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ISSUE 1 - FEBRUARY 2021

Covering Blue Mtns Community Sports, Fitness, Health & more www.bluemountainsactive.com

IN THIS ISSUE -PLUS MUCH MORE

LOCAL

PYSHIO:

INJURY

PREVENT

RETURNING

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SPORT PAGE 5 & 6

WHY GOAL SETTING IS MORE THAN A NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION Last

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Welcome To Blue Mountains Active IN THIS ISSUE ISSUE 1 - FEBRUARY 2021 It Really Is That Simple: 4 Quick Tips Towards Better Health. Pages 3 & 4 The Physio Depot: What are the ways to prevent injury when returning to sport? Pages 5 & 6. A Quick Intro To Rugby: Get to know Rugby Union a little better plus info on local clubs. Page 8. Tai Chi In The Mtns: Read about Tai Chi and its health benefits from a local instructor. Pages 9 & 10 Local History: History Pool. Pages 11 & 12.

of

Blackheath

What Is An Exercise Physiologist?: Hear from your local Exercise Physiologist and why you need one. Page 15 & 16. Blue Mtns Yoga Studio: All you need to know about Yoga and Iyengar Yoga in the Blue Mountains. Page 17 & 18. Should I Be Counting Calories?: Do we really need to count them, and do they really count?. Pages 19 & 20 Reality Check: Why goal setting is more than a new year's resolution. Page 25 & 26 Healthy Quotes / Sports Quiz: Page 23 & 24

&

Blue

Mtns

Blue Mountains Active is a new online bi-monthly publication. Our goal is to promote healthy and active lifestyles throughout the Blue Mountains community. Each issue our dedicated team produce articles, gather news and information towards promoting healthier and active lifestyles. Content from local sports, fitness, health, nutrition and outdoor recreation are just some topics we cover. We are here to support local businesses, organisations and each other.

We are currently seeking locals from the Blue Mountains to contribute. This is a great opportunity for someone looking to get involved in journalism or looking to get contribute to the Blue Mountains community

Special Advertising Rates We can expose your business to potential local customers. Some special advertising rates are currently on offer for our second and third issues. We also consider donating advertising space to non-profit organisations. Get in contact with us editor@bluemountainsactive.com

THIS MONTHS CONTRIBUTORS Kerry-Anne Knibbs, Lachlan Farley, Jenny Kelly, Samantha Edwards, Kieran Fercher, Vicki McAuley, Jenna Verhoeven, Marek Indyka

SUPPORTERS Steps To Greatness (Katoomba), The Physio Depot (Springwood), Foundation Allied Health (Lawson), jvnaturopathy.com (Blaxland), Ebb & Flow Studio (Faulconbridge), Blue Mtns Yoga Studio (Katoomba)

APRIL DEADLINE March 22 - Content and advertisments

CONTACT editor@bluemountainsactive.com www.bluemountainsactive.com Advertisements and content are submitted at the risk of the contributor, BM Active accepts no responsibility for inaccurate or misleading information. Before undertaking any health advice in this publication seek professional medical advice


It Really Is That Simple - 4 Quick Tips T0 Better Health

Written by Lachlan "Keeping It Simple" Farley - Steps To Greatness Katoomba When it comes to nutrition and eating better, everyone is always going to the extremes of things. Cut sugar. Don't eat Carbs. Fat is the devil. Only eat vegetables and lean protein. Go extreme vegan. Paleo is the only option. Hell just don't eat food at all, just water. The list goes on, I don't work this way.  For one most of the above mentioned aren't as bad as everyone makes out, in fact, carbs, and fats are essential for your health, you just need to understand when and how to eat them.   It's just about moderation. But I'm not going to get into that today.   Today I wanted to keep it simple, a few quick tips that will help make this crazy time not so hard on the waistline and also generally improve your health and energy levels.  1. Water   I know simple right  But it will indeed make a massive difference. So how can we incorporate it? For starters, you should be drinking 2-3L a day anyway. And if not, this is a great place to start, helps with hunger, energy levels, even anti-aging, the list goes on.  But let's also make sure you are feeling great with when you drink your water. First thing in the morning try and get 1-2 large glasses of water in; this will kick start everything for you and will be a big boost for your immune system and your energy levels.  Next, whenever you feel hungry drink a large glass of water first, often thirst is mistaken for hunger. Plus extra water is not going to hurt you. 30-60 minutes post-meal have another glass of water; this will also help with satiation and stop you from snacking. 2. Apple Cider Vinegar There is undoubtedly an extreme level of over hype about how this fix all substance that helps burn fat and cure disease that's not the case at all, but it does have it's benefits. I think it's fantastic and use it to aid in digestion and keeping my stomach healthy. But I've seen people use it to wash their hair.  I don't know if I would go that far, but chucking this on your salad or adding it to your meals is going to help your stomach stay happy and personally I just like the taste on my salad, so win-win.

3. Veggies Yep, that's right keeping it simple.  Literally, eat your veggies first. And I don't mean your potatoes and pumpkins; I mean the leafy green ones. Then eat your meat and save your carbs for last.  As I said, carbs aren't a bad thing, and they shouldn't be avoided. But eating the other stuff first will stop you overindulging on them because it is certainly much more straightforward to overeat carbs than it is anything else.   This simple change in the order of eating can make a massive difference. SUBMIT CONTENT: Send us your news, stories, sports results or upcoming events. Blue Mountains Active want to hear from Blue Mountains locals, weather you play sport, run a club, frequent the gym, run a business or feel like contributing to the local community. .editor@bluemountainsactive.com - www.bluemountainsactive.com


4. Walking Going for a walk is going to be a fantastic boost to your health, your energy levels and to counteract overeating. Now I am going to be ambitious here and see if you can swing two walks during this time of lockdown or increased time at home.  I know a massive ask, but trust me there is a rhyme and a reason for everything I do.  So I want you to try and get a walk-in as close as possible to waking up, and this could be around the block once, up and down the stairs 3-4 times, or if you have the time make it a solid 30 minutes.  Doing it like this will shake out the stiffness of sleeping for 8 hours, will gear you up for a great day, and boost your metabolism and burn some extra fat. *Bonus points* If you can get outside in nature and do it, bush, a park, anything that is natural will be even better. This is a prevalent practice in Japan for boosting health and well being it's called sēnlínyù or forest bathing.  I would highly recommend it anytime you can. The second time you should go for a walk is at the end of the day after dinner, wind down the body with a gentle stroll, burn off some extra calories and especially if you can get into nature.  Do this before dessert and then decide if you really want it. You will get a slight endorphin high from your walk that can replace the desire for sweet things (The brain seeking that rush)  So that's all I have for you today, As I said, keeping it simple, simple is always better.  And take action today on this, have a large glass of water and go for a walk. Because the biggest lesson that can be learnt that knowledge without action is useless.  I promise you will feel better for it.  Until then,  Lachlan "Keeping It Simple" Farley Owner of Steps to Greatness Personal Training Studio

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WHAT ARE THE WAYS TO PREVENT INJURY WHEN RETURNING TO SPORT? Written by Kieran Fercher - The Physio Depot, Springwood As sport returns and lockdown rules are starting to ease, sportspeople and weekend warriors are chomping to get out there again! There is always a risk of injury in returning to the sport after an extended period of time off. This is particularly relevant with the additional closure of gyms, and for those who have been moving less than ever by working /studying from home over this period.With decreased activity or training, it’s not just our fitness or muscles that deconditions… The bones, tendons, and joint surfaces also lose strength, which puts you at a higher risk of injury.These changes are exaggerated for children who continued to grow during the lockdown period, there can be dramatic changes in body mass, since they last played a sport, especially in adolescents.

TIPS FOR RETURNING TO SPORT/TRAINING WITHOUT GETTING INJURED! SLOW AND STEADY WINS THE RACE Increase your training volume steadily and slower than you think. Your body takes time to adapt to certain training load. It’s tempting to go back into our old routines straight away, but start at about 75% of your training load and intensity, and gradually increase this slowly week by week.

GET SOME STRENGTH WORK IN AROUND YOUR SPORT Chances are over the last few months the muscles that support and protect your joints aren’t as strong as they were pre-lockdown.Targeted preventative strengthening programs to supplement your training will help reduce the likelihood of overuse and noncontact/contact sporting injuries, and it is a great way to improve your performance!For sports that involve sudden changes of direction (soccer, football, netball) prioritizing single-leg strength and control plays a huge part in injury prevention.


RECOVER RECOVER RECOVER Recovery is as important as the training itself, the time spent recovering is when your muscles are rebuilding, your tissues are getting stronger and tendons becoming robust to sustain more training. Start with a rest day between every training session. Initially, you will feel like your body can keep training, but it may catch up with after a few weeks of consistent training.

USE A PROFESSIONAL TO GUIDE THE RETURN TO EXERCISE, SPORT OR ACTIVITY Like anything using a Personal Trainer or Physio to help guide your return to exercise can be important to returning without getting injured and performing better! Aside from providing structure and direction to your training program, it will provide accountability to your training and goals.

State of the art Physiotherapy clinic in the heart of the Blue Mountains. Expert team of therapists catering to all fitness levels. Our passion is to get you out of pain fast, moving more and back to doing what you love.

1B/3 Raymond Road Springwood (02) 4751 9127 thephysiodepot.com.au

Blue Mtns, Cent West & West Sydney


End the stigma. Reach out.

DO NOT BELIEVE EVERY THING YOU THINK

Mental Health Awareness


A Quick Intro To Rugby, If you've never watched a game of Rugby Union it can be a little difficult to understand, especially if you are familiar with Rugby League. 15 Players take the field for each team, each player has a different position on the field such as props, hooker, locks, flankers, flyhalf and a few others. The obvious objective is to score more points than the opposition, points can come in many different ways. A try. Touching the ball to the ground in the in-goal area worth 5 points. A goal kick, or conversion, comes after a try is scored and is worth 2 points. A penalty kick is worth three points and another kicking option is the drop goal. A drop goal is worth three points and can be scored during play when a player positions himself for a kick the ball must be dropped and touch the ground before kicking. If the ball goes out of bounds or over the touch line a line-out occurs. Line-outs restart play, players from both teams form a tunnel like formation, a player on the touch line throws the ball above the tunnel. Players can lift a team mate into the air to retrieve the ball.Another contest for the ball in Rugby Union is called a scrum. Scrums are formed when the referee calls for a breach of the laws. Eight players from each team are invovled in a scrum. Each team push against each other to gain possession of the ball. Other terms in Rugby are maul and ruck. In 1864 Sydney University was the first rugby club formed in Australia a year later the first rugby union competition was established in 1865. The Wallabies are Australia's national men's team and first played in 1899, in Sydney. The women's national team is know as The Wallaroos. In Australia Super Rugby is the top professional rugby union competition with the National Rugby Championship (NRC) the second tier competition. Big tournaments around the world include the Rugby World Cup held every four years, usually showcasing 20 nations. Six nations championship, a northern hemisphere tournament with England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, France and Italy all participating. Tri nations series featuring Australia, New Zealand and South Africa held annually. Rugby is played in the Blue Mountains across junior and senior levels. The Blue Tongues Junior Rugby Club was formed in 2006, by 2012 6 junior sides were competing in the Sydney competition, 10s, 11s, 13s, 14s, 15s and 17s. " The club has grown to include teams playing in the ‘minis’ competition from under 6’s to under 9’s. These age groups are the future lifeblood of both the junior and senior club teams. Whilst the change is continual of players, coaches, committee and teams, the heart of the club remains constant. To provide a platform for kids of all ages and abilities to play this great game called rugby in the Blue Mountains and surrounds." - from bluemountainsjuniorrugby.org.au. Rules for juniors are altered and can be found on the website above. The seniors team was founded in 1957 and play in the Sydney competition, they are known as the Mountain Goats.

www.bluemountains.rugby.net.au


MUCH MORE TO TAI CHI Unlike so many exercises, Tai Chi isn’t a new fad that will disappear just as quickly as it arrived. It has existed and been practiced in China for over a thousand years.

Written by Kerry-Anne Knibbs - Ebb & Flow Studio - Faulconbridge Fitness and health are closely related, however, they are not always aligned. Research from Harvard University  has found that you don’t have to do punishing workouts to improve your health. Tai Chi and Qigong, is gentle and is a great workout for the body that burns 120 to 180 calories every half hour. Most people know that Tai Chi can improve your balance, muscle strength, and flexibility, however, the slow movements of both Tai Chi and Qigong aim to address much more than just physical function, such as:  

•Immune System •Asthma •Fibromyalgia •Aerobic Capacity •Stress/Anxiety Relief •Joint Health •Internal Organ Health •Diabetes •Parkinson's Disease •Multiple Sclerosis etc…

As a Tai Chi and Qigong instructor I am less interested in the martial arts application (of TaiChi) and more interested in the medical physiology of Qi cultivation in both Tai Chi and Qigong practices. Qi or Chi cultivation, as the ancient Masters called it, is the interaction of the Qi energy, which you might think of as the oxygen or life force energy, that interacts with the different systems of the body. Dr Roger Jankle, a doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine from California and author of The Healer Within’, helps us to understand the medical physiology. When you practice Tai Chi and Qigong it has an effect on all systems of the body. In the skeletal system, Qi cultivation penetrates to the marrow of the bone and is stored as a resource for healing. The circulatory system, is where Qi and blood delivers functional and healing resources to the organs and every part of the body. Tai Chi has proven especially beneficial for people with heart conditions. In the lymphatic system and the body fluids — including lymph, cerebral and synovial, Tai Chi and Qigong enhances the propulsion and function of the fluids. This is why Tai Chi is known for addressing inflammatory and immune issues.


Tai Chi and Qigong is also known for soothing, harmonising and balancing the nervous system. The sensation of Qi energy, moving around the body is paired with the neurological impulses, transporting and transmitting to all areas of the body. In the system of the organs, much focus is given to the cultivation of Qi energy as the organs sustain life. Tai Chi and Qigong provides the muscular system with upper- and lowerbody movements safely strengthening the heart and major muscle groups. Muscles remain relaxed rather than tense, which differs to yoga moves that fully extend or stretch your joints and connective tissue. You also don't have to get down on the floor, making the exercise more achievable. Requiring no special equipment or attire, it is so versatile — you can practice it anywhere and even in your lunch break! The health benefits of Tai Chi and Qigong are said to out perform any other exercise and this is why Tai Chi and Qigong is practiced by more than 20 percent of the world’s population and it’s not just for seniors. It is becoming the most popular form of exercise internationally, so watch out for this trend in Australia.

You can get involved by simply Googling Tai Chi or Qigong to find an instructor in your area or one who is able to do online classes as this is the new normal since COVID19. But don’t exclude open air park practice or, if allowed, face to face classes indoors. Instructors should have qualifications, insurance and references and some instructors will have NDIS understanding to help you access a class with funding. I offer regular classes in Faulconbridge, Blue Mountains, at Ebb & Flow Studio — www.ebbandflowlifecoach.com

Ebb & Flow Studio ww.ebbandflowlifecoach.com


Blackheath Pool: The Gem of the Mountains Written by Jenny Kelly - www. friendsofblackheathpool.blogspot.com Blackheath Pool has long been a part of mountain life. The pool (which actually encompasses three pools of differing size, depth and utility) is situated in the beautiful Blackheath Soldiers’ Memorial Park. There it is surrounded by lofty rhododendrons planted to commemorate Blackheath men who enlisted in World World War 1. The pool is a focus for summertime activity for locals and visitors alike and holds a special place in the hearts of many people who have swum in it since childhood. It is a place you remember. The site of the pool was always a place of springs and creeks and thus attractive to human beings both before and after colonisation. Its ready water supply was useful in the early days of European occupation. Bullock drivers watered their cattle there, and when the railway came a dam was created to provide the permanent supply of water essential for steam trains. In the 1920s community feeling developed that the dam should be turned into a functional swimming pool and in 1929 a citizens’ committee was formed to raise funds to purchase materials for that project. Community working bees took place on Saturdays and Wednesday afternoons with Blackheath shops being closed for this purpose. The dam was cleaned and graded to allow for different depths for swimmers of different ages and skill levels, its bottom was gravelled, and railway sleepers painted white were placed around the edge for spectators. The steamroller used in the process now sits nearby in the gardens near the Blackheath Community Hall. The Blackheath Pool brought thousands of people to Blackheath because it was regarded as the finest pool, situated in the finest park, in the Blue Mountains. An added attraction was that there was no charge for its use, reflecting the philosophy of the community which built it. It was the people’s pool. The original wood and tin dressing sheds soon proved inadequate and in 1938 a grant was provided by the Minister for Local Government to build the charming classical revival brick changing rooms, which remain in use today. The pool’s popularity grew: a swimming club was formed and carnivals were held. In 1939 a club house and ambulance station, funded through local donations, were added and these are now .


today’s entrance buildings The annual Rhododendron Festival, another Blackheath attraction, started in 1952. The parade meandered through the town to end in the park near the pool, and featured such crowd-pleasing events as the Jantzen swimming costume parade where bathing beauties strutted along pool boardwalks. In the early 1960s the Blackheath Rotary Club installed a filtration plant to allow the pools to be chlorinated, and built concrete walkways between the pools. A fourth pool, known as the The Black Pool because it was dark, was filled by seeping underground water. It remained unfiltered but continued to be heavily used because of the popularity of its high diving tower. In the mid 1980s there were concerns that the old dam wall might collapse and closure on safety grounds was mooted. Community meetings ensued and funding was secured by then new member for the Blue Mountains Bob Debus. The Black Pool was filled in and brick paving, which remains in place today, was provided. By the early 2000s problems with leaks and cracking caused the pool to close for two years but in 2004 a major public protest on Australia Day effected a Blue Mountains City Council commitment to a significant restoration project, funded by the sale of local council-owned land. What resulted was the Blackheath pools which exist today: a 25 metre lap pool, a toddlers pool and a medium sized ‘freeform’ pool which follows the shape of the original dam. The freeform pool is particularly suited for developing water confidence in children. In 2017/18 Council wanted to close all upper mountains outside pools, with Blackheath Pool free form targeted saying it was cracked.Community response saved the day along with reports from volunteer engineers who confirmed the pool was safe. Blackheath Pool lives again for future swimmers! The pool remains a much loved place of fun and family which reflects the spirit of the Blackheath community of the early 20th century, who worked together to provide facilities to benefit locals and visitors in the growing township. The pool complex remains an important community asset to the present day. Custodians of this gem of the Mountains Friends of Blackheath Pool & Memorial Park has a mission to continue to protect this gem of the Mountains for the community now, & for future generations. friendsofblackheathpool.blogspot.com bmcc.nsw.gov.au/blackheath-pool


PREVENTION

Maintain physical distancing

SOURCE: WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION


Know the

COVID-19 SYMPTOMS The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure: Fever Cough Shortness of Breath

Seek medical advice if: You develop worsening symptoms You have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 You live in or have recently been in an on area with ongoing spread of COVID-19


WHAT IS AN EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGIST AND WHY YOU SHOULD SEE ONE

Written by: Sam Edwards - Foundation Allied Health, Lawson The verdict is in – exercise is medicine. It can help you to live longer, be healthier, feel happier and avoid illness. So, who is best qualified to prescribe it? Here are five reasons you should see an exercise physiologist for your dose of exercise. A literature review considering the benefits of exercise for chronic conditions said it best; “No single intervention has greater promise than exercise to reduce the risk of virtually all chronic diseases simultaneously.” And it’s so true.Exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of developing some of Australia’s biggest killers, including heart disease, dementia, diabetes, mental illness and many types of cancer. And it’s not just about preventing illness. Regular exercise also helps to improve your mood, boosts your energy levels, makes you happier, and improves your general well-being. If exercise was a pill, it would be a multi-billion-dollar industry. It’s not though… and too many Aussies are missing out on the benefits of regular physical activity, with only 1 in 2 adults doing the recommended minimum of 150 minutes each week. This falls to 1 in 4 for older adults.

SO, WHY AREN’T WE MOVING MORE? There’s a lot of reasons people avoid exercise, with “no time” consistently being the most common excuse. Factors like injury, poor health and a lack of knowledge also play a big role. Sometimes, you just need a little help, and that’s where an exercise physiologist can help.

WHAT’S AN EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGIST? Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) are university-qualified allied health professionals. They specialise in designing and delivering safe and effective exercise interventions for people with chronic medical conditions, injuries or disabilities. Services delivered by an AEP are also claimable under compensable schemes such as Medicare and covered by most private health insurers. When it comes to the prescription of exercise, they are the most qualified professionals in Australia. SUBMIT CONTENT: Send us your news, stories, sports results or upcoming events. Blue Mountains Active want to hear from Blue Mountains locals, weather you play sport, run a club, frequent the gym, run a business or feel like contributing to the local community. .editor@bluemountainsactive.com - www.bluemountainsactive.com


5 REASONS YOU SHOULD SEE AN EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGIST

1. YOU’RE LIVING WITH A CHRONIC CONDITION - There’s additional factors that you need to considered if you’re living with (or at risk of developing) a chronic condition. These include the impact of medication, risk of comorbidities and limitations to range of movement. An AEP understands these complexities. They have the skills and knowledge to prescribe safe exercise interventions that are tailored individually for your needs. If you have a chronic disease, it’s also a good idea to chat to your GP before exercising. They may refer you directly to an exercise physiologist to help you get active safely. 2. YOU’RE LIVING WITH CHRONIC PAIN - Chronic pain is classified as pain that if it persists for longer than three months or beyond normal healing time. AEPs are trained in a range of pain management techniques and will prescribe exercises to help improve your quality of life. 3. YOU’RE RECOVERING FROM AN INJURY - A physiotherapist generally diagnoses and manages the acute treatment of an injury. After the first phase of treatment, your physio may refer you to an exercise physiologist. They will further assist with your recovery and reduce your risk of re-injury. 4. YOU’RE LIVING WITH MENTAL ILLNESS - Exercise is a powerful tool for both preventing and managing mental health conditions like depression and anxiety. Exercise physiologists are uniquely qualified to prescribe exercise to those living with mental illness. 5. YOU’RE PREGNANT OR HAVE RECENTLY GIVEN BIRTH - Your body goes through so many changes throughout pregnancy and after childbirth, and your exercise needs change accordingly. Whilst exercise is safe and beneficial both during and after pregnancy, doing the wrong types of exercises can actually be dangerous. An AEP can help to prescribe exercises that are safe for YOUR body and your stage of pregnancy/post-natal care. WHAT IS THE ENHANCED PRIMARY CARE PLAN (EPC)? The EPC is a government initiative that allows people with chronic injuries or ailments to access professional services to assist with the management of their condition with the benefits of a Medicare Rebate. If you've had a chronic injury or medical condition which has been present for 6 months or longer then you should be able to get an EPC referral from your GP to see an Exercise Physiologist. If you are eligible then your GP will give you a referral for 5 x Exercise Physiology sessions (per calendar year) which are subsidised by Medicare.

www.foundationalliedhealth.com


A Bit About Iyengar Yoga and the Blue Mountains Iyengar Yoga Studio Written by Vicki McAuley - Blue Mtns Iyengar Yoga Studio Katoomba Yoga is an art, a science and a philosophy. It touches the life of man at every level, physical, mental and spiritual.It is a practical method for making one's life purposeful, useful and noble.Yoga is a friend to those who embrace it sincerely and totally.It lifts its practitioners from the clutches of pain and sorrow, and enables them to live fully, taking a delight in life.The practice of yoga helps the lazy body to become active and vibrant.It transforms the mind, making it harmonious. ”BKS Iyengar – Light on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali The legendary BKS Iyengar has been credited for bringing yoga to the west, and making it accessible to people of all ages, from all walks of life, all around the world. He developed his own style based on the tradition of Pantanjali’s Eight Limbs of Ashtanga Yoga.  Iyengar Yoga places emphasis on alignment, sequencing, precision and use of props. The practitioner not only develops strength and flexibility, but a sense of mental and physical wellbeing. Iyengar Yoga can be practiced by anyone, regardless of age or ability. The practice brings clarity and understanding to the underlying principles and philosophy. Guruji BKS Iyengar passed away on August 20, 2014, at the age of 95. While Guruji's physical presence may no longer be felt, he has left behind an incredible legacy that will allow future generations of yoga practitioners to continue to learn and develop physically and emotionally. Blue Mountains Iyengar Yoga Studio  was established in 1994, teaching in the tradition of BKS Iyengar. Director Lulu Bull is the principal teacher at the school, and was, up until his death in 2014, a direct student of BKS Iyengar. Over the years, Lulu has made regular journeys to the Iyengar Institute in Pune, India, to attend classes with BKS Iyengar himself, his daughter Geeta, son Prashant and granddaughter Abhijata. Lulu is currently a member of the Association Certification Committee which regulates all teacher certification in Australia.  She conducts teacher training and professional development programs within the school and travels interstate (when not restricted by Covid-19) to run retreats and workshops. Lulu has been practicing and teaching since 1984 and at present holds a Senior Intermediate Level Two Certificate.


Lulu states, ‘I feel blessed to have this practice in my life. It sustains me, humbles me, and brings insights to the trials and tribulations of life. I feel honoured to be able to live, practice and teach in the Blue Mountains community and landscape, and to be surrounded by a wonderful group of teachers and students who continue to support and teach me everyday.’ People often ask if yoga is religious. Although yoga originated in India, it is not a religion. In fact, yoga is a system of self-study and selfobservation. It develops a sense of vitality within the individual. It develops strength, flexibility and coordination. It reduces stress, teaches relaxation and establishes mental poise. And it’s never too late to start. The beauty of yoga is that it can be practiced by people of all ages. Students are encouraged to practice to their own capacity. If you’re suffering from injuries, yoga can be very beneficial in the recovery process. Yoga is a form of low impact movement that can be adapted by the use of props to assist in mobilising of stiff, inflamed joints and muscles. Blood flow is increased to the affected area, accelerating the healing process. The studio has a range of qualified and dedicated teachers who all bring their years of experience to help our students reap the many benefits of yoga. We welcome new students to the studio, and we cater for all levels from those who have never practiced yoga before to students with many years of yoga practice.

Here’s a handy guide to our classes … Foundation: This class teaches the basic foundations of Iyengar yoga. Classes are structured to cater for the beginner student new to yoga, students who have had a break from yoga or those who would like to go at a slower pace. Duration: 1 hour LEVEL I: For students with less than 12 months experience of yoga. Duration: 1 hour 15 mins LEVEL 1/2: For students with a minimum of 12 months Iyengar Yoga experience with knowledge of shoulderstand and working towards other inversions. Duration: 1 hour 30 mins LEVEL 2: For students who have been attending classes regularly for more than 12 months. This class includes inversions – headstand, shoulderstand, handstand. Duration: 1 hour 30 mins LEVEL 3: For experienced students only, who attend regular classes and maintain a home practice. Not open to casual attendance. Please contact the studio to assess suitability for this class. Duration: 2 hours OVER 55’s: This class is for students over age 55, who would like to work at a steadier pace. The class caters for common age-related conditions such as arthritis, osteoporosis and general back problems. Duration: 1 hour 30 mins We’re online, too. Lulu runs weekly recorded online classes for students who aren’t able to come into the studio, and for students wishing to supplement their studio classes.     We adhere to strict Covid guidelines, and as such our class numbers are limited. Bookings are essential. To book and buy a pass, visit us online at www.bmyogastudio.com.au. Any queries, email info@bmyogastudio.com.au


Should I Be Counting Calories? Jenna Verhoeven - jvnaturopathy.com

Jenna combines Evidence-Based Practice, solid and reliable methods; with compassion, empathy and honesty.

As a general observation, we as a species love counting things, recording data, and using all the gadgets that help us to do the counting ad recording! We countdown days until or birthday or certain festivities. We count how many kids are in the car before we leave the house. We use one of the million apps to help us count our steps; many of which let us know if we need to do more, if we’ve failed, or if we’ve exceeded the challenge. We count unread emails, unplayed voicemails, and unseen texts messages. If we are mindful, we count our blessings. But what about calories? Do we really need to count them, and do they really count? For many of us, we start a new year with a count down too. Five… Four... Three... Two... One... HAPPY NEW YEAR! The clock has ticked over to a New Year. As you sip your champagne and grab another sneaky chocolate coated strawberry you start mentally (or verbally) rattling off all the things you ‘resolve’ to do this year. January and February are busy times in the clinic. Once we’ve all eaten too much and overindulged on the finer things in life, we tend to look at ourselves under a microscope. We think of all the things we’d like to ‘do better’ than we did last year; be it eat cleaner, look and feel better, or improve our exercise and sports performance. Many a client has sat opposite me in clinic. Some wanting to lose weight. Some wanting to gain muscle or improve their fitness. Some with thyroid problems or hormonal issues. Of those who are unhappy with their weight, physical appearance, or sports performance most will ask me if they should be counting their calories. First up, I believe that ‘should’ can be a dangerous word, and secondly there is no hard and fast answer to the question, I do have some criteria which I use to help decide if we are going to count calories or keep a non-numbered food diary. When do they count? There are two times I’ll consider a client keep a caloric food diet. The first one is for some my athletes. Whether it be an athlete looking to lean down, build muscle, or improve their endurance, I may do a bit of calorie counting. Building muscle requires eating a surplus of calories, and with my endurance athletes, it about ensuring they are getting enough fuel to support their training and events. With my body composition clients, we may look at keeping a caloric diary. We do this just to give us a realistic look at what’s going in versus what’s been used. It’s important to note that it’s not just the OVERALL calories I am looking at, but the MACRONUTRIENTS are the important part. How much of your energy are you getting from protein, carbohydrates, or fats? Once we know this information, we can tweak it to optimise health and training outcomes. SUBMIT CONTENT: Send us your news, stories, sports results or upcoming events. Blue Mountains Active want to hear from Blue Mountains locals, weather you play sport, run a club, frequent the gym, run a business or feel like contributing to the local community. .editor@bluemountainsactive.com - www.bluemountainsactive.com


How do I count? I often picture ‘The Count’ from Sesame Street when I talk about counting calories. “One, one calorie ah ah ahhh. Two! Two calories! Ah ah ah.” And so forth. These days there are a lot of apps and tools for folks to use to count calories. If I’m doing very precise work, I like to use NUTTAB. It’s the Australian standard; the difficult part about using NUTTAB is that all foods are in 100g, this means you must take raw data, and amend do the maths to work out the values of your intake. A lot of work! Other apps or websites that are popular are Calorie King, My Net Diary (my favoured) and My Fitness Pal.

There are two very import things to consider if recording calories. 1. Most people underestimate the volume of food they are eating. Many apps use measurements like “small’ or ‘medium’ apple, or a ‘handful of grapes. These measurements can be relative. My handful is probably a lot smaller than yours! My idea of a ‘large’ orange may be different to yours. If you want to be accurate, you’ll need a set of scales, or use metric cup and spoon measures for everything. This can get quite arduous, but it can also be very eye opening. Like I said, a lot of folk either over- or underestimate how much they are eating. You may realise you’re eating a cup of blueberries with breakfast, not a quarter cup. Or you may learn what you thought was a cup of spinach, is just a third. 2. App/Website food selection. Make sure you select the best representation of food when recording it. Many apps these days allow users to add their own foods into the system. These entries are not verified, and many will be missing important data. When selecting foods, makes sure if has at least total calories, carbohydrates, protein, and fats. It also pays to be a little discerning. If you just logged a doughnut and it has only 73 calories, you might want to hunt for another entry!

When to count it out. Not all tools are useful all the time. There are times when I don’t think counting calories is helpful. Clients who have had negative or altered perceptions in body image, BIDD, or eating disorders are an example of those whom counting calories is not favorable. When I’m working with a client I will factor in their personality; those who are high achievers, type As, perfectionists, or high anxiety folk, we may consider alternatives too. Whilst I think checking in can be useful for some people, I feel there a few of us who will find it detrimental. For these folks, if I need to get a food picture, I will ask them to keep a food diary, or just take photos of the foods they’re eating. There’s always a way around finding the information I need to help you feel your best.

Count me in! Putting all the bean counting aside I have one final, and most important, point to make. One of the most important things to consider when it comes to the food you eat is, how does it make you feel? Do you feel energised after you eat you lunch, or sluggish? Do you feel irritated after you eat afternoon tea, or neutral? Do you get a headache after you eat breakfast, feel bloated, or ready to start the day? This month, maybe instead of counting calories as part of your new year new you vibe, I ask you to really explore how the foods you’re eating are making you feel. jvnaturopathy.com located in Blaxland


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Healthy Quotes It is health that is real wealth and not pieces of gold and silver. – Mahatma Gandhi

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WHY GOAL SETTING IS MORE THAN A NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION Written by: Samantha Edwards - Foundation Allied Health, Lawson This year has been tough; having our routines thrown out of whack, being in lockdown, and experiencing changes to eating and health habits to say the least. We may feel the need to ‘make up for lost time’ by setting aside some big goals for 2021 such as losing 20kg, exercising for 1 hour every day, or even quitting junk food cold turkey with an aim to begin on January 1st. REALITY CHECK The reality is, that jumping in head first to a strict regime is less likely to result in sustainable change, and more likely to result in seeing the steps towards goals as punishments, rather than enjoyable moments. On average, weight loss goals are set unrealistically high and are associated with higher amounts of effort and reward. But what happens if we don’t meet our goals? Do we try again from the beginning? Do we push ourselves harder and impose more restrictions? Do we ask for some help? GIVE YOURSELF SOME CREDIT Firstly, don’t be so hard on yourself. It’s okay to feel disheartened, upset or anxious if you feel that you haven’t met your goals this year, especially if you have had other things on your mind. Secondly, it’s unrealistic to think that you will never encounter obstacles or barriers along the way, and that’s where strategies come in. FINDING THE WHY – SMART GOALS Before we discuss barriers and strategies, let’s have a think about the reason why we want to achieve something. A goal of ‘losing 20kgs in 3 months’ is not specific nor realistic unfortunately, however a goal of ‘losing 10 kg’s in 6 months’ so that you’re ‘able to run with your children and not feel puffed’ is SMART – specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-bound. BARRIERS AND STRATEGIES As mentioned above, there will be times that you might encounter some barriers specific to you such as wet weather, lack of access to gyms or grocery stores, injury, and most common of all; a lack of time. Once you start thinking about the possible barriers, you can also begin planning strategies to overcome them.

Blue Mountains Active April Issue set to be released April 1-3. Get your content or advertisements in by March 22nd. editor@bluemountainsactive.com


For example:– Barrier: A lack of time to complete a 1 hour training session. Strategy: Try to be active in as many ways as possible during the day; parking a little further away than usual, using stairs instead of lifts, going for a lunch time walk or even doing some exercises before dinner. Barrier: Lack of healthy food options in the fridge. Strategy: Stock up your pantry with some fruit, vegetables and healthy snack options. Barrier: Lack of time to prepare lunches for the next day. Strategy: Meal prep lunches for the week ahead on the weekend.– Barrier: Wet weather outdoors for you usual walk/run. Strategy: Do an online exercise video or home workout program. TRUST THE PROCESS Setbacks can happen from time to time, and that’s okay! Rather than doubling up, pushing yourself harder or ‘starting again on Monday’, you can pick up where you left off at any time, subject to your wellbeing of course. Meeting your end goal doesn’t happen after 1 day or 1 week, it takes time and relative consistency. By relative consistency, I mean that you’re consistent on average, but still enjoy some time to indulge or overcome barriers. Trust the process. Goal Setting is more than having a New Year’s Resolution. It’s about setting lifestyle behavior changes that are sustainable, so that you can lead a fulfilling life and enjoy the process. NEED SOME EXTRA HELP? If you’re struggling to set goals or need some help with developing strategies when life gets in the way, speak to an Accredited Exercise Professional today. They can help you with motivation, setting realistic goals and finding a place to start. FIND AN EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGIST If you are interested in seeing a local exercise physiologist please contact Sam on 0438 780 673 or email foundationalliedhealth@gmail.com

Thank you for reading. Next Issue online April 1 - 5 2021

Please feel free to send us any suggestions, feedback or you may have some content you would like featured in our next issue. editor@bluemountainsactive.com www.bluemountainsactive.com

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Blue Mountains Active #1 February 2021  

Blue Mountains Active is a new online bi-monthly publication. Our goal is to promote healthy and active lifestyles throughout the Blue Mount...

Blue Mountains Active #1 February 2021  

Blue Mountains Active is a new online bi-monthly publication. Our goal is to promote healthy and active lifestyles throughout the Blue Mount...

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