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2013 Calendar Robi Smith is a Vancouver artist whose vibrant paintings of the North Pacific Ocean reflect her passion for local marine life and her concerns about threats to BC’s coastal ecosystems. For more information about Robi and her artwork, visit www.blue-lantern.ca. You can follow her on Facebook at facebook.com/BlueLanternStudio This calendar is printed locally on ecofriendly paper. Part of the proceeds will go to support non-profit organizations working to protect BC’s coast from oil spills, including The Dogwood Initiative and the Georgia Strait Alliance.

Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


King of the Salmon (2009)

December 2012 Sunday

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The large ribbonfish in this painting is called a King of the Salmon. According to the Makah people in the San Juan islands, the King of the Salmon leads the wild salmon home from the ocean to spawning grounds in rivers and streams.The orange outlines of dinosaurs represent carbon from fossil fuels falling into the ocean, increasing the water’s acidity.

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Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


Big-eyed Lanternfish (2008) Big-eyed lanternfish range from Washington State to Alaska.Their bodies are lined with photophores that light their way. At the bottom of the food chain, lanternfish eat plankton (or tiny bits of degraded plastic which they mistake for food).They are widely distributed in oceans around the world. During the day they hang out in the dark depths, but at night they rise to the surface to feed and possibly avoid predators. Blue Lantern Studio is named for the blue lanternfish!

January Sunday

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Penguin Awareness Day

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Resources For information about your favourite fish, check out fishbase.org To discover amazing marine life forms, explore the Census of Marine Life at www.coml.org

Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


Herring Ghosts (2011) Herring were once incredibly abundant off the west coast of BC and Washington State, supporting a web of wildlife and First Nations and commercial fisheries. Overfishing, pollution, habitat degradation and other factors threaten herring stocks.The Squamish Streamkeepers recently discovered that covering toxic creosote pilings with other material is beneficial to herring eggs. Herring are now returning to Howe Sound, bringing back dolphins, orcas and grey whales.

February Sunday

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2 World Wetlands Day

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World Whale Day

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Herring school Why herring stocks collapse is somewhat of a mystery. Researchers from various universities and First Nations communities have started a “Herring School� to learn more: www.sfu.ca/hakai/current-researchprograms/herring-school.html

Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


Black-throated Rockfish (2009) BC is home to 34 species of rockfish. As their name suggests, they like to hang out in the rocks where they can hide from predators, including humans. By nature, rockfish live well into old age. Some species are known to live 115 years or more.They also take a long time to reach sexual maturity, waiting to reproduce until they are 15 to 20 years old. Because catching rockfish can hurt species’ overall survival, leave them in the water. Catch-and-release doesn’t work for rockfish!

march Sunday

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Brant Wildlife Festival in Parksville BC, to April 1

8:30 pm Earth Hour

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Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca

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Burrard Inlet Midshipman (2011) Midshipman fish are fascinating.They breathe out of water.They have photophores on the undersides of their heads which light their way. The fish talk to each other by making different grunting and humming sounds with their swim bladders and can adjust their hearing sensitivity. After the females lay their eggs, the males take over to guard the nests. A nocturnal fish, the midshipman hides during the day in mud, sand or under rocks. At night, it migrates to the surface.

April Sunday

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Earth Day

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Learn more... Interested in learning more about the abundance of life in our coastal waters and who’s protecting them? Here are some links to get you started. · Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre: www.bms.bc.ca · SeaDoc Society: www.seadocsociety.org · Living Oceans Society: www.livingoceans.org · Georgia Strait Alliance: www.georgiastrait.org

Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


Salmon Migration (2010) The large King of the Salmon, a ribbonfish, leads the wild salmon home from the ocean to spawning grounds in rivers and streams.Wild salmon, traditionally abundant along our coast, are under increasing threat from open net fish farms, pollution, and urban development near or over spawning grounds. Hope comes from thousands of people who take action, either as volunteer streamkeepers or as political activists, like Alexandra Morton (www.salmonaresacred.org).

may Sunday

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Endangered Species Day

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Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca

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International Day for Biological Diversity

International Turtle Day

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Salmon Nation Wild salmon are so important to our coastal ecology and communities that many people refer to this region as the Salmon Nation. Even if you don’t live here, you can visit www.SalmonNation.com and learn about everything salmon.


Rough-scaled Grenadier (2010) Rough-scaled grenadiers are non-migratory deep water fishes found in waters from Northern Mexico to northwestern Alaska and through the Bering Sea to Japan.They grow as big as 1 m long and weigh up to 3 kg.The oldest recorded rough-scaled grenadier was 73 years old.

June Sunday

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World Environment Day

Clean Air Day

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Rivers to Oceans Week

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Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


Moon Jellies (2011) Moon jellies are found in most oceans around the world. In the wild, they only live about 6 months, though they can live much longer in aquariums.They feed on plankton, mollusks and other jellies, which they catch with their tentacles and then bring into their bodies for digestion.The four horseshoe shapes in the bell are the jellies’ gonads. Moon jellies are eaten by Ocean Sunfish, Leatherback Sea Turtles, larger jellies, and sea birds.

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International Plastic Free Day

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Shark Awareness Day

Jellywatch.org Have you seen any jellies at the beach lately? Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute have created a website and mobile apps for citizens to upload images and data about jellies and other unusual beach sightings around the world.The data help scientists map the health of the oceans. Go to Jellywatch.org to participate!

Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


Lion’s Mane Jelly (2011) Lion’s Manes are the largest known species of jelly.The record holder’s bell measured 2.29 m in diameter and sported 37 m long tentacles (longer than a blue whale).The size of these jellies varies greatly.They grow significantly larger in cold northern and Arctic waters and are smaller in warmer waters.They live for about a year, mostly in the open ocean. A sting from their tentacles is not lifethreatening, though it will hurt and can kill smaller animals.

August Sunday

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International Whale Shark Day

Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


Herring (2010)

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Here on the coast, herring are an important traditional food for First Nations people.They also feed to a huge web of life, from sea lions, seals and sea birds to hermit crabs and other fish that feed on the roe. In BC, you can see the Pacific herring spawn in late March, which attracts tens of thousands of birds, seals and sea lions. It also brings bird-watchers to Parksville, BC, who celebrate the arrival of Brant geese on their annual migration from Baja, Mexico, to their Arctic nesting grounds.

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Sea Otter AwarenessWeek

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BC/World Rivers Day

Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca

More about herring... · Herring research is a flagship project of the Raincoast Conservation Foundation: www.raincoast.org · PacificWild.org has great information and videos about herring in the Great Bear Rainforest. Click on Great Bear LIVE. · The Tla’amin First Nation and Simon Fraser University are collaborating on herring-related research: www.sliammonfirstnation.com/archaeology/herring.html


Opah (2008) The opah is a solitary fish who swims in deep, open water in oceans around the world, including off the west coast ofVancouver Island. Opahs grow to be very large—up to two meters long and 270 kilograms heavy, and are often caught as by-catch in longline tuna fisheries.They mostly eat squid, as well as crustaceans and small fishes.They are also known as moon-fish, mariposa and Jerusalem haddock.

October Sunday

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World Animal Day

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Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


Burrard Inlet Sockeye (2011)

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Wild salmon feed more than just people; they are part of an intricate web of life. Born and raised in coastal streams and rivers, they head out to sea for their adult lives where they are prey to larger fish, marine mammals and humans.They then return to the streams to spawn and die, where they are a key food for bears, as well as eagles and other wildlife. Bears bring the food and nutrients from salmon into the forest for plants, animals and insects.

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Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca


Jellies and Fish (2012)

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Jellies are a natural and ancient part of ocean ecosystems, and compete for the same food as many fish and shell fish.When competitor fish and shellfish disappear from over fishing, jellies can take over. Scientists and others have speculated that huge blooms of jellies may also be linked to increased nitrification of the ocean from agricultural run-off or acidification from increased carbon deposited into the ocean from burning fossil fuels.These links are tenuous, needing more research.

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Watching jellies Have you ever been mesmerized watching jellies float and pulse in an aquarium? Check out National Geographic’s extraordinary jellyfish videos onYou Tube.To find them, go to the National Geographic channel (www.youtube.com/user/NationalGeographic) and type “jellyfish” into the search bar.

Robi Smith - Blue Lantern Studio www.blue-lantern.ca

2013 Oceans Calendar  

This stunning, 13-month wall calendar features Robi Smith's paintings of the North Pacific Ocean. Each month, learn about different fish and...

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