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blue print Issue Five

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BPLM 2016 / Issue 5

Editor-in-Chief: Jessica Jones Art Editors: Lu Ren Pranavi Aradhyula Literary Editor: Yeshasvi Mahadev Layout Consultant: Katherine Qiao

Blueprint is made possible by the support of: University of Michigan Central Student Government Arts at Michigan University of Michigan College of Engineering Office of Graduate Education University of Michigan Engineering Student Government ArtsEngine Blueprint (est. March 2010) is a student-produced literary magazine on the University of Michigan’s North Campus. Our mission is to collect the artistic creations of the North Campus community, composed of the students, staff, faculty, and alumni of the College of Engineering, Stamps School of Art & Design, School of Music, Theatre, & Dance, and Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR It’s fascinating how blurry the lines between art and science become when we push the envelope in either discipline. A record-breaking scientific achievement, when viewed through the lens of an artist, becomes a breathtaking sculpture. An art form, when studied by mathematician, can be described and improved upon using equations. A careful melding of meaningful form and informative function produces a one-of-a-kind object that is far more than the sum of its parts. Operation Redefine Art was the initiative Blueprint launched this year to encourage graduate students in technical majors to reimagine their research or a scientific concept as a work of art, and the results blew us away. So, in addition to the visual art and poetry created by students, faculty, and staff, look for the Re: Define Art tag to see the works that challenge the traditional constraints of beauty and utility. On behalf of this year’s inestimable staff, I am honored to present our annual collection of the insanely creative work of the students, faculty, and staff of North Campus at the University of Michigan, Issue 5 of Blueprint Literary Magazine.

Jessica R. Jones

Editor-in-Chief

COVER IMAGE

Grab a Chair Teri LaForest Photography


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BPLM 2016 / Issue 5

TABLE OF CONTENTS 2

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Downtown Ann Arbor on Christmas Night

Mark J. Kushner

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Nagoya Central Train Station After Rush Hour

Mark J. Kushner

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Dark Matter

Jenny Geyer

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Flower-like ZnO Nanowires

Kuan-Hung Chen

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Capturing His Sunset

Teri LaForest

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Badlands

Mike Stander

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Norris Basin at Yellowstone

Mike Stander

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Henry

Anne Marie Moon

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Little Tree

Mike Stander

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Blue Aspiration

Shonda Bottke

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Sea of Glass

Teri LaForest

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Just Another Fall Day

Abhishek Bafna

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Wonder

Case Kittel

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Micro Glass-Blown Resonator

Tal Nagourney

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Pura Vida

Maeve Margaret Pascoe

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Window to an Escape

Maeve Margaret Pascoe

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Waiting

Urvi Kanakaraj

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Zander the Great

Zander Michigan

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Hummingbirds

Jianshan Liao

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For My Mother

Maeve Margaret Pascoe

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Mystery

Maeve Margaret Pascoe

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Leaning to a Fall

Abhishek Bafna

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Misty Maple Morning

Devyani Kalvit

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Radiance

Abhishek Bafna

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Clarke Quay in Singapore on a Saturday Night

Mark J. Kushner

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He Loves Me?

Teri LaForest

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Grab a Seat

Teri LaForest

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Joint Custody

Simon PatanĂŠ

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An Empty Office Atrium in Boston

Mark J. Kushner

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Tapestry of Life

Devyani Kalvit

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From Among the Shades of the Recent Dead She Came

Jenny Geyer

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Ann Arbor Sunset

Abhishek Bafna

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Strawberry Skies

Yeshasvi Mahadev

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The Devourer

Abhishek Bafna

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Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

Mike Stander

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Yellowstone Hot Springs

Mike Stander

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Bliss

Abhishek Bafna

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Central Train Station in Antwerp

Mark J. Kushner

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Bridge across Rock Creek Park in Washington D. C. at Sunset Mark J. Kushner

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Nenrin: A Trace-Embedded Object

Chuan-Che Huang

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While You Were Away

Yeshasvi Mahadev

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Bread

Jianshan Liao

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Kowloon and Hong Kong from Victoria Peak

Mark J. Kushner

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Ethereal Fall

Jianshan Liao

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Golden Days

Jianshan Liao

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Fall Leaf

Abhishek Bafna

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Lightning at Devils Tower

Mike Stander

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Simplicity

Maeve Margaret Pascoe

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Locked in Love

Teri LaForest

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Remember Me

Yeshasvi Mahadev

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Dimension

Maeve Margaret Pascoe

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White on Black

Susan Montgomery

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Hyperbolic Plane I

Teal Guidici

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Big Blue

Susan Montgomery

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Earthbound

Summer Ann Lapointe

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Alone

Susan Montgomery

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A Quiet Jury is Still Better Than Loud Indifference

Jenny Geyer

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USS Midway Standing Vigil in San Diego

Mark J. Kushner

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Golden Days

Jianshan Liao

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Artist & Author Biographies


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BPLM 2016 / Issue 5

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Downtown Ann Arbor on Christmas Night Mark J. Kushner Photography

Nagoya Central Train Station After Rush Hour Mark J. Kushner Photography


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BPLM 2016 / Issue 5

DARK MATTER

JENNY GEYER / POETRY

Lipstick blotted coffee cup– Impartial wax print Rash red against White porcelain A morning pick‐me‐up– And then the bruise on my arm That’s been there for a week– (Maybe more, I’m never sure) At the edges, trading, Blue for yellow– I’m everywhere and nowhere; Dark matter– Always, since before, And to be forever after But in between: Ghost hounds trampling The valley, opaque with dank fog And the pounding of paws– Then the hollow howls halt, To pause And stale in the air Consumed by the wind, Carrying the words of its disciplinarian: The dull, conservative hills; Stoic, dead‐eyed statues that stand With a silent and permanent, Grown‐up command: Be quiet, be still. An old radio song sings along To these lost thoughts;

Like footprints in the woods Of some wild thing, Faded and shallow after a hard rain– And then the bruise on my arm That’s been there for a week– (Maybe more, I’m never sure) At the edges, trading, Blue for yellow– I’m everywhere and nowhere; Dark matter– Always, since before, And to be forever after Grown‐up command: Be quiet, be still. An old radio song sings along To these lost thoughts; Like footprints in the woods Of some wild thing, Faded and shallow after a hard rain– And then the bruise on my arm That’s been there for a week– (Maybe more, I’m never sure) At the edges, trading, Blue for yellow– I’m everywhere and nowhere; Dark matter– Always, since before, And to be forever after

Flower-like ZnO Nanowires Kuan-Hung Chen Photography


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Capturing His Sunset Teri L LaForest Photography

As the sun slowly sank into northern Lake Michigan, I noticed a father and son across the way. Each appreciated the sunset in their own way: one stopped to photography while the other scampered back and forth. along the bank in the fading light. Since that night, I have never seen a sky so full of stars. Captured in Headlands International Dark Sky Park, Michigan.


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This is the most beautiful geyser basin in Yellowstone National Park. Not to be missed if you visit the park.

Bad Lands Mike Stander Photography

Shot from the top of “The Wall� in Badlands National Park, which is near Wall, South Dakota and the famous Wall Drugs.

Norris Basin at Yellowstone Mike Stander Photography


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Henry Anna Marie Moon Photography

LITTLE TREE Mike Stander Photography

What a sweet little tree in the Badlands. Notice the 'rock' that looks like dried mud. This is what the Badlands are made of, and is why they erode so quickly at the rate of about 1-inch per year.


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Blue Aspiration

Shonda Lee Bottke Mosaic Art Shells, pearls, art glass, stained glass, transparent Venetian smalti, iridized stained glass, and dichroic glass on a recycled mirror and plywood substrate with an oak frame. The concept for this mosaic began as water splashing on a beach. As I played with the glass and smalti, it morphed into an abstract phoenix.

Sea of Glass Teri LaForest Photography Captured onsite after a day of volunteering with Growing Hope in Ypsilanti, Michigan.


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Just Another Fall Day Abhishek Bafna Photography

Wonder Case Kittel Photography

Case finds inspiration best by simply observing the world around him in attempts to notice small details that may normally go ignored. By going on long walks through the Arb or while coming back from a late night of studying he carries his camera with him to capture life’s seemingly mundane, yet wonderful moments. He believes it is important to find a balance between the built and natural world, his photos influenced both by his engineering background and love for the outdoors. Case hopes that by sharing his explorations through photographs will ultimately inspire others to embark on their own unique adventures to discover Wonder.


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BPLM 2016 / Issue 5

MICRO GLASS-BLOWN RESONATOR TAL NAGOURNEY / RE: DEFINE ART

This fused silica shell resonator, only 5 mm in diameter and 70 µm thick, is the heart of a high-performance gyroscope. It is engineered to resonate at 10 kHz in the n = 2 wine glass modes, in which the circular rim deforms into an oval. The shape and vibrational characteristics of the resonator are designed to maximize its mechanical quality factor and ring-down time while reducing interference from environmental noise. This improves the bias stability of the gyroscope so it can achieve precision navigation over long periods of time without losing its bearing. The atomically smooth shell structure is molded from a 100-µm-thick fused silica substrate. The substrate is placed atop a mold that consists of a graphite disk having a hollow cylinder around a post machined into the center. A blowtorch aided by thermal imaging then rapidly heats the fused silica to its softening point at over 1600 °C. Once softened, the substrate is vacuum molded to achieve the desired shape, though only the center post and outer rim area actually contact the mold. This entire process occurs in only ten seconds.

After separating the shell from the rest of the substrate and polishing the rim, it is coated with a gold film and packaged within a ring of concentric electrodes, separated by a gap of several microns. These electrodes interact electrostatically with the metallized surface to drive and read out the vibrational motion of the shell. Once excited into resonance, rotation causes the vibrations to precess around the shell rim, their new orientation indicating the angle of rotation.

These shells will ring for hundreds of seconds, by far the best performance in the world.

Being transparent and extremely smooth, these shells are extremely difficult to photograph. I have been an avid photographer for much of my life and I can say that these were unequivocally the most challenging, albeit patient subjects I have ever worked with. Each beam of stray light and every nearby texture reflects in painful detail off their surfaces. These images are the product of several days of building and rebuilding a variety of lighting and background setups to highlight the pure, beautiful form of these delicate structures.

A shell immediately after blowtorch molding, still attached to the fused silica substrate.


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Pura Vida Maeve Margaret Pascoe Prismacolor Marker

Window to an Escape Maeve Margaret Pascoe Prismacolor Marker


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BPLM 2016 / Issue 5

WAITING

URVI KANAKARAJ / POETRY

Words thoughts sentiments opinions Floods the nous, Freezes the organs, Day is forgotten, Journey is blocked, Desires vanish, Surrounds disappear. In the still and disorder, I wait with my graphite, Pointed and steadfast, For them to calm And help me lay all my cards out. --For a promotion, for an offer, for some free time, for some coffee, For a green light, for a sale, for a fine meal, for a lottery, For an occasion, for a salary, for a guest to come, for a guest to leave, For a phone call, for a door bell, for a text reply, for a knock, To grow tall, to grow thin, to grow up and be liked, For a train, for a bus, for a delayed flight, for an elevator, For a lecture to end, for an empty toilet, for an interview, for an answer, For a weed to bloom, for water to boil, for crops to grow, for a prayer to be heard For the first customer, for the last song, (With bated breaths) for a goal to be scored For the ideal one, for the “I Do”, for the birth of a child, for the child’s first words, For a rocket to be launched, for a bomb to be dropped, for the truth to be revealed, for a life to end, We wait. You and I, we wait.

A woman WAITS for her slavery to end, A student WAITS for the rape to cease, A wife WAITS for freedom from her assaulting husband, An abused kid WAITS for a family, A 16 year old WAITS for her divorce, A child worker WAITS for some education, A traded human WAITS for her liberation, They wait. --The blunted graphite lay, Atop the grey disquiet parchments, In the dim sunset yellow, Jaded but unfinished, For it shall be tapered and sharpened, Over and over again, Our swords haven’t been dropped. Yet.

Tick…Tick.

A mother WAITS for her child to come home, A haggard WAITS for some water and food, A bleeding boy WAITS for some help, An elderly WAITS to be rescued from a fire, A patient WAITS for the pain to terminate, A man WAITS for a heart donor, A female WAITS to be unchained from the law A society WAITS to be freed from the Taliban, A refugee WAITS for their country’s glory, An oppressed WAITS for some identity, A soldier WAITS to meet his loved ones,

Zander the Great Alexander Kostantinos Melidis Album Art


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Editor’s Commentary: The Amethyst Woodstar hummingbird can flap its wings at 80 beats per second, the fastest of all the hummingbird species.

Hummingbird Jianshan Liao Photography

For My Mother Maeve Margaret Pascoe Prismacolor Marker


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Leaning to Fall Abhishek Bafna Colored Pencil

Mystery Maeve Margaret Pascoe Photography


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Radiance Misty Maple Morning Devyani Kalvit Photography

Maple leaves are considered the omen of good luck. And dew drops represent joy. The snapshot, ‘Mistry Maple Morning’, inspired by the works of Steve Mccurry, intends to propagate the sentiment of ‘finding pleasure in small things in life’. Because ‘life is beautiful if one has the eyes of the beholder!’

Abhishek Bafna Colored Charcoal


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BPLM 2016 / Issue 5

Mark J. Kushner Photography

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He Loves Me? Teri LaForest Photography

Grab a Seat Teri LaForest Photography

Sometimes you find yourself sitting there on the pavement wondering, Does he? And you’re hoping a daisy will give you the answer.

Captured on a hot summer day in St. Joseph, Michigan.


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JOINT CUSTODY

SIMON PATANÉ / POETRY An Empty Office Atrium in Boston every cell in my body screams primacy, is ascribed the cushions and agency of the histories stampeding, deoxyribonucleic road maps and passports printed on the air entering the alveoli of this ivory kingdom. teeth click and muscles clench in quaking cesarean tremor. this child sits fat on a mountain of comfort, white skin affords my lips the right to silence without worry. mouth accomplice to double homicide, visits deli. one pound cut of a cheap bargain: privilege is to listen without being heard.

Mark J. Kushner Photography


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TAPESTRY OF LIFE DEVYANI KALVIT / POETRY

‘The clown! The clown!’, a facade of his own Entered the town as the sun went down. A thunder, a roar, wailing of a distant cyclone Deserted was the town, alone was the clown!

Heavens saw it all when he shed a tear No one but he was alone and full of fear The stars shone bright and the moon juggled But didn’t laugh the clown with a smile so chiseled.

A creak and a twitch, wild was the breeze Dangled the planks in all the alleys. Twirling was the smoke from all the chimneys Huddled was everyone, with beer and buddies.

Gathered his things with hands of despair Life looked redundant and so unfair. With wings of present all broken and clipped He walked out of the town, downtrodden and ripped.

A look to the left and a look to the right People were present, but out of sight. Zigzag and straight, the footsteps that night His cul-de-sac, he hugged tight.

A jingle of bells and approaching footsteps Stopped him at once but absent were the peps. A finger entwined, so soft was the flesh Looked he around and found a face so fresh.

Sound of hooves, a dust cloud at a distance The clown stood still, an act of persistence. Horses, horses, black, white and gray Running so fast, as if in a fray.

Curly and long, blond were the hair Hazel eyes and complexion was fair. Chubby cheeks and a dimpled chin Her smile made his heart spin.

They came and they went Creating a permanent dent Torn was a cheek; he lost his smile To accept the new fact, it took him a while.

Out came the balls and started the game Next was the turn of the stick of the fame. Round and round the wand did swirl Seeing the cap, smiled the girl.

Soiled was his sac, that lay on the ground Some of its belongings could never be found. Balls and sticks and wand and mirror Saw his face, and he was in a horror.

Heaven came together, witnessed the history Time scribbled a note on life’s tapestry ‘Nothing’s impossible’ were the two golden words Proved again the clown with the conquered crosswords!


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FROM AMONG THE SHADES OF THE RECENT DEAD SHE CAME JENNY GEYER / POETRY

Once upon an autumnal resurrection, She burst from the starry earth; Under a new moon, mica shards sparkled In black soil, glistening Like eyes scattered in the dark. Now in the evening, If you stare long enough without blinking, You can see the curve of the land, Rising slowly. Breathing.

This is a picture of an actual Ann Arbor sunset recreated in colored charcoal with some additions.

Ann Arbor Sunset Abhishek Bafna Visual Art


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STRAWBERRY SKIES YESHASVI MAHADEV / POETRY

Starlight night, meaty novel, bottle of wine and a comfy corner out on the roof. Long walks, breathing in silence. Words flowing, dreams living. Foreign hands, foreign lands. Eyes closed. Ocean waves. Crunch of snow. Peddling across landmarks. Tribal inks. Rainforest colours. Coffee scents. Peace. Love. Life. Escape. Fly. I want to run away.

The Devourer Abhishek Bafna Photography This majestic cliff at Pictured Rocks reminds one of a giant waiting to devour ships off the horizon.

Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone Mike Stander Photography Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River. Shot late in the evening, in near darkness.


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Bliss

BPLM 2016 / Issue 5

Abhishek Bafna Photography

Yellowstone Hot Springs Mike Stander Photography Two small hot springs in the Artist’s Paint Pots area of Yellowstone National Park.

This shot hopefully captures both the serenity and vastness of the ocean giving one a blissful feeling.

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Central Train Station in Antwerp

Mark J. Kushner Photography

Bridge across Rock Creek Park in Washington D. C. at Sunset Mark J. Kushner Photography


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NENRIN: A TRACE-EMBEDDED OBJECT

CHUAN-CHE HUANG / RE: DEFINE ART

The advancement of “quantified-self” technologies and digital fabrication have enabled a new opportunity for people to create trace-embedded objects: individualized artifacts formed by and inscribed with each person’s own personal data and sensor traces. Such objects enable users to express themselves and reflect on their ongoing and past experiences.

We envision that in the near future, designers would be able to design parametric models that can be morphed by personal data; they can upload their designs to websites similar to Thingiverse; endusers can then select the designs they like, bring in their personal data to customize their objects, and finally make the objects. To explore this design space, we built Nenrin, a digitally fabricated lamp designed to facilitate the remembering and reflection of a mother’s pregnancy experience.

We imagine a user would make or order the wood base near the beginning of her pregnancy. This serves as the socket for the light bulb. We picked Honduras mahogany as the wood for the base due to its red color, a vibrant color that represents the emotive pregnancy experience. This piece is CNC-milled. Since minimal data is available at the beginning of pregnancy, the wood base has no data embedded.

She would then create a layer of acrylic plate per week, stacking them onto the wood base. The acrylic plates are carefully laser-cut to incorporate several different data sources. Inspired by the downward pointing triangle symbolizing the womb, we designed the exterior of the lamp as a layers of rounded triangles. We found that tracking the changing sizes of women’s belly is one of the most valuable data they would like to physicalize during pregnancy. Therefore, each layer of the acrylic plate contains a torso-shaped hollow in its center, representing belly size by week. In addition to the torso data, the size of the plate is also proportional to the weight of a user in a week, which creates a curvy silhouette for the lamp.

Rotatable acrylic side plates offer an easy access to a detailed account of the weeks. We embed a person’s pregnancy journal posted on a private Facebook group onto these rotatable plates. This textual information serves as a token for people to reflect on the important life events during pregnancy.

After her due day, she would finalize the object by creating the core piece in the middle of the object. This component represents the heart rate of the user during her labour. In contrast to the other data representing change over time, this component represents a singular important moment in pregnancy. Since this plastic core is encapsulated by the transparent acrylic of the exterior, we created a visual effect that “crystallizes” and encapsulates this milestone.


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WHILE YOU WERE AWAY YESHASVI MAHADEV / POETRY

I rushed out of the bedroom, determined not to cross paths with him on my way out. But I was too late; he was already brewing his morning coffee. ‘Morning,’ I mumbled, as I sat down at the counter across from him. He nodded, before setting a plate of pancakes under my nose. ‘Long night?’ ‘I got home by three.’ ‘Oh.’ He never asked. I never said. I pulled the bathrobe around me a little tighter. He ignored the two wine glasses in the sink from the night before.

Bread Jianshan Liao Photography


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BPLM 2016 / Issue 5

Each digital panorama is produced from 12-24 individual frames that contain a portion of the panorama and which are initially captured in color. Each portion of the panorama consists of three exposures that are used to generate high dynamic range (HDR) color subimages. The HDR sub-images are stitched to create the panorama which is then converted to black and white.

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Kowloon and Hong Kong from Victoria Peak Mark J. Kushner Photography


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Ethereal Fall Abhishek Bafna Photography

Golden Days Jianshan Liao Photography

Fall Leaf Abhishek Bafna Visual Arts The colour of maple leaves after fall has always fascinated me.


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Lightning at Devils Tower Mike Stander Photography We were on a hike on the trail that circles the base of Devils Tower as the weather was closing in. In fact the sky opened up and poured rain about 5 seconds after we got back to our car. This was the view from the trail where it returns to the visitor center parking lot just before the storm hit.

Simplicity Maeve Margaret Pascoe Photography


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Locked in Love Teri LaForest Photography

REMEMBER ME

YESHASVI MAHADEV / POETRY

‘Seventeen years,’ I whisper, watching her closely. Her eyes widen before they tinge with sadness, as they always do when I have to remind her of who I am. She looks down at her wedding ring, with a look of perplexed sorrow I am now so used to seeing, it doesn’t even hurt anymore. The doctors tell me that she’ll only get worse from here on. What they don’t see is that she’s never tried to pry it off her finger.


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The ice pieces in this photograph broke off from the Breiรฐamerkurjรถkull glacier in Iceland, drifted through the Glacier Lagoon and off to sea, then were brought to the shore by waves. I was fascinated by the artistic contrast of the ice with the dark rocks and sand.

Dimension Maeve Margaret Pascoe Prismacolour

White on Black Susan Montgomery Photography


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In Euclidean geometry, the normal sort of geometry that you learned in school, a plane is flat like a piece of notebook paper; this flat plane has what mathematicians call zero curvature. You may have also learned about spherical geometry, where a plane is round all over, like a globe, and it has positive curvature. If you were very lucky, somewhere along the way you learned about hyperbolic geometry. In hyperbolic geometry a plane isn’t flat or round, instead, it is shaped like a Pringles potato chip, and has negative curvature. There are many ways you can model a hyperbolic plane as a surface in our usual 3-dimensional Euclidean space. One simple method is the {3,7} polyhedral model in which equilateral triangles are put together 7 at a vertex. To imagine how this might work, think of a regular hexagon, made of 6 equilateral triangles. The addition of the 7th triangle at the same vertex causes the surface to bow and wobble, giving it its negative curvature.

HYPERBOLIC PLANE I

TEAL GUIDICI / RE: DEFINE ART

A crochet hyperbolic plane is quite simple to make - just increase one stitch every n stitches, for your favorite n. Crocheted hyperbolic planes have graced the cover of Mathematical Intelligencer, been featured in TED talks and have even been in an exhibit at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History. In the winter of 2010-2011, I needed a knitting project and realized that I had never seen nor heard of anyone knitting a hyperbolic plane. How would one create such a thing? Instead of copying the crocheted construction, I decided to base my method on the {3,7} polyhedral model. I designed the pattern so that one could create the plane without sewing any seams and, by starting at the center vertex, one could easily make the plane as small or large as one wanted. Once I figured out how to make the simplest knit hyperbolic plane, my mind immediately jumped to making patterned hyperbolic planes. Most knit stitch patterns are designed to have zero curvature. Adapting existing stitch patterns to both retain their visual form and have negative curvature was an exercise my brain loved. The {3,7} polyhedra construction is particularly suited to patterns that resemble snowflakes or flowers, and this resemblance can be seen in Hyperbolic Plane 1. Hyperbolic Plane 1 is constructed out of 8 identical {3,7} hyperbolic planes, which are sewn together, 3 to a vertex, creating a tessellation of the hyperbolic plane. The planes are knit in 50% merino wool and 50% silk yarn, giving the work an unexpected flowing nature.


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Iceland’s Glacier Lagoon is a lake containing pieces of ice that break off the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier before they drift off to sea. I was impressed by the deep blue color of the ice.

Big Blue Susan Montgomery Photography


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EARTHBOUND

SUMMER ANN LAPOINTE / POETRY

but maybe we are not the end all. if i throw a stone it will not leave our atmosphere but that does not mean there is no beyond or space to speak of. maybe we become something less than real when we admit we are not alone; maybe we became something less substantial when we realized the universe does not revolve around us and everything falls to pieces because “what are we if not special” answer: human. dissolve in pieces of things once solid and things we can’t identify. give pieces of soul and heartache in the name of “science”—also known as: we ache to be relevant in cosmic eyes and alien gods. i saw god once and he was not human but that is not anything new, really. i saw god once and he told me we place too much emphasis on starships and space travel when all we want is proof we are alone but we are not alone. i saw god and he told me he did not exist. there’s something intimate in non-existence. forget earth bounds, geocentricity, “i will make myself something in the eyes of thirty stars” i saw god and he said I am the end all.

Alone Susan Margaret Montgomery Photography Skógafoss is one of the most popular waterfalls in Iceland. It took a lot of patience to wait until there was only one person in front of it for that feeling of isolation before mother nature, but it was totally worth it to get this shot.


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A QUIET JURY IS STILL BETTER THAN LOUD INDIFFERENCE JENNY GEYER / POETRY

My dry hands, gripping the edge of the kitchen sink, are pale as the piled dishes in front of me; the squeak of the plates scraping against each other, almost inaudible—but it makes me grind my teeth. and from somewhere in the room, I hear you say, something about, her lying about a boob job and that trip to Belgium for work, next week and how Christmas makes you sad—

I listen to the metallic ting of the running faucet ‘s steady stream vigorous tapping against flayed aluminum, like tiny precious stones, trickling down the miles of pipe below— and interject so quietly that there is no movement of my lips: but you would rather go to church EVERY Sunday, than EVER talk to a therapist. I sigh through my nose; sound of splashing, soothing as I rinse the last dinner plate.

USS Midway Standing Vigil in San Diego Mark J. Kushner Photography


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Golden Days Jianshan Liao Photography


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ARTISTS&

Abhishek Bafna

AUTHORS

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Mark J. Kushner

Abhishek is a graduate student studying Electrical and Computer Engineering, focusing on using machine learning algorithms to develop intelligent systemns. He dabbles in pencil and charcoal sketching, and has just recently begun to focus on colored charcoal. He is greatly inspired by nature and the change of seasons. Most of his works are natural scenes or objects captured as photographs by him, that he tries to later recreate in charcoal.

Mark J. Kushner is a professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. His interest in photography dates from high school where he learned the craft of wet processing film and images in a darkroom. Over the years he has tracked the developments in photography, from film to scanned film to digital, and now his work emphasizes black-and-white digital panoramas.

Shonda Bottke

Zander Michigan is a stylish folk/Americana singer/songwriter from Detroit, MI. He did, however, get his start in Ann Arbor as an IOE student at U of M. He plays the guitar, the harmonica, and sometimes even plays the fool.

Shonda Bottke is an Admissions Coordinator for the Graduate Professional Programs in the College of Engineering. She began working in the medium of mosaic art in 2005. As a mosaic artist she gets her inspiration from nature and the minutiae in everyday objects. Shonda’s approach for each mosaic is to search out, find, and highlight the unique qualities, or “hidden spirit” within each of the tesserae she carefully selects for each mosaic. Ultimately she strives to create an interesting and dynamic piece of art while expressing her passion for the ocean, nature, and conservation.

Case Kittel

Case is a current senior in Civil Engineering with minors in Sustainability and Prog. in the Environment. When Case is not doing homework he enjoys being outside backpacking, canoe-racing, skiing, biking, and exploring exciting places around Ann Arbor. On campus, he also participates with the Michigan Club Wrestling Team, BLUElab Woven Wind, EnAcct, and CoE Social Squad. Case’s passions include outdoor adventuring, flying for his Private Pilot’s license, and eating spicy food. After college he is interested in working within the architectural, engineering, urban planning, and transportation fields, (or maybe as an alpaca herder in the Andes). CaseKittel.wordpress.com

Devyani Kalvit

Besides being a B.Tech graduate from IIT Delhi and a 1st year Master’s student in Mechanical Engineering, Devyani Kalvit is an editor, photographer, globetrotter, and above all, a passionate dreamer. What adds another feather to her cap is her craziness for ‘Anaconda Conservation’ in the jungles of Amazon. A free soul, she identifies herself with the ‘Zealous Zephyr’ and believes in the spirit of ‘My way and the Highway’. One of her accomplishments is her memorable trek to the Mount Everest Base camp. She looks forward to scale the mountain someday!

Urvi Kanakaraj

Urvi Kanakaraj would like to exercise her bragging rights and admit that she is a language enthusiast, a dancer, a martial artist, a craftist, a poet, an egalitarian, a teacher, forever a student, a bathroom singer, a geek, a realist, a fighter, a lover, a traveler, a musicaholic, a self-made public speaker (enough already!)!!! In fact she is just another mortal prancing and dancing around this planet in the sunshine (until she stumbles upon the chance to travel to another planet!)

Zander Michigan

Yeshasvi Mahadev

I’m a writer, foodie, dreamer and film maker. I want my hard work to show off, I want to inspire, love, live, laugh and travel. Most of my work is inspired by online writing challenges on various forums that, and more often than not, contain less than a 100 words. These ‘microstories’, as they’re called within the writing communities, have the innate ability to speak volumes despite their abrupt sizes, and it is why I find them so very beautiful.

Teri LaForest

With an affinity for the Great Lakes and the ocean, Teri LaForest is a University of Michigan student studying Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering. She appreciates both the magnificent and the minuscule moments in life, and she sometimes tries to capture them with a camera. She also occasionally speaks in the third person and doesn’t know how she feels about that.

Susan Montgomery

My photography career started when my sons insisted I get a “real” camera before a trip to the Grand Canyon in 2004. Photography provides a great balance to my work as a lecturer and chemical engineering program advisor. I focus on nature, travel, and editorial stock photography – You can learn more at SusanMontgomeryPhotos.com . My purpose in submitting photographs to Blueprint is to encourage engineering students to embrace and explore their creative side.

Simon Patané

Simon Patané is a graduate student in the Master of Engineering: Space Engineering program. He graduated from Vassar College in May 2015 with a dual degree in Physics and Astronomy and a minor in International Politics. Writing, specifically poetry, has been a passion of his for several years now and he also performs his work as spoken word. Simon is originally from Buffalo, NY, so moving from one wintry arctic haven to another has been easy.


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Re: Define Art Teal Guidici - PhD Candidate - Statistics

As an artist who loves mathematics (or am I a mathematician who loves the arts?), I am forever looking for ways to combine these passions. Creating and knitting my own mathematically inspired knitting projects allows me to flex my problem solving and artistic muscles, while also paying homage to a discipline that I love. It allows me to combine in unexpected ways the traditionally masculine sphere of mathematics with the traditionally feminine sphere of handicrafts. This juxtaposition serves to make abstract mathematics less intimidating and expand the understanding of what is possible with knitting.

Chuan-Che Huang - PhD Candidate - Human Computer Interaction

Chuan-Che (Jeff ) Huang is a PhD student at the School of Information. His research interest is to interweave machine intelligence, interaction design and user-centered design together to create smart, considerate and enchanting objects. He spends most of his effort now on designing intelligent thermostats to encourage energy savings. Previously he had designed magic gloves to support children’s creativity, public displays to facilitate community formation, and an interactive architecture to serve as a building landmark. His work has been deployed and exhibited at TEI, UMSI and NCRC.

Tal Nagourney - PhD Candidate - Electrical Engineering

After receiving his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the Rochester Institute of Technology and Cornell University, respectively, Tal returned to his hometown of Ann Arbor to pursue his PhD at U of M. He currently studies precision micro gyroscopes in the Najafi research group. His work holds the world record for quality factor and ring-down time for micro shell resonators.


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Profile for Blueprint Magazine

Blueprint Issue 5  

Blueprint Issue 5  

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