficit Prime Minister & Cabinet B/Fwd.)

65,424

128,879

244,462

1,179

1,929

IAS – Youth Sport and Recreation 4-1G2ZYPH & 4-1G3OFHC

Prime Minister & Cabinet

Club Commitment – Support AFL Club Team

Telstra

Territory Day community Grant

TIO

883

883

School Nutrition Program

Parent contribution

30,218

Community Safety Patrols – other income

Reimbursement

1,072

Youth Sport and Recreation – other income

Outcome payment/reimbursement

Total Unexpended Grant liability and Unexpended Grant reserves

11,527

11,527

7,212,226

7,050,725

8,831,193

12,061,132

NOTE 13 – FINANCIAL INDICATORS Current Ratio

2017

2016

2015

2014

Current Assets – Externally Restricted Assets Current Liabilities

3.65:1

2.05:1

1.13:1

1.13:1

NA

NA

NA

43879.84:1

3.83%

4.08%

4.10%

3.86%

31.75%

37.51%

19.22%

18.58%

Debt Service Ratio Net Debt Service Cost Operating Revenue* * as defined Rate Coverage Percentage Rate Revenues Total Revenues Rates & Annual Charges Outstanding Percentage Rates & Annual Charges Outstanding Rates & Annual Charges Collectible

Adoption of AASB 1004 also has an effect on current ratio. Prior to implementation of AASB 1004 2016 current ratio was 1:12:1.

FS–30 • Financial Statements


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 NOTE 14 – OPERATING LEASES LEASE PAYMENT COMMITMENTS OF COUNCIL Council has entered into non-cancellable operating leases for various items of computer and other plant and equipment. Contingent rental payments exist in relation to the lease of one grader if utilisation exceeds 250 hours during any month. No contingent rentals were paid during the current or previous reporting periods. No lease imposes any additional restrictions on Council in relation to additional debt or further leasing. Leases in relation to computer and office equipment permit Council, at expiry of the lease, to elect to re-lease, return or acquire the equipment leased. No lease contains any escalation clause. Commitments under non-cancellable operating leases that have not been recognised in the financial statements are as follows: 2017 $

2016 $

Not later than one year

252,352

49,487

Later than one year and not later than 5 years

442,754

438,562

695,106

488,049

Later than 5 years

NOTE 15 – RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL The Key Management Personnel of the Council include the Mayor, Councillors, CEO and certain prescribed officers under section 112 of the Local Government Act 1999. In all, 16 persons were paid the following total compensation: 2017 $ Salaries, allowances & other short term benefits Post-employment benefits Long term benefits

1,165,333 83,784 8,297

Termination benefits TOTAL

– 1,257,414

Other than amounts paid as ratepayers or residents (e.g. rates, swimming pool entry fees, etc.), Council received the following amounts in total: Contributions for fringe benefits tax purposes

Planning and building applications fees

Rentals for Council property

TOTAL

PARTIES RELATED TO KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL Seven close family members of key management personnel are employed by Council in accordance with the terms of the Award, and as recorded in the public Register of Salaries maintained in accordance with the Local Government Act.

Financial Statements • FS–31


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 NOTE 16 – RESTATEMENT OF COMPARATIVES During the year the council reviewed its accounting for unexpended grants and determined it to be more appropriate to change the recognition basis for unexpended grants to only record unspent grants compulsorily repayable to funding bodies as a liability, as opposed to the prior treatment where all grants unspent were treated as a liability. This treatment correctly reflects the recognition of unspent funds as revenue under AASB 1004 Contributions as the council has no obligation to repay the unspent funds and has therefore earned the revenue. This change has been applied retrospectively and the comparative amounts have been restated as follows:

Extract of accounts affected by the restatement

Original 1-Jul-15

Restated 1-Jul-15

Difference 1-Jul-15

Statement of Financial Position Liabilities Deferred Income

(13,197,561)

(2,287,857)

(10,909,704)

(10,909,704)

10,909,704

(10,909,704)

10,909,704

Equity Unexpended grants reserve Statement of Changes in Equity Unexpended grants reserve

Extract of accounts affected by the restatement.

Original 30-Jun-16

Restated 30-Jun-16

Difference 30-Jun-16

Statement of Financial Position Liabilities Deferred Income

(12,061,132)

(5,010,407)

(7,050,725)

(7,050,725)

7,050,725

(20,350,471)

(16,491,492)

(3,858,979)

(7,050,725)

7,050,725

Equity Unexpended grants reserve Statement of Profit or loss Grants, Subsidies & Contributions Statement of Changes in Equity Unexpended grants reserve

Extract of accounts affected by the restatement Balance at 1 July 2015 (as previously reported) Adjustments (see note 16) Balance at 1 July 2015 (restated) Net Surplus/(Deficit) (restated – see note 16) Transfers from unexpended grants reserve to accumulated funds Transfers to other reserves Balance at 30 June 2016 (restated)

FS–32 • Financial Statements

Accumulated Funds

Unexpended grants reserve

Total

252,718

252,718

10,909,704

10,909,704

252,718

10,909,704

11,162,422

189,992

189,992

3,858,979

(3,858,979)

(1,520,252)

(1,520,252)

2,781,437

7,050,725

9,832,162


CENTRAL DESERT REGIONAL COUNCIL NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

SERVICE DELIVERY CENTRES AND COMMUNITY CONTACTS

Alice Springs Office Freecall: 1300 360 605 Phone: 08 8958 9500 Fax: 08 8958 9501 Street Address: 1 Bagot Street, Alice Springs NT 0870 Postal: PO Box 2257, Alice Springs NT 0871 info@centraldesert.nt.gov.au www.centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Anmatjere (Ti Tree)

Lajamanu

Willowra

Phone 08 8966 9900 Fax 08 8966 9901 anmatjere@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Phone 08 8974 5500 Fax 08 8974 5501 lajamanu@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Phone 08 8956 4820 Fax 08 8956 4920 willowra@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Atitjere

Laramba

Yuelamu

Phone 08 8956 9787 Fax 08 8956 9917 atitjere@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Phone 08 8956 8765 Fax 08 8956 8341 laramba@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Phone 08 8956 4016 Fax 08 8956 4088 yuelamu@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Engawala

Nyirripi

Yuendumu

Phone 08 8956 9989 Fax 08 8956 9976 engawala@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Phone 08 8956 8720 Fax 08 8956 8739 nyirripi@centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Phone 08 8993 7900 Fax 08 8993 7901 yuendumu@centraldesert.nt.gov.au


www.centraldesert.nt.gov.au

Central Desert Regional Council 2016-17 Annual Report  
Central Desert Regional Council 2016-17 Annual Report  

The annual report of the Central Desert Regional Council of the Northern Territory, Australia

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