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BLUR magazine | ISSUE 31 | June 2013


For best experience, view in full screen We recommend reading BLUR in full-screen mode, especially when viewed on a PC. This removes the PDF reader controls and sets the background canvas to black. However, if you use a very high resolution monitor, you might experience a slight reduction of quality of the displayed images when viewing in full screen.

Interactive elements in BLUR issues Tablet and smartphone devices offer various ways of previewing PDF documents, but not all support the full feature set of interactive elements used by BLUR. For best viewing pleasure on the iPad and similar devices, please install the free Adobe Acrobat Reader app from your App Store. Starting with issue 29, BLUR’s interactivity features and hyperlink support have been optimized for viewing on tablets and smartphones as well as the PC. Some of these optimizations include: • The Contents page features large buttons for elegant navigation to a certain page, while the Home hyperlink is the simplest way to get back to Contents. • Gallery 36 contains interactive thumbnails that open the image in full size, while the full size images hyperlink back to the gallery. • Every section of the magazine that features an author now has a dedicated hyperlink button to navigate the reader directly to the promoted author’s webpage. • The upper third of every page in BLUR is a hyperlink leading back to the Contents, while tapping the left and right edges of the screen enables you to browse through the magazine.

CELEBRATING FIVE YEARS OF BLUR MAGAZINE

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BLUR magazine is published by Photography Association CREATUS (F.U.C.*), a nonprofit association founded in August 2009 with the aim of contributing to the development of the photography scene in Croatia, while promoting and connecting Croatian photographers with their international colleagues.

ISSN: 1847-7410 Publisher: F.U.C.* Address: street Ljubičica 19, 10 360 Sesvete, Croatia Contact: info@blur-magazine.com Bank account: Privredna banka Zagreb 2340009 – 1110540685 MB: 2580837 OIB: 39145219372

Parental advisory Artistic and educational photographic discoveries in BLUR Magazine often feature artistic imagery that might not be suited to underage children. Although none of the content featured in BLUR could possibly be regarded offensive, it does contain artistic nude photography which is an integral part of photography since its beginnings. We recommend that minors explore the content under adult guidance.

Publishing and distribution of ‘’Blur magazine’’ is supported by Zagreb City and City Office for Education, Culture and Sports

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A WORD FROM THE EDITOR

Call for cooperation In the five years of BLUR’s existence, members of our team have mainly entered through the back door, one by one without a major open request like this. Usually people would just approach me individually, or we would invite them to collaborate. But after the recent minor redesign of the magazine and the opening of new sections, the time has come to expand the team and openly invite interested parties to join us. Our website, which from the very beginning was designed solely as a place for visitors to download our publications, has also undergone a redesign, and the number of visitors has grown enough that we dare to add new content, which is another reason we need to expand our valuable team. Therefore, we invite interested parties to contact us. Although we are roughly defining what are we looking for, we are open to suggestions and ideas for a simple reason: We are a very unique team. First of all, we are volunteers; there is no money in what we do. All we offer is the opportunity to have your name associated with BLUR and become appreciated and recognized by fans of photography from around the world. We offer you a challenge and some fun that comes with tasks that are not overwhelming (except, of course, what I give myself ) and the satisfaction of being part of a team that creates a magazine read widely throughout the world.

Robert Gojević, founder and editor in chief

photo: Borut Peterlin

We are looking for: EDITORS FOR SOME OF THE COLUMNS IN THE MAGAZINE. If you’re communicative and know good English, we’re already intrigued. Now you just have to convince us that you are the ideal person that we’re looking for—you’re a fan of photography, not photo equipment. EDITORS OF SHORT NEWS FOR THE BLUR WEBSITE. Since we’re not interested in that hot new camera or lens out in the market, tell us what would you could occasionally write for our news—in your own English words, not copy/paste. EDITORS FOR TWITTER. BLUR has never had editors for our Twitter account, and, if possible, we urgently need to change that. Worth a try, right? COPYWRITER. Why not you? Why do we not have associates in this field? MARKETING EXPERT. We have never taken advantage of our potential. In the end, no matter how loved photography is—and everything we do is because we love it—experience has shown that there is no progress without money. Anyone interested may contact us at info@blur-magazine.com with an explanation of why you’re perfect for us!

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impressum Robert Gojević

founder | chief editor | design | art director | desktop publishing

Michael McAllister

proofreading

e-mail: robert.gojevic@blur-magazine.com

Ivan Pekarik

acting executive editor | PR

Dario Devčić

programmer | web developer

e-mail: ivan.pekarik@blur-magazine.com

Željka Hubak

marketing and PR

Želimir Koščević

expert associate

e-mail: zeljka.hubak@blur-magazine.com

Denis Pleić

columnist | translator

Igor Kalendaric

e-mail: igor.kalendaric@blur-magazine.com

e-mail: denis.pleic@blur-magazine.com

Maurício Sapata

editor of Pinhole & Playstick

motion graphics+composting

Zsolt Scheffer

Blur collaborator and Japanese translator

e-mail: mauricio.sapata@blur-magazine.com

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WARREN HAROLD

PLAYSTICK

LEANNE SURFLEET

INSTANTION

TORALF SÜMMCHEN

WET PLATE

FRANCESCO ROMOLI

PROJECT

MOHAMMADREZA REZANIA

CLOSE UP

INGETJE TADROS

GALLERY 36

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KRISTIANNE KOCH

PROEYECT

ALICJA PIETRAS

OPEN

FRANCESCO GOLA

WIDE

RONNY RITSCHEL

TETRA

KAKIMOTO HIROMI

ANALOG WABI

JUSTINE BETH GARTNER

PINHOLE

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February | April | June | August | October |

December | 2013

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COVER PAGE

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IMPRESSUM

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PROJECT FRANCESCO ROMOLI

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PINHOLE JUSTINE BETH GARTNER

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OPEN ALICJA PIETRAS

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INTERACTIVE ELEMENTS

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CONTENTS

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WET PLATE TORALF SÜMMCHEN

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ANALOG WABI SABI KAKIMOTO HIROMI

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PROEYECT KRISTIANNE KOCH

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BLUR INFO

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GALLERY 36

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INSTANTION LEANNE SURFLEET

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TETRA RONNY RITSCHEL

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A WORD FROM THE EDITOR

CLOSE UP MOHAMMADREZA REZANIA

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PLAYSTICK WARREN HAROLD

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WIDE FRANCESCO GOLA

CONTENTS

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What made you decide to do nude photography using the wet plate process? What was the most interesting aspect for you? It was never “a decision,” in a narrow sense. I’ve been shooting nudes for a long time and some years back wanted to try wet plate. When I did, I was hooked. I love the slow, deliberate nature of the process and, of course, the unique look of the plates. Is there anything in the whole process you would change if you could? Is there anything annoying in the process, or do you simply enjoy it exactly as it is? Wet plate photography is relatively difficult to do well consistently. And by “to do well” in this context, I mean to create plates with good contrast and artifact-free, or “clean.” The literature, historic and modern, is replete with “problem solving” recipes for one ailment or another. I have had my fair share of head-scratching problems. Those problems are a frustration when you are trying to work your way through to a resolution, especially when they are spoiling a shoot. But there is also satisfaction in that problem-solving process. No, I would not change a thing.

GALLERY 24 by Robert Gojević

I think the vast majority of current wet plate practitioners are hobbyists, and most of them are not doing nudes. Of the more limited group of practitioners that I might consider “committed” to the method, whether hobbyist or professional, I think “nudity” is pretty well represented. For example, two of your seven past wet plate contributors to this magazine focus on nudes. Once you throw me in, it’s up to three-eighths. And I think that’s great. But your greater point remains true – in the grand scheme of photography, there are relatively very few that do wet plate nudes. Do I strive to be in that niche? No. I’m driven by a passion to shoot what I love using a method I love.

What kind of future do you foresee for the process, given the current state of affairs in the world of photography? I foresee a continued increase in popularity, but I think it will always remain at the margins given the practical difficulties associated with the process.

Despite the recent popularity of wet plate, there are still not many photographers using the process, and only very few do nudes. I’d say we could count them on one hand. How do you feel about that, and is it, perhaps, also one of the reasons why you do what you do?

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The Sadhu Ingetje Tadros http://www.ingetjetadros.com Australia


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Possession Diana Lemieux http://www.dianalemieux.com USA


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Find The Light Chandra Sugiharto http://www.chandrasugiharto.com Indonesia


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Sugar Skull Daiana Sioui http://www.ds-photo.ca Canada


Close-up | brings readers closer to a photographer by providing extensive insight into his work. The photographer is presented through a wide selection of photographs, a detailed interview, and by highlighting important biographical information. Imagine talking with a photographer whom you admire over a cup of coffee. This is exactly what BLUR’s editor-in-chief does in this section—virtually, of course.

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by Robert Gojević

MOHAMMADREZA REZANIA sense creator

http://www.sensecreator.com/ Iran

“My name is Mohammadreza Rezania. I was born on August 10, 1984, at Tehran, Iran. I always try to create my work in a sensational, emotional environment. In other words, I try to capture the viewer in a way that he or she will not be able to glance at the photos in a superficial way, but will feel them with all of their existence. This doesn’t happen without a great connection between the subject and the photographer/viewer. My goal is to create something unique for the viewer! As people view the photos, they should feel the unity, magnificence, and splendor. Viewers should feel changed by seeking these photos. I do my best to reach a point where all of my followers or viewers consider me a photographer who creates emotion-filled portraits, a “sense creator.” That’s my most precious goal.”

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Tell us something about your start as a photographer. Do you remember your first photo?

I started photography about 4 years ago. The passion for photography grew in me when I was touring with friends of mine, and I shot a portrait with my friend’s camera. It was when I realized that I have the ability to capture what I saw in a successful way.

The first picture I took was a landscape, which made me who I am today. Everything started and grew after this particular landscape shot. I remember it as if it had happened yesterday: the scene was a single tree on top of a hill, and above that was a big cloud. I shot it while I was in the car getting ready for the road trip.

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Project | is a section that presents a photographer through a series of photos united by a particular theme that works as a cohesive whole and is elaborated on by an artist statement.

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by Robert Gojević

FRANCESCO ROMOLI Humana

http://www.russelaid.com Italy

“Certainly at first sight, it may seem a work about contrast: black and white/color, angry/smil-

ing, torn/damaged, hidden/out. And, of course, there is this. But the portrait photography is a closed field. A field where they meet, mingle, and distort four forces. What the subject believes to be, what the subject would be, what the viewers think they know, what the photographer knows create his image. The moment of shooting represents a lifetime. A simple gesture of a few minutes is the paradigm of the lives of all of us, all the efforts we make to understand and make ourselves understood, an always precarious balance between being and appearance.”

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PLA

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WET PLATE is a section dedicated to an antique photographic process discovered in the mid 19th century, which was also a primary photographic method used until the 1880s. It refers to a process of pouring a solution collodion onto a plate of thin iron or glass, then placing the plate into a camera and exposing it to the light and, at the end, developing that plate while it is still wet, which is the reason of naming the process (and our section) “wet plate�. The images resulting from this process can be ambrotypes, glass negatives or tintypes. Although quite a demanding, expensive and lengthy process, wet plate collodion technique is gaining back its popularity among many contemporary photographers.

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by Robert Gojević

TORALF SÜMMCHEN 16C and C-X

http://monorecorder.tumblr.com/ Germany / USA

PLA

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Toralf Sümmchen is a Brooklyn-based architect and artist born in a small town in East Germany with many toy factories, quite close to the border with Bavaria. He could see West Germany every day from the kitchen window of his parents’ apartment and on TV; nevertheless, his desire to get beyond this border was quite limited at that time. At school, while working on potato printing and propaganda posters, he was told that that he had no particular artistic talent whatsoever. That didn’t keep him from making elaborate pencil drawings of seagulls or fashion models from photos in the East German magazine called “Sibylle,” that his mother subscribed to. He got his first 35mm camera in the age of 14 from the money he earned in a summer job. His father taught him how to process black and white film and printing in the makeshift darkroom set up in the family kitchen. He completed an education in electrics and electronics without gaining much interest in the field and finally grew some muscles when he helped to build his sister’s house. In 1989, everything changed and he went back to school and studied architecture for too long. Later he ended up working for an American architect in Europe, Asia, and the United States. Besides that, he always enjoyed drawing and painting in his sketchbooks. For a long time, photographing was merely a way of seeing and documenting the different places he was living. After using digital photography for about a decade, he started using film again and discovered the few instant materials that were still available. Only since 2012 did he start exploring alternative photographic processes.  Today, the 35mm and medium format cameras stay in the box and most of the time as he enjoys using vintage wooden 5x7 and 8x10 view cameras. He is interested in exploring urban contexts and spaces and the stories these spaces tell through their mostly overlooked small details. Recently, he also started photographing still lifes and portraits. Photography on film, wet plate collodion, and other alternative processes opened up ways for him to combine the aesthetics he explored in traditional media with analog photographic processes. ‘I am not really certain how original my contribution to photography is, as I am obviously an amateur.’ (slightly altered quote by Patti Smith)

PLA

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PLA

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INSTANTION is a section dedicated to instant analog photography. The name of this section combines the words instant and station, or as we call it, a place for instant photography. Instant photography refers to any photographic process that allows photo development without the darkroom. Instant photography was developed in the 1930s by Edwin Land, founder of the Polaroid Corporation. Because of its popularity, most of the photographers in this section use Polaroid film, but artists using Impossible or Fuji instant film are certainly welcome.

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by Robert Gojević

LEANNE SURFLEET amazing medium

http://www.leannesurfleet.com/ UK I have always found instant film fascinating, and when Polaroid stopped production of all instant films, I genuinely felt a little scared, thinking that I may never be able to shoot it again! Luckily, there is still the odd pack of Polaroid film floating around out there, and with the new film being produced by the Impossible Project, I can carry on my experimentation with this amazing medium. I mostly shoot self-portraits and portraits of girls. My Polaroids are part of a larger and ongoing body of work. I feel that Polaroid film can help communicate narrative and atmosphere within a photograph. It has its own life almost, and it’s something that I just can’t get enough of.

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I’m a fine art photographer based in the UK. I work predominantly with analog and instant cameras, exploring the subject of the self. I also work with themes such as light and loneliness. I love to portray dream states within my photographs, giving the sense of memory and a familiarity that the viewer can relate to in many different ways. I’ve also come to realize my need to record my own existence, as a way of coping with my personal anxieties.

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PLAYSTICK is a section dedicated to “toy camera� photography. The name Playstick comes from a well known simplified male figure illustration called Play Stick. The name also contains the word plastic as an association to plastic (or toy) cameras like Diana, Holga, Lomo LC-A, Lubitel, and others.

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by MaurĂ­cio Sapata

WARREN HAROLD Alternating Weekends

http://www.thatwasmyfoot.com USA My parents separated when I was seven, and their divorce was final by the time I was 11. I didn’t have a strong relationship with my father before the divorce, and afterwards I barely saw him at all, eventually creating an almost 20 year gap. In 2001, I faced my own divorce with our three-year-old son in the middle. My biggest concern was the effect this would have on him and our relationship. I vowed never to let him feel the vacuum I did.

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Artist Biography: Warren Harold graduated with a B.S. in Photography from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas, in 1993. He worked for seven years with Craig Stewart, a commercial photographer in Houston, Texas. He left Craig’s studio in 2000 to work as a Quality Control Specialist in the Photo Operations Group at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. His toy camera and pinhole images have been included in several group shows and publications and were exhibited in his first solo show at SRO Photo Gallery, Lubbock, Texas, in 2012.

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PINHOLE | is a section, as its name says, dedicated to pinhole photography. This type of photography is created with a pinhole camera, a camera that uses a small aperture, usually the size of a pinhole, instead of a lens. Basically, the smaller the hole, the sharper the resulting image. Because of their simplicity, pinhole cameras are often handmade. The concept behind the pinhole camera—the camera obscura—dates back to the time of the ancient Greeks and Chinese. It was even mentioned by great thinkers like Aristotle, Euclid, and Mo Jing. However, the first photograph created with a pinhole camera was by a Scottish scientist, Sir David Brewster in the 1850s.

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by MaurĂ­cio Sapata

JUSTINE BETH GARTNER Painting with light

http://justinebethgartner.com/ USA I enjoy using analog film and a pinhole camera because it slows down the photographic process and opens up the creative process, pushing me to contemplate more fully the subject at hand. It allows me to play around with extended or multiple exposures and film advancement, and I look forward to being surprised with each experiment.

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Biography

Change how you see. See how you change. Justine was born in Minnesota and raised in both quiet/ rural and diverse/urban settings.  She was trained as a visual artist in Florida, the south of France, and New York City and has been deeply impressed upon by travel and work in Europe, India, Japan, Venezuela, and Brazil.  She is currently based in Brooklyn, New York, working on a new series of images from Tokyo, and working out the details for a new upcoming project in IndiaTravel From The Heart- Buddhism & the Art of Pilgrimage “I moved from place to place constantly as a child, and for the most part, this was exciting.  Not only did I feel comfortable adjusting to these new places, as I grew up, my desire to explore further and farther away from home expanded and strengthened.  I’ve traveled extensively since then. Like travel, the camera forces one to look at things differently, and if you can open yourself to the experience, you can begin to see all things in life from many different angles.” -Justine Beth Gartner

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ANALOG WABI-SAB | is a concept in Japanese aesthetics characterized by simplicity, asymmetry or irregularity, unpretentiousness, tranquility, imperfect quality and love of old, weathered objects – all leading to a meditative appreciation of the impermanence and transience of things, with overtones of desolation and solitude. In this regard, it is also closely related to another Japanese concept, mono no aware, which describes a “gentle sadness� for the transience (and beauty) of things. Therefore, Analog Wabi-Sabi is a section which presents analog photography through the wabi-sabi prism and perspective, with particular emphasis on Japanese photography and photographers.

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by Denis Pleić

KAKIMOTO HIROMI Vague memories

http://www.hiromikakimoto.com Japan

I collected snippets of vague memories and half-forgotten happenings to produce landscapes to photograph. This process is akin to dreaming, where memories and landscapes collaborate to produce images reassembled from memories that might only have existed for just a second. I tried to reproduce dreams also, in the sense that they change private moments into universal images.

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“Meguri-kaeshi no Kiroku”-”Returning Memory”

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Your photos deal with memories— memories of childhood and places which almost seem to have magical properties. Could you describe in a few words the concept behind your photo series “Megurikaeshi no Kiroku” (“Returning Memory”), “Mayu no jikan” (“Time of Cocoon”), and “Little World”? I could say that memories, a little girl character, and the border between “real” and “unreal” are the main concepts for my work. In “Returning Memory,” a very early work of mine, I used my younger sister in the role of an imaginary little girl. In the story that enfolds her unique presence, I have tried to portray the idealized images of women wrapped in clothes that are not the true state of their living flesh. Through this series, I understood the importance of a special period of being a little girl. It can be part of every woman’s memory, and it can be a fictional story too. What interested me was that instead of grabbing at facts as they are, sometimes reliving the past through vague memories and imagination can lead to the truth. In “Little World” the little girl character is sent to a world filled with girly things like flower gardens, balloons, and an assembly of memories from the past and imagination.

Little World

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TETRA | is a section dedicated to a specific type of photography: black and white, square-format images that are recognizable for their minimalism and high aesthetic value, often making use of long exposures. The section name comes from the Greek word for the number four, which symbolizes the four equal sides of the format.

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by Robert Gojević

RONNY RITSCHEL Iceland

http://ronnyritschel.com/ Germany

Iceland—the so-called land of fire and ice! Since the eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull, everybody knows Iceland, but my plans to explore this country with my camera were made long before that natural event. In late 2010, I finally decided to go to Iceland sometime in the spring when the island is less crowded with tourists, who come during the following 3-4 months of summer. In April/May 2011, I was in Reykjavik for nearly 20 days—enough time to go along the ring road (1340 km), but not enough time to explore the whole country. I have to come back, in winter ... Iceland is also known for its majestic waterfalls, icebergs, lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, which combines all my photographic requirements for breathtaking landscape pictures. Despite this, Iceland is one of the best places in the world for long exposure photography—my main reason for visiting the country. I really like the idea behind long exposures—it cannot be rushed, you need time and patience, and that is what you see and feel in the final results. And Iceland offered me the most dramatic landscape I have seen so far. For the whole series I used water as the main element of my pictures, because wherever you are in Iceland, you will always see some water. It’s everywhere. If you stand in front of a waterfall, you can feel its power, and to capture this amazing feeling I had to use long exposure. I converted all of the images to black and white. For me, that means no distraction from color. It’s all about structure.

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My name is Ronny Ritschel. I am an international award-winning photographer, author, and workshop leader from Germany, currently based in Canada. I am completely self-taught. I started taking pictures in 2006 with some film equipment. At the time, I also began developing my own photographs to enhance my understanding of the picture taking process. Finally, after nearly two years of taking pictures with analog equipment, I switched to digital. I now use both methods. As a “hybrid� photographer, I currently use a Nikon D800 and a large format 4x5-inch film camera. Besides my work as a photographer, I am also the publisher of a wellknown German photography blog called BlogTimes. For me, photography is more than just knowing how to work with your equipment; you have to train your vision and wait patiently for the right moment to capture that special view of the world. For this reason, art is always something personal.

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WIDE | section devoted to promoting landscape photography. This section strives to expand our presentation of these kind of photos, which have been somewhat underrepresented in BLUR magazine in their classical form. Sometimes it seems that landscape photography isn’t very creative because it relies mostly on Nature’s beauty and is, therefore, more technical than artistic. In this section we want to prove that human creativity, indeed, plays a major role in capturing the beauty of Nature in its full glory. Since “landscape photography” is a rather general term, we will try to present various approaches to this genre in this section, regardless of techniques used.

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by Robert Gojević

FRANCESCO GOLA Beyond My Eyes

http://www.francescogola.net Italy

“Beyond My Eyes” is a project about what the eyes of mind can see. Working with long exposures, I realized that you don’t freeze just a moment, but an entire period of time. You can transform your picture in an hourglass. It’s the concrete representation of the parallel universe I mentioned before. “Beyond My Eyes” is a universe where the main characters are Time and Silence, that take shape through what the mind is able to see. I’m lost in this endless space ... and I don’t want to come back.

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Time. From the time you are young, your parents try to teach you that time is the most precious resource that life gives you. Unfortunately, as frequently happens in life, you have to find out for yourself to understand it. When I started to work for my company, I understood that the time to really enjoy my life was tailing off very fast. I had to escape. But how can you escape when you are trapped in the frenzy of modern life? So I picked up my camera, and I sought refuge in nature, where I found peace for my soul, wandering in the silence. I found that while I was deep in nature, I was able to think about nothing: job, love, life, troubles—everything disappeared. It is like living in a parallel universe, and in this universe I learned to see the world with different eyes: the eyes of mind. “Beyond My Eyes” is a project about what the eyes of mind can see. Working with long exposures, I realized that you don’t freeze just a moment, but an entire period of time. You can transform your picture in an hourglass. It’s the concrete representation of the parallel universe I mentioned before. “Beyond My Eyes” is a universe where the main characters are Time and Silence, that take shape through what the mind is able to see. I’m lost in this endless space ... and I don’t want to come back.

Francesco Gola was born 1981 in Pavia, Italy. He currently lives and works in Italy. After earning his Master’s Degree in Electrical Engineering, he started traveling for his company, and he found in photography the perfect escape from the chaotic world.

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OPEN | section in which we try to widen our horizons by crossing the boundaries of themes we’ve emphasized in BLUR during the past few years. This section will host street, documentary, concert, experimental, and other types of photography, and even photo manipulation. The creative approach is still the most important aspect in choosing photographers, but we will show preference for those who could be described as “different.”

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by Robert Gojević

ALICJA PIETRAS Memory Self-Portrait

http://alicjapietras.com/ Poland The project “Memory Self-Portrait” is a kind of diary, a record of very specific times, which, for many reasons, weren’t very happy for me. At the same time, that period of my life was truly transforming, a real turning point. As intimate atmosphere was very crucial to speak about the pain and sadness of those moments, I photographed myself and my very close female friends. That enabled me to get to the point where there was no shame and no will to hide true feelings.

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If I were to say what my interests are, it would have to be the visible and the invisible, more the invisible … floating in the universe of dreams. From the very start of my adventure with photography, I felt there’s much more to it than just what we see. My studies at Warsaw School of Photography in Poland concentrated around discovering how to make my inner world visible for others, how to make the viewer dive into my reality and feel what I feel. After a few years of my education, I discovered for myself such photographers as Sara Moon, Sally Mann, Francesca Woodman, John Foncuberta, and Duane Michals, to name only a few who influenced me the most. Their art is the perfect example of pure photographic poetry, images that enable us to read between the lines. I also experimented with many different photographic techniques, using a wide variety of cameras, including toy and pinhole cameras. The project “Memory Self-Portrait” is a kind of diary, a record of very specific times, which, for many reasons, weren’t very happy for me. At the same time, that period of my life was truly transforming, a real turning point. As intimate atmosphere was very crucial to speak about the pain and sadness of those moments, I photographed myself and my very close female friends. That enabled me to get to the point where there was no shame and no will to hide true feelings.

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PROEYECT | is a little brother to the PROJECT section. Its purpose is to present mini projects, i.e. sets of photos, which are too few to included under PROJECT, but by their quality, unified theme, and story, deserve collective publication. Photographers often tell a kind of story through several photos, and this is the place for such stories. The number of photos is not a primary concern, so in this section, we may publish several unrelated stories.

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by Robert Gojević

KRISTIANNE KOCH Rite of passage

http://kristiannekoch.com

As I spend time with my children, I have discovered a connectedness that I never dreamed I would have with them. Growing up in the same waters of the Pacific Ocean off San Clemente, California, with frequent trips to Hawaii and the swimming pools of Palm Springs, I learned the language of water and discovered adventure, joy, and fear. The water is one of the few places where we can be both fragile and capable. When my children immerse themselves in the waves of the Pacific, they experience the stages of a traditional rite of passage. There is the time of separation from the safety of the shore, the transition where feeling scared and vulnerable in deeper water is expected, and the reincorporation back to the safety of the shallow water and smaller waves. Every time I see my children experiencing this rite of passage, I also go through the three phases of separation, transition, and reincorporation. I learn to trust the rough seas that seem to swallow and release them and the calm waters that embrace and support them. I see them learning their own way to be vulnerable, courageous, and free spirited. Spending this time in the water is an important rite of passage in our family. This socialization prepares them for a future with others who have learned the language of water fluently.

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BLUR magazine | ISSUE 31 | June 2013

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BLUR magazine | ISSUE 31 | June 2013

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BLUR 31