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SUMMER CHARRETTE

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ECO ABE T E M P O W E R I N G

W I T H

S U S T A I N A B L E

D E S I G N

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Eco Abet Eco (e-co) a. Short for ecology b. (as modifier) an eco group Abet (uh-bet) a. To approve, encourage, and support (an action or a plan of action); urge and help on. b. To urge, encourage, or help (a person) Eco Abet is a non profit architecture and design organization based in Kansas City whose mission is to provide design and architectural services to impoverished, underserved, and traumatized communities both locally and globally. Provision of these services is intended to positively impact the physical, economic, social, and emotional well being of the communities.


Table of Contents Eco Abet Introduction

4

One Stop Shop Team Boulevard Team Magnolia’s

16 20 28

816 Bike Collective Team Zahner Team Treanor

36 40 50

Myhouse Team BRR Team Spin

60 64 72

Switzer Neighborhood Farm Team My Smart Plans Team Burns and McDonnell

84 88 94

Credits

104


“95% of the w

focus all their effo ing services f 10% of the wo


world’s desingers forts on developfor the richest orld’s customers.” Adapted from Paul Polak, Out of Poverty: When Traditional Approaches Fail


HOW CAN WE PROVIDE DESIGN SERVICES TO THE OTHER 90% OF THE POPULATION?

>>


Eco Abet Summer Charrette 8 Eco Abet

While living in Sri Lanka, Charmalee Gunaratne became involved with the design of a UNICEF-sponsored Children’s Resource Center during the ceasefire period of 2001-2002 in war torn Kilinochchi. Since then, the design of affordable and socially responsible architecture has been the focus of her work. A few years after relocating to the United States, Charmalee, in 2008, submitted a design proposal to the Monsters of Design competition organized by Young Architects Forum Kansas City. The submission addressed transitional shelter for disaster relief housing. The same year she launched a web blog, called Eco Abet, to create awareness of design needs in low income communities.

Charmalee Gunaratne and Mary Deacy first met at a Women in Design event in Kansas City. They spoke often about their dreams and goals as architects and found they shared a common desire to design for those currently underserved. Charmalee and Mary began working on two projects in Africa with Mary’s firm, Summit Architecture, and then in 2010 co-founded Eco Abet as a nonprofit architecture and design organization. Founding board members, psychologist Amanda Drews, PhD, attorney David J. André, and educator Mary Anne Kapp from Prescott, Arizona, have lent valuable expertise and advice during the formation of Eco Abet. In March 2011, architecture graduate, Rachel Duncan, met Charmalee at Kansas City’s premier mentoring event organized by Women in Design. Their discussion centered around local homelessness and, as a result, the summer charrette was born. Shortly thereafter, Chris Richards, a student intern, donated his time and skills to work on the planning committee.


Eco Abet Introduction 9 Eco Abet

“Where resources and expertise are scarce, innovative, sustainable, and collaborative design can make a difference in people’s lives.” Cameron Sinclair, Co-Founder Architecture for Humanity

Eco Abet is passionate about helping people. Our team designs with sustainability as a focus, and truly believes that design is for everyone.


Eco Abet Summer Charrette 10 Eco Abet

GLOBAL PROJECTS

Kajjansi, Uganda St. Mary Kevin Orphanage There are approximately 2.2 million orphans in Uganda. In collaboration with Change the Truth of Kansas City, we are currently working on a master plan for St. Mary Kevin Orphanage in Uganda which houses 190 orphans.


Eco Abet Introduction 11 Eco Abet

Narok, Kenya Nabolu Girl’s Centre Traditionally, the Maasai community does not allow girls to attend school. As a result, girls frequently run from their home villages in search of opportunity. We are developing a girls’ boarding school in Narok, Kenya to provide education to these Maasai girls. The Nabolu Girl’s Centre believes that, with support, Maasai girls can maintain their cultural pride and obligations while pursuing an empowering education. The Nabolu Girls Centre brings this idea to fruition by providing girls with a safe place to seek an education, shelter, scholarships, support, and family reconciliation. Nabolu is a Maasai word that means “to open the future.” Through innovative Maasai run programming, the Nabolu Girls Centre not only opens the future for Maasai girls, but for their communities as well. Its mission is to provide access to educational resources and support to girls in need, help maintain Maasai cultural pride, teach girls integral life skills, raise awareness within the community about issues affecting Maasai girls, and provide a home away from home. Utilizing Maasai girls design concepts of their new school, Eco Abet was able to create a learning environment that will open the future to each of the individual’s aspirations.


LOCAL PROJECTS KANSAS CITY

While we have been working on projects internationally, we realize that there also is a great need locally.


Eco Abet Introduction

On July 12th, 2011, Eco Abet hosted its first annual summer charrette and fun/friendraiser at the KC Design Center in Kansas City, MO. Eco Abet brought together the Kansas City design community with representation from several non-profit organizations that address the needs of local underserved groups. There were over 70 participants and 8 charrette teams. The teams collaborated to generate a solution for a specific, identified design need. The charrette took place from 11:30 am to 5:00 pm and was followed by a reception, public exhibition, and presentation. Funds generated by the event are being used to provide architecture and design internships with Eco Abet. In return, interns will provide a valuable design service to underserved communities.

13 Eco Abet

SUMMER CHARRETTE


Eco Abet summer charrette

july

12th

2011

architecture for everyone


reStart, Inc One Stop Shop for Homeless pgs 16-35

1 816 Bike Collective

pgs 36-59

2 Newhouse Myhouse for Teens

pgs 60-83

3 Westside CAN Switzer Neighborhood Farm pgs 84-103

4


IN 2010, RESTART PROVIDED SERVICES TO 9,131 HOMELESS INDIVIDUALS IN KANSAS CITY >>


Eco Abet Design Charrette

ONE STOP SHOP for HOMELESS 18 reStart

reStart, Inc. is committed to providing shelter and supportive services to homeless men, women, youth and families with the goal of helping them move toward independence and self-sufficiency and • ending homelessness in our community. reStart provides an entire spectrum of care at five different sites, including emergency shelter, transitional living, and permanent housing with supportive programs designed to help homeless clients improve self-determination, increase skills and income, and to achieve permanent housing. In 2010, reStart provided shelter and supportive services to 9,131 homeless men, women, families, and youth, including 428 families and 3,829 children and youth. Each day, more than 550 people come to reStart for food, shelter, and the support they deserve. Despite diverse backgrounds, all reStart guests share the opportunity to “reStart” their lives. At our Homeless Services Center, located at 8th and Paseo, we provide drop-in day services for as many as 175 chronically homeless individuals daily. 87% of these individuals have a diagnosed or untreated mental illness and 56% have substance abuse disorders. reStart provides comprehensive mental health and substance abuse assessment, referral, and treatment options, with clinical services provided on site. We provide health screenings (testing for STDs, HIV, TB and other illnesses), health care education, and employment referrals through The Helping Hand of Goodwill Industries and the State of Missouri Department of Rehabilitation. We help clients access mainstream benefits, navigate community health resources and find healthcare providers. reStart provides interactive arts education and cultural experiences as well. The supportive services offered include life skills classes, housing assistance, and HIV/AIDS care. Team BOULEVARD

• • • •

Homeless Services Center Re-Design Suggestions: The wall at the guard station should be removed, halved or, at minimum, a window should be put in. The wall blocks the staff view of the full scope of the room. Internal built-in shelving, specifically for client personal hygiene supplies that are only accessible by the staff would assist in making the most of limited space and prevent the need to replace high-use, low quality temporary storage bins. Staff offices and rooms should all have windows in the doors with blinds in order to serve as safety precautions and provide the option for closed sessions if privacy is required (such as during AA meetings, or health tests/screenings, etc.). Currently, three doors do not have windows in them at all— posing safety risks for those clients and staff. The storage area needs a complete revision. There is a need for a secure space that is segmented for client belongings (and that will minimize the problem of pests coming into/out of client belongings). Also, a separate space for HSC supplies which is not accessible to clients or open to pest invasion would solve logistical problems. The addition of a space for the copier machine is needed outside of the conference/meeting space that is accessible to staff only. Additional windows throughout the building are needed to provide a view of the external happenings around the perimeter of the building. Ways in which we could make the common spaces more appealing to women and/or transgendered clients should be investigated. Reconfigure the bathrooms to make them more user friendly.

Team MAGNOLIA’S


One Stop Shop

CONTEXT PLAN

19 reStart

Neighborhood Plan

The Paseo

8th St

SITE PLAN

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

The Paseo

Lydia Ave

8th St

The Paseo

8th St

Highland Ave

Flora Ave

Site Plan

One Stop Shop

The Paseo

Admiral Blvd


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Team BOULEVARD 20 Boulevard

Existing Issues:

The new design will concentrate on improving the circulation within the structure, bathroom and shower facilities, and flow through reception and security area. It will create additional secure storage space, accommodating private offices, and separation of copy area from staff offices.

SITE

Existing Floor Plan


One Stop Shop

21 Boulevard

Interior:

The design was conceptualized down to an appropriate color palette that would help bring light and interaction into the shop. Furniture concepts include office storage and seating, common room furniture, as well as proper locker room equipment.

MATERIALS


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

22 Boulevard

Bathrooms & Storage:

The program was reworked to increase the number of showers and add safe, secure storage for workers and visitors in the back rooms

PROGRAM


One Stop Shop

23 Boulevard

Reception & Entrance:

To resolve visitors avoiding reception check in, the new plan better controls the circulation by forcing the visitors to pass by the front desk before entering the main seating area.

PROGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

24 Boulevard

c a b Common Space:

The major programmatic elements of the revised plan include a a private waiting area so meeting location and purpose are not revealed, b computer desks to provide for undistracted work space, and an c open area that allows access to all offices

PROGRAM


One Stop Shop

25 Boulevard

Office Relationship:

Dividing the open space and integrating it with similar office functions will increase interaction between support service offices and visitors

PROGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

26 Boulevard

Open Room Perspectives:

Proposed office spaces displaying color, scale and materiality

VIEWS


One Stop Shop

27 Boulevard

www.boulevard.com

ReStart: Evelyn Craig Jennifer Curzon

Executive Director Development Manager

Team Boulevard: Aimee Gray Mary Currens Shannan Slavens Matt Lero Janelle Kimsey Sara Wells

a3g architects Park University SRS Design RDM Architecture Arnold Imaging Kansas State University


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Team MAGNOLIA’S 28 Magnolia’s

Design Concerns:

The [re]design focuses on enhancing the building security, reception area, circulation, privacy and comfort, and storage. The ultimate goal was to develop a pragmatic and cost effective solution for the center.

SITE

Existing Floor Plan

PROGRAM


One Stop Shop

29 Magnolia’s

Interior:

With the stated budget realities in mind, as well as the overall needs of the organization, it was concluded that the center would be best served with a phased concept.

DIAGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

30 Magnolia’s

First Floor Plan: [Phase 1]

The initial phase would address the spatial quality of the waiting areas, a new space layout for the second floor south of the existing showers, and the efficiency of privacy needs regarding the program service offices.

PROGRAM


One Stop Shop

31 Magnolia’s

First Floor Plan: [Phase 2]

The second phase would focus on adding more functional space through the creation of a new laundry and storage area to the north of the existing showers, therefore allowing for a new multi-purpose area in its place.

PROGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

32 Magnolia’s

Plan Perspective:

The approach towards the waiting area was to segment it into two zones, a quiet seating zone and a general seating zone. The service spaces were placed between these two seating areas allowing for a more controlled and private entry into the offices.

VIEWS


One Stop Shop

33 Magnolia’s

Plan Perspective:

The entry sequence has been amended to encourage the clients to filter through the service zone, creating guest interaction with the programs being offered at the center. The seating areas will also have new window glazing at the exterior walls and thus more optimal daylighting.

VIEWS


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

34 Magnolia’s

VIEWS


One Stop Shop

35 Magnolia’s

magnoliaskc.com

ReStart: Evelyn Craig Jennifer Curzon

Executive Director Development Manager

Team Magnolia’s: Christopher Mitchell Doug Shaffer Allison Gould Matthew Heirigs Sarah Dollar Lindsay Eftink

MSM Architects MSM Architects TK Architects el dorado Kansas State University Kansas State University


A ONE OF A KIND BICYCLING ENDEAVOR >>


Eco Abet Design Charrette

816 BIKE COLLECTIVE

38 816

We are the 816 Bicycle Collective, a not-for-profit free community bicycle shop. For the last three years we have served our community by making bicycles and bicycle maintenance accessible to those who cannot afford to pay the exorbitant charges for these services.

We hope that, if nothing else, we can meet more people within our community that share our passion for helping others and making Kansas City a safer place for cyclists.

Our organization is structured around an educational platform that encourages collaboration and cooperation between volunteers and guests. We have already distributed over one hundred and fifty bicycles and served over five hundred people.

We have fostered collaborative projects with the Kansas City Art Institute, The Key Coalition Neighborhood Organization, Troost Folk, Troostfest, Troost Alliance, The Urban Planning Department of UMKC, Habitat Restore and Bridging the Gap.

The spaces that we need within the shop:

• •

Recently the 816 Bicycle Collective has fallen on hard times. The physical space we occupy is in a state of disrepair and is becoming a liability to our volunteers and guests. Our project has been a staple in our neighborhood and we, as volunteers and residents within this neighborhood, want to see the project continue to grow and become a sustainable resource to the Kansas City area. Our project is the only one of its kind in the greater Kansas City area and we intend to keep it alive despite any obstacles that may arise.

• • • •

Store front: This is where we would have bikes and parts for sale and where bikes to be earned would be stored. Front desk: A greeter station where people can be directed. We see the greeter also fixing flat tires and making small adjustments to bicycles. Chill-out spot: The area will include seating, a radio and crafts for children. Outside: This space will have permanent bicycle stands, bike art and a basketball hoop. Shop space: There will be five stands, each with their own set of basic tools. We would want these to be sectioned off by work surfaces, not walls. In addition, we would like to expand our rain barrel system outside so that we may not rely completely on water services We would like to introduce bicycle powered generators into the shop. The fewer walls in the shop the better. Our shop will be in the first floor of the South building. There is a basement which is where we would store excess bicycles, parts and lockers for our belongings. On the second floor of this building, there will be a big office space. This is where the greater Kansas City Bicycle Federation will meet as well as other bicycle advocacy groups in Kansas City. We would like to rent our other spaces out to like-minded projects.

The 816 Bicycle Collective is entirely operated by members who volunteer ten to twelve hours per week. Additionally, our income derives solely from donations by individuals and various organizations that support our project. All proceeds go to shop functionality, rent and utilities.

Team ZAHNER

Team TREANOR


816 Bike Collective

CONTEXT PLAN

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

30th St Site Plan

Holmes St

Cherry St

Gillham Rd

Oak St

39 816

31st St

Neighborhood Plan

816

31st St

Cherry St

Cherry St

SITE PLAN

Linwood Blvd


Team ZAHNER

Eco Abet Summer Charrette

40 Zahner

Key Adjacencies:

1. Union Station 2. Liberty Memorial 3. Crown Center 4. Children’s Mercy 5. Operation Breakthrough 6. Troost Lake 7. Troost Park 8. Urban Youth Center 9. Shopping Center 10.Penn Valley 11.Former Location New Building

SITE


816 Bike Collective

31st St

SITE

Residence

Alley

Future Building

Cherry St

41 Zahner

Leasable

Alley Green Space


42 Zahner

Main Street MAX Bus

Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Community Circulation:

The bike collective’s vision towards the future is to inspire more interaction and connectivity by serving as a node within the community. Its location in the neighborhood provides excellent access to major bus and bike routes.

DIAGRAM


DIAGRAM

43 Zahner

Troost Street MAX Bus

816 Bike Collective


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Residence

Driveway/Courtyard 44 Zahner

Leasable Space

First Floor Plan:

Breeze Way/ Chill out Private Shop/ Donation Processing Driveway/ Courtyard Leasable Space Public Shop Retail Space Residence

PROGRAM


816 Bike Collective

45 Zahner

PROGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Residence

Deck

46 Zahner

Leasable Space

Second Floor Plan: Deck/ Rain Water Collection Break Area/ Conference Space Deck Leasable Space Advocacy Office Space Residence

PROGRAM


816 Bike Collective

47 Zahner

PROGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Tomorrow

48 Zahner

Today

816 Bike Collective Before & After:

The design breathes new life into the area, transforming an existing intersection of boarded windows and practical desertion into a vibrant hub of transportation.

VIEWS


816 Bike Collective

49 Zahner

www.azahner.com

816 Bike Collective: Idris Raoufi Bri Lauterbach Kirk McDowell-Shaffer

Founding Member Founding Member Founding Member

Team Zahner: Eric Bosch Reeves Wiedeman Dale Duncan Trudy Faulkner Carly Pumphrey Katie Vossman Mark Neibling Bryan Gross Leandra Burnette

City of Kansas City, MO Helix Architecture Helix Architecture Helix Architecture Helix Architecture Helix Architecture Helix Architecture Helix Architecture KC Design Center


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Team TREANOR BUILDING DESCRIPTION

Construction Historically designed for both commercial and residential use, the building at 31st & Cherry is a two-story building with a basement. It has a brick foundation and part below-grade basement with assumed concrete slab-on-grade (to be field verified). It has loadbearing masonry walls with wood-framed floors and roof structure. The construction date of the north and south buildings appears to be 1911, with the center building infill occurring later. 50 Treanor

Program The building is intended to be the Collective’s bicycle display and reception area, work area, receiving, storage and offices.

METHODOLOGY Team Treanor began the charrette through a discussion with the building’s owner and client, 816 Bicycle Collective. With this discussion, the main goals and purpose of the organization’s were stated by representatives of the organization. The team evaluated the priorities of the organizations goals and how each may be met through the rehab of the property. We agreed on two primary goals with supporting objectives for each. The goals were to promote and encourage the recycling of bicycles and to help foster the community.

SITE


816 Bike Collective

RECOMMENDATIONS Evaluations 1. Structural Evaluation of all spaces and structural conditions 2. Architectural Evaluation and Assessment of existing and proposed conditions • Life Safety • Building Codes • Accessibility • Historic Integrity 3. • • •

Environmental Assessment a. Air Quality Conditions b. Lead based paint abatement c. Asbestos abatement

3. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

North Building [Interior and Exterior] North foundation wall needs structural repair Existing vent openings need to be infilled with masonry Rebuild stone areas at grade Evaluate existing condition of basement floor Assume at least 100% of wood floor joists need to be replaced Install new plywood subfloor Install new chimney caps (to prevent water infiltration) Parapet caps need to be removed for roof and flashing replacements, reinstall parapet caps over these new systems Remove paint from stone sills Repoint open and deteriorated mortar joints Repair/replace deteriorated steel lintels at first floor Replace broken stone door sills Northeast parapet corner is bowing and is out of plane. Rebuild approximately 24” of the corner on the east wall Rebuild stair framing, corner column and perimeter walls as required on north facade Repoint open and shifted brick mortar joints at window to stabilize opening Remove the exterior stair in its entirety and the roof framing on south facade Reconstruct exterior balcony framing without stairs (stairway would be located on interior) Install new guardrail at balcony Roof over balcony is not required and can be removed Remove deteriorated areas of sidewalk slab on grade and replace as required Investigate condition of exterior stairway down to basement Install guardrail around basement stairway at the sidewalk level

PROGRAM

51 Treanor

Maintenance Items 1. South Building [Interior and Exterior] • Assume foundation load bearing walls are structurally sound • Minimal ceiling height of 6’-8” is required by code for any use of the basement • Verify condition and suitability for use of assumed slab on grade • Assume at least 75% of wood floor joists need to be replaced • Install new plywood subfloor • Repoint the exposed masonry perimeter walls • Reconstruct stairs • Assess existing stone condition to ascertain removal and replacement areas • Remove the loose and delaminated stone immediately to prevent possible pedestrian injury • Replace severely deteriorated stone banding, sills and lintels • Repoint all open brick mortar joints • Parapet caps need to be removed for roof and flashing replacements, reinstall parapet caps over these new systems • Remove incompatible and non-historic infill at original storefronts and doorways • Install new chimney caps (to prevent water infiltration) • Remove paint from glazed brick at south and east elevations (at the original storefront locations) • Repoint glazed brick mortar joints, these have a white mortar

2. One-Story Building [Interior and Exterior] • Investigate that the concrete slab on grade does not have large cracks or areas out of plumb that would cause tripping hazards • Clean and remove rust from steel lintels, paint steel • Investigate condition of intermediate load bearing columns supporting lintel at storefront • Repoint open and deteriorated mortar joints • Parapet caps need to be removed for flashing replacements and reinstall parapet caps


Eco Abet Summer Charrette 4. Roofing for all buildings • Assume replacement of at least 75% of roof framing (south building) and 100% of roof framing (north building) • Replace 100% of underlayment • Replace 100% of roof system and flashing • Install new roof flashing at all parapets and under the existing parapet caps • Install new gutters and downspouts directed to rain collection devices 5. • • • • • •

General Items Secure all window and door openings Install protective openings to prevent water infiltration Where original intact and in good condition doors and windows exist, repair these features and make them operable Where window and door openings are deteriorated and cannot be repaired, install new doors and windows Insure that all window sills slope out to the exterior Install joint sealants at all openings

52 Treanor

CODE DATA Building Description Program: Building to house 816 Bicycle Collective’s bicycle display and reception area, work area, receiving, storage and offices. Construction: Two-story building with basement. Brick foundation with part belowgrade basement with assumed concrete slab-on-grade. Load-bearing masonry walls with wood-framed floors and roof structure. Applicable Codes (Kansas City, Missouri) 2006 – International Building Code 2003 – International Existing Building Code 2006 – International Mechanical Code 2005 – National Electrical Code 2006 – Uniform Plumbing Code 2000 – International Fire Code 2006 – Life Safety Code 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design

PROGRAM


816 Bike Collective Use & Occupancy Classification Occupancy Type: Mercantile – First Floor Retail, Second Floor Offices, Basement Storage (309) Total Usable Area: Basement SF First Floor SF Second Floor SF Total

= 1,538 SF = 1,530 SF = 1,530 SF = 4,598 SF

Building Heights & Areas Base Allowable Heights & Areas (table 503) • Group M, Type IIIB (4 stories, 12,500 SF per floor) Actual Building Heights & Area • 2 stories above grade (28’-0” +/-) Basement SF First Floor SF Second Floor SF Total

= 1,538 SF = 1,530 SF = 1,530 SF = 4,598 SF

Accessibility Accessibility Required (1103.1) Route Required within site (1104.2) Entrances > 50% to be accessible (1105.1) • two entrances to be provided, both to be accessible Parking: 1 accessible space to be provided (table 1106.1)

PROGRAM

53 Treanor

Building Construction Type Construction Classification – III (602.3) Fire Resistance Rating – B (table 601) Building Elements Resistant Ratings (tables 601 & 602) • Structural Frame 0 Hours • Bearing Walls Exterior 2 Hours • Bearing Walls Interior 0 Hours • Non-bearing Walls Exterior 0 Hours • Non-bearing Walls Interior 0 Hours • Floor Construction (w/ beams & joists) 0 Hours • Roof Construction (w/ beams & joists) 0 Hours


Eco Abet Summer Charrette Means of Egress Allowable Max Floor Area per Occupant for Mercantile (table 1004.1.1): • Mercantile: Areas on other floors 60 gross • Mercantile: Basement and grade floor 30 gross • Mercantile: Storage 300 gross Egress Width (1005.1): • Stairways • Other

.2” per occupant (2009 IBC .3”) .15” per occupant (2009 IBC .2”)

Allowable occupants per floor: Second Floor: 1, 530 / 60 = 25 occupants First Floor: 1,530 / 60 = 25 occupants Basement Storage: 1,538 / 300 = 5 occupants Total 55 occupants

54 Treanor

Minimum Clear Dimensions: • Doors: 32” (1008.1.1) • Stairways: 48” (1007.3) • Landings: 44” (1009.4); 48” (IBC 2009 1009.5) • Corridor Width: 44” (1017.2) Exit Access Door Required (table 1015.1) • 1 exit required for spaces <49 Exit Access Door Arrangement (1015.2.1.2) • 1/3 Diagonal Exit Access, Travel Distance (table 1016.1) • M = 200 feet (without sprinkler) Dead-end Corridors (1017.3) • No more than 20 feet. (no limit if length of dead-end is less than 2.5 times width of corridor) Corridor Fire Resistance (table 1017.1) • Not required, less than 30 occupants served on second floor Fire Barriers Required at Vertical Exit Enclosures (1020.1) • One vertical exit – 1-hour rated enclosure • Openings: 1 hour (706.3.2) 

PROGRAM


816 Bike Collective Shaft & Vertical Exit Enclosures • Required at openings in floor/ceiling assembly (707.2) • Not required at 50% of egress stairway (707.2 Except. 11) (1005.3.2, Except. 8) • Rating: 1 hr (707.4) • Continuity: floor to assembly above (707.5) • Openings: 1 hr assembly (707.7 and table 715.4) Opening Protectives • Doors in Corridors: 20 min (715.4.3) • Doors in Exit Enclosures: 1 hr (714.2.4) • Doors in Other Fire Partitions: 45 min • Labelling: Doors to be labeled (715.4.5) • Glazing: Match opening protective (715.4.6) • Closing: Self-Closing (715.4.7) • Latch: Active latch bolt • Smoke-activated: Smoke detector activated

PROGRAM

55 Treanor

Plumbing Systems: Type M: Mercantile (table 2902.1) • Water closets: 1 male per 500 • Water closets: 1 female per 500 • Lavatories: 1 per 750 • Drinking Fountains: 1 per 1,000 • Service Sink: 1


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Second Floor

A

A

31st STREET

56 Treanor

First Floor

Plan Detail

CHERRY STREET

Design Goals:

The two primary goals implemented throughout the design were to further promote and encourage the recycling of bicycles and the fostering of community.

PROGRAM


816 Bike Collective

57 Treanor

Plan Detail

Design Objectives:

Section AA

These objectives would in turn educate the public, create jobs, stimulate sustainable transportation, and provide a safe environment.

PROGRAM

CHERRY STREET


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

58 Treanor

816 Bike Collective exterior & interior: The building maintains attributes of its original character and has become an inviting shop for the neighborhood, inspiring rehabilitation for the entire block.

VIEWS


816 Bike Collective

www.treanorarchitects.com Idris Raoufi Bri Lauterbach Kirk McDowell-Shaffer

Founding Member Founding Member Founding Member

Team Treanor: Joy Coleman Krissy Buck Julie Cawby Daniel Cooper Tim Cummins Dana Gould John Krudwig Winifred Wright Dan Edleson

Treanor Architects Treanor Architects Treanor Architects Treanor Architects Treanor Architects Treanor Architects Krudwig & Associates, inc Eisterhold Associates, Inc. University of Oregon

59 Treanor

816 Bike Collective:


2000 TEENS ARE HOMELESS EVERY NIGHT IN KANSAS CITY >>


Eco Abet Design Charrette

MYHOUSE FOR TEENS An estimated 2,000 teens are homeless on any given night in Kansas City. The number could be higher because a surprising number of young people spend hours ‘couch-surfing’, which is moving from one friend’s house to another, sleeping on a couch because they have no place to call home. This homeless population is expected to grow because of the slow economy.

62 Newhouse

Newhouse, a shelter providing a safe place for victims of domestic violence and their children in the urban core of Kansas City, is proposing the program Myhouse, which is aimed at helping homeless girls in the metropolitan Kansas City area, between the ages of 15–21, achieve self-sufficiency. The program will meet the basic needs of homeless girls by providing housing, food, safety, and financial security. The program is designed to promote self-sufficiency and reduce the risk of future homelessness. The program will also offer case management services, life skills instruction as well as group and individual therapy. In addition, the girls will be encouraged to stay in school, gain employment, and regularly save a portion of their income so they are financially able to live independently once they leave the program. The Myhouse program envisions providing a ‘home’ environment for the participants. Newhouse is in the planning stages of buying a property where this home will be built. This potential location is across from the current Newhouse shelter facility. Newhouse’s vision is to build a six-bedroom home with common areas such as a large teaching kitchen, a community room, computer lab, library, and a play area/room for the teens. The bedrooms will Team BRR

be shared. Open office space for Newhouse staff (Advocates) will be needed, as well as private offices for a Case Manager and a Therapist who will provide services on-site. Newhouse would like to create a flower and vegetable garden to provide a beautiful space for the participants to both relax and learn about working in teams to manage, plant and harvest the produce that will be used in the Myhouse teaching kitchen. Additionally, a 3-4 car garage with a large storage area will be needed for the participants. Newhouse is celebrating its 40th year of providing services and safe shelter to victims of domestic violence, making it well positioned and experienced in providing the comprehensive services needed to operate a successful transitional living facility.

Team SPIN


Myhouse

CONTEXT PLAN

Independence Ave Neighborhood

Brooklyn Ave

Plan

Site Plan

Olive St

Park Ave

6th St

Brooklyn Ave

Independence Ave

Brooklyn Ave

Garfield Ave

63 Newhouse

SITE PLAN

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

Myhouse for Teens


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

64 BRR

Orientation:

Building was positioned on site to maximize security while attempting to make best use of topography and still be sensitive to adjacent neighborhood context.

SITE

My House for Teens

Park Ave

Brooklyn Ave

Team BRR


Myhouse The Approach:

Design Objectives:

Team BRR first set out looking at the given site to determine orientation, access, existing buildings, and existing terrain to begin to develop ideas for how to best approach the site constraints. The next step was to evaluate the given program to determine adjacencies, spatial requirements, access, and circulation in the new home. Once the basic footprint and adjacency floor diagrams were established, we set out to further develop the concept, the massing, and the diagram of the house and site.

After evaluating the site and the given program requirements, the Charrette team came up with the following design objectives that helped shape the conceptual design for the home. • • •

Major Programmatic Requirements: Large Bedrooms for multiple residents, shared bathrooms, laundry facilities, teaching kitchen, living room/lounge, offices for full time advocates and staff, library, computer room, multiple-car garage for storage, secure entry, flower and vegetable garden and outdoor patio space.

• •

Maximize use of the site while minimizing visual impact in order to promote neighborhood cohesive design. Building footprint, L-shape, to help promote resident security while minimizing fencing needs. Building volume and design to be sensitive to adjacent existing buildings. Interior space to be open and encourage resident interaction. Exterior space to be inviting and secure.

65 BRR

Conceptual Layout

Relationships were determined by similar programmatic function.

DIAGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

c a

stair

b

patio/ garden

a a 66 BRR

garage/ storage First Floor Plan:

[Living/Dining/Learning] The first floor provides secure entry around the back side of house, 3 a offices for the Myhouse Advocates, Case Workers, and Counselors, a b private library and computer facility, and a c large teaching kitchen, dining, and living areas.

PROGRAM


Myhouse

a b

d

c

stair

a

a

b 67 BRR

a Second Floor Plan: [Sleeping/Bathing]

The second floor consists of 4 a bedrooms, 2 b shared bathrooms, a c shared laundry facility, and a d large exterior porch on the front of the house. These spaces can accommodate up to 15 full time residents.

PROGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

68 BRR

ve A n y l k o o Br

VIEWS


Myhouse site aerial view from southeast

69 BRR

VIEWS


Eco Abet Summer Charrette site aerial view from southwest

Broo

klyn

Ave

70 BRR sketch elevation of kitchen/dining area

VIEWS


Myhouse

www.brrarch.com

Leslie D. Caplan Kevin Fox

President/CEO Finance Committee

Team BRR John Quinton Jason Kimball Ellen Foster Michelle Westerfield Jennifer Lehmkuhl Chris Richards Ian Lee

BRR Architecture BRR Architecture BRR Architecture BRR Architecture BRR Architecture Eco Abet Drury University

71 BRR

Newhouse:


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Brooklyn Ave

TEAM Te a mSPIN SPIN My House for Teens

Entry from Brooklyn Ave

72 Spin

Site Influence:

The site was chosen due to its proximity to the existing shelter. The intention of the project is to blend in with the surrounding residential neighborhood in an effort to be consistent with the existing community atmosphere.

SITE


Brooklyn Ave

Myhouse

Approach & Orientation

SITE

73 Spin

To avoid perceptions of institutionalization, safety checkpoints are staggered. Users will first pass by the administration section and then end in a pathway through the courtyard garden. The building is positioned at the front corner of the site to use its mass as a protective barrier and reserve as much usable exterior space as possible.

Br

oo

kl

yn

Av

e


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

pede

stri

veh

icu

lar

an

Circulation: 74 Spin

The design offers a range of entry points based on a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s familiarity with the residence. The paths become more personal as one moves into the protected courtyard. A drive is established in place of the existing building to connect Brooklyn Avenue to the garage and back alleyway.

DIAGRAM


Myhouse

w

r

n ai

r

e at

rain

wate

r

The building is designed to collect rainwater in a retention pond on the lowest point of the site. This grey water technique can be utilized in the maintenance of the groundsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; vegetation.

DIAGRAM

75 Spin

Water Retention:


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Vegetation:

76 Spin

The structures are situated to fit on the open part of the site, therefore maintaining as many trees as possible. The courtyard is positioned to receive optimal amounts of daylight for the growth of flowers and vegetables. There is also the potential for a green roof over the administrative office to help with rainwater runoff.

DIAGRAM


Myhouse

Private

Social

Private

77 Spin

Residence Pods:

The design calls for varying degrees of privacy to be taken into account when programming the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s living quarters.

DIAGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

78 Spin

PROGRAM


Myhouse

a b

c b

The spatial program includes a sitting area which is an extension of the interior living room, b two garden beds for different solar exposure levels, an c open lawn courtyard, and a d rainwater collection pool.

PROGRAM

79 Spin

Courtyard Plan:

d


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Resident Entry

80 Spin

First Floor Plan:

Visitor Entry

The first floor provides all the basic needs and functions of a typical home by using the different entries and office positioning to create security checkpoints for visitors and new arrivals while maintaining comfortable and warm living situations.

PROGRAM


Myhouse

2nd Floor Key:

The second floor consists of the bedrooms, bathrooms, and a small communal study space for the residents. Hierarchy of privacy is present to promote interactions between the residents while maintaining a sense of possession and personal establishment.

PROGRAM

81 Spin

Second Floor Plan:


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

82 Spin

Brooklyn Ave Perspective:

The program is proportioned to appropriately encompass the site. The structure utilizes design elements to promote a cohesive impact with the surrounding neighborhood.

VIEWS


Myhouse

www.spinpizza.com

Newhouse: Leslie D. Caplan Kevin Fox

President/CEO Finance Committee

Team Spin: Pendulum Studio sfs architecture sfs architecture sfs architecture Brian Dillard Architecture Eco Abet Dolcie & Co. Communities in Schools Kansas State University

83 Spin

Devan Case Katie Finnegan Derek McMurray Todd Cowger Casey Meyer Brad Mascal Dorota Lopez Jamie Thiessen Ralph Shinogle


COMMUNITY GARDEN PLUS LEARNING HABITAT


Eco Abet Design Charrette

SWITZER NEIGHBORHOOD FARM Switzer Neighborhood Farm (aka Westside Community Garden) is a Currently, the most challenging component is the need for water. To ½ acre vacant lot that is owned jointly by two neighborhood not-for- install water pipes and a meter to the property would cost at least $8,000. To be able to use the water from the fire hydrant would profit organizations. mean paying as much as $5,000 to properly water the garden The Westside was first platted in 1869; however people had been throughout the growing season. Therefore, we are trying to harvest as living here long before. When Kansas City was moving south from the much rainwater as possible. We have two tanks that hold 2,350 galriver, they blasted out the bluffs and that rubble was deposited in lons of water, and we have almost 20 rain barrels, but this will not be West Kansas City. Our neighborhood was then a construction landfill. enough during the dryer months of July and August.

86 Switzer Farm

At one time there was a stable on the premises to house the horses and carriages of the people who lived at the top of the hill. More recently, the structure was enlarged and eventually housed a company called EdCor which packed and sold first aid kits. Westside Housing Organization bought the building for a nominal sum in the mid 1990’s. However, they were unable to obtain financing to repurpose the old structures. The buildings, including the old stables, were demolished. An environmental cleanup, including removal of several inches of soil, was completed. The land has remained vacant and dollars to develop the site have remained elusive.

To harvest water from the street would mean the need to have some sort of filtration and purification system to remove petroleum and other chemicals in order to use the water for consumable produce.

In 2010, the Westside CAN Center obtained permission to create a community garden on the site. The site was chosen as one of the projects for the Skills USA conference. Over 80 students converged on the site on June 25, 2011 to construct 26 raised beds, 2 benches and a pergola. The beds were filled with composted soil donated by Kansas City Community Gardens. DST, at the behest of neighbor Howell Construction, donated the tool shed along with lumber for the farm stand. In addition to the garden, the Westside CAN Center raises chickens. The site has been studied by Kansas State University as part of a Brownfield site in partnership with Region VII EPA. The site has been tested for hazardous materials such as lead, mercury, chromium and other harmful chemicals. The site has also been used by Kansas State’s College of Landscape Architecture for a design project.

The garden replaces a vacant blighted lot that housed homeless people and drug dealers who nested in the tall weeds. The lot sits on a signature intersection and on a scenic boulevard on West Pennway. Within the last 10 years, significant investment has been made; Ruiz Branch Library ($1.2 million), Tony Aguirre Community Center ($2.4 million), Villa del Sol Apartment Home Complex and the installation of the Riverfront Heritage Trail along the Westside of West Pennway ($1.1+million), which included new sidewalks, artistic pedestrian lighting and public art ‘el pequena promenade’. The site is the path taken by children on their way to Garcia School or Alta Vista Charter School. We think that this could serve as a community garden as well as a learning habitat for the children in the neighborhood. The school to the north and the east are both currently empty and we believe these sites could be utilized to positively improve the neighborhood.

Team MY SMART PLANS

Team BURNS & MCDONNELL

The ‘farmers’ are residents of the Westside neighborhood or are day laborers from the WCAN Center’s day laborer program. Marcella Gaona and Cosme Pantoja have taken on management of the farm/ garden. Marcella works with the gardeners and Cosme manages the chickens, grounds maintenance, construction and security. Ezekiel Amador III is our bee keeper.


Switzer Neighborhood Farm

CONTEXT PLAN

Jefferson St

Summit St

Madison Ave

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

I-35

Site Plan

20th St

t yS nwa Pen 21st St 20th St

I-35

Neighborhood Plan SITE PLAN

87 Switzer Farm

20th St

Madison Ave

t yS wa

n Pen

Switzer Neighborhood Farm


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Team MY SMART PLANS

88 My Smart Plans

SITE


Switzer Neighborhood Farm With no preconceived ideas for the Switzer Urban Farm, our assembled team of Landscape Architects, Architecture students, an Interior Designer and a Civil Engineer began with absorbing the ideas, goals and visions of Westside Community Action Network (Westside CAN) who oversees the farm. Westside CAN director Lynda Callon provided great insight and inspirational thoughts on the current state of the farm and her vision for the farm users and the community.

wa t e r c yc l e ra i n w a t e r h a r ve st o ve r f l ow p a t h

Following the sit-down with Lynda, Team Smart Plans generated a list of goals and visions for the farm that led to FOUR terms that represented these goals and visions. Management, Education, Healing & Pride became the backbone for the design concept that looked to address these programs and ethics. The siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s analysis study helped the team to understand the existing siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opportunities and constraints. Understanding community context relationships and existing drainage patterns helped fuel the design concept strategies. The final design aimed to expand and refine the existing user program and provide the framework for future growth that better Manages resources, provides Education opportunities, offers Healing through sweat equity and creates a space the stimulates Pride.

Because of the extreme grades on site, terraces maximize the usable space of the garden and create an amphitheater setting for community events. Finally, community space surrounding the garden ties into the streetscape and helps celebrate the farm as a viewing platform.

DIAGRAM

wa t e r i n g cans

ra i n ga r d e n

surface runoff

r a i n wa t e r

collection and h a r ve s t i n g

sunlight

sunlight

89 My Smart Plans

The design and program centers on the management of water resources through a cycle of collection, storage and use. This cycle of water is visually exposed, promoting interaction and interpretive education opportunities. To complement the expressive and colorful neighborhood architecture, a fabric shade structure is proposed as the backdrop to the farm that will collect clean water, provide shade for community gatherings and become the iconic landmark to the space. Water is collected in a series of holding tanks that can be accessed individually. Overflow from these tanks is led through a series of open channels and runnels through the site that can also be accessed by the farmers as a water source.

rain barrels


m a n a ge m e n t

Eco Abet Summer Charrette

s e l f s u s t a i n i n g t h ro u g h wa t e r h a r ve s t i n g managing resources

healing

education stimulate critical thinking interpretation l e a r n i n g t h ro u g h ex p e r i e n c e

pride

swe a t e q u i t y

community connection neighborhood landmark

90 My Smart Plans

DIAGRAM


Switzer Neighborhood Farm

wa t e r h a r ve s t i n g t a n k s compost pile wa t e r h a r ve s t i n g fabric structure barns c o m m u n i t y ga t h e r i n g runnels/c hannels c o m m u n i t y s t a ge t e r ra c e d ga r d e n l o t s

i n t e ra c t i ve o ve r f l ow stream â&#x20AC;&#x153;fieldsâ&#x20AC;? ra i n ga r d e n

PROGRAM

91 My Smart Plans

s t r e e t s c a p e ga t h e r i n g space


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

92 My Smart Plans

VIEWS


Switzer Neighborhood Farm

www.mysmartplans.com

WestsideCAN: Lynda Callon Rubea Stouppe

Executive Director/CEO Summer Intern

Team My Smart Plans: LAND3 studio LAND3 studio Jeffrey L. Bruce and Co. Treanor Architects UCMO UMKC & SCAD Drury University

93 My Smart Plans

Brian Roth Brian Burmeister David Stokes Matthew Murphy Rachel Dumsky Derrick Riley Halie McCarter


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Team BURNS & MCDONNELL kcmsd vacant buildings

housing public library

Orientation:

94 Burns & McDonnell

The Switzer Neighborhood Farm is located on 20th Street between Madison Avenue and West Pennway. It is conveniently situated between the nearby Tony Aguirre Community Center and Ruiz Branch Library to the south, as well as The Villa del Sol Apartments to the West of the site.

SITE

community center


Switzer Neighborhood Farm Methodology:

17th & Summit Downtown

Team Burns & McDonnell began their design process through an interactive design workshop. Everyone was asked â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is in your ideal Switzer Community Farmâ&#x20AC;?? After completing their designs, each participant took a turn to explain what they envisioned for the project. Since no one on the team knew each other or the client directly, the workshop, which allows participants to use their imaginations freely and otherwise open up about their ideas, allowed the group to quickly form a basic design concept.

West Bottoms

Concept:

Crossroads Kauffman PAC

Southwest Boulevard

Seeking to evoke the whimsical nature of a farm in the City, the team choose to use the rainwater collection system to irrigate the crops and power the light for the existing chicken coop (diagram pg. 97). A phased approach was developed for long-term implementation.

95 Burns & McDonnell

DIAGRAM

Following the lead of the client, every design intervention was approached as a tool for learning. Using color, introducing a vertical component to the site, and focusing on developing the garden as a long-term community asset were crucial.


EDUCATION OUTREACH

IDENTITY

PHASE PHASE PHASE

Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Optimize existing water run-off capture Create identity for Switzer Garden- website, logo Focus efforts on exterior appearance Identify community partners- library, parks, community center

Construct new entry buildings Create interior community terrace Develop community partners- outdoor reading space Monthly community events- KC event calendar

Construct bee silo Construct water collection and waterwheel system Re-build chicken-run and coop as an educational entity

96 Burns & McDonnell

DIAGRAM


Switzer Neighborhood Farm Gateways: The front entryway consolidates the existing farm stand and shed into a trellised plaza. A new entry is created at the southeast corner to draw in the community with a bee silo that doubles as signage. Screening: A new masonry fence, constructed by local workers sets the foundation for the new fence that secures the farm, creates unique views into the space, and grows community crops Community Space: Terracing the center of the garden creates additional planting beds and outdoor classrooms where in the first years sunflowers work to bio-remediate the soil. A new staired access along the west edge of the property functions as an outdoor auditorium. Switzer Neighborhood Farm provides economic, social, and educational opportunities for the Westside.

97 Burns & McDonnell

DIAGRAM


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

neighborhood farm windows with a view c o n t r i b u t e s t o t h e o n - g o i n g i n ve s t m e n t s b e i n g m a d e w i t h i n t h e we s t s i d e c o m m u n i t y

a t r e l l i s s u r ro u n d s t h e s i t e w i t h v i ew b oxe s b u i l t i n openings to stimulate curiosity and create a first imp r e s s i o n fo r p e o p l e p a s s i n g by

f r e s h p ro d u c e

bee silo

v i ew s i n t o t h e f a r m a r e f ra m e d by t h e p ro d u c e s t a n d a n d a n o ve r h e a d t r e l l i s

e n t ra n c e i n t o t h e f a r m i s t h ro u g h t h e b e e s i l o

98 Burns & McDonnell

PROGRAM


Switzer Neighborhood Farm

Trellis View from Inside the Farm

PROGRAM

99 Burns & McDonnell

Terrace Multi-purpose Gathering Area


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

20th St

Pennw ay St

on dis

Ma e Av Aerial:

100 Burns & McDonnell

Looking toward the south side of the site, the Bee Silo stands as a portal into the Switzer Neighborhood farm.

VIEWS


Switzer Neighborhood Farm

ve A n o adis

M

Aerial:

VIEWS

101 Burns & McDonnell

At the north end of the site an expanded series of rain collection tanks will alleviate the need for purchased water throughout the summer months. A central pavilion will offer a setting within a terraced flower garden that will work on cleaning the soil for future produce cultivation.


Eco Abet Summer Charrette

Perspective:

102 Burns & McDonnell

Utilizing the slope of the site, a gathering pavilion was designed to be centrally located within the farm.

VIEWS


Switzer Neighborhood Farm

www.burnsmcd.com

WestsideCAN: Lynda Callon Rubea Stouppe

Executive Director/CEO Summer Intern

Team Burns and McDonnell Burns and McDonnell AICP MOCK Studio, LLC HTK Architects Kansas State University Eco Abet AIA Associate, Designer

103 Burns & McDonnell

Paul Sanders Gunner Hand Travis Wilson Kevin Rooney Vontwill Burrell Beth Dawson


Credits Charrette Panel

Photos

Kirk Gastinger, FAIA Kite Singleton, FAIA Dominique Davison, AIA Ryan Townsend Vicki Noteis, AIA Joy Swallow, FAIA

Vladimir Krstic, PHD

Children International Women Empowerment Breakthrough Downtown Council of Kansas City, Missouri 816 Bicycle Collective Google Images Google Maps Gloria Baker Feinstein Kumaralingam Pathytharan Jenee Siems

Charrette Sponsors

Resources

Burns & McDonnell BRR Architecture Treanor Architects Zahner Architectural Metals Spin Pizza Magnoliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s My Smart Plans Boulevard Brewing Company

Publication Design

Panel Moderator

Charrette Partners

Paul Polak, Out of Poverty: What Works When Traditional Approaches Fail, San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc., 2008 TEDTalks, Cameron Sinclair on Open-Source Architecture, TED2006 Downtown Council of Kansas City, Missouri

Brad Mascal

American Institute of Architects Kansas City Women in Design Kansas City Young Architects Forum Kansas City Downtown Council Kansas City Kansas City Design Center Economic Development Corporation Kansas City 816 Bike Collective Newhouse ReStart, Inc WestsideCAN

Publication Editor

Charrette Photographer/ Videographer

Eco Abet Volunteer Designers

Clint Wynn

Jennifer Martin, AIA

Eco Abet Board of Directors Charmalee Gunaratne, President Mary Deacy, Vice President David J. AndrĂŠ, Secretary Amanda Drews, Treasurer Mary Anne Kapp

Rachel Duncan Chris Richards Brad Mascal

Eco Abet Summer Charrette  

Kansas City Community Design Charrette

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