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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO BRENDAN MANNIX-SLOBIG

4th YEAR NB MLA STUDENT

Kansas State University | Manhattan, Kansas 66506


TABLE OF CONTENTS 3

Taos Summer Institute

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McCain Quad

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Frontier Farm Credit Administration Building

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Computer Graphics

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Hand Graphics

Brendan James Mannix-Slobig 1123 Thatcher Avenue River Forest, Illinois 60305 708.771.6430

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bmannslo@k-state.edu


References: William P. “Chip” Winslow III, RLA, FASLA PROFESSOR

785.341.0229 chipwin@k-state.edu

CLARB Certified Landscape Architect Department of Landscape Architecture / Regional and Community Planning College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Kansas State University 311 Seaton Hall Manhattan, Kansas 66506

Joshua Creed Cheek, RLA

INSTRUCTOR | TEACHING TECHNICIAN

816.289.1621 cheek@k-state.edu

Department of Landscape Architecture / Regional and Community Planning College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Kansas State University 201B Seaton Court Manhattan, Kansas 66506


TAOS SUMMER INSTITUTE

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TAOS, NEW MEXICO | 2010 | 200 ACRES Professor: Katie Kingery-Page

The Taos Institute of Arts and Crafts is located in Taos New Mexico in a desert landscape. The campus will serve as a place where artists and crafts people can go for a week or two to participate in several studio workshops. The site is approximately 200 acres located north of the city of Taos, New Mexico. To the northeast there is a view of a mountain peak that Pueblo Indians consider sacred. The sacred peak is the staple of the campus’ design as it terminates the major axis employed in the design. The axis 13 begins in the parking lot, continues 7 through the portal, and terminates with a lookout that frames the sacred peak. The campus architecture mirrors the surrounding mountains and employs local materials, ultimately merging 1 with the native landscape. The buildings are constructed in the image of adobe pueblos in an attempt to incorporate the harmonization 8 of man-made structure with natural existing beauty. 14

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SECTION A

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LEGEND 10

SITE PLAN 0

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Gatehouse Sleeping Cells Bathhouse Studio Dining Hall Outdoor Dining Library

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Congregation Hall Pool House Service Yard Central Space Outdoor Studio Lookout Parking


BUILDING MASS Buildings and walls are used to define the spaces within the campus. The campus plan is highly condensed, leaving little residual space.

primary secondary tertiary

CIRCULATION The central axis is also the primary circulation of the campus. The axis aligns visitors with the sacred peak, guiding them to the lookout that terminates the axis.

primary secondary tertiary

public semi-public semi-private private

SPATIAL HIERARCHY

PRIVACY

Spaces are ordered by their proximity to the central axis. The primary space is located immediately past the entrance gateway. Secondary and tertiary spaces vary based on distance from the central axis.

There are four degrees of privacy within the campus. The space just outside the entrance gateway is the most public. The living quarters are the most private and are located farthest from the central axis.


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FRAMING THE SACRED PEAK


SHADE BENEATH THE COTTONWOOD

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McCAIN QUAD MANHATTAN, KANSAS | 2011 | 1.61 ACRES Professor: Jessica Canfield

The concept behind the McCain Quad is the Flint Hills, the unique geographic region in which Manhattan calls home. The Flint Hills are defined by a network of valleys and creeks that weave between cuestas, giving the hills their crossing character. Cuestas have a steep side known as the escarpment and a sloped 4 side known as the vale. The pedestrian experience is like that of a stroll through the Flint Hills while sustaining functional and efficient circulation.

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A chipboard model was constructed for the McCain Quad final presentation. Adobe Illustrator was used to trace the grading plan in order to export digital line work to the laser cutter. After all the pieces were cut and engraved, the model was assembled with glue.

LEGEND 1 2 3 4

FINAL MODEL

Amphitheater Sculpture Outdoor Classroom Seating Area

SECTION A

The section below reveals a number of geometrically abstracted hills and valleys like that of the Flint Hills. The sloped sides invite people to access their mown lawns above. outdoor classroom

primary circulation


SPATIAL HIERARCHY

Kedzie Hall

Fairchild Hall

primary secondary tertiary

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CIRCULATION primary secondary tertiary McCain Auditorium

Calvin Hall

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SPATIAL OVERLAP

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MASS vs VOID 4

SITE PLAN 0 10 20

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outdoor classroom

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FRONTIER FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION BUILDING MANHATTAN, KANSAS | 2012 | 3.83 ACRES Professors: Josh Cheek, Howard Hahn, Lee Skabelund, Chip Winslow

but also the surrounding landscape. The concept diagram below illustrates the three dimensions of the Manhattan community: the people, the place and the biota. The web like diagram shows FFC as the focal point of the community. Every design decision relates back to the diagram below, reflecting a facet of Manhattan’s community. The Community Garden frames the surrounding neighborhoods. The Sculpture Garden is inspired by the experience in a Flint Hills wooded draw. Finally, the planting plan includes masses of native plants, creating a habitat for local fauna.

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CONCEPT DIAGRAM

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Vanesta

Frontier Farm Credit (FFC) recognizes the community as being the most significant factor to their sustained success, even through the recent economic times. The site design for the FFC Administration Building welcomes the humble corporation to Manhattan’s thriving community. Manhattan’s community goes beyond the people alone. Located within the Flint Hills, the Manhattan community is defined not by the people alone,

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LEGEND 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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Entrance Sign Pedestrian Access East Parking Lot West Parking Lot Entrance Allee ADA Parking Trash Enclosure

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Entrance Plaza Community Garden Service Entrance Edible Garden Outdoor Space Sculpture Garden Pedestrian Access

SITE PLAN 0 10 20 30 *north is down

50’

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THE GRID The radial grid reflcets the concept of a community web. The web holds together all the members of the Manhattan community. The site design for the southern half of the site is based off of a radial grid. The grid reflects the concept of the community web, tying together the people, the place and the fauna. The radial grid physically ties together the landscape to the interior spaces of the building plan. The dramatic curved facade of the Administration Building served as the geometric datum for the radial grid. The grid lines were offset from the building facade, creating a marriage between the interior and exterior shapes and spaces. Interior rooms are pulled through the walls of the building into the landscape. Outdoor spaces are designed to fit together, ultimately creating a total experience.

STUDY MODEL Throughout the design, a variety of mediums were used to help influence design decisions. Small scale study models were used to help visualize the scale of the spaces as they related to the building and the proposed vegetation. The study model was also used to simulate the potential for shadows. In order to reduce the potential for heat island effect, several large trees are proposed throughout the parking lot. The tree canopies absorb hot sun rays and and cast cool shade on parking spaces below.

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SECTION A The section below reveals how the trees are used to frame the view of the neighborhoods northeast of the site. The ascending canopies of the trees create a forced perspective from the walkway. The benches in the space adjacent to the walkway orients the visitor to experience the distant vista. People are invited to explore the lawn to enjoy the shade cast from the dense canopy above. 0

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framed view

30’ south-east seating allee

lawn vanesta dr.

existing sidewalk

existing retaining wall

barrier planting

corporate meeting room

SECTION B

framed view

framed view

Views of the rooftops and residencies to the south-east are the focus of the section below. As visitors proceed down the allee, they look ahead through a window created by the trees above and grasses below. A wall of dense shrubs screens undesired views of Kimball Ave. a four lane arterial roadway. 0

walkway

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limestone bands

north-east allee

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barrier plantings existing retaining wall

existing sidewalk

kimball ave.

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SPATIAL EXTENSION The Community Garden is located on the eastern side of the Administration Building. The concept behind the community garden is framing views of the neighborhoods and residencies to the south-east and northeast. Allees of trees are used to emphasize distant views by framing specific scenes like windows. Shrubs are layered along the south east corner of the property, blocking undesired views and noise from Kimball Ave.

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The corporate meeting room is pulled through the building’s walls into the landscape. An outdoor space, just outside of the meeting room, mirrors the proportions of the interior space. Inlaid limestone bands reinforce the extension of interior space into the landscape. The limestone bands extend from the meeting room walls to the lawn outside.

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COMMUNITY GARDEN

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south-east neighborhoods

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DETAIL PLAN A

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DETAIL PLAN 0 5 10

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SCULPTURE GARDEN


SECTION A

sculpture

walkway

overpass

raingarden pool

falling water

SPATIAL ROOMS

RAIN GARDEN

The Sculpture Garden is modeled after the spatial experience of a wooded draw found in the Flint Hills. A network of streams and creeks carve through the Flint Hills, creating pockets of fertile soil. Woody vegetation fills in these pockets, with the larger specimens found closest to the water. The Sculpture Garden mimics one of these fertile pockets. The water feature is the creek, the focal point. Low canopy trees flank the primary space, which is defined by towering birch trees.

The Sculpture Garden also functions as a complex rain garden, designed to reduce the garden’s dependency on potable water. The rain garden collects water from land immediately surrounding the space, the Administration Building’s rooftop and storm water runoff from the southwest corner of the parking lot. The pools are designed to fill up before overflowing into the adjacent garden pool. The pedestrian circulation within the space is not interrupted by the flowing rainwater as it bridges over any moments where their paths intersect. Each pool recharges a cistern that will be used during the dry summer months to maintain the dense garden vegetation.

sculpture

sculpture

reflection pool

sculpture


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CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS

EARTHWORK DIAGRAM

IRRIGATION PLAN

LIGHTING PLAN

LAYOUT PLAN

GRADING PLAN


SECTION A: WATER FEATURE The grand water feature is the focal point of the Sculpture Garden. Inspired by a creek in the Flint Hills, the water feature serves as an audible antidote to the traffic noise cast from Kimball Ave. to the south. The water is designed to flow off the edge as a sheet of water, emitting a deep sound that cancels out all ambient sound. Weather permitting, employees are invited to have their lunch outside and eat at the bar that is integrated into the fountain.

SECTION B: RAIN GARDEN POOL The rain garden is a collection of pools similar to the illustration on the left. The pools are designed to fill a cistern before overflowing into the neighboring garden pool. The pools are densely planted with shade and water tolerant sedges that define a consistent ground plane with the circulation above.

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DESIGN DETAILS

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COMPUTER GRAPHICS

BEYOND 40

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI | 2012 Professors: Blake Belanger, Howard Hahn Programs: Google Earth, ArcGIS 11, Photoshop CS5.5 Beyond 40 is a strategic visionary plan for the future of US 40 Highway in Kansas City, Missouri. The proposal frames the corridor through a futuristic lens, looking beyond year the 2040, providing a vision that would otherwise be unseen. Preceding the design proposal, several ArcGIS maps were composed, including a series on watershed analysis. These maps are laid over the Beyond 40 visionary concept image. The ArcGIS map series targeted critical watersheds within the US 40 Highway corridor.

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DETROIT’S RIVERFRONT

DETROIT, MICHIGAN | 2012 Professor: Katie Kingery-Page Programs: Google SketchUp, ArcGIS 11, Photoshop CS5.5 The Detroit Riverfront International Competition called for proposals to reimagine the under utilized riverfront property, currently Hart Plaza. The following image illustrates my vision for a wetlands that reclaims the waterfront. A new boardwalk extends the pedestrian experience beyond the river bank, reinforcing Detroit’s connection to the Detroit River.

STREETscapes WICHITA, KANSAS | 2012 Professor: Katie Kingery-Page Programs: Google Earth, ArcGIS 11, Photoshop CS5.5 The most recent master plan for Wichita, Kansas identified streets and avenues, including First and Second Street, that have the best potential for bicycle traffic. The following section perspective illustrates a two-lane cycle track buffered by a bioswale designed to reduce stormwater runoff throughout the corridor.


HAND GRAPHICS

CLAFLIN ROAD MANHATTAN, KANSAS | 2012 Professor: Katie Kingery-Page [18�x 24� Ink on Paper]

This sketch was done as part of a case study of a great street in Manhattan, Kansas. Claflin Road is a two way local street that cuts through campus. This sketch was composed on site as our teacher wanted us to sketch on site as opposed to copying from a photograph. The assignment required several hand graphics including a plan, two sections, two detail plans, one long view perspective and one detail sketch. This sketch is the long view perspective as required. I started the piece with pencil and lightly traced the scene before finishing with a pen to the vegetation. The sketch was especially challenging as I do not typically sketch on site. This assignment taught me about the patience required to draw, especially on site. I also learned how to translate what I was seeing onto a sheet of paper in front of me.

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RESIDENTIAL PLAN DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES | 2012 Professor: Josh Cheek [24”x 24” Ink and Marker on Trace Paper]

This exercise was for an advanced graphics class. The emphasis was not on the design of the landscape but the rendering its self. The following graphic was first drawn on trace with ink pens and rendered on the back.


Brendan Mannix-Slobig MLA Portfolio