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Mike Wicks

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Funding An Introduction O

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Copyright Š 2013 Blue Beetle Books Inc. Crowdfunding - An Introduction by Mike Wicks

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Published as an eBook original by Blue Beetle Books.

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No part of this eBook may be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of Blue Beetle Books.

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3552 Promenade Crescent, Victoria, B.C. V9C 4L2

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Tel: 250-704-6686

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Table of Contents E PL

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Introduction 4 5

Chapter Two - Why Do People Support Crowdfunding Campaigns?

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Chapter One - What Is Crowdfunding Anyway?

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Chapter Four - Crowdfunding By The Numbers

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Chapter Three - Crowdfunding Platforms

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Chapter Five - Creating A Campaign

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Chapter Six - Going Viral

Chapter Seven - The What-Not-To-Dos

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Chapter Eight - Case Study: Jordan Stratford (Wollstonecraft)

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Introduction SA

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his eBook does not offer a complete guide to crowdfunding in all its guises; it is meant as an introduction to this fascinating way of raising money for product development, projects and companies. It focuses primarily on rewards-based crowdfunding for two main reasons; first it is the easiest form of crowdfunding to become involved with, and second it is the most relevant at this time to small business entrepreneurs.

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Two-thirds of successful campaigns raise under $5,000, and the majority of campaigns are unsuccessful, so it should not be viewed as a get-rich-quick scheme. As with all things, however, you can increase your chances of success by doing your homework. The vast majority of projects posted don’t have a hope of succeeding because their proposition is not well thought out, the product is weak, and the project overall is poorly presented. Reading this book will help you understand what you have to do to give your project a better than average chance of raising the money you need to develop your product, or take your company to the next level.

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Although equity, or investment-based, crowdfunding is of interest to small business owners, it is currently fraught with difficulties. At present the only way to raise capital in this way is to go through sites that reach out to accredited investors. Unfortunately this is akin to looking for angel investors, and we all know how difficult that is.

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Rewards-based crowdfunding can offer real rewards, but they don’t come easy. There are many examples of companies attempting to raise $250,000 for a project and ending up with several million dollars, but in fact they represent a very small percentage of the campaigns launched.

I wish you the very best of luck! Mike Wicks

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Chapter One

What Is Crowdfunding Anyway? SA E PL

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People wanting to raise funds for a project, product development, or almost anything else can sign onto a crowdfunding website and create a campaign. Later in this book we will be showing you exactly how to do this, but for now let’s take a look at where the crowdfunding phenomenon originated.

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Micro-financing is another form of crowdfunding that existed before this new term become commonplace; with sites such as Kiva encouraging people in prosperous countries to donate small sums of money to entrepreneurs in developing countries.

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A good formal definition comes from Investopedia (www.investopedia.com): “The use of small amounts of capital from a large number of individuals to finance a new business venture. Crowdfunding makes use of the easy accessibility of vast networks of friends, family and colleagues through social media websites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to get the word out about a new business and attract investors. Crowdfunding has the potential to increase entrepreneurship by expanding the pool of investors from whom funds can be raised beyond the traditional circle of owners, relatives and venture capitalists.”

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Non-profit organizations have been raising small amounts of money, from large numbers of people through fundraising campaigns forever, which was, essentially, crowdfunding. The Internet however offered a way to extend a non-profit’s reach, and by the end of 2011 over $1.2 million had been raised by non-profits using crowdfunding platforms, the largest percentage being in Europe, with North America catching up quickly.

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he short definition is that crowdfunding is where a large number of people (a crowd) financially support a project by giving a relatively small amount of money either in return for a reward, as a donation, or potentially in return for equity. It is a form of social networking and uses the power of the Internet and online communities to spread the word about a project or product.

Having said that, crowdfunding’s real roots lay in crowdsourcing and Jeff Howe, who is a contributing editor at Wired magazine, and author of Crowdsourcing: Why the Power of the Crowd Is Driving the Future of Business, defines it in two ways, first what he calls the The White Paper Version: Crowdsourcing is the

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New legislation recently signed by President Obama will soon allow small businesses in the United States to raise equity funding through crowdfunding websites, which is seen as a major advancement in crowdfunding, especially for small businesses (The Canadian Securities Commission is currently looking at similar legislation). This new legislation allows businesses to use Crowdfunding platforms to raise money for special, or startup, projects by offering equity in return.

act of taking a job traditionally performed by a designated agent (usually an employee) and outsourcing it to an undefined, generally large group of people in the form of an open call; and the Soundbyte Version: The application of Open Source principles to fields outside of software. Source: www.crowdsourcing.com

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So really, crowdfunding as we know it today is a subset of crowdsourcing, or at the very least it spawned it.

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As recently as 2009 there were just a few online crowdfunding platforms, today there are more than 500 worldwide. Crowdfunding, as it currently exists, allows anyone to raise money, through donations, for any project they are working on through dedicated crowdfunding websites, or platforms. Projects can be anything from an individual writing a book, to a company launching a new product. In fact, people are even using it to get strangers to fund their medical bills, but that’s another story.

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Crowdfunding businesses promote projects via the Internet so the public is aware of the details and can donate to the ‘cause’ if they desire. Crowdfunding investment platforms currently include four different business models. These include; investment-based; lending-based; donation; and reward-based platforms. It is recommended that the pros and cons of each model be considered before moving forward with any specific model.

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An accredited investor is: someone who has at least $1 million in net financial assets (excluding real estate); or someone who can prove a net income over the last two calendar years exceeding $200,000 (a husband and wife with a combined income of $300,000 also qualify) they also have to show that they expect to exceed those figures in the current year; or someone who has assets including real estate of $5 million; finally anyone with at least $150,000 to invest is considered an accredited investor. In all these cases the securities commission is making the assumption that people with this level of assets, or income, are financially sophisticated enough to make sound financial decisions on their own behalf.

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Music, film, theatre, publishing, technology and video-gaming are currently the most successful sectors using crowdfunding. However, small business entrepreneurs are starting to recognize the potential of this funding source. This is especially so where their product, or project, is of interest to the general public. People look for creative and innovative ideas to support; in particular where the campaign offers, as a reward, an opportunity to be the first on the block with a new product. This can be an exceptionally powerful motivator.

Mass market equity funding in Canada is not currently legal, but it is being considered for the future. The term ‘mass-market’ is used here to differentiate between everyday investors and accredited investors.

Campaigns that achieve the greatest success are those that feature a specific project, with set goals and deliverables offering attractive ‘rewards.’ A moderate timeline is also important to success.

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Kickstarter

Even when you are approaching accredited investors through a crowdfunding campaign you will need to have an incorporated company, and provide a business plan with full financials. Check out a platform called RockThePost in chapter three for more information on equity crowdfunding and promoting to accredited investors.

Kickstarter opened its doors in April 2009 and experienced immediate success. During its short business lifetime, 30,000 projects have obtained funding as the result of its crowdfunding business platform. An impressive $350 million has been raised to support these projects.

This book focuses primarily on reward-based crowdfunding, as it is by far the easiest place to start and provides an opportunity for small businesses to raise money for the development of specific new products, or projects. Some 93 per cent of all campaigns in 2011 fell into this category (Source: DailyCrowdSource.com). It should be noted however, rewards-based campaigns raise lower amounts of funding, with two-thirds under $5,000. Don’t be put off by this relatively low figure, there are many success stories out there, one of the most well-known being the Pebble Watch which beat its target ten times over, raising $10 million for development of this innovative product.

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Some of the positive reasons investors are attracted to Kickstarter include the fact that the funds are not committed to a particular project, unless the funding goal is met.

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The project risk for the investor is dramatically reduced by this “all or nothing” investment strategy. If an entrepreneur needs $5,000 to launch a project, then Kickstarter believes that their chance for success is diminished if the goal is not met. This policy protects investors against a perceived risky investment proposition. As might be expected, the people raising money for a project do not always view this uncertainty as a positive aspect of the Kickstarter platform.

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Kickstarter charges a five percent fee, but only if the goal is met. If the goal is not met, there are no charges. While this may sound like a benefit, many entrepreneurs dislike the fact that they are not allowed to keep the money they raised when the goal is not met.

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Before we go any further, let’s take a quick look at a few of the most popular crowdfunding platforms.

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One major limitation of raising money through Kickstarter is that backers can only donate money by using Amazon’s payment processing system. For organizations hungry for donations, it is heartbreaking when investors do not donate because it is too difficult. Many people do not have an Amazon account, and do not want to go to the trouble of establishing an account so they can make a donation.

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A Word of Warning when using Kickstarter Without doubt Kickstarter is the most popular platform and for good reason given that it is probably the first site people come across when checking out crowdfunding. So, it is natural for many of you to gravitate toward using it, but there are several things you need to know before you register.

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UK creators must be permanent UK residents at least 18 years of age either creating a project in their own name or on behalf of a legal entity with a Companies House Number. You’ll need a UK address, UK bank account, government-issued ID (driver’s license or passport), and a major UK credit or debit card.

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While many Canadians have had successful campaigns on Kickstarter, as things currently stand they cannot do so without using an agent (a third-party) who resides in the United States. This can be a friend, relative, or it can be a business relationship. The primary reason for this is that Kickstarter uses Amazon to process all payments and that company restricts usage to people that can comply with the following rules (taken directly from the Kickstarter website):

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The people at Kickstarter do say, “We’re working hard to open up to more countries. If you’ve been waiting, we really appreciate your patience.”

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The bottom line is that it may be easier for Canadians to use an alternative site, but with a little effort you can still use Kickstarter to host your project. The downside of course is that you have to be able to trust the third-party you are using and it could possibly lead to confusion over ownership of the product you are promoting. Another area where you need to be cautious is transferring funds from the U.S. to Canada - ensure you properly report the transfer of all revenues gained from your crowdfunding project as it is possible they could be considered as being from the sale of goods. In these cases it is always best to check with your accountant, or tax specialist.

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US creators must be permanent US residents at least 18 years of age with a social security number (or EIN), a US bank account, US address, US stateissued ID (driver’s license), and major US credit or debit card.

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The company has recently opened up their site to people living in the United Kingdom. This has caused some annoyance to those Canadians who have been expecting Kickstarter to allow them to use the site unencumbered for several years.

Another thing to take into consideration is any fees, or commissions your third-party might take from the revenues earned in return for handling your money.

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RocketHub

The publicity, and contacts, even a marginally successful campaign can generate can be worth significantly more than was actually raised. In chapter seven we hear from a successful new author who exceeded his target by almost $88,000 and was subsequently approached by major publishers and film companies, making the finances raised via crowdfunding a small part of the overall financial success he enjoyed.

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RocketHub is another player you may want to consider. Similar to Kickstarter, there is no fee to launch a project. If a campaign reaches its financial goal, a four percent fee is charged. For those who do not reach their goal, unlike Kickstarter, they do get to keep the money raised, but the fee increases to eight percent. Rewards, much like in PBS fundraising campaigns, are the way investors are compensated for their good will. Depending on the donation amount, rewards vary widely.

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In the next chapter we take a look at what’s behind this phenomena - why are so many people giving their hard-earned money to strangers?

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Indiegogo represents yet another crowdfunding possibility for small businesspeople to raise capital. Projects are allowed to raise funds for up to 120 days. Even if the goal is not met, the money raised is still given to the project, but a higher fee is charged (four percent fee is charged if the fundraising goal is met, and nine percent fee if the goal is not met). While some investors may negatively view the fact that a project is still funded, even if its goals are not met, most entrepreneurs prefer this flexible approach. Entrepreneurs would likely agree that it would be terrible to fall short of a fundraising goal by a few hundred dollars and thereby lose all the money raised.

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As mentioned earlier, the crowdfunding sector is growing at an incredible rate and this has led to a great deal of niching with sites focusing on everything from environmental projects to healthcare. Beware though that smaller, newer, platforms may attract less visitors and therefore may make it harder to reach your financial targets. One very important thing to take into consideration when considering a crowdfunding campaign is that it is not all about the amount raised.

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Chapter Two

Why Do People Support Crowdfunding Campaigns? SA O

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show off this innovative new product to friends and work colleagues well before the average Joe will be able to get his hands on one. Not only that, their ‘investment’ amount was almost certainly less than the watch retails for today, so they got a bargain by supporting its development - which itself offers bragging rights.

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hen I first mention crowdfunding to people who have not heard about it, the question I get asked most is, “Why would people give money to strangers - even if they do get a small reward in return?”

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Here are some of the other reasons people are willing to part with their hard-earned money.

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The fact of the matter is people do and they do so in their hundreds of thousands. Let’s take a look at what makes the average backer of a project tick. In some ways it’s a little like armchair traveling, if you can’t get out and visit exotic countries you can at least read about them in magazines, books, and newspapers, or watch programs about them. There are many people who are closet entrepreneurs, or who would love to play the stock market if they had the money. With crowdfunding they can become involved in a company and the innovative new products it’s developing with very little ‘investment’ - in some cases it can be as low as one dollar. Whether it’s one dollar or $10,000 once a person becomes a ‘backer’ they are inextricably bound to the company and the project they have backed. Those people who backed the Pebble Watch in the early days of the company’s crowdfunding campaign will very shortly be the first to receive their watches. They will be able to

Supporting a Cause - if a person has any sort of connection to the product, or outcome, of a campaign then they are likely to support it in the same way they would a charity. So for example, if the product is a new type of wheelchair, people who use wheelchairs, or who have family or friends who rely on them, may have a vested interest in supporting the project financially. As I write this, people are supporting campaigns as varied as a documentary film against cruelty to animals, a campaign that is trying to bring solar energy to the Galápagos Islands, and even one to save a local bookstore, which has already raised $30,000. Affecting Change - for some people it’s not just the cause, but making a difference in the world. This can be through supporting a product that’s going to make a difference, an event, a film, or even an individual entrepreneur. For example, Heartwood  is a feature-length and transmedia documentary about citizens on the remote BC

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Crowd Funding An Introduction