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WAKE FOREST

Historic Preservation Plan

September 2012


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Wake Forest Historic Preservation Plan Acknowledgments WAKE FOREST BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION

TOWN STAFF

Vivian A. Jones, Mayor Zachary Donahue Frank Drake Greg Harrington Anne Hines Margaret Stinnett

Louise Howard, Chair Alexis Cooke, Vice-Chair Parker Schlink, Treasurer Amy Dowdle Ruth Ann Dyer Debra Ludas Thomas Neal William (Sandy) Smart Ann Welton

Chip Russell, AICP, Planning Director Agnes Wanman, AICP, Senior Planner

September 2012

Town of Wake Forest | 301 S. Brooks Street, Wake Forest, NC 27587 | 919-435-9400 | www.wakeforestnc.gov


Table of Contents Preserving the Past for the Future

Introduction—7

Town of Wake Forest History—7

The Beginning Early Years The Railroad Incorporation and Commercial Growth The Move The Mill Late 20th Century Until Today

Historic Preservation in Wake Forest—13 Surveys Survey Findings: Ailey Young House

Certified Local Government Program—17

Basic Responsibilities Benefits Becoming a CLG Grants

Historic Preservation Commission—19 Establishment Vistion Statement and Slogan Powers and Duties Regular Activities Special Activities and Projects

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Historic Districts and Landmarks

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Historic Districts and Landmarks—27

Local Wake Forest Historic District Wake Forest Historic District—National Register Glen Royall Mill Village Historic District—National Register Downtown Wake Forest Historic District—National Register

Local Historic Landmarks—41 I.O. Jones House Battle-Purnell House Oakforest Purefoy-Chapell House Heartsfield House Ailey Young House

Individual Properties Listed on the National Register of Historic Places—50 W.E.B. DuBois School Forestville Baptist Church Lea Laboratory Oakforest Powell House Purefoy-Chappell House Purefoy-Dunn Plantation Royall Cotton Mill Commissary William Thompson House Wakefields

Vision Statement, Policies and Activities 54

Appendix Summary of Community Workshop—Jan. 12, 2012 59


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Introduction The following Historic Preservation Plan is designed to describe the current status of historic preservation in Wake Forest, North Carolina and to provide guidance for the program and the Historic Preservation Commission through the next ten to fifteen years. It uses a format of policies rather than the traditional goals and objectives found in many plans in order to be more compatible with the town’s Community Plan, adopted in September 2009, which addressed, in limited fashion, historic preservation in the section on “Quality of Life.” Like those of the Community Plan, the policies and activities outlined in this Historic Preservation Plan were based upon the results of a well promoted and attended public workshop, held during January 2012. The results of that workshop are included as the Appendix to this document.

Town of Wake Forest History The Beginning Wake Forest was born as a college town and for more than a century the town and the college grew up together with intertwined histories. The original 1830s campus has changed owners and names, but remains a geographical focus of the community that has grown around it. Development began in 1820 when Dr. Calvin Jones from New England bought 615 acres in “Wake Forest Township” from Davis Battle. Dr. Jones probably built the sturdy, two-story frame house in the center of what became Wake Forest College and is now (2012) the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. The town began in 1832 when the North Carolina Baptist Convention, intent on establishing an educational institute to train new ministers, purchased Dr. Calvin Jones’ 615 acre plantation. Dr. Jones had placed an advertisement in the Raleigh papers offering his farm for sale. The advertisement described the community as “One of the best neighborhoods in the state, the Forest District containing three schools (one classical) and two well constructed and well filled meeting houses for Baptists and Methodists, and has a lawyer and a doctor. The inhabitants, without I believe a single exception, are sober, moral and thriving in their circumstances, and not a few are educated and intelligent.” John Purefoy, a Baptist minister, learned of the property and convinced the North Carolina

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Preserving the Past for the Future


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How did Wake Forest get its name?

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r. Calvin Jones from New England bought 615 acres in “Wake Forest Township” from Davis Battle in 1820. After he was named the postmaster for the area in 1823 he began heading his letters as coming from Wake Forest. When the North Carolina Baptist Convention bought his plantation in 1832, it continued with his designation. Wake County was created in 1771 from parts of Johnston, Cumberland, and Orange

counties and was named in honor of Margaret Wake Tryon, the wife of the then Royal Governor, William Tryon. (w/link to Tryon Palace) In 1805 this area was designated as the Forest District, primarily for the widespread forest in the area north of the Neuse River, largely hardwoods but with some softwoods including longleaf pine. The area was also sometimes referred to as the Forest of Wake. Dr. Jones combined the two in his designation.

Baptist Convention to purchase the farm north of the community of Forestville for $2,000 on which to establish the school it had been planning named the “Wake Forest Institute.” It opened to young men and boys in February, 1834. Early Years Seventy-two students were enrolled by the end of the first year. The institute grew rapidly and the college trustees hired architect John Berry of Hillsborough to enlarge the facility. Berry designed three brick buildings—one classroom structure, soon called Wait Hall in honor of the first president, Rev. Samuel Wait, to replace the Calvin Jones House (which was relocated) and two professors’ houses. All three buildings were constructed between 1835 and 1838. The professors’ houses, known as the North Brick House and the South Brick House because of their locations, were first occupied by Professors C. W. Skinner and Amos J. Battle. Wait Hall was destroyed by fire in 1933, the victim of an arsonist, and the North Brick House was torn down in 1936, leaving the South Brick House, on the corner of South Avenue and South Main Street, as the only survivor of the early Berry-designed campus buildings. In 1838 the manual institute form was abandoned and the school rechartered as “Wake Forest College” to reflect its new emphasis. With an increasing need for space and money, the college decided to divide the Calvin Jones farm into lots and sell them for $100 each, with those on the west side of “Main Street” selling for $150. Eighty one-acre lots north of the campus and west of the railroad were put on the market in 1839. The central street became known as Faculty Avenue and today, as North Main Street, constitutes the greater portion of the locally designated “Wake Forest Historic District”. Calvin Jones House (c.1820)


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The Railroad

South Brick House (1837)

The Raleigh and Gaston Railroad, constructed on the east side of the growing school, was completed in 1840, making travel to the college easier. The closest depot was in Forestville, as was the post office, so students and professors often got off the train there and walked the dusty mile. The Raleigh and Gaston Railroad was a controversial subject for Wake Forest College because of the station’s location in Forestville. The railroad refused to finance two stations so close together, so the college paid $2,000.03 to move the depot from Forestville to Wake Forest. Even though Forestville predated both Raleigh and Wake Forest, with the community settling around 1760, the railroad station was relocated in 1874, though there were still no buildings in Wake Forest east of the railroad tracks. In a futile attempt to protect itself Forestville became incorporated as a town in 1879, maintaining its incorporation until 1915. In 1984 the Wake Forest town board voted to annex a substantial area, including Forestville. After controversy and court battles the area finally became part of the Town of Wake Forest in 1988. Incorporation and Commercial Growth The moving of the station stimulated commercial development and the College sold lots on the east side of the tracks for new stores and businesses on White Street. This growth allowed the community to draft its first charter and became incorporated on March 26, 1880 as the Town of Wake Forest College. In 1909 the charter was amended and the town renamed, Wake Forest. This new charter gave the town the authority to sell bonds to build a generator and electric system.

South White Street

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When the Civil War began in 1862 the students and at least one faculty member left to enlist, causing the college to close. Wait Hall later became a hospital for wounded soldiers, as did some of the Faculty Avenue homes. When the college reopened in 1865, much depleted, there were still very few buildings on and around the campus.


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Between 1880 and 1905, several of the businesses operating in Wake Forest were established: Powers and Holding Drugstore, W. W. Holding Cotton Merchants, Dickson Brothers Dry Goods and the Wake Forest Supply Company which became Jones Hardware. There was a hotel next to the drug store that Dr. Benjamin Powers built across from the depot. Thomas E. Holding, a pharmacist, left his partnership with Dr. Powers and built and operated another drug store a little north. By 1920 other businesses downtown included the Bolus Department Store, the Wilkinson General Store, Dickson Brothers Dry Goods, Brewer & Sons feed and grocery store, and Keith’s Grocery Store. T. E. Holding and the Brewer family both established banks, both of which, unfortunately, failed during the 1930s. The arrival of electricity in Wake Forest on November 12, 1909 historically changed its residents’ way of life forever. Residents had voted 88-1 in April of that year to build a power plant. (No one knows who the single opponent was!) “There was great cheering by the students of Wake Forest College when the lights were turned on and they had an informal celebration tonight,” said a November 12, 1909 article in the News and Observer. “Cheers and ‘Hurrah for electric lights’ could be heard repeatedly.” The Move Wake Forest College moved to Winston-Salem in 1956, becoming Wake Forest University, and sold the campus to the present occupant, the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. This move provided a major shock to the community. The town had always been closely associated with the college. However, the seminary shared the campus for a few years before the final move, managing to make a smooth transition, and the town eventually adjusted to the change. The seminary serves a wide geographic area and has an enrollment of around 3,000 students, including a relatively small number of undergraduate students. The Mill Another aspect of Wake Forest’s growth at the turn of the last century was the Royall Cotton Mill, Wake Forest’s first industry. Located just north of Faculty Avenue, it was established in 1899-1900 by three brothers-in-law, W. C. Powell, R. E. Royall and T. E. Holding the Mill to produce muslin sheeting from local cotton. After an addition between 1906 and 1908 the mill was one of the state’s largest cotton mills. Mill worker housing and a commissary store were built between the mill and Wake Forest. It was actually incorporated as the Town of Royall Mills in 1907, two years prior to the official Glen Royall Mill Apartments incorporation of the Town of Wake


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Forest, although its predecessor, the Town of Wake Forest College, already existed! Residents had no say in the governing of their town. Only property owners could vote and the entire village was owned by the mill! The mill board of directors served as the town board. In the early 1940s the company subdivided the village and began selling lots and houses. Then, in 1945, the company petitioned the NC General Assembly and the town’s charter was repealed. The Mill Commissary Apartments village was annexed into the Town of Wake Forest in September 1977, as part of a large annexation that nearly doubled the size of the town. The mill continued in operation until its closing in 1976, providing a second major blow to Wake Forest area residents. The loss of this major employer eliminated the only livelihood of many families. The mill building was eventually renovated into apartments. This renovation was completed in 1996. The commissary building was also turned into apartments. In 1995 the commissary building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and Jim Adams and Steve Gould received an Anthemion Award for the renovation project. (The Anthemion Award is an award in Wake County for achievement in historic preservation.) The surrounding housing village was designated as the Glen Royall Mill Village Historic District and listed on the National Register on August 27, 1999. The mill buildings and adjoining workers’ housing had one of the earliest major impacts on Wake Forest not brought about by the college. Late 20th Century Until Today Although the college’s move in 1956, along with the relocation of US-1 west of town in 1952, brought some hard times the town persevered, attracting new industry such as Schrader Brothers and Athey in the mid-1960s and Weavexx in the early 1970s. Those companies are gone now, swept away by changes in the national economy and the growth of global markets but the town continues to pursue and attract new employment opportunities. Beginning in the 1990s and continuing today, Wake Forest has tree seen an explosive growth in its population go here and commercial activities. With Original Town Hall (c. 1909, 1940) its population close to 30,000 and

image to


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Wake Forest Town Hall (2010)

expectations of growing to 40,000, new subdivisions have been built and the town boundaries have extended into Franklin County on the north and to the Neuse River on the south, from west of U.S. 1 (Capital Blvd.) on the west to just shy of U.S. 401 on the east. There have been many adjustments to the growth and the needs of the new residents, including merging the town’s water and sewer systems with Raleigh’s. Wake Forest celebrated its 100th birthday throughout 2009 with a series of special events that began with First Light Wake Forest (in honor of the first electricity in Wake Forest) on December 31, 2008 and ended with the Centennial Community Christmas Gala on December 5, 2009. In recent years, since 2000, the town has given high priority to its programs in planning, historic preservation, downtown revitalization, and urban forestry. Two additional historic districts have been designated and listed on the National Register, the Downtown Historic District, listed on February 2, 2002 and a large Wake Forest Historic District, including the locally designated historic district, the historic college campus, and the surrounding residential areas, on December 18, 2003. Though the Town of Wake Forest continues to enjoy the beauty and dignity of the centrally located campus, it now has its own identity as it successfully responds to new roles and opportunities as a rapidly growing residential and commercial community. With a progressive town government and active organizations, such as the Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce and the Downtown Revitalization Corporation, Wake Forest is redefining itself with an eye on the new century while maintaining respect for the last two.


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The citizens of the Town of Wake Forest have long appreciated their historic heritage, including the older homes and other buildings in town. A corresponding increase in appreciation throughout the nation and state resulted in legislation authorizing local governments to take action. After the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 focused attention on historic preservation nationwide, North Carolina rewrote its 1965 legislation that had authorized specified local governments to establish historic district commissions and historic properties commissions to protect individual properties. This 1971 rewrite made it applicable statewide. In 1975 amendments to the 1971 law provided for a 50% deferral of local property taxes on locally designated historic properties. Subsequent amendments made numerous changes regarding the operations of local commissions, increasing the period for which demolitions could be delayed, and authorizing local governments to use eminent domain to acquire locally designated historic properties threatened with demolition. The amended 1971 statute was replaced with another one in 1989 which changed the name of “historic properties” to “historic landmarks” and consolidated formerly separate legislation for historic district and historic properties commissions into a single enabling statute. Commissions that deal with both landmarks and districts were given the name “historic preservation commissions”. This new legislation gave commissions new powers, including increased power to regulate alterations, demolition, and new construction; to negotiate with owners for acquisition or preservation of properties; and to prepare and recommend official preservation elements in local comprehensive plans. The new legislation also added “prehistorical” to the kinds of significance qualifying properties or districts for designation. Then, in 1991, it was amended to increase the delay of demolition of landmarks and properties in historic districts from six months to one year and also authorized commissions to delay the relocation of such properties. The Town of Wake Forest began discussing the possibility of establishing a historic preservation program with a commission and a historic district in 1973. A draft ordinance was first presented to the town board at their July 1975 meeting; however, a more complete survey was needed prior adoption. This was done and the Wake Forest Board of Commissioners adopted its first historic preservation ordinance as part of the zoning ordinance on May 10, 1979, establishing the Historic District Commission and a local historic district. Surveys An early survey was conducted in November 1973 by Ruth Little-Stokes of the area the town considered the most significant. This area was bounded on the east by the railroad, on the south by South Avenue, on the west by Wingate Street, and on the north by Cedar Avenue. Most of this area later became the locally designated historic district. A second, more complete, survey was completed in 1979 by Melanie Murphy. This survey included the area which became the local district as well as the mill village and downtown.

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Historic Preservation in Wake Forest


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By the end of 2003 all the areas included in the 1979 survey had become historic districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places and one area was also a locally designated historic district, allowing for development oversight. The Historic Preservation Commission decided a new survey was in order. This new survey was to review properties within the town limits and the extraterritorial zoning jurisdiction of the town that were not already in a historic district or already individually listed on the National Register or state study list. The purpose was to find more historic properties that may be out there and to identify any areas that might become eligible as a historic district in the following 20 years or so. This survey, “Town of Wake Forest and Suburban Areas Historic Buildings Update,” was completed in August 2008 by Ruth Little and her company, Longleaf Historic Resources. The most interesting find was the Ailey Young House (called the Allen Young House in the survey), which happened to be located on town-owned property! Neither the town administration nor the county tax office knew of its existence, although it was generally known in the local neighborhood. Only a few areas, though, were identified as possible candidates for future historic districts and that is only if their architectural integrity is maintained through the coming years. These possible areas include the 700 and 800 block of Durham Road and the Cardinal Hills and Spring Valley subdivisions. Numerous individual buildings were identified as worthy of protection.

2008 SURVEY FINDINGS Ailey Young House The most significant find on the survey of 2008, “Town of Wake Forest and Suburban Areas Historic Buildings Update,” was the Ailey Young House (called the Allen Young House in the survey), which happened to be located on town-owned property! Neither the town administration nor the county tax office knew of its existence, although it was generally known in the local neighborhood. Site and Structural Conditions: Sited in the middle of a wooded lot with dense undergrowth,

the lot was purchased by the Town of Wake Forest for future cemetery expansion. The house was not listed on the tax records and town officials were not aware of the house until it was “discovered” by those conducting the historic buildings survey. The local community, however, was aware of the house and its history. The town utilities department staff was also aware of the presence of the house because it is located adjacent to a utility easement access driveway. Although the house has suffered some fire damage, and has lost its

Ailey Young House (c. 1875) pictured in November 2009


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Architectural Description and Significance: The long-

abandoned, partially-burned 1 ½-story saddlebag house sits on high, finely crafted fieldstone piers on a lot located on North White Street, north of Spring Street and south of the town cemetery. The saddlebag house consists of two frame pens flanking a very large stone chimney with a brick stack. Large fireplaces served the main room of both pens. In the right front corner of the east pen, a stair ascends to the second floor. A similar stair accessed the second floor on the west pen but these were destroyed in the fire. The right pen has horizontal sheathed walls and a mantel. Each pen has a front door that opened onto a shed-roofed porch that has collapsed. Window openings have lost their sashes with the exception of one 4-pane upper sash surviving on the rear. Apparently some of the larger openings held 6-over-6 sashes. Its sills and the boards of the walls are circular sawn. Visible nails include square, machine-cut nails, finish nails, and wire nails. Its apparently original board-and-batten siding, with beveled battens, is in sound condition. The saddlebag style house was commonly in use as slave housing. This house, however, is a much grander version. It was probably built around 1875, or maybe a little earlier. It is most certainly a rare example of Reconstruction Era post-Civil War housing for the African American working class. According to local restoration carpenter, Patrick Schell, “There’s just nothing like this left. The fancier houses tend to survive, but something like this, the housing for regular folks, especially African Americans, is extremely rare!”

Historical Significance: The Ailey Young House may be the oldest African American historic

building in Wake Forest, and has historical significance as the dwelling of one of the town’s most important African American citizens. The house was constructed as rental housing by Wake

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windows and doors and front porch, the quality of its construction has allowed it to survive to this day. It sits high off the ground on sturdy stone piers. The structure has been used by people for drinking and was damaged by vandals. Perhaps, that was what actually caused the fire. The house burned sometime between the 1970s, when the house was last occupied, and the mid-1990s. Or, speculation offers the theory that the house was burned when a fire was set, in an inappropriate spot, for warmth. The second story ends of the house have burned out, along with a significant portion of the north wall on the back of the house, indicating a probable point of origin. Structural members at those locations and the roof have been severely damaged. The floor boards on the first and second floors of the west end of the house were destroyed by the fire. The roof was severely damaged by a tree, which was pushing into the roofing surface as it grew, and several holes from chimneys and/or flues were open to the elements. The window sashes and doors were missing. However, the foundation, sills, joists, walls, exterior board and batten siding, and central chimney were in good condition.


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Forest College Professor William G. Simmons and was one of a number of houses known as “Simmons Row.” These houses appear on the 1915 to 1936 Sanborn Fire Insurance maps. All the other houses are long gone. After Professor Simmons’ death his widow sold the houses to families and subdivided land in the area. This area formed the beginning of what is now known as the East End area. Ailey Young purchased the house and raised her family there. The house was the childhood home of her son, Allen Young, the town’s most significant African American educator. He taught public school in Wake County until 1905 when he and others organized the Presbyterian Mission School for Colored Boys and Girls, a name that was soon changed to the Wake Forest Normal and Industrial School, the first school for black children in Wake Forest. Allen Young served as its principal. At least one of his children taught there. The school was a thriving private institution in the 1910s and attracted boarding students from northern states in the 1920s and 1930s when over 300 students were enrolled. The reduction in attendance after the opening of the DuBois school, a Rosenthal public school, finally resulted in its closing in the 1950s. Allen Young also founded the Presbyterian Church for African Americans and operated a dry cleaning business that catered to Wake Forest College. The last family member to live in the house was Hubert Young. No one has lived there since the 1970s. Allen Young’s daughter, Ailey Mae Young, a schoolteacher, was the first African American town

Wake Forest Normal and Industrial School (1910s)—Courtesy of N.C. Division of Archives & History, Raleigh, NC


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All buildings associated with the Young family or with the school have been destroyed.

Certified Local Government Program The Certified Local Government (CLG) Program is a federal program, administered by the State Historic Preservation Office, under which local governments may be certified to participate in national historic preservation programs. This certification system is established by the state. The Town of Wake Forest became the 38th local government in North Carolina to achieve Certified Local Government status on October 29, 1997. The webpage of the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office contains the following information on the CLG program: “In 1980, Congress amended the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 to require each state to establish a procedure by which local governments may be certified to participate in the national framework of historic preservation programs. This requirement has become the Certified Local Government (CLG) Program in which many North Carolina counties and cities participate.� Since Congress created a preservation program for the United States in 1966, the national historic preservation program has operated as a decentralized partnership between the federal government and the states. The federal government established a program of identification, evaluation, and protection of historic properties and gave the states primary responsibility for carrying out this program. The success of that working relationship prompted Congress to expand the partnership to provide for participation by local governments. Basic Responsibilities In North Carolina, governments which qualify for certification must have an active and legally adequate historic preservation commission, and must meet the federal requirements for certification. The Historic Preservation Act amendments of 1980 state that a local government must: 1. Enforce appropriate state or local legislation for the designation and protection of historic properties. 2. Establish an adequate and qualified historic preservation review commission. 3. Maintain a system for the survey and inventory of historic properties compatible with the statewide survey. 4. Provide for adequate public participation in the local historic preservation program, including the process of recommending properties to the National Register of Historic Places. 5. Satisfactorily perform responsibilities delegated to it under the 1980 Act.

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commissioner, serving in the 1970s, and the second woman. She was first elected to office in 1971 and re-elected in 1975. The Ailey Young Park is named for her.


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Benefits Local governments and local commissions benefit from being CLGs in the following ways: 1. The North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office must set aside at least 10 percent of the money it receives from the federal Historic Preservation Fund for CLGs. Each CLG in the state is eligible to compete for a portion of that money to be used as a matching grant for eligible survey, planning, pre-development, or development activities. This has become a significant advantage for CLGs in recent years as general grant funding from both federal and state sources has declined. In addition, only CLGs are generally able to direct federal Historic Preservation Fund grant money toward projects relating to physical restoration and stabilization. 2. CLGs review all new nominations to the National Register of Historic Places for properties and districts within their boundaries. Consequently, CLGs share their local expertise with state and federal preservationists and gain a say in state and federal recognition of historic resources in their areas. 3. CLGs are encouraged to expand the expertise of their commission members and must provide for their continuing education. The community benefits from the increased expertise and knowledge of preservationists at the local level, and CLG commission members benefit from increased opportunities and from the recognition of their communities. Becoming a CLG In North Carolina, many municipalities and counties have preservation programs. Most communities with historic preservation, historic district, or historic landmarks ordinances containing the provisions of the state enabling legislation (General Statutes 160A-400.1 through 160A-400.14) are eligible for certification. A local government that wishes to seek CLG status should plan to submit the following to the CLG Coordinator of the State Historic Preservation Office: 1. Evidence that a comprehensive inventory of the area’s cultural resources has been or will be conducted. 2. Information regarding the area’s locally designated historic districts and/or historic landmarks. 3. The ordinance creating the local commission. 4. The commission’s rules of procedure. 5. The design guidelines used by the commission. 6. Résumés of the members of the commission. 7. A description of the commission’s past and current activities.


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A government may be certified at any time; however, it must satisfactorily function as a CLG for a year before it is eligible for the grant funds earmarked for CLGs. If a commission is interested in participating in the grant program, it should be aware of the timing of the grant application and award cycle. Grant applications are due around the first of the year and awards are made in the late spring or early summer. Grants are for projects that can be completed within one year. Grants have a 50/50 matching requirement and are awarded on a competitive basis. Funds may be used for activities such as (1) architectural or archaeological survey, (2) National Register nominations, (3) preservation planning, (4) design guidelines, (5) architectural plans or feasibility studies, and (6) in a limited number of cases, physical restoration and stabilization.

Historic Preservation Commission Establishment The Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) was originally established in Wake Forest with the adoption of the first historic preservation ordinance as part of the zoning ordinance. The original draft was presented to the Board of Commissioners in July 1975 but the ordinance was not actually adopted until May 10, 1979. The 1975 draft called the commission the “Historic Development Commission.” The adopted 1979 version named the commission the Historic District Commission. The Rules of Procedure were adopted in 1980 and amended in 1991 and 1996. A new set of Procedures for Certificates of Appropriateness Public Hearings was adopted by the HPC on June 9, 2004. Vision Statement and Slogan In March 2003 the Historic Preservation Commission adopted a vision statement and slogan. The Vision Statement is: “To safeguard the heritage of the town, by preserving districts and landmarks that embody important elements of its culture, history, architectural history, or prehistory and to promote the use and conservation of such districts and landmarks for the education, pleasure, and enrichment of the residents of the town, the county, and the state as a whole.” The new slogan adopted is: “Preserving the Past for the Future.” Powers and Duties Among the many powers and duties listed in the local ordinance, perhaps the most utilized are: • Undertake an inventory of properties of historical, pre-historical, architectural,

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Grants


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archeological, and/or cultural significance. • Recommend to the Board of Commissioners, individual buildings, structures, sites, areas, or objects within its zoning jurisdiction to be designated by ordinance as “historic landmarks”, and areas within its zoning jurisdiction to be designated by ordinance as “historic districts.” • Review and act upon proposals for alteration or demolition of designated landmarks and for alteration, demolition, or new construction within historic districts, i.e. Certificates of Appropriateness. • Report violations of this ordinance or other ordinances affecting historic landmarks and properties within historic districts to the local official responsible for enforcing the ordinance. • Act as, establish, or designate a group, body, or committee to give advice to owners of historic landmarks or property within a historic district concerning the treatment of the historical and visual characteristics of their property, such as gardens and landscape features, minor decorative elements, and for the informal review of major additions and new construction. • Conduct an educational program on historic landmarks and districts within the town. • Public information or otherwise inform the public about any matters pertinent to its purview, duties, organization, procedures, responsibilities, functions, or requirements. • Communicate with other boards or commissions in Wake County or with agencies of the county or other governmental units to offer or request assistance, aid, guidance, or advice concerning matters under its purview or of mutual interest. • Prepare and recommend the official adoption of a historic preservation element as part of the town’s comprehensive plan at the request of the board of commissioners. Other powers and duties involve acquiring, restoring, preserving, and operating properties and the authority needed to take whatever actions are necessary in order to fulfill its duties. The new Unified Development Ordinance, under development in 2012, is likely to make some minor changes, but no major changes are anticipated. Demolition Delay: In June 2007 the General Assembly adopted special legislation, House Bill

827, granting Wake Forest and Cary the authority to delay demolition of historic properties in their zoning jurisdictions. In spring 2008 Wake Forest adopted a zoning amendment extending the requirement for a Certificate of Appropriateness for the demolition of any historic property in the town’s jurisdiction. The HPC now has the ability to delay any demolition up to 365 days, just the same as previously authorized within the locally designated historic district and landmark properties. Regular Activities The regular activity of the Historic Preservation Commission is to review proposed alterations, renovations, and new construction in the locally designated historic district and landmark properties. The purpose of this review is to ensure that the proposed work is in conformity


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Special Activities and Projects In addition to its regular activities involving Certificates of Appropriateness and educational efforts, the Historic Preservation Commission is involved in a number of current and/or ongoing major activities or projects, including: • Christmas Historic Home Tour: The most prominent activity is the biennial Christmas Historic Home Tour, held on even numbered years. • Streetlights along North Main Street: The HPC has long considered placing utility lines underground and providing decorative street/pedestrian lighting a high priority. The town will cover this expense but the HPC will approve the design. • Restrict Large Trucks along North Main Street: NCDOT has turned us down two times but this still remains a goal of the HPC. Such trucks are much too large to use this narrow residential street. However, as long as it is a US numbered highway it may not be possible to restrict large through trucks. • Ailey Young House: Discovered in the 2008 historic building survey it was mothballed in early 2010, with financial help from the Town of Wake Forest and the Wake County Historical Society. Plans are to renovate it for some use, perhaps a cemetery office and/ or museum focusing on the Young family, history of the East End neighborhood, and architecture of post-Civil War working class housing for African Americans. • Workshops or Lectures on Historic Preservation Topics: Occasional workshops and lectures are held on historic preservation topics.

Christmas Historic Home Tour

Ailey Young House

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with the design guidelines and Secretary of Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation, that is, they are compatible with the historic design of the building and the district as a whole. Design, dimensions, materials, and color are all considered. These approvals are called, “Certificates of Appropriateness” (COAs).


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In the past few years the Historic Preservation Commission has completed or participated in a number of major activities or projects which are not ongoing, including: • Design Guidelines: Developed and adopted in 1999. • Spring Garden Tour: Original sponsor and cosponsored with the Wake Forest Garden Club first few spring garden tours beginning in Spring, 2000. • Historic District Signs: Signs were installed at the major entrances to the three National Register historic districts. The mill village was first, then Spring Garden Tour downtown, followed by the larger Wake Forest Historic District. The design of the signs was kept simple and inspired by the windows in the mill building. The more decorative wrought iron poles express a Victorian flare appropriate to late 19th and early 20th century Wake Forest. • Refurbished Old Historic District Signs and “Welcome to Historic Wake Forest” Signs: The wood historic district signs located at each end of the median on North Main Street and the Welcome to Historic Wake Forest signs located on Durham Road, S. Main Street, and Wait Avenue at the water plant had all deteriorated over the years due to the lack of maintenance. They were repainted and reinstalled in 2002. The S. Main Street sign was removed during the construction of the Calvin Jones Highway. It was broken in the process and never replaced. • Historic Forestville Signs: Installed identification signs for “Historic Forestville” in 2006. • Policy on cement based siding, e.g. Hardiplank: In the early part of the first decade of the 21st century, the HPC set the policy that Hardiplank was an acceptable material for new construction and renovations, as long as the exposure matches the original clapboard siding. Such siding must have a smooth finish. Wood grain finish is not acceptable. • Policy on Paint Color: The HPC conducted a rather extensive investigation of other communities and, in 2009, decided not to regulate the color of paint. Paint is easily changed and paint color review was considered to be a “can of worms.” • Jurisdiction-wide Historic Building Survey: Completed in 2008 by Ruth Little and her company, Longleaf Historic Resources. • Nominations for Three Historic Districts for Listing on the National Register of Historic Places: Wake Forest’s three

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• Demolition Delay Ordinance: In conjunction with Cary, Wake Forest received special legislation from the General Assembly on June 7, 2007 (Session law 2007-66, House Bill 827) granting both towns the ability to delay demolitions of historic properties throughout their jurisdiction. The Historic Preservation Commission recommended a local ordinance effectively extending the COA requirement and 365 day maximum delay authority to the HPC throughout the zoning jurisdiction of Wake Forest. The board of commissioners adopted this zoning amendment on May 20, 2008. • Designation of Five Additional Landmarks: For several years Wake Forest only had one designated local landmark property. In recent years the Historic Preservation Commission recommended five more to the board of commissioners. These are the Battle-Purnell House, designated on August 20, 2002; Oakforest, designated on October 21, 2008; the Purefoy-Chappell House, designated on December 16, 2008; the Heartsfield House, designated on December 20, 2011; and the Ailey Young House, designated on June 19, 2012. The original landmark property, Battle-Purnell House (1802-1803)

Oakforest (1803)

Purefoy-Chappell House (1838, c. 1895)

Heartsfield House (1803)

Ailey Young House (c. 1875)

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National Register Historic Districts are the Glen Royall Mill Village Historic District, listed August 27, 1999; the Downtown Wake Forest Historic District, listed February 20, 2002; and the larger Wake Forest Historic District, listed December 18, 2003.


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the I. O. Jones House, was designated by the Wake Forest Board of Commissioners on March 14, 1991. • Historic District Walking Tour Brochure: Rewritten, redesigned, with new photos the brochure was printed in 2008. • List of East End Neighborhood Design Guidelines for Possible Conservation District: Completed in 2011 this is a brief

list of guidelines to protect the neighborhood atmosphere of the East End neighborhood.

East End Neighborhood

Historic District Walking Tour Brochure


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North Main Street


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Historic Districts


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Historic Districts Local Wake Forest Historic District Wake Forest officially designated its first historic district on May 10, 1979. The district runs along North Main Street, once called “Faculty Avenue� because of all the professors who lived there, extending from North Avenue to Oak Avenue, and along North Avenue and East South Avenue. Because this was the only historic district in Wake Forest for twenty years most local

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Simmons-Allen-Bridges House (1883)

South Brick House (1837)

Parker-Bestwick House (1951)

Medlin-Cooke Building (1905)

Brewer-Stryer House (1892)

Davis-Bush House (c. 1905)

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Historic Districts & Landmarks


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Local Wake Forest Historic District May 10, 1979


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Calvin Jones House (c. 1820)

Powell-Autry House (c. 1895)

Patterson-Eppes House (1928)

residents still think of this as the historic area. Most of the larger homes, mostly associated with the college, are located here. This historic district is included, in its entirety, within the Wake Forest Historic District listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Wake Forest Historic District窶年ational Register The Wake Forest Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 18, 2003 and has a period of significance from c. 1820 to 1953. It contains the historic core of the Town of Wake Forest, consisting of the original Wake Forest College campus, surrounding residences of college faculty, staff, and other community citizens, and other buildings. The entirety of the locally designated historic district is included within the boundaries of this one. The district is focused on the historic campus of the college, established in 1834 on the plantation of Dr. Calvin Jones. The central campus contains eleven, two and three story, large brick Colonial Revival and Classical Revival style buildings built between 1888 and 1952, except for three post-1956 buildings. A twelfth building, the 1913 Beaux Arts style Wake Forest Baptist Church, is located on a lot carved from the campus, but is not a college building. The historic district retains an overall piedmont North Carolina historic character, created by a network of stone rubble walls and large hardwood trees. Along North Main Street, house lots tend to be large, with lushly landscaped front and side gardens. That street has an elegant fifteen-foot wide median landscaped with trees, shrubs, and flowers, creating a gracious atmosphere. Granite curbing lines the street.

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Powers-Arrington House (1910)


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Wake Forest Historic District窶年ational Register December 18, 2003


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The oldest building in the district, the Calvin Jones House, 414 North Main Street, is the c. 1820 two story Federal style farmhouse of Calvin Jones, who sold his farm for the creation of Wake Forest College in 1832. The house was moved to this site in 1956 and is now, along with a new building behind the house, a museum of the history of the town and college. Several of Wake Forest’s institutional buildings are located in the district south of the campus. The former Wake Forest School and gymnasium, 136 West Sycamore Avenue, are Colonial

Broyhill Hall (formerly Lea Laboratory, 1888)

Wake Forest Baptist Church (1913-1915)

Stealey Hall (formerly Wait Hall, 1935)

Old Town Water Works (now dental office)

Community House (1942)

F.M. Purefoy House (c. 1910)

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Many historic houses in the district were constructed by faculty and staff of Wake Forest College between the late 1830s and 1946, when the college decided to relocate to WinstonSalem, North Carolina. The largest houses line North and South Main Streets and have large, well-landscaped lots. Some of these are simple I-houses, while others are stylish Italianate, Queen Anne, Colonial Revival and Classical Revival style houses. The side streets have more architecturally modest Queen Anne, Craftsman, Colonial Revival, and vernacular houses.


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Revival style brick buildings built in 1939. The Community House, 123 West Owen Avenue, a WPA funded Colonial Revival style frame community building with a swimming pool, was completed about 1942. Nearby, two recent buildings include the contemporary style addition to the Wake Forest Elementary School, 136 West Sycamore Avenue, and the large brick Boys and Girls Club of Wake Forest, 325 South Wingate Street. The district also includes churches, a repurposed train station, a limited number of commercial buildings and former municipal buildings that are currently used in other capacities. The Wake Forest Historic District possesses a unique architectural character in Wake County. The buildings include examples of each historical period and style from the early nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century, many of them designed by notable local, state, and outof-state architects. The campus of Wake Forest College and the surrounding town constitute North Main Street one of the most significant groupings of historic buildings in Wake County, outside of the city of Raleigh. The district’s central significance is as a physical testament to the spirit of enlightened religious education that flourished at Wake Forest College, as well as to the elevated level of architectural taste manifested in residential design throughout the district.

Jesse Hollowell House (c. 1935)

Bond House (c. 1900)

Dr. R.W. Wilkinson Jr. House (1924)

South Main Street (c. 1940)

South Main Street (c. 1925)

South Main Street (c. 1949)


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George Bolus House (1928)

Judge Percy Wilson House (c. 1930)

Magnolia Hill (1928)

Stone Chapel (formerly St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church, 1940)

I.O. Jones House (c. 1903, c. 1925)

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K.T. Raynor House (c. 1940)


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Glen Royall Mill Village Historic District—National Register August 27, 1999

Glen Royall Mill Village Historic District—National Register The Glen Royall Mill Village Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on August 27, 1999 and has a period of significance from 1900 to 1949. This residential area is characterized by an irregular grid of streets laid out c. 1899. House lots were not surveyed until 1941 when the village owner, the Royall Cotton Mill decided to sell the houses. The Royall Cotton Mill was incorporated in 1899, during a period of major expansion in North Carolina’s textile industry, to spin and weave cotton, producing cotton sheeting skein yarn, becoming one of North Carolina’s premiere textile concerns. Construction on the mill and village began in 1900. The mill hired contractor Benjamin Thomas Hooks to construct the village housing according to plans and specifications prepared by mill superintendent John D. Briggs. Residents shopped at the mill commissary located at the corner of Brewer Avenue and Brick Street, now converted into apartments, worshipped at a church in the village, and

Mill Commissary (now apartments)


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their children were educated in village schools. The early mill workforce is said to have come principally from a nearby area known as “The Hurricanes,” an area known for its hard-scrabble farms and moon shining, but some operatives came from other mill communities. The mill continued in operation until a shift from cotton to synthetics in the 1970s resulted in the closure of the mill in April 1976. Beginning in 1900 the Royall Cotton Mill management built housing for its mill operatives and their families. These one-story Pyramidal House frame houses originally featured weatherboard siding, wood shingle roofing, and brick foundation piers and flues. The dominant house in the village is a pyramidal roofed four room form, excluding ells or wings, with a central brick flue. The second most numerous type is the “triple-A” cottage, so named for its distinctive roof with two end gables and a third, decorative gable on the front elevation. The larger, multi-gabled mill superintendent’s house at 105 East Chestnut Avenue is related to this form. There are also several shotgun-form houses, distinguished by their narrow gabled fronts. The Powell-Drake House (a.k.a. PowellWhite House), located at 614 North Main Street but actually faces East Cedar Avenue, is the exception as to house and lot size and style. This house is the largest and most architecturally refined in the district. This large two story house has a large lot and features Queen Anne, Craftsman, and Colonial Revival

Pyramidal House

Triple-A House

Shotgun House

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Corner of Brewer Street and Brick Avenue


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attributes, wrap-around porch supported by classical columns, porte-cochere, front entry with sidelights and transom, and leaded windows. Robert Powell apparently built the house, beginning in 1909, although the property wasn’t deeded to him until 1913. He was the son of one of the mill founders and served the mill in a number of capacities. When the mill village was an incorporated town the Powell-Drake House (c. 1915) resident of this house was the only voter in town other than the Royall Cotton Mill, the only other property owner. Its major renovation in the 1990s resulted in the owners, Frank and Kathryn Drake, receiving an Anthemion Award from Capital Area Preservation in 1998. The Glen Royall mill village was incorporated as the Town of Royall Cotton Mills in 1907 with the mill directors serving as the town commissioners. Apparently the principal motivation behind incorporation was a desire by the mill management to avoid annexation by Wake Forest, an action that would have doubled the mill’s tax burden. The town’s charter was repealed in 1945 but not actually annexed into the Town of Wake Forest until 1977! A company owned church and school, now incorporated into the Glen Royall Shotgun House Baptist Church at the corner of Elizabeth Street and East Chestnut Avenue, was constructed during the first decade of the 20th century and a separate public graded school, no longer existing, was built on an adjoining site by 1926. During the 1920s and 1930s, home construction in the village tapered off due to a period of economic downturn at the mill. However, construction began again immediately following the end of World War II, with Cape Cod cottages and other house forms built on undeveloped lots. Post-1949 houses are relatively few. The pyramidal, “triple-A,” and shotgun houses erected at Glen Royall were representative of a new architectural approach to the mill house building type. Traditionally, a 2-story hall and parlor plan was used in mill housing. However, new forms began appearing around the turn of the 20th century. In her 1929 study Welfare Work in Mill Villages, The Story of Extra-Mill Activities in North Carolina Harriet L. Herring conjectured that the new trend toward pyramidal cottages, or “squaretopped” houses, resulted from the beginning of the bungalow influence. True bungalows became dominant after about 1915. Mill owners were careful to build a mix of houses of difference room numbers so as to accommodate the needs of their renters. Three-room

Superintendent’s House

Brewer Street


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The Glen Royall Mill Village retains a high degree of architectural integrity. Most of the neighborhood’s original housing stock survives and the historic street pattern remains unaltered. Historic yard patterns and shade tree distributions have been preserved or perpetuated. The 1900 Royall Cotton Mill is contiguous to the district but is not included owing to loss of integrity. Downtown Wake Forest Historic District—National Register The Downtown Wake Forest Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 20, 2002 and has a period of significance from c. 1890 to 1951. It is the commercial core of the Town of Wake South White Street Forest. All buildings in this district were built between 1890 and 1949 and range from one story to three stories in height. Most are of brick construction but a few built during the 1940s are of cinder block. Many buildings were built in the mid-1910s after a devastating fire. Typical façade features include metal cornices, corbelling and other decorative brickwork, upper-story windows in flatheaded or segmental-arched openings, and storefronts with display windows, transoms, and recessed entries. Most buildings are only South White Street (1930s) remotely influenced by period styles but a few from the 1940s exhibit stylistic influence, typically the Colonial Revival and Art Deco styles. The historic functions of the buildings represent the usual variety of a downtown, including upper floor apartments. The district’s streets were paved and concrete sidewalks installed prior to World War II. The district retains its basic character and integrity. Commercial buildings retain characterdefining features such as relatively unaltered upper stories, parapets and cornices, and, in most

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houses were “popular with newly married couples and small families who do not want to take boarders,” whereas the larger houses permitted “doubling up” of families and the taking in of boarders during periods of peak production and employment. The evidence suggests that Glen Royall families took in boarders even if their particular house model was small. Glen Royall displays the mix of house sizes described by Herring, as well as both triple-A and pyramidal houses with double front doors suggesting the potential for conversion into duplexes. The dominant triple-A and pyramidal forms alternate along the principal north-south streets of Elizabeth and Mill, with one type facing its mirror image across the street but flanked on each side by the other type. Mill villages where “no two adjoining houses are alike” were declared by some industry analysts to be a sign of social health, but in her interviews with mill workers Herring noted that few seemed to care whether their dwellings looked the same or different from adjoining houses.


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Downtown Wake Forest Historic District—National Register February 20, 2002

cases, storefronts with display windows, transoms, recessed entries, etc. Where modern façade improvements were made, most are sympathetic with the character of the original. Obviously modern buildings were excluded from the district, helping to define the boundaries. The establishment of the Wake Forest depot in 1874 stimulated the growth of the town and marked the beginning of commercial development within the district boundaries. Lots were laid out on the east side of the railroad tracks near the depot, partly on college land, and the area was incorporated by the state legislature in 1880 as the Town of Wake Forest College. The new lots were located on White Street, named after the second president of Wake Forest College, and cross streets were named after another president (Wait), a professor (Owen), and the owner of the plantation on which the college and town developed (Jones). The college community represented the district’s principal clientele, at least at first, but the district


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Most early commercial buildings in the district were frame construction but some chose to build of brick rather than wood before 1900. The two three-story brick commercial buildings from the period were, and still are, the largest in the district: the Powers-Barbee Building and the Wilkinson Building.

Old Post Office Building (1940)

Frame buildings were more susceptible to fire than brick ones and at least two fires are known to have depleted the district’s first generation of commercial buildings, the most recent large scale fire occurring in 1915. A number of brick buildings were constructed immediately after the 1915 fire including the Arrington Building, Mangum’s Grocery, and Jones Hardware. For a brief period before the construction of specialized filling stations beginning in the 1920s, gasoline was sold from pumps located in front of White Street stores. One of these survives – a Bowser Enclosed Long Distance Pump that stands in front of the Wilkinson Building. Buildings of the 1930s and 1940s show a shift toward greater architectural sophistication in the district. The Colonial Revival style enjoyed the greatest popularity, perhaps reinforced by the predominately Colonial Revival character of the construction at Wake Forest College. One such building is the 1940 Wake Forest Post Office, designed in accordance with standardized Treasury Department plans and specifications. The c. 1940 Ben’s of Wake Forest Building shows banded parapet brickwork that is Art Deco in character and the Lovelace Building suggests Moderne influence. Another development of the 1940s was the use of cinder-block construction, such as seen in the late 1940s J. W. Fort Barbecue Restaurant. A local tragedy resulted in the construction of the railroad overpass in 1935. Tradition holds that the overpass was constructed to replace an at-grade crossing after an accident involving a school bus filled with children. It is supported at its two ends by abutments with angled walls and scored surfaces. Inside the abutments at the two edges of the street are arcades that run

South White Street

Renovated Cotton Warehouse

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also served the commercial needs of the surrounding countryside and, after 1900, of the several hundred workers and dependents from the Glen Royall Mill Village, located on the northern edge of town.


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Local Historic Landmarks


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Primarily due to the move of the college to Winston-Salem development in downtown essentially ceased by the early 1950s. Only two buildings have been built along S. White Street between East Roosevelt and Owen Avenues since: the 1971 Fidelity Bank (not included in this district) and the 2002 Hale Building. Downtown has compensated for the growth of suburban shopping centers by attracting specialty shops, restaurants, and professional offices. A growing appreciation of historic ambiance among Wake Forest’s citizenry and the popular Renaissance Plan for the Heart of Wake Forest focusing on downtown have benefitted the downtown and inspired recent renovations and façade improvements, including the tax credit conversion of the W. W. Holding Co. Cotton Warehouse into an artist and gift emporium.

Local Historic Landmarks Wake Forest has designated six local historic landmark properties, including: I. O. Jones House (c. 1903), Battle-Purnell House (1803), Oakforest (c. 1807), Purefoy-Chappell House (1838), Heartsfield House (1803) and Ailey Young House (c. 1875).

I.O. Jones House (1903)

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parallel to the street and are supported by stout square-section pillars. Above, at the level of the tracks, are balustrades with arched openings.


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I.O. Jones House This Queen Anne style house at 538 South Main Street was designated as a local historic landmark on March 14, 1991. The I. O. Jones House is a large two-story house with a pyramidal roof, interior chimney, and a front-gabled two-story wing with a cutaway bay window. The pedimented gable has an oval Adamesque-style window. The 1-over-1 sash windows are apparently original. The wraparound one-story porch has a gabled entrance bay, turned posts with sawnwork brackets, and a simple railing. Around 1925 a Craftsman-style entrance vestibule was added in front of the original entrance, and a small sunroom above it, perhaps in place of an original open upper-story porch. At this time the side section of the porch was enclosed as a sunroom. The I. O. Jones House was constructed c. 1903 by Robert Freeman and his wife, Genoa Rox Hunter Freeman as a wedding gift for their daughter, Elizabeth, and her husband, Ira Otis Jones. Robert Freeman started the Wake Forest Supply Store in 1906, along with his son-inlaw, I. O. Jones, and O. K. Holding. In 1915-1916, after the death of Robert Freeman and O. K. Holding, I. O. Jones moved the store to another location in downtown Wake Forest. In 1931 I. O. Jones’ son, Leland, entered the business and in 1931 they changed the name to Jones Hardware Company. Jones Hardware remained in operation, at a couple different locations, until it finally closed in 2005, one year short of 100 years! I. O. Jones led an active life. He had ventured into the financial sector, opening the Bank of Wake in 1928, along with others. Not the best in timing for opening a bank, it closed in 1930, due to the economy. He was a trustee and a deacon of the First Baptist Church of Wake Forest and was also active in several civic groups. Twice in the 1950s he was elected the headmaster of the local Masonic Lodge and he was also active with the Rotary Club. He never ran for Town Council due to his belief that business and politics do not mix! The Jones House was always full of family, friends, or students from Wake Forest College, according to the memories of the grandchildren. Because there was limited dormitory space at the college, the family often rented rooms to students and many of the boarders became close family friends. One of Elizabeth Jones’ interests was gardening, perhaps why the business eventually took on a decidedly “garden center” flare. She had gardens on both sides of the house and a rock garden in the back. In the summer there was always fresh vegetables and also homemade butter from the cow they kept out back. Elizabeth (Lizzie) was interested in landscaping long before the average townsperson. She was a member of the Wake Forest Garden Club for many years and served on several committees. Every spring she would allow townspeople to tour her immaculate lawn. Battle-Purnell House The Battle-Purnell House, located at 1037 North Main Street, was designated as a local landmark historic property on August 20, 2002. This house was built by Josiah Battle in 18021803. It is a 2-story, T-shaped house, unusually large for its time. The house originally had 300 acres accompanying it. Josiah Battle was a local farmer and was a part owner of a local sawmill.


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The Battle-Purnell House is perhaps the largest and best-preserved late Georgian-style dwelling in rural Wake County. Both the five-bay main block and the rear ell of the house are 2-stories tall. Set on a high stone basement, the house is clad in plain weatherboards and displays raisedpanel doors with six panels, 9-over-9 sash windows, and window and door surrounds with three-part moldings. The three double-shouldered Flemish bond chimneys are handsomely finished with paved shoulders and glazed headers. The kitchen addition was built out of old materials in keeping with the original structure. Oakforest Oakforest, located at 9958 Seawell Drive, was designated as a local historic landmark property on October 21, 2008. The house stands on a stone and cinder block foundation, and originally was a Federal style hall and parlor house. The original south-facing porch with its hand-hewn columns is still in use. The slender, round columns are unique in that the capitals and bases were all carved in one piece with the columns. An addition in the style of Greek Revival gave the house a double-pile, center hall-plan. The architectural style was in vogue in 1830-1840s. At that time the front door was changed from south facing to west. The double doors were centered in a rectangle of horizontal boards, and the veranda was covered as seen in the 1887 photograph. The 1894 photograph shows an added portico. In 1895, a returned-eave pediment roof, four Doric columns, and a sawn work balustrade to the roof were added to the west porch. The south facing, three-bay faรงade contains double-hung, 9-over-9 sash windows on the first floor and double-hung, 6-over-9 sash windows on the second floor. Some of the original glass remains. Most of the features on the Greek Revival main elevation have also remained, such as the flush boarding on the entrance bay; the 6-over-6 sash windows with molded surround and bullseye corner blocks; double front doors with single vertical panes; and multi-paned transom and sidelights also with bulls-eye corner blocks.

Oakforest (c. 1807)

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Battle-Purnell House (1802-1803)

After his death in 1826 the house passed to his son, John A. Battle. By 1854 the house and land was owned by John and Mary Purnell. In 1895 John Purnell died and the property was left to his wife and children. The house was rented out over the years. In the early 1900s the Jackson family purchased the property. They were also farmers and produced honey. The acreage decreased over the years until, at present, only nine acres remain with the house. The current owners purchased the house and nine acres in 1991 and did an extensive renovation.


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The rear, pine, 2-story ell was built circa 1865. The L-shaped, rear porch was added sometime shortly after the ell was built. It was screened around 1950. The kitchen wing was built by slave labor during the Civil War. It consists of four rooms on two floors and a separate attic. The rooms added on the second floor were intended for servants’ quarters. The “new” kitchen was connected to the house by a pantry with a root cellar underneath. The original kitchen, which was used as an office until it burned down circa 1899, was near the southeast corner of the house. The property also contains several outbuildings and a family cemetery. Despite the fact that there was a cemetery connecting to Benjamin’s Smith house, John Smith created a cemetery at Oakforest. John Smith was the first to be buried there in 1843. Kenan Seawell was the last to be buried in the family cemetery in 1979. It is surrounded by cast iron and brick fencing, but originally was stonewalls. Some of the original stone remains in the interior of the cemetery. The original owner, Benjamin Smith, acquired 66 acres in Johnston County in 1755 through a land grant. Through the years he subsequently acquired a great deal of more land. He acquired 274 acres in 1784 for his service for 36 months as a private in the Revolutionary War. Benjamin Smith gave a land deed for 200 acres to his son, John Smith in 1803. One of John Smith’s daughters, Elizabeth, married Wiley Daniel Jones in 1847. They lived at Oakforest and he became a prominent businessman in North Carolina. Wiley D. Jones was both noted and notorious. He was an astute businessman, a trustee on the Board of the Raleigh & Gaston Railroad, an officer of the Confederate Army, and a political leader in the Reconstruction. During the Civil War, he was a captain of the Wake County Militia and was captured at Roanoke. He spent most of his service as a prisoner of war in the North. Elizabeth faced many obstacles during the war while managing the plantation in her husband’s absence. On March 24, 1865, the Confederate Army requisitioned the carriage horses from Oakforest. Following this, Union soldiers from Sherman’s Army descended on the homestead and looted the place. Octavia was home from Saint Mary’s School at the time. She managed to save the hams by hiding them under a blanket and sitting on them while the looting soldiers were flirting with her. They did not take the hams, but did help themselves to the carriage, which was later found broken and abandoned near Crabtree Creek in Raleigh. Despite his imprisonment, Wiley had enough influence to have Union guards stationed at the college and his home after his family suffered the looting. He also traveled with Governor Holden to see President Andrew Johnson. It is suspected that due to his involvement with the key players in the Reconstruction period, threats from the Ku Klux Klan expressing intent to burn a cross at Oakforest were a direct result of his political activities. In 1891, the statement that Wiley had a “moderating effect on Reconstruction” was written in his obituary. It was the Jones family that added the 2-story ell and a small porch to house in 1865. Elizabeth and Wiley had two sons and one daughter. John Wesley Jones inherited Oakforest, his brother Hamilton was for a time the sheriff of Forestville, and Octavia who became an accomplished pianist and music teacher. A piano was bought for her after the war, and still sits in the parlor. She married Miles Edward Carver, son of Job and Elizabeth MacDonald Sanderson Carver of Forestville on January 17, 1872. Job was the first person buried in the cemetery at Forestville Baptist Church. John Wesley Jones added a pedimented second story to the west porch in 1895.


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Unfortunately, one of the most wonderful symbols of Oakforest is no more. In 1893, the Tryst Oak in the pasture was designated the best example of a white oak. Its picture was placed on glass with other North Carolina trees in the exhibit of the Chicago Exposition. In 1910, another picture of it appeared in the North Carolina Teacher Magazine, when the white oak was chosen by the school children as North Carolina’s tree. In the 1950s, it was saved by being filled with cement and was called the finest white oak in the Southeast, second only to the Treaty Oak of Maryland. In 1992, after the tree had survived two years of being struck down the middle by a lightning bolt, it gave up. Its origins as an acorn reportedly date to 1215, the year the Magna Carter was signed. The tree has served as excellent firewood for the hearth in the library, and its acorns are slowly developing into future tryst oaks. The American boxwoods, however, are still growing. They also serve as a symbol for Oakforest. The alley of boxwoods lines the original front drive, and is assumed to have been planted prior to the Civil War. A picture taken in 1886 where they are shown to be quite existential provides conclusive evidence. There are also English boxwoods to the north that line a kitchen garden and pathway. They were planted in the 1930s. Until 1950, Wake County was more rural than urban. Oakforest is one of the few reminders of that time left in Wake Forest’s jurisdiction. When Kelly A. Lally wrote The Historic Architecture of Wake County, it was placed on the North Carolina study list (see p. 250). In 1998, it was placed on the National Register based on its historical and social history significance. There are extensive archives of primary sources at Oakforest and other family homes as well as photographs in the North Carolina Collection of the Department of Cultural Resources. Purefoy-Chappell House The Purefoy-Chappell House, located at 1255 South Main Street, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 22, 2008 and designated as a local historic landmark property on December 16, 2008. The house and outbuildings, including the c. 1862 doctor’s office, are rare survivors of once common forms. The house and outbuildings are also survivors of the once flourishing Town of Forestville. As an early nineteenth century 1-room house with a rear shed room, the Purefoy-Chappell House represents an early common, vernacular regional house type found in North Carolina.

Purefoy-Chappell House (1838, c. 1895)

The house is comprised of four major sections -– a c. 1838, 1½-story, side gable, single pile main block with a rear shed wing; a c. 1895, 2-story, side gable, single pile addition built onto the south gable end of the original house; a 2-room side gable kitchen/dining building dating to c.

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After passing from the hands of one family member to another the house came into the ownership of Speed Massenburg and his wife, Barbara, and they moved into the house in 1981, as the seventh generation of the family to own and live at Oakforest.


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H IS TORIC D IS TRIC TS AND LANDMARKS

1838 that was connected to the main block and the c. 1895 addition by a 1-story hyphen containing a modern kitchen added in 1974. A very small 1-story shed roof addition was built c. 1960 onto the rear of the c. 1895 addition to house a small bathroom. A 1-story was originally on the front façade, facing South Main Street but was removed prior to the widening of the street in 1966. The house stands on a stone foundation and has a metal roof. The exterior is covered by weatherboards and, in some places, board and batten siding. The windows in the original section have 9-over-9 sashes with smaller windows by the chimneys and the c. 1895 wing has 4-over-4 sash. Two parged stone shouldered chimneys run up the north side of the house, one for the original block and one for the rear shed. Contributing outbuildings include a c. 1838/c. 1900 smoke house and a c. 1862 doctor’s office. The smoke house sits south of the main house. The heavy timber frame building was extended c. 1900 with light frame construction and covered with weatherboard. The 2-room, hip-roof frame doctor’s office has a central brick chimney that served as a flue for a stove. This board and batten sided building has two 6-over-6 sash windows in the east room of the building, which served as the doctor’s office. The west room retains its shelves and served as the apothecary and storage room for medical supplies. The house was built on a lot purchased in 1837 by James S. Purefoy near where the Raleigh and Gaston Railroad had just been established. The increase in tax value as of January 1, 1839 suggests that the house was built in late 1838. James Purefoy was the son of John Purefoy, the Baptist minister and plantation owner who convinced the North Carolina Baptist Convention to purchase Dr. Calvin Jones’ 615 acre plantation as the site for what would become Wake Forest College. James and his wife, Mary, lived in the house, raising their two sons, John and Edgar, until 1853 when it was sold to Richard Ligon. James Purefoy joined the Wake Union Baptist Church, where his father was the pastor. He was ordained a Baptist minister in March of 1842 and served several churches in Wake, Granville, Franklin, and Warren counties until 1889, the year of his death. He also served as treasurer of the Baptist State Convention from 1842 to 1870, as the historian for the Central Baptist Association from 1876 through 1888, and as a trustee, financial agent, and benefactor of Wake Forest College. In addition, James Purefoy was a businessman and a farmer. At the request of the college board of trustees, in 1846 he purchased a lot on South Avenue across from the campus and built the Purefoy Hotel. He also purchased an adjacent lot and operated a general store. Purefoy served as the postmaster of Forestville beginning in 2839, most likely soon after he had completed building his house and moved to the village. The Leroy Chappell family purchased the house in 1862, building the doctor’s office, and lived there until 1964. Dr. Chappell first studied medicine locally under a Dr. Johnson and then attended the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia for a year. His first practice was in Shallotte in Brunswick County, NC and then moved to Kinston, Lenoir County. It was there that he met his wife, Eliza. The couple had two sons, Leroy and Henry. Little is known about Dr. Chappell’s career in Forestville, although it appears he was a successful doctor. G. W. Paschal, in the second volume of his “History of Wake Forest College”, states that Dr. Chappell was President Wingate’s physician when he died in 1879. By 1900, Dr. Leroy Chappell, 70 years old, and his wife Eliza, 69 years old, lived in the house with their son, Henry, his wife, Bettie, and their newborn son, Frank. It seems likely that the


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Heartsfield House1 The Heartsfield House, located at 9737 Ligon Mill Road, was designated as a local historic landmark property on December 20, 2011. The property includes the home, several outbuildings and other structures, and a cemetery. The well and well house, the historic road bed, and cemetery are considered to be contributing to the historic property. The storage building, horse barn and tennis court were all built during the 1990s and are not contributing. About 200 feet south of the house runs an old road bed which may be the remnant of an early road connecting “Powell Road”, now US1A, and Fall of Neuse Road. The small cemetery lies between the old road bed and the house. Heartsfield House is one of the oldest and most prominent homes in the Wake Forest area. Built in 1803, it still has visible in the basement and attic the heavy mortise-and-tenon frame that is consistent with this date. The foundation was built of large stacked granite blocks, a material commonly used for foundations in northeastern Wake County. The Flemish bond double-shouldered chimneys rank among the county’s finest displays of early 19th century brick work.

Heartsfield House (1803)

Originally, the house was built in the federal style, a two-story house with a rear 1-story shed. Then, around 1850 the style received a Greek Revival makeover, including the addition of the wide 1-story front porch, the interior floor plan was altered, and portions of the woodwork were replaced. The front porch was enclosed in the 1950s. Vinyl siding was installed in 1978. Another addition was added to the rear in 1987. Original window sashes remain in the 1803 section. Although Dr. Wesley Heartsfield was the first documented owner, based on documentary evidence the house may have been built by or for a member of the Dempsey Powell family. Wesley Heartsfield was born in 1810, the second child of Andrew II and Siddie Heartsfield. Family tradition states that he studied medicine in Cincinnati and returned to Wake County to practice. He married Candace Smith in 1835 and they had nine children. Over the years he accumulated several properties. Then, in 1848, he acquired the 485 acre tract containing the 1803 dwelling on Ligon Mill Road. Physical changes to the house and Greek Revival makeover, such as the conversion to the center hall floor plan, change in interior woodwork, and the addition of the wide front porch, coincide with Wesley Heartsfield taking ownership. 1 In the early years deed references and signatures were often, although not always, signed “Heartsfield”. After about 1880 the family seems to adopt the standard spelling “Hartsfield”. This house is called the Heartsfield House because that is how Dr. Wesley Heartsfield, the first documented owner, signed his name.

H IS TORIC D IS TRIC TS AND LANDMARKS

large 2-story wing was added to the original house during the late 1890s, when Henry started his family and both couples began to live in the house. Frank Chappell inherited the house and, after his death in 1964, his wife, Celera Chappell, sold the house in 1965.


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H IS TORIC D IS TRIC TS AND LANDMARKS

Family history states that between 1853 and 1863 the Heartsfields lived at the house on Ligon Mill Road so his sons could attend a local academy. The 1860 census lists Wesley Heartsfield with forty slaves, which was a very large number for Wake County. This would classify him as a “planter”. (Historian Kelly Lally describes a “planter” as a landowner owning more than twenty slaves.) Less than five percent of the county’s population was of the planter class. Three of Wesley and Candace’s five sons died in the Civil War. In 1866 Wesley Heartsfield conveyed 685 acres, including the Heartsfield House, to his son, Jacob Andrew. Other property was conveyed to his other surviving son. The deed for the Heartsfield House property conveyed the tract for the sum of $2.00 and “the love and affection of my beloved son”. Wesley Heartsfield died in 1880 at the age of 70. Jacob Andrew Heartsfield died in 1915 and in 1916 the house and 89 acres were conveyed to Jacob Andrew Hartsfield, Jr. The property then passed down to his son, Jacob Andrew III in 1934. After more than 100 years the house passed out of the Heartsfield family ownership in 1954 when it was bought by Cary Maupin. The Maupins enclosed the front porch and added a small bathroom on the second floor. The current owners bought the house in 1974. The house is significant as an example of high-style rural domestic architecture of the Federal period. The rear addition does not significantly detract from the property’s overall setting, architectural style, historic materials or association. Several early 19th century dwellings survive in Wake Forest and the Heartsfield House compares favorably to them. The Calvin Jones House on North Main Street, built prior to 1820, is a two-story Federal dwelling with a hall-and-parlor plan interior similar to the original configuration of the Heartsfield House. However, the Calvin Jones House is not on its original site and the shouldered chimneys and double-tier front porch are reconstructions. The 1803 Battle-Purnell House, also on North Main Street, reflects a more sophisticated design aesthetic than that of the Heartsfield House and is more closely associated with the plantation homes in Franklin and Granville counties than the more modest ones of northern Wake County. Its front porch is also reconstructed. The c. 1800 Carver House in Forestville retains its Federal proportions, chimneys, and windows, but has replacement siding and a 20th century front porch. The Heartsfield House is a rare surviving early 19th century dwelling of architectural and historical importance to the town of Wake Forest and merits designation as a Wake Forest Historic Landmark. Ailey Young House The Ailey Young House, located at 320 North White Street, was designated a local historic landmark property on June 19, 2012. The property was purchased by the Town of Wake Forest during the 1990s for future cemetery expansion. The house was boarded up in 2009 to help protect it from vandals and damage due to exposure. In early 2012 the town cleared the property of most trees and underbrush. This long-abandoned, partially-burned 1 ½-story saddlebag house sits on high, finely crafted fieldstone piers on a lot located on North White Street, north of Spring Street and south of the town cemetery. The saddlebag house consists of two frame pens flanking a very large stone


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The saddlebag style house was commonly in use as slave housing. This house, however, is a much grander version. It was probably built around 1875 or maybe a little earlier. It is most certainly a rare example of Reconstruction Era post-Civil War housing for the African American working class. According to local restoration carpenter, Patrick Schell, “There’s just nothing like this left.” The fancier houses tend to survive, but something like this, the housing for regular folks, especially African Americans, is extremely rare!

Ailey Young House (c. 1875)

The Ailey Young House may be the oldest African American historic building in Wake Forest, and has historical significance as the childhood home of one of the town’s most important African American citizens. The house was constructed as rental housing by Wake Forest College Professor William G. Simmons and was one of a number of houses known as “Simmons Row”. These houses appear on the 1915 to 1936 Sanborn Fire Insurance maps. All the other houses are long gone. After Professor Simmons’ death his widow sold the houses to families and subdivided land in the area. This area formed the beginning of what is now known as the East End area. Ailey Young purchased the house and raised her family there. The house was the childhood home of her son, Allen Young, the town’s most significant African American educator. He attended Shaw University and taught public school in Wake County until 1905 when he and others organized the Presbyterian Mission School for Colored Boys and Girls, a name that was soon changed to the Wake Forest Normal and Industrial School, the first school for black children in Wake Forest. Allen Young served as its principal. At least one of his children taught there. The school was a thriving private institution in the 1910s and attracted boarding students from northern states in the 1920s and 1930s when over 300 students were enrolled. The reduction in attendance after the opening of the DuBois school, a Rosenthal public school, finally resulted in its closing in the 1950s. Allen Young also founded the Presbyterian Church for African Americans and operated a dry cleaning business that catered to Wake Forest College. The last family member to live in the house was Hubert Young. No one has lived there since the 1970s. Allen Young’s daughter, Ailey Mae Young, a schoolteacher, was the first African American town commissioner, serving in the 1970s, and the second woman. She was first elected to office in 1971 and re-elected in 1975. The Ailey Young Park is named for her. All buildings associated with the Young family or with the school have been destroyed.

H IS TORIC D IS TRIC TS AND LANDMARKS

chimney with a brick stack. Large fireplaces served the main room of both pens. In the right front corner of the east pen, a stair ascends to the second floor. A similar stair accessed the second floor on the west pen but these were destroyed in the fire. The right (east) pen has horizontal sheathed walls and a mantel. Each pen has a front door that opened onto a shed-roofed porch that has collapsed. Window openings have lost their sashes with the exception of one 4-pane upper sash surviving on the rear. Apparently some of the larger openings held 6-over6 sashes. Its sills and the boards of the walls are circular sawn. Visible nails include square, machine-cut nails, finish nails, and wire nails. Its apparently original board-and-batten siding, with beveled battens, is in sound condition.


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H IS TORIC D IS TRIC TS AND LANDMARKS

Individual Properties Listed on the National Register of Historic Places A number of properties in Wake Forest or the surrounding area are individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places. As such, these properties are eligible for preservation tax credits. These properties include:

W.E.B. DuBois School Built 1926-1942, Listed October 5, 1993—518 N. Franklin St.

Forestville Baptist Church Built 1860, Listed October 25, 1984—1350 S. Main St.

Lea Laboratory (now Broyhill Hall) Built 1888, Remodeled/expanded 1920, Listed May 29, 1975—North Avenue, campus of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary


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Purefoy-Dunn Plantation Listed March 24, 1988—11300 Capital Blvd.

Powell House Listed October 15, 1974—10200 Capital Blvd.

Royall Cotton Mill Commissary Listed October 16, 1991­—811 Brewer Ave.

Purefoy-Chappell House Built 1838, Expanded c. 1895, Listed October 22, 2008— 1255 South Main St.

William Thompson House Built 1840, Moved and renovated 2004, Listed September 15, 2005—2328 Old NC 98 Hwy.

H IS TORIC D IS TRIC TS AND LANDMARKS

Oakforest Built c. 1807, Listed June 11, 1998—9958 Seawell Dr.


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H IS TORIC D IS TRIC TS AND LANDMARKS

Wakefields Listed October 6, 1974—13371 Wake Union Church Rd.


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H IS TORIC D IS TRIC TS AND LANDMARKS

Individual Properties on the National Register


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VIS ION S TATE ME NT, POLIC IE S AND AC TIVITIES

Vision Statement, Policies and Activities Vision Statement The Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission adopted an overall Historic Preservation Goal/Vision Statement: “To safeguard the heritage of the Town, by preserving districts and landmarks that embody important elements of its culture, history, architectural history, or prehistory and to promote the use and conservation of such districts and landmarks for the education, pleasure, and enrichment of the residents of the Town, the County, and the State as a whole.” Policies The following policy statements and activities were the results of discussion during a Special Community Workshop held in January 2012. The bulk of these Policies and Activities were developed from the consensus and group discussions during that workshop. Attendees voted on their priorities within seven different categories, represented by the six following policy statements. The two categories on education at the workshop were combined here into one. After voting the attendees divided into separate discussion groups, based on the categories, to discuss the issues involved. The items within each target group that received the highest number of votes are included in this document along with the results of the group discussions. Policy HP-1: Historic preservation education targeting the community at large, historic property owners and occupants, and members of the Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) should include a special emphasis on Local History and Architecture, the Historic District Design Guidelines, and Preservation Methods and Techniques. Education is important for the community at large in order for the community and town government to give historic preservation its deserved priority. People do care about preserving local history. This policy should include the education of planning department staff, in addition to HPC staff, and of town board members, realtors, school children, newcomers to town, staff from the Chamber of Commerce, etc. Activities should include more workshops and presentations for the public, bring in outside instructors, provide incentives for preservation, etc. The HPC should be more cutting edge, providing technical assistance to owners and occupants of historic properties, and cultivating a heightened public awareness of the importance of historic preservation to the overall well-being of the community. Historic preservation is an economic driver as well as a quality of life issue and important to the welfare of the town as a whole. Our local history and architecture is like a “calling card” for the town.


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The Historic Preservation Commission and the town’s Historic Preservation Program cannot be said to be successful without the appropriate use of Communication Tools. The town’s Web Page was voted as the most important. This resource can provide a substantial amount of information about historic preservation in Wake Forest including the programs, events, the HPC, procedures, and information on historic districts and properties, information on preservation methods and techniques, and a historic property data base (the second highest vote getter). While the web page, an interactive data base, and activities of the town Communications Department are important sources of information for the public in the modern age it is also important to provide information to those who do not use these electronic methods of communication. Published and printed sources of information are important, such as a newsletter, available printed copies of maps and documents, and especially partnering with the news media to get the word out. Policy HP-3: Historic Preservation Programs are important including Property Designation and Listing, Protecting Endangered Properties, Incentive Programs, and the Enforcement of the Historic District Design Guidelines. Preservation Programs are all about preserving historic properties and neighborhoods. As one workshop attendee stated, “That’s why we came!” Such programs should include identifying historic properties and getting them designated as local landmarks or listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Incentive programs such as tax credits or abatements can be very helpful and making it easier for the property owner to understand what and how to preserve their property, such as providing technical assistance, can provide greater incentives to protect historic properties. The Enforcement of the Historic District Design Guidelines is very important in order to protect the historic integrity of the local historic district but other areas and properties need protection, too. Policy HP-4: Physical Improvements in Historic Neighborhoods should be encouraged including Pedestrian Lighting, Sidewalk Improvements, and Street Improvements. Physical Improvements to historic neighborhoods is important in the overall quality of the neighborhood, both as a quality of life issue and as an attractiveness issue for visitors. Pedestrian lighting that provides safe lighting along sidewalks is necessary for safety and the perception of safety for residents and visitors. Wake Forest’s historic areas consistently lack adequate pedestrian lighting. Such pedestrian lighting should be

VIS ION S TATE ME NT, POLIC IE S AND AC TIVITIES

Policy HP-2: Communication Tools should be utilized, especially the Town Web Page, a Historic Properties Data Base, a Newsletter, working closely with the town Communications Department, and partnering with the news media to get the word out.


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VIS ION S TATE ME NT, POLIC IE S AND AC TIVITIES

of a color and the fixtures of a design compatible with the historic character and period of the neighborhood. Lighting is an extraordinarily expensive improvement so should be budgeted and installed over a period of time. However, plans should be in place and budgeting included every year toward this important project. Sidewalk and street improvements, and maintenance, need to be taken care of as needed. North Main Street is a NCDOT road and such improvements along this street must be made by that agency. Landscaping maintenance and improvements along the streets is handled by the town. Maintenance and replacement of dead street trees should be conducted in a timely fashion by the appropriate town department. Policy HP-5: Special Projects in Historic Preservation should be encouraged including Town Policies in Support of Historic Preservation, the Protection of the Ailey Young House, and the Development of an Interactive Data Base. Historic preservation Special Projects are numerous. The most important includes Town Policies in Support of Historic Preservation. When new projects and plans are proposed the town staff and advisory boards should consider the effect on historic properties and areas. Policies could help establish incentives for preservation, help with specific activities or events, etc. The need to protect and renovate the Ailey Young House was identified as a priority during the January workshop and Christmas decorations in the historic area were also mentioned. The development of a Data Base received a high number of votes. Generally, this means an interactive online data base that is available to the public. However, this also means a data base available for those who do not use electronic devices for access. The historic downtown was mentioned as an appropriate project as well as use of the railway as a historic greenway property. Policy HP-6: Special Events in Historic Preservation should be encouraged including the Biennial Christmas Historic Home Tour, other Guided Historic Tours, and a Historic Home and Garden Tour. The overwhelming majority voted that the biennial Christmas Historic Home Tour be given a highest priority as a continuing event. The possibility of other guided historic tours and a historic home and garden tour also received a substantial number of votes. Other events proposed were a children’s scavenger hunt, an electronic IPod tour, a cemetery drama, or a ghost tour. A children’s scavenger hunt could involve a self-guided tour of the downtown and historic district with rewards for finding all the items, such as “treat” items from downtown stores. Maybe a walk to town hall, incorporating a discussion on historic preservation and geared toward a particular grade, or an art show or concert at the Birthplace could be other potential events. The following policies are included in the Wake Forest Community Plan and are hereby adopted as part of this plan:


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The Wake Forest Historic District Design Guidelines and the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation are consistently used by the Historic Preservation Commission while reviewing applications for Certificates of Appropriateness. Policy ACH-6: The identification, restoration, and active use of structures, buildings, monuments, landmarks, sites and neighborhoods of historic or architectural significance shall be encouraged to safeguard the heritage of the town, and to enhance their educational, economic and cultural value to the community and State of North Carolina. This is the primary function of the historic preservation program in Wake Forest. Toward this end the Historic Preservation Commission approves Certificates of Appropriateness, identifies and/or approves historic landmark properties and historic districts, and offers some limited educational opportunities for the public and property owners. Greater efforts in this area will be made in the educational and outreach area. Policy ACH-7: The destruction of architectural, historic, and archaeological resources of Wake Forest shall be strongly discouraged. In 2008 Wake Forest amended its zoning ordinance to authorize mandatory delay of demolition of historic properties for up to 365 days. Plan Maintenance This plan should be reviewed and revised by the Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) and Board of Commissioners approximately every five years, as the Wake Forest Community Plan is revised, or as deemed necessary by the HPC.

VIS ION S TATE ME NT, POLIC IE S AND AC TIVITIES

Policy ACH-5: Design Standards should continue to be employed so that development and redevelopment is consistent with the architectural context, community character, economic attractiveness and livability of Wake Forest.


Appendix Summary of Community Workshop JANUARY 12, 2012


Appendix: Summary of Community Workshop JA N UA RY 12 , 2 012

Hosted by the Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

TOWN STAFF Chip Russell, AICP, Planning Director Agnes Wanman, AICP, Senior Planner

HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION Louise Howard, Chair Alexis Cooke, Vice-Chair Parker Schlink, Treasurer Amy Dowdle Ruth Ann Dyer Debra Ludas Thomas Neal William (Sandy) Smart Ann Welton

CONSULTANT Glenn R. Harbeck, AICP Glenn Harbeck Associates, Inc. Planning and Public Involvement


Community Workshop January 12, 2012


Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

Summary of a Special Community Workshop on Historic Preservation Priorities in Wake Forest This report summarizes the results of a special community workshop held on January 12, 2012 to help gauge the interests and priorities of the citizens of the Town of Wake Forest with regard to historic preservation in the community. The workshop was hosted by the Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission (HPC), whose members took an active role in facilitating the meeting.

Workshop Agenda The workshop agenda consisted of four parts: 1. Individual citizen survey work 2. Transfer and compilation of wall-mounted master survey sheets 3. Small group discussions 4. Small group reporting

Workshop Process Summary Immediately upon entering the workshop, each citizen was given a personal survey sheet in which they were asked to rank their priority preferences for historic preservation activities within each of seven subject areas. The seven areas were: 7 Historic Preservation Topics 1.

TARGET GROUPS: Priorities for education about historic preservation.

2.

Historic Preservation SUBJECTS: Priorities for educational programming.

3.

COMMUNICATION TOOLS: Priorities for historic preservation.

4.

Historic Preservation PROGRAMS: Priorities for action.

5.

PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS: Priorities for action.

6.

Historic Preservation SPECIAL PROJECTS: Priorities for action.

7.

Historic Preservation SPECIAL EVENTS: Priorities.

After the participants completed their personal survey, they were asked to transfer their scores from their personal surveys to enlarged, wall mounted master sheets. This allowed the individual survey results to be compiled for immediate analysis of all participant priorities. These seven master survey sheets then provided a focal point for discussion by seven small groups operating concurrently. HPC members served as small group facilitators, encouraging citizens to expand on the results of the survey, and recording their comments on flip chart sheets. To better organize the small group work, a

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64 | Summa r y of Hi s t o ric P re se rv a tio n Wo rk sh o p — J a nua r y 12, 2012

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

number of discussion questions were provided for use across all small groups. The discussion questions were: 9 Discussion Questions 1.

Why do you suppose the highest ranked item is ranked as such?

2.

Which item might be the most difficult to accomplish? Why?

3.

Which item might be the easiest to accomplish? Why?

4.

Which items can be done entirely by the Historic Preservation Commission and staff?

5.

Which items might require help from people or organizations beyond the HPC and staff?

6.

What role, if any, might Town government play in helping with the items listed?

7.

Which item on the list do you think might be most expensive to do?

8.

Are there any items that have no cost? Which ones?

9.

Now that this discussion has taken place, would you want to suggest the reassignment of priorities or add new items?

Format of this Report This report is formatted as follows: 

SURVEY RESULTS from the wall mounted master survey sheets have been typed up with the exact number of priority votes recorded by citizen participants

For all ACTION ITEMS in each of the seven topic areas, the number of first, second, and third place votes have been graphed in an Excel BAR CHART. This allows for a convenient comparison as to which of the various action items were viewed as number 1, 2 or 3 (highest) priorities.

A brief SUMMARY ANALYSIS of the bar chart is provided beneath each chart.

COMMENTS recorded during the small group portion of the workshop have been typed up exactly as written on the flip charts (some abbreviations have been expanded). While there is no attempt made in this report to interpret small group comments, the HPC may find these comments helpful in providing insights into various priorities. The particular HPC member(s) who facilitated each group would be an approriate resource to intepret the comments.

Priorities by Each of the Seven Topic Areas This section summarizes the findings of the workshop as gleaned from citizen participants. A couple points need to be made here. First, the following action items list only the top three items in each of the seven topic areas. As a practical matter, it would be wise for the HPC not to go farther down the list in developing its work program. As a Commission, you will want to choose a limited number of action items, and focus your energies on getting a shorter list of items accomplished. At the same time, keep in

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Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

1. TARGET GROUPS: Priorities for education about historic preservation.  RESIDENTS OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICT  CITIZENS OF THE COMMUNITY AT LARGE  MEMBERS OF THE HPC 2. HISTORIC PRESERVATION SUBJECTS: Priorities for educational programming.  LOCAL HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE  HISTORIC PRESERVATION GUIDELINES  PRESERVATION METHODS 3. COMMUNICATION TOOLS: Priorities for historic preservation.  TOWN WEB PAGE  HISTORIC PROPERTIES DATA BASE.  NEWSLETTER 4. HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS: Priorities for action.  PROPERTY DESIGNATION AND LISTING  PROTECTING ENDANGERED PROPERTIES  INCENTIVE PROGRAMS (tie)  ENFORCEMENT OF DISTRICT DESIGN GUIDELINES (tie) 5. PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS: Priorities for action.  PEDESTRIAN LIGHTING  SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS  STREET IMPROVEMENTS 6. HISTORIC PRESERVATION SPECIAL PROJECTS: Priorities for action.  TOWN POLICIES IN SUPPORT OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION  AILEY YOUNG HOUSE  DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTERACTIVE DATA BASE 7. HISTORIC PRESERVATION SPECIAL EVENTS: Priorities.  BIENNIAL CHRISTMAS HISTORIC HOME TOUR  GUIDED HISTORIC TOURS  HISTORIC HOME AND GARDEN TOUR The balance of this report provides supporting documention for the above priorities.

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mind that this workshop and the results coming out of it, are not intended to be a legalistic exercise. The HPC should feel free in using your judgment and discretion in pursuing your own priorities, but with due consideration of the workshop findings as a source of guidance. These two recommendations may seem at odds—they are not. If establishing priorities for historic preservation activities in Wake Forest were as simple as administering a survey, then there would be no need for the HPC.

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66 | Summa r y of Hi s t o ric P re se rv a tio n Wo rk sh o p — J a nua r y 12, 2012

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

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January 12, 2012

TARGET GROUPS Priorities for education about historic preservation. Rankings as Voted

Education (Target Groups)

1

2

3

4

5

Community at large

22

9

2

7

3

1

Historic property owners and occupants Historic Preservation Commission Members Other Town boards

12

12

10

9

3

0

9

5

11

5

8

1

0

9

9

13

10

1

Staff

3

4

9

4

16

3

Other: School children, citizenry, neighboring areas, newcomers, community clubs in historic areas, Local groups beyond Wake Forest Historic district Commission, Realtors

1

3

0

0

0

12

0

10

6

20

Comments

30

40

Community at large Historic property owners and occupants Historic Preservation Commission Members Other Town boards Staff

First Place Votes Second Place Votes

Third Place Votes Other

Analysis of Citizen Rankings: Citizens attending the meeting felt that RESIDENTS OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICT and CITIZENS OF THE COMMUNITY AT LARGE should be the highest priority targets for education about historic preservation. The community at large actually had the largest number of first place votes. Coming in at third place for education were MEMBERS OF THE HPC.

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Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

Small Group Discussion Concerning

1. TARGET GROUPS: Priorities for education about historic preservation. 1. WHY DO YOU SUPPOSE THE HIGHEST RANKED ITEM IS RANKED SO HIGH?              

(People) staff and chamber should be educated! --especially concerning guidelines. Town staff/planning—need to know educate the staff/pass on. Better education? How? Town Co.—seminars/state/PNC—Planning Department to go. Provide comp time. National Arts--Grants----South doesn’t get share/don’t apply—write grants Research grants?? Bd? Educate community—they will insist on. Other HPC—created—Staff member trained on HPC Commission to educate people—Wake Forest wants to be known as Historic Town—EDUCATE THE LEADERS Educate HPC and staff Historic preservation as an economic driver National Register—regulate outside Incentives/tax credits Voluntary regulations (in Tennessee), suggested guidelines Better education of Town staff

2. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE MOST DIFFICULT TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?          

What are the rules? Historic = $$$ Regulations on certificates of appropriateness Not necessary to educate community at large Educate on why we need historic district Quality of life issue So many residents in Heritage have never been in historic district Widen education—involve children Wake Forest Historic Society—Helping educate Programs—Wake Forest Gazette

6. WHAT ROLE, IF ANY, MIGHT TOWN GOVERNMENT PLAY IN HELPING WITH THE ITEMS LISTED?         

Community based or Town? Town sponsor formal education programs HPC leaders in these programs Incentive? HPC should be more cutting edge Bring in outside Instructors/seminars Workshop/presentations N.C. Cultural Resources Claudia Brown—National Register

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5

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Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

2

January 12, 2012

HISTORIC PRESERVATION SUBJECTS Priorities for educational programming. Rankings as Voted

Education (Subjects)

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Building preservation methods

7

3

9

4

8

1

2

0

1

Economic impact/quality of life

4

7

6

4

2

5

5

0

1

Historic preservation guidelines

13 8

2

3

2

1

1

1

1

Landscape design and plantings

1

4

1

2

5

7

7

0

Local history and architecture

11 10 3

6

1

2

4

1

0

Painting and general maintenance Tax credits/ finances

0

1

2

4

8

7

4

5

0

3

4

5

6

6

1

3

4

0

Weatherization/energy efficiency Other: Benefits vs. Costs of Historic Preservation

0

2

2

5

3

6

7

7

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

4

0

2

5

10

15

Comments

20

25

30

Building preservation methods Economic impact/quality of life

Historic preservation guidelines Landscape design and plantings Local history and architecture Painting and general maintenance Tax credits/ finances Weatherization/energy efficiency

First Place Votes Second Place Votes Third Place Votes

Other

Analysis of Citizen Rankings: Citizens attending the meeting felt that LOCAL HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE as well as HISTORIC PRESERVATION GUIDELINES should be the highest priority subjects for educational programming. Coming in close behind in third place were BUILDING PRESERVATION METHODS.

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

6


Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

Small Group Discussion Concerning

2. HISTORIC PRESERVATION SUBJECTS: Priorities for educational programming. 1. WHY DO YOU SUPPOSE THE HIGHEST RANKED ITEM IS RANKED SO HIGH?       

Need guidelines for consistency People care about preserving local history Local history as a starting point for investment in community: personal and economic Local history and architecture like a “calling card” for town Guidelines: more than a “manual” is needed Priority depends on group being addressed Local history ties to national history Wake Forest University, Du Bois, Etc.

2. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE MOST DIFFICULT TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?  

Showing economic impacts and quality of life Getting people to understand why historic preservation is important to the town

3. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE EASIEST TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY? 

Local history and architecture “already done”

4. WHICH ITEMS CAN BE DONE ENTIRELY BY THE HPC AND STAFF? 

Majority of items can be tackled with the HPC and staff

5. WHICH ITEMS MIGHT REQUIRE HELP FROM PEOPLE OR GROUPS BEYOND THE HPC AND STAFF?   

Tax credits Building preservation Energy efficiency

6. WHAT ROLE, IF ANY, MIGHT TOWN GOVERNMENT PLAY IN HELPING WITH THE ITEMS LISTED?    

Town could serve as main hub for information for those unfamiliar with HPC Town could provide experts for various topics Town could provide space for workshops and meetings Non-internet source of information for those who do not have access/not computer savvy

7. WHICH ITEM ON THE LIST DO YOU THINK MIGHT BE MOST EXPENSIVE TO DO?    

Economic impact assessment Hiring of speakers/experts Depends how you tackle the item Depends on universality of topic

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

7

69


70 | Summa r y of Hi s t o ric P re se rv a tio n Wo rk sh o p — J a nua r y 12, 2012

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

8. ARE THERE ANY ITEMS THAT HAVE NO COST? WHICH ONES?   

Nothing is free! Guidelines are already done Depends on how you tackle the topic

9. NOW THAT THIS DISCUSSION HAS TAKEN PLACE, WOULD YOU WANT TO SUGGEST THE REASSIGNMENT OF PRIORITIES OR ADD NEW ITEMS?  

Difficult to prioritize, it is all connected Priorities depend on what hat you’re wearing

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

8


Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

3

January 12, 2012

COMMUNICATION TOOLS Priorities for historic preservation. Rankings as Voted

Communication Tools

1

2

3 4 5 6 7

Facebook page/ social media site(s) Historic district blog

4

6

6

7

9

6

4

3

6

5

7

10

9

0

Historic properties data base

17

4

7

9

3

4

0

Links to other useful sites/information Newsletter

1

7

12

8

6

5

2

5

9

7

5

10

5

2

Town web page

13

12

5

2

3

9

0

Other: The Town’s 70-year old newspaper, Wake Forest Historic Association, Community Meetings

1

0

0

0

0

1

6

0

5

10

15

20

Comments

25

30

35

Facebook page/ social media site(s) Historic district blog Historic properties data base Links to other useful sites/information Newsletter

First Place Votes Second Place Votes

Third Place Votes

Town web page

Other

Analysis of Citizen Rankings: Citizens attending the meeting felt that among the various communication tools available, the TOWN WEB PAGE should be the first priority. Close behind was a high level of interest in an HISTORIC PROPERTIES DATA BASE. The data base actually had more first place votes, but slightly fewer first, second, and third place votes combined. The NEWSLETTER came in third just ahead of LINKS TO OTHER USEFUL SITES AND INFORMATION.

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

9

71


72 | Summa r y of Hi s t o ric P re se rv a tio n Wo rk sh o p — J a nua r y 12, 2012

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

Small Group Discussion Concerning

3. COMMUNICATION TOOLS: Priorities for historic preservation. 1. WHY DO YOU SUPPOSE THE HIGHEST RANKED ITEM IS RANKED SO HIGH?       

Need to identify historic properties Ability to search Marketing Reach many/most people Town website natural place to search, ties all together Database establishes value Database describes styles, etc.

2. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE MOST DIFFICULT TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?    

Blog: static Database: lots of effort Need funding or volunteers Database: get information together

3. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE EASIEST TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY? 

Website already there

4. WHICH ITEMS CAN BE DONE ENTIRELY BY THE HPC AND STAFF? 

Everything

5. WHICH ITEMS MIGHT REQUIRE HELP FROM PEOPLE OR GROUPS BEYOND THE HPC AND STAFF?   

Blog: need out submitters Town website: no perm. to update Newspaper

6. WHAT ROLE, IF ANY, MIGHT TOWN GOVERNMENT PLAY IN HELPING WITH THE ITEMS LISTED?     

Funds Hire people Administer support, update website Coordinate with Bill Crabtree (PR manpower communication expertise funding) Town policies/rules

7. WHICH ITEM ON THE LIST DO YOU THINK MIGHT BE MOST EXPENSIVE TO DO?  

Newsletter if printed Building database, need workers not free

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

10


Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

dix | JanuaryAppen 12, 2012

8. ARE THERE ANY ITEMS THAT HAVE NO COST? WHICH ONES?    

Facebook- no monetary cost Newspaper: press releases (both papers) Town webpage: no monetary cost Links on website

9. NOW THAT THIS DISCUSSION HAS TAKEN PLACE, WOULD YOU WANT TO SUGGEST THE REASSIGNMENT OF PRIORITIES OR ADD NEW ITEMS? 

Website still most important, ties everything together

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

11

73


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Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

4

January 12, 2012

HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS

Priorities for action. Rankings as Voted

Historic Preservation Programming

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

8

Awards program

1

2

2

6

7

15

4

0

Incentive programs

4

5

12

10

5

4

1

0

Property designation and listing

7

13

13

5

2

1

0

0

Speakers bureau

0

2

1

5

7

7

13

1

Technical assistance

4

5

2

3

7

5

9

0

Other: Community forums

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

Enforcing District Design Guidelines Protecting Endangered Properties

8

6

7

5

4

1

4

0

14

10

2

3

1

3

1

0

0

10

20

Comments

30

40

Awards program Incentive programs Property designation and listing Speakers bureau

Technical assistance Enforcing District Design Guidelines Protecting Endangered Properties

First Place Votes Second Place Votes Third Place Votes

Other

Analysis of Citizen Rankings: Among the various historic preservation programs identified in the survey, PROPERTY DESIGNATION AND LISTING was identified as most important. PROTECTING ENDANGERED PROPERTIES was also a high priority, actually garnering more first place votes than property designation. Tied for third place were INCENTIVE PROGRAMS and the ENFORCEMENT OF DISTRICT DESIGN GUIDELINES

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

12


Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

Small Group Discussion Concerning

4. HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS: Priorities for action. 1. WHY DO YOU SUPPOSE THE HIGHEST RANKED ITEM IS RANKED SO HIGH?    

Preserving property--That’s why we came Historical community--preserved The rest is irrelevant if not protected The rest are how we accomplish that

2. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE MOST DIFFICULT TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?   

Preserving is the hardest-- The rest are tools Enforcement is the hardest---education (HPC, Realtors) Incentives can be used to help enforcement

3. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE EASIEST TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?   

Technical Assistance Education Do nothing!

4. WHICH ITEMS CAN BE DONE ENTIRELY BY THE HPC AND STAFF?    

Technical Assistance Speakers Awards Develop incentives that lead to awards (fair, qualified)

5. WHICH ITEMS MIGHT REQUIRE HELP FROM PEOPLE OR GROUPS BEYOND THE HPC AND STAFF?   

Designations Incentives (Tax) Enforcement

6. WHAT ROLE, IF ANY, MIGHT TOWN GOVERNMENT PLAY IN HELPING WITH THE ITEMS LISTED?      

Incentives Budget Education- Realtors Technical Assistance Publicity Enforcement

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

13

75


76 | Summa r y of Hi s t o ric P re se rv a tio n Wo rk sh o p — J a nua r y 12, 2012

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

7. WHICH ITEM ON THE LIST DO YOU THINK MIGHT BE MOST EXPENSIVE TO DO?   

Funding protection of endangered property Incentives Savannah and Baltimore models

8. ARE THERE ANY ITEMS THAT HAVE NO COST? WHICH ONES?    

HPCC speakers Other volunteer speakers Community forum Resource Manual- Sharing HPCC library or other

9. NOW THAT THIS DISCUSSION HAS TAKEN PLACE, WOULD YOU WANT TO SUGGEST THE REASSIGNMENT OF PRIORITIES OR ADD NEW ITEMS?  

Short/mid/long term goals Town Museum

SUMMARY  Protecting Endangered Property #1 Enforcement  Requires support from local government  Widespread community support and interest to elect people who can have pride in the community, build with education

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

14


Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

5

January 12, 2012

PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS Priorities for action. Rankings as Voted

Historic District Improvements

1

2

3

4

5

Pedestrian lighting

29

6

3

3

1

Sidewalk improvements

5

24

8

3

1

Street improvements

2

7

19

12

1

Street trees

3

6

6

21

5

Other: Speed Limits, Yard/Street Cast Off Junk, House Lighting, Handicapped Accessibility, Stormwater Ditches (Mill Village)

2

1

0

1

12

0

10

20

Comments

Mattresses, cast-off furniture, other eye sores

30

40

Pedestrian lighting Sidewalk improvements Street improvements Street trees

First Place Votes Second Place Votes

Other

Third Place Votes

Analysis of Citizen Rankings: Among the four major types of physical improvements identified for installation within the public right of way of the Town’s historic streets, PEDESTRIAN LIGHTING was easily the highest priority item. (see first place votes in dark green.) SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS were a distant second, at least in terms of first place votes received. STREET IMPROVEMENTS came in third.

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

15

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78 | Summa r y of Hi s t o ric P re se rv a tio n Wo rk sh o p — J a nua r y 12, 2012

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

Small Group Discussion Concerning

5. PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS: Priorities for action. 1. WHY DO YOU SUPPOSE THE HIGHEST RANKED ITEM IS RANKED SO HIGH?           

So necessary Law suits Hit and run- bike on N Main St. Safety So bad now Scary at night- especially Mill Village Turns off homebuyers Poor lighting on N Main St./ Mill Village Flarherty/ Mill Village/ seminary needs sidewalks High traffic with DuBois school in session Lots of problems with trash--especially Mill Village

2. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE MOST DIFFICULT TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?     

Lighting- so expensive $ Street improvements/ Dealing with DOT Need to apply for street grants Need ordinances enforced Is solar an option?

3. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE EASIEST TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?  

Trees Street improvements- they are in good shape

4. WHICH ITEMS CAN BE DONE ENTIRELY BY THE HPC AND STAFF? 

Write letters to unkempt homeowners

5. WHICH ITEMS MIGHT REQUIRE HELP FROM PEOPLE OR GROUPS BEYOND THE HPC AND STAFF?     

Support letters to commissioners/all adjacent areas supporting N Main St. Neighborhood meetings Get on same page Expand historic district/ local ordinance Agnes could meet with Mill Village to help put together directory (any area around N. Main St.)

6. WHAT ROLE, IF ANY, MIGHT TOWN GOVERNMENT PLAY IN HELPING WITH THE ITEMS LISTED? 

Town needs to pursue grants for all historic districts

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

16


Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

7. WHICH ITEM ON THE LIST DO YOU THINK MIGHT BE MOST EXPENSIVE TO DO? 

Lighting- work into budget/get grants/DOT approval

8. ARE THERE ANY ITEMS THAT HAVE NO COST? WHICH ONES?    

Trash- people could clean up after themselves Programs for beautification Town needs to address covenants People living in historic district have responsibility to keep up appearances

9. NOW THAT THIS DISCUSSION HAS TAKEN PLACE, WOULD YOU WANT TO SUGGEST THE REASSIGNMENT OF PRIORITIES OR ADD NEW ITEMS? 

Nope

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

17

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80 | Su mma r y of Hi s t o ric P re se rv a tio n Wo rk sh o p — J a nua r y 12, 2012

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

6

January 12, 2012

HISTORIC PRESERVATION SPECIAL PROJECTS Priorities for action. Rankings as voted

Special Projects

1

2

Ailey Young House renovation

11

19

9

2

More choice

Interactive data base

7

12

20

2

Seminary, Downtown, Historic

Town policy(ies) in support of historic preservation Other: Christmas Décor for Historic area, DuBois, Budget Line Item to assist Historic Property Owners, Downtown

21

9

9

1

1

3

1

12

Ailey Young expense agree on what to do How do we work with town

5

10

0

3

15

4

20

Comments

25

30

35

40

45

Ailey Young House renovation Interactive data base Town policy(ies) in support of historic preservation Other

First Place Votes Second Place Votes Third Place Votes

Analysis of Citizen Rankings: Among the three special projects offered for consideration, TOWN POLICIES IN SUPPORT OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION were identified as most important by citizens attending the meeting. The AILEY YOUNG HOUSE came in second, and the DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTERACTIVE DATA BASE, third.

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

18


Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

Small Group Discussion Concerning

6. HISTORIC PRESERVATION SPECIAL PROJECTS: Priorities for action. 1. WHY DO YOU SUPPOSE THE HIGHEST RANKED ITEM IS RANKED SO HIGH?            

Limited choice in the news—more choices In the news Politically correct Neat old house Construction-period Appreciation Property owners want sympathy/ from the town empathy Town has historic flavor Anchor- seminary- N. Main St. and S. Main St. Sets tone- stability- strength Interest in downtown Should connect historic part with renaissance plan

2. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE MOST DIFFICULT TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?          

Ailey is most difficult Cost Reconstruct/stabilize/renovate Use- where are we headed Agree on what to do Town board has been in favor of preservation Can’t write a blank check Planning and inspections- support town policies? --historic Restoration as education too/ multiple uses You don’t have to come from a fancy house to impact history

3. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE EASIEST TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?     

John thinks it’s easy Doable- database People do this Qualify/quantify what historic town policies Not on a website not interactive

4. WHICH ITEMS CAN BE DONE ENTIRELY BY THE HPC AND STAFF?   

None Use historic money to raise money Cemetery, crematorium would add importance Ailey Young House

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

19

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Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

5. WHICH ITEMS MIGHT REQUIRE HELP FROM PEOPLE OR GROUPS BEYOND THE HPC AND STAFF?    

All of them Technical assistance from Town Too many cooks in kitchen Garden club/ Women’s club

6. WHAT ROLE, IF ANY, MIGHT TOWN GOVERNMENT PLAY IN HELPING WITH THE ITEMS LISTED?       

Landscape labor IT Expertise from Agnes State Agency/ Jeff, David, Pat Shell Special tax district for historic projects Lenient inspection fees Money

7. WHICH ITEM ON THE LIST DO YOU THINK MIGHT BE MOST EXPENSIVE TO DO? 

Same

8. ARE THERE ANY ITEMS THAT HAVE NO COST? WHICH ONES? 

No

9. NOW THAT THIS DISCUSSION HAS TAKEN PLACE, WOULD YOU WANT TO SUGGEST THE REASSIGNMENT OF PRIORITIES OR ADD NEW ITEMS?   

Downtown Could be other choices as important Railway as historic Greenway property- 1836

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

20


Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

7

January 12, 2012

HISTORIC PRESERVATION SPECIAL EVENTS Priorities. Rankings as Voted

Special Events

1

2

3

4

Biennial Christmas historic home tour Guided historic tours

31

5

5

3

8

15

16

2

Historic home and garden tour

4

18

14

2

Other: Ghost Tours, Children/Parent Self-Guided Tour of Historic Places, Cemetery Tour of Historic Property Owners

1

1

5

15

0

10

20

Comments

30

40

50

Biennial Christmas historic home tour

Guided historic tours

Historic home and garden tour First Place Votes Other

Second Place Votes Third Place Votes

Analysis of Citizen Rankings: Citizens attending the meeting identified the BIENNIAL CHRISTMAS HISTORIC HOME TOUR as their most important special event highlighting historic preservation. GUIDED HISTORIC TOURS came in a distant second from the standpoint of first place votes received. The HISTORIC HOME AND GARDEN TOUR came in third.

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

21

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84 | Summa r y of Hi s t o ric P re se rv a tio n Wo rk sh o p — J a nua r y 12, 2012

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

Small Group Discussion Concerning

7. HISTORIC PRESERVATION SPECIAL EVENTS: Priorities. 1. WHY DO YOU SUPPOSE THE HIGHEST RANKED ITEM IS RANKED SO HIGH? A. Look at peoples’ stuff B. Toss up—house or garden C. Every other year—a positive anticipation 2. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE MOST DIFFICULT TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY?       

Difficulty- tours Participation/ burn out Coming up with guides Wake Forest children- scavenger hunt Self guided tour Electronic IPod Tours- we are doing

3. WHICH ITEM MIGHT BE THE EASIEST TO ACCOMPLISH? WHY? 

Getting leaders to keep events going

4. WHICH ITEMS CAN BE DONE ENTIRELY BY THE HPC AND STAFF?   

Need everybody involved Nothing to be done just by commission Cemetery drama- Ghost tour

5. WHICH ITEMS MIGHT REQUIRE HELP FROM PEOPLE OR GROUPS BEYOND THE HPC AND STAFF?  

Everything needs help from others Need professional voice and script for IPod

6. WHAT ROLE, IF ANY, MIGHT TOWN GOVERNMENT PLAY IN HELPING WITH THE ITEMS LISTED?  

Town government funding, use of staff IT experts of town

7. WHICH ITEM ON THE LIST DO YOU THINK MIGHT BE MOST EXPENSIVE TO DO? 

Most expensive: Advertising/marketing any startup project

8. ARE THERE ANY ITEMS THAT HAVE NO COST? WHICH ONES? 

“No free lunch”- make Wake Forest a point of destination

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

22


Appen dix |

Summary of Historic Preservation Workshop

January 12, 2012

9. NOW THAT THIS DISCUSSION HAS TAKEN PLACE, WOULD YOU WANT TO SUGGEST THE REASSIGNMENT OF PRIORITIES OR ADD NEW ITEMS?      

Children’s/Parents Scavenger Hunt --self guided tour of downtown and historic district with a reward for finding all items (Shorty’s Hot Dog) NC store candy, ice cream? Several areas: Mill, downtown, Historic District, several tours ?? 3rd grade walk to town hall Take it into schools for teachers An event at the birthplace-- concert, art show

Town of Wake Forest Historic Preservation Commission

23

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Town of Wake Forest | 301 S. Brooks Street, Wake Forest, NC 27587 | 919-435-9400 | www.wakeforestnc.gov

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