Page 1

SPRING 2014 A publication for the policyholders of the Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield family of companies

Discover Generosity: The First Annual “Give and Get in!” Fundraiser Enjoy an exciting and scientific day at the Museum of Discovery while helping others Live Fearless!

Discover the amazing world of science and give back to your local community all in one fun-filled day. Visit the Museum of Discovery on May 3 and bring one of our suggested donations* (see list of items at right) or make a monetary donation and you’ll get in for free! It’s all part of Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield’s “Give and Get In!” fundraiser for the Second Chance Ranch. Second Chance Ranch is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit program that provides abused, neglected and atrisk youth a caring home while working to resolve any crises in their lives and return them home. MPI 2174 3/14

When WheRE

Saturday, May 3 Noon to 5 p.m. Museum of Discovery 500 President Clinton Ave. #150 Little Rock, AR 72201

page

8

*Suggested Donations:

Toiletries Cleaning supplies School supplies

New clothing items Seasonal items

Welcome to Arkansas Blue Cross!

Know your numbers

page

page

4

10

4 reasons to see your doctor and skip the ER page

12


Welcome to

Arkansas

Blue Cross

and Blue Shield!

If you just recently joined Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield, we want to welcome you. You had other choices for your health plan, but you picked the best. Here’s why:

We’ve been trusted by Arkansans for affordable, reliable insurance plans for more than 65 years. We also cover many companies throughout the country.

The 37 independent, locally operated Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans collectively provide health care coverage for 100 million — nearly one in three — Americans.

The Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans have origins in the working class, but we have developed a reputation as the “best in class” insurance brand.

Your health plan ID card is accepted by almost every doctor and hospital in the state, and you can take your health care benefits with you, across the country and around the world. Learn more about the little suitcase symbol on your ID card on page 19.

There are many reasons why Arkansas Blue Cross is the best, but the top one is that we put our members first.

always have ... always will.

HAVE CHANGES? Here is what you do:

4

If you have an individual or family health plan that you purchased on your own, Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield offers several convenient ways to pay your bill.

By mail You can send a check or money order to our payment processing center. Remember to include your member ID or account number.
 For members with metallic medical plans (Gold, Silver, Bronze, Catastrophic): 
 Enterprise Exchange Services
 P.O. Box 34320 • Little Rock, AR 72203-4320

 For all other members (including dental and non-metallic medical plans): 
 Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield
 Attn: Cashiers (Drafts)
 P.O. Box 3590 • Little Rock, AR 72203-4320

IN PERSON You can visit any MoneyGram* location, an Arkansas Blue Cross office, or one of our ArkansasBlue retail stores.

Life is full of changes. If you received a health insurance plan by enrolling through the Health Insurance Marketplace, you can make changes to your information by calling the Marketplace. It’s easy — just call 1-800-318-2596 (TTY users should call 1-855-889-4325). If your health plan is with Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield, your changes will be forwarded to us. (Remember, a change in your information could affect coverage for members of your household.) We can help you with lots of services — finding a doctor, getting a new ID card, tracking a claim — but to keep your information up to date, call the Marketplace.

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

HOW TO BILL PAY YOUR

Location

MoneyGram

Arkansas Blue Cross Offices and ArkansasBlue locations

What to bring

You’ll need a copy of your bill. Pay by cash or debit card with a PIN. No transaction fee applies.

You’ll need your member ID or account number. Please bring a check to pay your bill. Cash is not accepted.

Where to go

With more than 250 Arkansas locations in stores like Walmart, there’s sure to be a convenient location near you. Call 1-800-666-3947 or visit moneygram.com to find one in your neighborhood.

We have locations throughout the state. See page 23 for addresses and contact information.

BANK DRAFT If the convenience of a monthly automatic bank draft sounds like a good fit for you, contact our offices and we will be happy to set it up. Just call the number on the back of your member ID card or locate your Customer Service number on page 23. This information does not apply to Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield’s Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Plan products.

*MoneyGram is an independent company that provides health insurance payment services for Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield customers.

If you have questions, visit our websites at arkansasbluecross.com, healthadvantage-hmo.com and blueadvantagearkansas.com.

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

5


Welcome to

Arkansas

Blue Cross

and Blue Shield!

If you just recently joined Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield, we want to welcome you. You had other choices for your health plan, but you picked the best. Here’s why:

We’ve been trusted by Arkansans for affordable, reliable insurance plans for more than 65 years. We also cover many companies throughout the country.

The 37 independent, locally operated Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans collectively provide health care coverage for 100 million — nearly one in three — Americans.

The Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans have origins in the working class, but we have developed a reputation as the “best in class” insurance brand.

Your health plan ID card is accepted by almost every doctor and hospital in the state, and you can take your health care benefits with you, across the country and around the world. Learn more about the little suitcase symbol on your ID card on page 19.

There are many reasons why Arkansas Blue Cross is the best, but the top one is that we put our members first.

always have ... always will.

HAVE CHANGES? Here is what you do:

4

If you have an individual or family health plan that you purchased on your own, Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield offers several convenient ways to pay your bill.

By mail You can send a check or money order to our payment processing center. Remember to include your member ID or account number.
 For members with metallic medical plans (Gold, Silver, Bronze, Catastrophic): 
 Enterprise Exchange Services
 P.O. Box 34320 • Little Rock, AR 72203-4320

 For all other members (including dental and non-metallic medical plans): 
 Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield
 Attn: Cashiers (Drafts)
 P.O. Box 3590 • Little Rock, AR 72203-4320

IN PERSON You can visit any MoneyGram* location, an Arkansas Blue Cross office, or one of our ArkansasBlue retail stores.

Life is full of changes. If you received a health insurance plan by enrolling through the Health Insurance Marketplace, you can make changes to your information by calling the Marketplace. It’s easy — just call 1-800-318-2596 (TTY users should call 1-855-889-4325). If your health plan is with Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield, your changes will be forwarded to us. (Remember, a change in your information could affect coverage for members of your household.) We can help you with lots of services — finding a doctor, getting a new ID card, tracking a claim — but to keep your information up to date, call the Marketplace.

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

HOW TO BILL PAY YOUR

Location

MoneyGram

Arkansas Blue Cross Offices and ArkansasBlue locations

What to bring

You’ll need a copy of your bill. Pay by cash or debit card with a PIN. No transaction fee applies.

You’ll need your member ID or account number. Please bring a check to pay your bill. Cash is not accepted.

Where to go

With more than 250 Arkansas locations in stores like Walmart, there’s sure to be a convenient location near you. Call 1-800-666-3947 or visit moneygram.com to find one in your neighborhood.

We have locations throughout the state. See page 23 for addresses and contact information.

BANK DRAFT If the convenience of a monthly automatic bank draft sounds like a good fit for you, contact our offices and we will be happy to set it up. Just call the number on the back of your member ID card or locate your Customer Service number on page 23. This information does not apply to Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield’s Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Plan products.

*MoneyGram is an independent company that provides health insurance payment services for Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield customers.

If you have questions, visit our websites at arkansasbluecross.com, healthadvantage-hmo.com and blueadvantagearkansas.com.

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

5


Make sure you are

Insurance made easy

on our websites With so much going on with the Affordable Care Act, a lot of people and organizations are trying to get the attention of those looking for information.

Have questions? Don’t get confused. Contact us.

®

One way they do this is by creating websites that resemble those of trustworthy sources, like Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield. To be sure you’re accessing our websites from your computer or mobile device, and not an imposter site, always verify that the Web address in your address bar includes one of our domain names listed below. arkansasbluecross.com healthadvantage-hmo.com blueadvantagearkansas.com Once you’re on one of our sites, you can be confident that you’re getting the most updated and secure health insurance information. If you select a link that takes you to a non-Arkansas Blue Cross website, we’ll let you now with a message. Domain name

www.arkansasbluecross.com

Keep

smiling with our

dental plans! Pediatric plan — Good dental habits start early and our Pediatric Dental Plan ensures that kids up to age 19 get the exams, cleanings and sealant treatments they need.

Dental health plays a big part in your overall health, so don’t think of your teeth as just a pretty smile. Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield makes dental coverage easy with several plans to choose from. Silver plan — If you need the basics, like exams and teeth cleaning, as well as fillings, root canals, oral surgery and gum disease treatment, this plan is for you.

Gold plan — This more extensive plan covers the same items as the Silver Plan, and includes inlays, overlays, crowns, bridges, implants, partials, surgical services for gum disease and more.

Our Dental Gold Plus Vision plan features all of the benefits of our Gold Plan, plus coverage for eye exams, eyeglasses and contact lenses.

6

For more information on our dental plans or our Dental Gold Plus Vision plan, call 1-800-392-2583 or visit our websites!

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

We offer friendly and convenient customer service with a variety of ways to get the information you need. Give us a call, come visit, send a letter or email us. Whatever is convenient for you!

Member Name:

YOUR INSURANCE

TRAVELS WiTH YOU! If you have a little suitcase on your health plan ID card, you have access to health care coverage when you are traveling, whether it is across the country or around the world. The suitcase represents the national BlueCard® Program, which is accepted by doctors and hospitals almost everywhere, giving you the peace of mind that you’ll be able to find the doctor or hospital you need for urgent and emergency services. To find nearby doctors and hospitals, call 1-800-810-BLUE (2583) or visit the National Doctor & Hospital Finder on our websites listed on page 23. You may need to call the telephone number on the back of your ID card before you are treated. With BlueCard, you won’t have to complete claims forms, or pay up front for medical services, except the usual out-of-pocket expenses. And, all the “paperwork” is done for you electronically through the Blue Plan system. So the next time you pack your suitcase, make sure you also pack the suitcase that has been providing health care security to our members for 20 years!

JOHN DOE

Member DOB: 10/02/1976 www.arkansasbluecross.com Group #: 061000-8 arkansasbluecross.com Vision Customer Service: Providers: File all claims Members: See your benefitand booklet Customer Service: 1-800-238-8379 800-238-8379 pre-determination requests directly for covered serivces. Possession thecard claims administrator. oftothis does not guarantee

Member ID: 990542946

elegibility for benefits. Hospital or Blue physicians: file Blue claims with Arkansas Cross and Shield local BlueClaims Cross Administrator and/or Blue Shield Plan. Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield Vision Blue Cross and Blue Shield P O Box 1525 PArkansas .O. Box 2181 VISION Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield P O Box 2181AR 72203-2181 Lantham NY 12110 Little Rock, provides administrative services only Little Rock AR 72203-2181 An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and does not assume any financial An Independent of the Blue Cross and and Blue ShieldLicensee Association risk for claims. Blue Shield Association

To call us, find the number on the back of your ID card, or see the list of customer service numbers on page 23. Our representatives are available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

You can visit one of our seven offices located throughout the state (listed on page 23). You can even send us a letter in the mail: Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield P.O. Box 2181 Little Rock, AR 72203-2181

Visit our Facebook page

To send an email, go to the website for your health plan (listed on page 23), select “Contact Us” and fill in the email form. While you are on the website, register for our self-service section for our members, My Blueprint. Through My Blueprint you can: • View the status of a medical claim. • Replace a lost ID card. • Access pharmacy information.

• Review your deductible and out-of-pocket amounts. • Update your Personal Health Record. • View your Summary of Benefits and Personal Health Statements. However you contact us, know that our customer service representatives are dedicated to helping you understand your coverage and pointing you in the right direction when you need a little help.

We love to hear from you! SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

7


Make sure you are

Insurance made easy

on our websites With so much going on with the Affordable Care Act, a lot of people and organizations are trying to get the attention of those looking for information.

Have questions? Don’t get confused. Contact us.

®

One way they do this is by creating websites that resemble those of trustworthy sources, like Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield. To be sure you’re accessing our websites from your computer or mobile device, and not an imposter site, always verify that the Web address in your address bar includes one of our domain names listed below. arkansasbluecross.com healthadvantage-hmo.com blueadvantagearkansas.com Once you’re on one of our sites, you can be confident that you’re getting the most updated and secure health insurance information. If you select a link that takes you to a non-Arkansas Blue Cross website, we’ll let you now with a message. Domain name

www.arkansasbluecross.com

Keep

smiling with our

dental plans! Pediatric plan — Good dental habits start early and our Pediatric Dental Plan ensures that kids up to age 19 get the exams, cleanings and sealant treatments they need.

Dental health plays a big part in your overall health, so don’t think of your teeth as just a pretty smile. Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield makes dental coverage easy with several plans to choose from. Silver plan — If you need the basics, like exams and teeth cleaning, as well as fillings, root canals, oral surgery and gum disease treatment, this plan is for you.

Gold plan — This more extensive plan covers the same items as the Silver Plan, and includes inlays, overlays, crowns, bridges, implants, partials, surgical services for gum disease and more.

Our Dental Gold Plus Vision plan features all of the benefits of our Gold Plan, plus coverage for eye exams, eyeglasses and contact lenses.

6

For more information on our dental plans or our Dental Gold Plus Vision plan, call 1-800-392-2583 or visit our websites!

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

We offer friendly and convenient customer service with a variety of ways to get the information you need. Give us a call, come visit, send a letter or email us. Whatever is convenient for you!

Member Name:

YOUR INSURANCE

TRAVELS WiTH YOU! If you have a little suitcase on your health plan ID card, you have access to health care coverage when you are traveling, whether it is across the country or around the world. The suitcase represents the national BlueCard® Program, which is accepted by doctors and hospitals almost everywhere, giving you the peace of mind that you’ll be able to find the doctor or hospital you need for urgent and emergency services. To find nearby doctors and hospitals, call 1-800-810-BLUE (2583) or visit the National Doctor & Hospital Finder on our websites listed on page 23. You may need to call the telephone number on the back of your ID card before you are treated. With BlueCard, you won’t have to complete claims forms, or pay up front for medical services, except the usual out-of-pocket expenses. And, all the “paperwork” is done for you electronically through the Blue Plan system. So the next time you pack your suitcase, make sure you also pack the suitcase that has been providing health care security to our members for 20 years!

JOHN DOE

Member DOB: 10/02/1976 www.arkansasbluecross.com Group #: 061000-8 arkansasbluecross.com Vision Customer Service: Providers: File all claims Members: See your benefitand booklet Customer Service: 1-800-238-8379 800-238-8379 pre-determination requests directly for covered serivces. Possession thecard claims administrator. oftothis does not guarantee

Member ID: 990542946

elegibility for benefits. Hospital or Blue physicians: file Blue claims with Arkansas Cross and Shield local BlueClaims Cross Administrator and/or Blue Shield Plan. Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield Vision Blue Cross and Blue Shield P O Box 1525 PArkansas .O. Box 2181 VISION Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield P O Box 2181AR 72203-2181 Lantham NY 12110 Little Rock, provides administrative services only Little Rock AR 72203-2181 An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and does not assume any financial An Independent of the Blue Cross and and Blue ShieldLicensee Association risk for claims. Blue Shield Association

To call us, find the number on the back of your ID card, or see the list of customer service numbers on page 23. Our representatives are available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

You can visit one of our seven offices located throughout the state (listed on page 23). You can even send us a letter in the mail: Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield P.O. Box 2181 Little Rock, AR 72203-2181

Visit our Facebook page

To send an email, go to the website for your health plan (listed on page 23), select “Contact Us” and fill in the email form. While you are on the website, register for our self-service section for our members, My Blueprint. Through My Blueprint you can: • View the status of a medical claim. • Replace a lost ID card. • Access pharmacy information.

• Review your deductible and out-of-pocket amounts. • Update your Personal Health Record. • View your Summary of Benefits and Personal Health Statements. However you contact us, know that our customer service representatives are dedicated to helping you understand your coverage and pointing you in the right direction when you need a little help.

We love to hear from you! SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

7


With a strong desire to help people live a healthier, better life, Laurel made the fearless decision to open her own aerobics studio. The first year, her studio barely made a dime, but Laurel was having fun, making friends and helping improve her community’s health. A year later, the local hospital’s assistant administrator asked if she’d be interested in working for their new fitness center.

t’s 11:40 a.m. on a Wednesday at St. Mary’s Wellness Fitness Center in Russellville and Laurel Stabler is about to teach her popular Drums Alive class, a collision between Richard Simmons and Ringo Starr — equal parts drumming, dancing and aerobic exercise. Laurel, who is the group fitness and personal training director, straps on her wireless microphone headset and cranks up the music as seniors claim a spot by their exercise ball of choice.

The class stretches, lifting their drumsticks high above their heads. Then the drumming starts — softly at first, then louder as the beat begins to crescendo — until there’s a heavy, rhythmic intensity. Soon the exercise enthusiasts are swaying, circling, stretching and smiling as they hammer away on colorful exercise balls. This is a glimpse into Laurel’s class — a high-octane calorieburning drum line. Certainly, these seniors are living fearlessly as they

join in this pilot program for seniors, but Drums Alive is only as lively as the instructor. aurel’s high-energy enthusiasm has connected people with fitness for 30 years, but she wasn’t always a human dynamo at St. Mary’s Wellness Fitness Center. Originally, Laurel embarked on a career in social work, focusing on patients with mental health problems. But in her day-to-day job, she noticed a trend: Her clients made more progress when they incorporated fitness into their lifestyle.

Today, Laurel works as a Healthways SilverSneakers® Fitness Program instructor and has more than 22 years at St. Mary’s Wellness Fitness Center where she supervises the center’s group fitness and personal training departments and oversees the internship program.

“She’s an entertainer. She’s dynamic,” said Chris Draggs, director of St. Mary’s Wellness Fitness Center. Laurel teaches 30 to 40 classes each month, including the senior-based Drums Alive class. There are 10 or more SilverSneakers classes available each week. rums Alive is a group fitness experience that combines music, rhythm and movement. Once a tool for stability and resistance training, the exercise ball takes on an entirely new role as people pound away on them with drumsticks. “It blew me away,” Laurel said of the first time she saw Drums Alive. “I told myself, ‘This is going to happen.

This is going to work.’” Five years ago, she traveled to Dallas to be certified as a Drums Alive teacher from the program’s founder, who created the musical aerobic mayhem to overcome a hip injury. Laurel plans to teach more instructors how to conduct Drums Alive classes in their locations. ack in class, “I’m a Believer” by The Monkees blasts through the speakers and Laurel leads the drummers as though they were part of the band itself. She calls out instructions, encouragement and keeps the beat while everyone pounds away. It’s clear to see that more than drums are alive in here.

For more information on SilverSneakers, call 1-888-423-4632, or visit silversneakers.com. SilverSneakers® is a registered mark of Healthways, Inc. The SilverSneakers® Fitness Program is provided by Healthways, Inc., an independent company that operates separately from Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield.

Get to know Laurel Stabler On music and exercise: “Music is key. You can take a class and change the way participants feel with music. Group fitness is beat driven. It’s music driven.” On retirement: “I always tell my class that I’ll be teaching classes until I’m 91. Then I’m going to go play some dominoes.“

8

On teaching seniors: “Growing old definitely is not for sissies. Our seniors are in great shape.”

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

79


With a strong desire to help people live a healthier, better life, Laurel made the fearless decision to open her own aerobics studio. The first year, her studio barely made a dime, but Laurel was having fun, making friends and helping improve her community’s health. A year later, the local hospital’s assistant administrator asked if she’d be interested in working for their new fitness center.

t’s 11:40 a.m. on a Wednesday at St. Mary’s Wellness Fitness Center in Russellville and Laurel Stabler is about to teach her popular Drums Alive class, a collision between Richard Simmons and Ringo Starr — equal parts drumming, dancing and aerobic exercise. Laurel, who is the group fitness and personal training director, straps on her wireless microphone headset and cranks up the music as seniors claim a spot by their exercise ball of choice.

The class stretches, lifting their drumsticks high above their heads. Then the drumming starts — softly at first, then louder as the beat begins to crescendo — until there’s a heavy, rhythmic intensity. Soon the exercise enthusiasts are swaying, circling, stretching and smiling as they hammer away on colorful exercise balls. This is a glimpse into Laurel’s class — a high-octane calorieburning drum line. Certainly, these seniors are living fearlessly as they

join in this pilot program for seniors, but Drums Alive is only as lively as the instructor. aurel’s high-energy enthusiasm has connected people with fitness for 30 years, but she wasn’t always a human dynamo at St. Mary’s Wellness Fitness Center. Originally, Laurel embarked on a career in social work, focusing on patients with mental health problems. But in her day-to-day job, she noticed a trend: Her clients made more progress when they incorporated fitness into their lifestyle.

Today, Laurel works as a Healthways SilverSneakers® Fitness Program instructor and has more than 22 years at St. Mary’s Wellness Fitness Center where she supervises the center’s group fitness and personal training departments and oversees the internship program.

“She’s an entertainer. She’s dynamic,” said Chris Draggs, director of St. Mary’s Wellness Fitness Center. Laurel teaches 30 to 40 classes each month, including the senior-based Drums Alive class. There are 10 or more SilverSneakers classes available each week. rums Alive is a group fitness experience that combines music, rhythm and movement. Once a tool for stability and resistance training, the exercise ball takes on an entirely new role as people pound away on them with drumsticks. “It blew me away,” Laurel said of the first time she saw Drums Alive. “I told myself, ‘This is going to happen.

This is going to work.’” Five years ago, she traveled to Dallas to be certified as a Drums Alive teacher from the program’s founder, who created the musical aerobic mayhem to overcome a hip injury. Laurel plans to teach more instructors how to conduct Drums Alive classes in their locations. ack in class, “I’m a Believer” by The Monkees blasts through the speakers and Laurel leads the drummers as though they were part of the band itself. She calls out instructions, encouragement and keeps the beat while everyone pounds away. It’s clear to see that more than drums are alive in here.

For more information on SilverSneakers, call 1-888-423-4632, or visit silversneakers.com. SilverSneakers® is a registered mark of Healthways, Inc. The SilverSneakers® Fitness Program is provided by Healthways, Inc., an independent company that operates separately from Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield.

Get to know Laurel Stabler On music and exercise: “Music is key. You can take a class and change the way participants feel with music. Group fitness is beat driven. It’s music driven.” On retirement: “I always tell my class that I’ll be teaching classes until I’m 91. Then I’m going to go play some dominoes.“

8

On teaching seniors: “Growing old definitely is not for sissies. Our seniors are in great shape.”

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

79


< < 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 m 12 c 1 g A b / H dL % 6 . 5

< 20080 m

hea

numbers < 1 0 0 dL / g m 0 0 2 < 5.6% HbA1c dL / g m 0 0 2 < 120

^

1c bA

00

g/dL

Know your lth

10080

^

120 80

John Brineman, M.D.

From blood pressure to cholesterol to blood sugar, going to the doctor can involve a bunch of numbers, but what do they all mean, and which ones are really important? John Brineman, M.D., Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield’s Central Region medical director, recently shared his thoughts about knowing your health numbers and gave some tips for getting back to your healthy best. Q: So, I guess the first number we could look at is 1 — having one primary care physician (also called a family doctor or general practitioner). Why is that important? A: Think of your health like a large ship with many moving parts. You have to have a captain of the ship, and your primary care physician (PCP) is that person. A PCP sees the big picture so he or she can steer you in healthy directions. Q: Sticking with 1, should everyone get a checkup once a year? A: I would suggest you ask your PCP what is an appropriate exam schedule for you. He or she can tailor it to your unique circumstances, your risk of illness, your age and your health history.

10

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

Another important number would be the months or years it has been since your last exam. When you call for your first appointment, let them know that information. They will make sure the doctor isn’t rushed during your appointment. Q: So what are common numbers a person’s doctor will look at when doing an exam? A: Well, certainly your doctor is going to look at your cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar (see graphic for normal ranges) but he or she also is going to look at your age, your weight and your level of activity.

Q: What would you say is the most important number? A: I would say that the most important number your doctor will look at is your body mass index (BMI), because it is a pretty good indicator of your overall health. It can give your doctor an idea of what some of those other numbers might be.

Q: So, if I go to the doctor, and he gives me a bunch of these numbers, and I don’t understand them, what should I do? A: A big part of the doctor-patient relationship is asking questions. If you don’t understand, ask until you do. If you get home and you still don’t understand, you can call us and we can put you in touch with a nurse case manager who can help you understand.

Q: So once you have all those numbers, what do you do with them?

Q: Any more important numbers?

A: Working with your doctor, you can set up goals to get your health back on track. Another great set of numbers is 30 minutes of exercise at least three times a week. Do it with a friend or family member. And don’t make it too difficult. It should be an enjoyable experience. But you do want to get your heart rate up.

A: Yes! A very important number is 0. That is what you will pay for preventive services if you are under one of the health plans that took effect with the launch of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Your doctor can tell you which services are needed based on your age and health.

Blood

Pressure

120 – Normal blood pressure 80 TOP NUMBER – Systolic: The pressure when the heart pumps blood out BOTTOM NUMBER – Diastolic: The pressure when the heart fills with blood

CHOLESTEROL

(Measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dl) of blood)

BELOW 200 – ideal total cholesterol 100-129 – ideal LDL (bad) cholesterol 60 and ABOVE – ideal HDL (good) cholesterol

Blood

SUGAR (fasting)

(Measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dl) of blood)

< 100 – normal 100-125 – you are at risk for type 2 diabetes >126 – you may have type 2 diabetes

LIFE expectancy 37th – The United States’ global ranking for life expectancy 76 – Average years U.S. men live

EXERCISE PREVENTIVE SERVICES 30 – minimum of minutes you should exercise

3 – minimum times each week you should exercise

$0 – what you pay for preventive services if you have a health plan sold after March 2010.

81 – Average years U.S. women live 1 in 3 – Number of U.S. adults with high blood pressure 45th – Arkansas’ national ranking for life expectancy 76 – Average life expectancy of Arkansans 31 – Percent of obesity in Arkansas

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

11


< < 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 m 12 c 1 g A b / H dL % 6 . 5

< 20080 m

hea

numbers < 1 0 0 dL / g m 0 0 2 < 5.6% HbA1c dL / g m 0 0 2 < 120

^

1c bA

00

g/dL

Know your lth

10080

^

120 80

John Brineman, M.D.

From blood pressure to cholesterol to blood sugar, going to the doctor can involve a bunch of numbers, but what do they all mean, and which ones are really important? John Brineman, M.D., Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield’s Central Region medical director, recently shared his thoughts about knowing your health numbers and gave some tips for getting back to your healthy best. Q: So, I guess the first number we could look at is 1 — having one primary care physician (also called a family doctor or general practitioner). Why is that important? A: Think of your health like a large ship with many moving parts. You have to have a captain of the ship, and your primary care physician (PCP) is that person. A PCP sees the big picture so he or she can steer you in healthy directions. Q: Sticking with 1, should everyone get a checkup once a year? A: I would suggest you ask your PCP what is an appropriate exam schedule for you. He or she can tailor it to your unique circumstances, your risk of illness, your age and your health history.

10

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

Another important number would be the months or years it has been since your last exam. When you call for your first appointment, let them know that information. They will make sure the doctor isn’t rushed during your appointment. Q: So what are common numbers a person’s doctor will look at when doing an exam? A: Well, certainly your doctor is going to look at your cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar (see graphic for normal ranges) but he or she also is going to look at your age, your weight and your level of activity.

Q: What would you say is the most important number? A: I would say that the most important number your doctor will look at is your body mass index (BMI), because it is a pretty good indicator of your overall health. It can give your doctor an idea of what some of those other numbers might be.

Q: So, if I go to the doctor, and he gives me a bunch of these numbers, and I don’t understand them, what should I do? A: A big part of the doctor-patient relationship is asking questions. If you don’t understand, ask until you do. If you get home and you still don’t understand, you can call us and we can put you in touch with a nurse case manager who can help you understand.

Q: So once you have all those numbers, what do you do with them?

Q: Any more important numbers?

A: Working with your doctor, you can set up goals to get your health back on track. Another great set of numbers is 30 minutes of exercise at least three times a week. Do it with a friend or family member. And don’t make it too difficult. It should be an enjoyable experience. But you do want to get your heart rate up.

A: Yes! A very important number is 0. That is what you will pay for preventive services if you are under one of the health plans that took effect with the launch of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Your doctor can tell you which services are needed based on your age and health.

Blood

Pressure

120 – Normal blood pressure 80 TOP NUMBER – Systolic: The pressure when the heart pumps blood out BOTTOM NUMBER – Diastolic: The pressure when the heart fills with blood

CHOLESTEROL

(Measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dl) of blood)

BELOW 200 – ideal total cholesterol 100-129 – ideal LDL (bad) cholesterol 60 and ABOVE – ideal HDL (good) cholesterol

Blood

SUGAR (fasting)

(Measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dl) of blood)

< 100 – normal 100-125 – you are at risk for type 2 diabetes >126 – you may have type 2 diabetes

LIFE expectancy 37th – The United States’ global ranking for life expectancy 76 – Average years U.S. men live

EXERCISE PREVENTIVE SERVICES 30 – minimum of minutes you should exercise

3 – minimum times each week you should exercise

$0 – what you pay for preventive services if you have a health plan sold after March 2010.

81 – Average years U.S. women live 1 in 3 – Number of U.S. adults with high blood pressure 45th – Arkansas’ national ranking for life expectancy 76 – Average life expectancy of Arkansans 31 – Percent of obesity in Arkansas

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

11


IT’S OITK!

Y C N E G R EME

When to use the emergency room

TO WA

4 reasons

to SEE YOUR

DOCTOR

AND SKIP THE

emergency room 1 2 3 4 12

Your primary care doctor already knows you and your health history which makes him or her the best physician to understand the whole picture, as well as spot reoccurring health issues.

No wait time In the ER, you have to wait until all of those with more serious ailments are taken care of, as well as all those who arrived before you. When you visit your doctor, you’ll have a set appointment time.

You won’t spend as much If you have a copayment, it will be considerably less at your primary care doctor’s than at the ER.

Fewer forms to fill out Your doctor has your insurance, pharmacy, allergies, medication and your medical records all on file. All you need to do is make the appointment.

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

• Suspected heart attack

• Severe shortness of breath

• Stroke

• Choking

• Poisoning

• Broken bones

• Serious burns

• Anything that causes long-term damage

If you can’t get in to see your doctor, consider going to an urgent-care center, retail health clinic or walk-in doctor’s office. These care settings are staffed with doctors, nurses and physician assistants and usually will take your insurance. You’ll get quality care, and you’ll often pay much less than you would for emergency care. Most are open evenings, weekends and holidays, and cost about the same as a doctor visit.

Emergency health care is an important safety net in every community. Unfortunately, sometimes the emergency room (ER) is used like a doctor’s office instead of a place for real emergencies. For your non-emergency situations, here are five good reasons to wait and visit your primary care doctor instead of the ER.

Your doctor knows you

Here are some situations when you should visit the ER:

S R E B M U N Y H T R WO

NOTE 42 .8

per every 100 people

Visits to the emergency room per year

47.1

$

2 ,168

per every 100 people

Visits to the emergency room per year IN THE SOUTH*

The average cost per visit to the EMERGENCY ROOM**

33%

Percentage of ER visits that are not MEDICALLY SERIOUS***

NATIONWIDE*

Get h Will I 3. c . u 0 1 M 0 2 vey, “How t, 201 are Sur ources,cy Departmen C s l e a R c i h d c y Me esear ergen bulator er for Rgnoses in Em m t n A l e a C n l atio Dia tiona CHS, N alth Nages for Top Ten e H f o *CDC/N Char itutes nal Inst his?” Patient o i t a N ** d for T Charge SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU .gov *** cdc

13


IT’S OITK!

Y C N E G R EME

When to use the emergency room

TO WA

4 reasons

to SEE YOUR

DOCTOR

AND SKIP THE

emergency room 1 2 3 4 12

Your primary care doctor already knows you and your health history which makes him or her the best physician to understand the whole picture, as well as spot reoccurring health issues.

No wait time In the ER, you have to wait until all of those with more serious ailments are taken care of, as well as all those who arrived before you. When you visit your doctor, you’ll have a set appointment time.

You won’t spend as much If you have a copayment, it will be considerably less at your primary care doctor’s than at the ER.

Fewer forms to fill out Your doctor has your insurance, pharmacy, allergies, medication and your medical records all on file. All you need to do is make the appointment.

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

• Suspected heart attack

• Severe shortness of breath

• Stroke

• Choking

• Poisoning

• Broken bones

• Serious burns

• Anything that causes long-term damage

If you can’t get in to see your doctor, consider going to an urgent-care center, retail health clinic or walk-in doctor’s office. These care settings are staffed with doctors, nurses and physician assistants and usually will take your insurance. You’ll get quality care, and you’ll often pay much less than you would for emergency care. Most are open evenings, weekends and holidays, and cost about the same as a doctor visit.

Emergency health care is an important safety net in every community. Unfortunately, sometimes the emergency room (ER) is used like a doctor’s office instead of a place for real emergencies. For your non-emergency situations, here are five good reasons to wait and visit your primary care doctor instead of the ER.

Your doctor knows you

Here are some situations when you should visit the ER:

S R E B M U N Y H T R WO

NOTE 42 .8

per every 100 people

Visits to the emergency room per year

47.1

$

2 ,168

per every 100 people

Visits to the emergency room per year IN THE SOUTH*

The average cost per visit to the EMERGENCY ROOM**

33%

Percentage of ER visits that are not MEDICALLY SERIOUS***

NATIONWIDE*

Get h Will I 3. c . u 0 1 M 0 2 vey, “How t, 201 are Sur ources,cy Departmen C s l e a R c i h d c y Me esear ergen bulator er for Rgnoses in Em m t n A l e a C n l atio Dia tiona CHS, N alth Nages for Top Ten e H f o *CDC/N Char itutes nal Inst his?” Patient o i t a N ** d for T Charge SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU .gov *** cdc

13


Your Personal

NOTE: Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise regimen.

Trainer Be your own

Front lunges: Stand with your feet hip-width apart and take a large step forward with right foot, bringing the left knee close to the floor but never touching, with your right knee at 90 degrees and in line with your ankle. Push off with your heel to return to the start. Repeat on the left side.

tricep dips

Many of us want to get healthier, but it’s hard to know how to start. Resistance training, along with cardiovascular training and proper nutrition, is a great way to begin.

FRONT LUNGES

Tricep dips: Start by sitting on the edge of your chair, with your hands facing forward on the edge. Keep your arms straight and your knees at 90 degrees. Then, slide forward off the chair, bend your elbows, dip your body downward with your elbows back, shoulders down and back barely skimming the chair. Finally, straighten your arms to return to start.

What are the different forms of training? Cardiovascular training increases your heart rate, and includes things like running, walking, swimming and bicycling. Resistance training helps strengthen your muscles and includes lifting weights and using your own weight to challenge your muscles. If you’re new to resistance training, it can be pretty daunting. You can begin your resistance training in the comfort of your own home with this beginner’s workout. All you need is a chair or bench and two soup cans or dumbbells.

SIT & STANDS

Warm up: Take a 10-minute walk or do some leg swings, arm swings and jumping jacks to elevate your heart rate and warm up your muscles. Do each exercise for 10-12 repetitions, moving quickly to the next exercise. After you complete all exercises, start your circuit again for a total of 2-4 times through — depending on your fitness level. Sit & stands: With legs shoulder-width apart, arms straight out in front, begin to slowly sit then stand quickly, barely letting your bottom hit the chair or bench. Be careful to not hunch your body forward. Wall pushups: Place your hands on the wall, slightly wider than your shoulders, angle yourself against the wall for pushups, keeping your body straight (don’t let your back arch). Rear leg lift: Stand holding onto the back of a chair or a wall, and slowly raise your leg with your toes facing the floor, never arching your back, keeping your shoulders back and your chest up.

WALL PUSHUPS

14

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

Heather Iacobacci-Miller is an ISSA-certified fitness trainer, an RRCA-certified running coach and an Arkansas Blue Cross employee.

Bicep curls: Stand or sit holding cans or dumbbells in your hands with your arms straight and palms forward. Keep your elbows close to your body and slowly curl your arms up, stopping before the weights touch your shoulders, then slowly lower back to the start.

shoulder press

shoulder press: Stand or sit and with arms bent like a goal post, weights in hands, palms facing forward, and slowly straighten your right arm up, then return to the start and raise your left arm.

Always end a workout with gentle stretches for arms and legs.

This is your

brain…

on the COUCH We all know being a couch potato isn’t good, but a recent study hints that being lazy changes your brain, and could increase your risk of heart disease. The study, recently published in “The Journal of Comparative Neurology,” used two groups of rats — one with exercise wheels and one without. After three months, scientists looked

at the part of the brain that controls breathing and blood vessels. This part of the brain is similar in rats and people. The scientists found that the lazy rats had far too many nerve cells in this area of the brain. They suspect that this may make the brain send too many signals to blood vessels, increasing blood pressure and leading to heart disease. Obviously, more research is needed, but it gives us all one more reason to get up and get moving!

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

15


Your Personal

NOTE: Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise regimen.

Trainer Be your own

Front lunges: Stand with your feet hip-width apart and take a large step forward with right foot, bringing the left knee close to the floor but never touching, with your right knee at 90 degrees and in line with your ankle. Push off with your heel to return to the start. Repeat on the left side.

tricep dips

Many of us want to get healthier, but it’s hard to know how to start. Resistance training, along with cardiovascular training and proper nutrition, is a great way to begin.

FRONT LUNGES

Tricep dips: Start by sitting on the edge of your chair, with your hands facing forward on the edge. Keep your arms straight and your knees at 90 degrees. Then, slide forward off the chair, bend your elbows, dip your body downward with your elbows back, shoulders down and back barely skimming the chair. Finally, straighten your arms to return to start.

What are the different forms of training? Cardiovascular training increases your heart rate, and includes things like running, walking, swimming and bicycling. Resistance training helps strengthen your muscles and includes lifting weights and using your own weight to challenge your muscles. If you’re new to resistance training, it can be pretty daunting. You can begin your resistance training in the comfort of your own home with this beginner’s workout. All you need is a chair or bench and two soup cans or dumbbells.

SIT & STANDS

Warm up: Take a 10-minute walk or do some leg swings, arm swings and jumping jacks to elevate your heart rate and warm up your muscles. Do each exercise for 10-12 repetitions, moving quickly to the next exercise. After you complete all exercises, start your circuit again for a total of 2-4 times through — depending on your fitness level. Sit & stands: With legs shoulder-width apart, arms straight out in front, begin to slowly sit then stand quickly, barely letting your bottom hit the chair or bench. Be careful to not hunch your body forward. Wall pushups: Place your hands on the wall, slightly wider than your shoulders, angle yourself against the wall for pushups, keeping your body straight (don’t let your back arch). Rear leg lift: Stand holding onto the back of a chair or a wall, and slowly raise your leg with your toes facing the floor, never arching your back, keeping your shoulders back and your chest up.

WALL PUSHUPS

14

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

Heather Iacobacci-Miller is an ISSA-certified fitness trainer, an RRCA-certified running coach and an Arkansas Blue Cross employee.

Bicep curls: Stand or sit holding cans or dumbbells in your hands with your arms straight and palms forward. Keep your elbows close to your body and slowly curl your arms up, stopping before the weights touch your shoulders, then slowly lower back to the start.

shoulder press

shoulder press: Stand or sit and with arms bent like a goal post, weights in hands, palms facing forward, and slowly straighten your right arm up, then return to the start and raise your left arm.

Always end a workout with gentle stretches for arms and legs.

This is your

brain…

on the COUCH We all know being a couch potato isn’t good, but a recent study hints that being lazy changes your brain, and could increase your risk of heart disease. The study, recently published in “The Journal of Comparative Neurology,” used two groups of rats — one with exercise wheels and one without. After three months, scientists looked

at the part of the brain that controls breathing and blood vessels. This part of the brain is similar in rats and people. The scientists found that the lazy rats had far too many nerve cells in this area of the brain. They suspect that this may make the brain send too many signals to blood vessels, increasing blood pressure and leading to heart disease. Obviously, more research is needed, but it gives us all one more reason to get up and get moving!

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

15


Our new discount ® program, Blue365 ! If you like Reebok fitness equipment, Nutrisystem, Jenny Craig, Sprint telecommunications, Beltone hearing aids, Heathway’s fitness centers, EMindful online wellness webinars, or Fairmont Hotels and Resorts, you will find these, and many more great deals, through our new discount program, Blue365! Blue365®, sponsored by participating Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies, helps you stay healthier — for less! Blue365 is free to all members of Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Health Advantage, BlueAdvantage Administrators of Arkansas

Not-so-natural

thyroid supplements

and the Federal Employee Program Service Benefit Plan. And because it is a national Blue program, you can enjoy these discounts when you travel! Blue365 offers access to a wide range of savings from top health and wellness brands around the country, plus some of your favorite local companies. You’ll see weekly “Featured Deals” and long-term “Ongoing Deals” on healthy products, along with discounts on health and fitness clubs, weight-loss programs, healthy travel experiences and so much more. Joining Blue365 is simple. Just go to one of our websites (see page 23) and select the “members”

Feeling tired, cold and gaining weight? If you think your thyroid may be to blame, you could be right, but check with your doctor before you head to the pharmacy.

section. Then go to the “Member Discount Programs” link. Once you are on the Blue365 site, you can enter your email and member ID number to register. Now you can enjoy our great health and wellness deals! And Blue365 makes it easy for you to find out about weekly “Featured Deals” by sending the news right to your email. Either way, you’ll get some of the best healthy savings around!

Buying a Blue365 deal is easy: If you see a “Buy Now” button, that means you’ll be able to purchase your deal directly on the Blue365 website. We’ll email a voucher right to your inbox as soon as you purchase it.

If you have questions, you can email Blue365 at support@blue365deals.com or call 1-855-511-BLUE.

If you see a “Redeem Now” button, you’ll be directed to a Blue365 vendor’s website where you’ll find special savings offered only to Blue365 members. There, you’ll be able to get either a coupon code to use on that website or a printable coupon to redeem at a specified retail location. Blue365 Deals are not valid for cash back. They can’t be combined with other promotions. They must be used in one transaction. They don’t cover tax or gratuity. For more details, please check the Terms of Use on Blue365’s website.

16

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

A recent review of 10 common dietary supplements for thyroid found actual thyroid hormone in nine of the samples – a big problem if you take them when you don’t have a thyroid disorder. In some cases the thyroid hormone was equal to actual prescribed dosages. What could it hurt? Well, if you do need medication for a thyroid disorder, and take a supplement before you are tested, your test could come back as normal and keep you from getting the right medication, or getting it at the right level. If you don’t need the medication, a test could come back with elevated levels, prompting your doctor to prescribe medication that would do the opposite of what you needed. You also could end up damaging your thyroid with continued use. Check with your doctor before taking a supplement. You also should bring any over-the-counter medications and supplements with you to appointments. SOURCE: Thyroid journal

Blood

pressure

UP?

Soak up

somE sun ! You know how good you feel when the sun warms your skin? Well, it turns out that a dose of those golden rays can help lower your blood pressure. In a recent study, healthy volunteers exposed to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation for 30 minutes showed a small but significant drop in their blood pressure. A control group exposed to light and heat with no UVA did not experience the same drop. UVA exposure causes nitric oxide in the skin to release into the bloodstream. This causes arteries to widen, and lowers blood pressure. However, if you have high blood pressure, don’t just rely on the sun … see your doctor. Don’t forget to use sunscreen! Source: The Journal of Investigative Dermatology

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

17


Our new discount ® program, Blue365 ! If you like Reebok fitness equipment, Nutrisystem, Jenny Craig, Sprint telecommunications, Beltone hearing aids, Heathway’s fitness centers, EMindful online wellness webinars, or Fairmont Hotels and Resorts, you will find these, and many more great deals, through our new discount program, Blue365! Blue365®, sponsored by participating Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies, helps you stay healthier — for less! Blue365 is free to all members of Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Health Advantage, BlueAdvantage Administrators of Arkansas

Not-so-natural

thyroid supplements

and the Federal Employee Program Service Benefit Plan. And because it is a national Blue program, you can enjoy these discounts when you travel! Blue365 offers access to a wide range of savings from top health and wellness brands around the country, plus some of your favorite local companies. You’ll see weekly “Featured Deals” and long-term “Ongoing Deals” on healthy products, along with discounts on health and fitness clubs, weight-loss programs, healthy travel experiences and so much more. Joining Blue365 is simple. Just go to one of our websites (see page 23) and select the “members”

Feeling tired, cold and gaining weight? If you think your thyroid may be to blame, you could be right, but check with your doctor before you head to the pharmacy.

section. Then go to the “Member Discount Programs” link. Once you are on the Blue365 site, you can enter your email and member ID number to register. Now you can enjoy our great health and wellness deals! And Blue365 makes it easy for you to find out about weekly “Featured Deals” by sending the news right to your email. Either way, you’ll get some of the best healthy savings around!

Buying a Blue365 deal is easy: If you see a “Buy Now” button, that means you’ll be able to purchase your deal directly on the Blue365 website. We’ll email a voucher right to your inbox as soon as you purchase it.

If you have questions, you can email Blue365 at support@blue365deals.com or call 1-855-511-BLUE.

If you see a “Redeem Now” button, you’ll be directed to a Blue365 vendor’s website where you’ll find special savings offered only to Blue365 members. There, you’ll be able to get either a coupon code to use on that website or a printable coupon to redeem at a specified retail location. Blue365 Deals are not valid for cash back. They can’t be combined with other promotions. They must be used in one transaction. They don’t cover tax or gratuity. For more details, please check the Terms of Use on Blue365’s website.

16

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

A recent review of 10 common dietary supplements for thyroid found actual thyroid hormone in nine of the samples – a big problem if you take them when you don’t have a thyroid disorder. In some cases the thyroid hormone was equal to actual prescribed dosages. What could it hurt? Well, if you do need medication for a thyroid disorder, and take a supplement before you are tested, your test could come back as normal and keep you from getting the right medication, or getting it at the right level. If you don’t need the medication, a test could come back with elevated levels, prompting your doctor to prescribe medication that would do the opposite of what you needed. You also could end up damaging your thyroid with continued use. Check with your doctor before taking a supplement. You also should bring any over-the-counter medications and supplements with you to appointments. SOURCE: Thyroid journal

Blood

pressure

UP?

Soak up

somE sun ! You know how good you feel when the sun warms your skin? Well, it turns out that a dose of those golden rays can help lower your blood pressure. In a recent study, healthy volunteers exposed to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation for 30 minutes showed a small but significant drop in their blood pressure. A control group exposed to light and heat with no UVA did not experience the same drop. UVA exposure causes nitric oxide in the skin to release into the bloodstream. This causes arteries to widen, and lowers blood pressure. However, if you have high blood pressure, don’t just rely on the sun … see your doctor. Don’t forget to use sunscreen! Source: The Journal of Investigative Dermatology

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

17


LOCAL flavor Healthy eating

made delicious “Good food” and “healthy food” are not mutually exclusive terms. It is possible to cook healthy dishes that taste good — even to the point of being considered comfort food. Don’t believe it? Just ask Jason Knapp, executive chef of the Green Leaf Grill in downtown Little Rock. “The key, in my opinion, is simple cooking,” said Jason. What constitutes “simple cooking?”

HEALTHY

Cooking Don’t fry! Give these techniques a try!

The Green Leaf Grill is a new restaurant located on the first floor of the Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield building at Sixth and Gaines in downtown Little Rock. It is a full-service restaurant and open for breakfast and lunch to the general public.

“Simple techniques and quality ingredients,” said Jason. “If you take a great vegetable and add a few things to it and know some simple cooking techniques — how to sear, how to braise, how to stew properly — then you can make great food out of very little.” Case in point: Brussels sprouts, the vegetable most kids (and many adults) dread to see on their dinner plate, has become a huge hit at the Green Leaf Grill. “We toss them in olive oil, salt, pepper, onion and garlic and then we roast them in the oven,” Jason said.

Jason has put a healthy twist on some old favorites — like Sloppy Joes. “We make turkey and portobello mushroom Sloppy Joes,” he said. “We use ground turkey that’s been cooked in a little olive oil. Then we add the onions, bell peppers, garlic, Portobello mushrooms, tomato sauce and some homemade chicken stock. There’s not a lot to it, but it’s Sloppy Joes.” “We want to have that comfort food aspect to our restaurant,” he said. “We just want to make it healthier.”

SEARING — is a cooking technique used in grilling, baking, braising and roasting in which the surface of the food (usually meat) is cooked at a high temperature to form a caramelized crust. Technique: Allow the meat to come to room temperature. Using vegetable oil or peanut oil (olive oil and butter tend to have a low smoke point) coat the bottom of a pan and place it on the stove on high. When it is hot, place the meat into the pan. Once the meat starts to color it will brown quickly — pay attention. When one side is seared, turn it over. BRAISING — uses both moist and dry heat and relies on heat, time, and moisture to break down the tough connective tissue in meat. It’s ideal for cooking tougher cuts. Technique: Sear the food to brown its surface. Then place it in a dish with a small amount of liquid that has an acidic component (like tomato juice, beer or wine) and a stock component. Cover and cook at a very low simmer until tender.

Green Leaf Grill executive chef Jason Knapp (right) and sous chef Jack Daugherty cook up healthy food options.

18

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

STEWING — is slowly cooking food in its own juices with a minimum amount of moistening agent like stock, wine, beer or sauce. It is especially effective with lower-quality cuts of meat. Technique: Cut the food in small pieces and place in a pot with the liquid called for in your recipe. Cover the pot and simmer on low heat until the food is tender. It may be necessary to add liquid while cooking to keep the stew moist.

Healthy Choices after-school program in rural Arkansas Fighting childhood obesity and hunger may seem like two different tasks, but the Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas is supporting one program that is helping students overcome both. In 2013, the Foundation awarded the Save the Children charity a $40,000 grant for its Healthy Choices after-school program that reaches children in eight of Arkansas’ rural schools. In 2014, the program received additional funding from the foundation. The Healthy Choices program provides healthy snacks every day to more than 600 children in communities where families typically have limited access to fresh foods. Students also participate in aerobic games that promote teamwork and supporting each other, helping them improve their fitness levels while also building their confidence.

According to the most recent data from the 2011 National Survey of Children’s Health, Arkansas ranks 6th for obesity among 10- to 17-year-olds. On top of that, 30 percent of Arkansas’ rural children live in poverty. Children in Save the Children’s Healthy Choices programs enjoy a snack each day in the after-school program.

Children in the Save the Children after-school program at Augusta Elementary exercise outdoors.

“One thing we’re seeing,” said Lauren Faehl, Save the Children Arkansas program director, “is that the kids are becoming advocates for fruits and veggies. The program introduces them to new foods, and now they’re asking their parents for cucumbers and kiwis.” Save the Children hopes that by educating students on nutrition, providing them regular physical activity and engaging their families, students will learn to make healthy choices that reduce their risk for long-term chronic health problems. That’s definitely an agenda worth supporting! To learn more about the program, visit the Save the Children website: savethechildren.org

2013-2014 schools participating in the Healthy Choice after-school program: Earle Elementary Earle, AR

Stewart Elementary Forrest City, AR

William Jefferson Clinton Primary Hope, AR

Augusta Elementary Augusta, AR

Osceola Elementary Osceola, AR

Pine Haven Elementary Bauxite, AR

Miller Elementary & Miller Primary West Helena, AR SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

19


LOCAL flavor Healthy eating

made delicious “Good food” and “healthy food” are not mutually exclusive terms. It is possible to cook healthy dishes that taste good — even to the point of being considered comfort food. Don’t believe it? Just ask Jason Knapp, executive chef of the Green Leaf Grill in downtown Little Rock. “The key, in my opinion, is simple cooking,” said Jason. What constitutes “simple cooking?”

HEALTHY

Cooking Don’t fry! Give these techniques a try!

The Green Leaf Grill is a new restaurant located on the first floor of the Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield building at Sixth and Gaines in downtown Little Rock. It is a full-service restaurant and open for breakfast and lunch to the general public.

“Simple techniques and quality ingredients,” said Jason. “If you take a great vegetable and add a few things to it and know some simple cooking techniques — how to sear, how to braise, how to stew properly — then you can make great food out of very little.” Case in point: Brussels sprouts, the vegetable most kids (and many adults) dread to see on their dinner plate, has become a huge hit at the Green Leaf Grill. “We toss them in olive oil, salt, pepper, onion and garlic and then we roast them in the oven,” Jason said.

Jason has put a healthy twist on some old favorites — like Sloppy Joes. “We make turkey and portobello mushroom Sloppy Joes,” he said. “We use ground turkey that’s been cooked in a little olive oil. Then we add the onions, bell peppers, garlic, Portobello mushrooms, tomato sauce and some homemade chicken stock. There’s not a lot to it, but it’s Sloppy Joes.” “We want to have that comfort food aspect to our restaurant,” he said. “We just want to make it healthier.”

SEARING — is a cooking technique used in grilling, baking, braising and roasting in which the surface of the food (usually meat) is cooked at a high temperature to form a caramelized crust. Technique: Allow the meat to come to room temperature. Using vegetable oil or peanut oil (olive oil and butter tend to have a low smoke point) coat the bottom of a pan and place it on the stove on high. When it is hot, place the meat into the pan. Once the meat starts to color it will brown quickly — pay attention. When one side is seared, turn it over. BRAISING — uses both moist and dry heat and relies on heat, time, and moisture to break down the tough connective tissue in meat. It’s ideal for cooking tougher cuts. Technique: Sear the food to brown its surface. Then place it in a dish with a small amount of liquid that has an acidic component (like tomato juice, beer or wine) and a stock component. Cover and cook at a very low simmer until tender.

Green Leaf Grill executive chef Jason Knapp (right) and sous chef Jack Daugherty cook up healthy food options.

18

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

STEWING — is slowly cooking food in its own juices with a minimum amount of moistening agent like stock, wine, beer or sauce. It is especially effective with lower-quality cuts of meat. Technique: Cut the food in small pieces and place in a pot with the liquid called for in your recipe. Cover the pot and simmer on low heat until the food is tender. It may be necessary to add liquid while cooking to keep the stew moist.

Healthy Choices after-school program in rural Arkansas Fighting childhood obesity and hunger may seem like two different tasks, but the Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas is supporting one program that is helping students overcome both. In 2013, the Foundation awarded the Save the Children charity a $40,000 grant for its Healthy Choices after-school program that reaches children in eight of Arkansas’ rural schools. In 2014, the program received additional funding from the foundation. The Healthy Choices program provides healthy snacks every day to more than 600 children in communities where families typically have limited access to fresh foods. Students also participate in aerobic games that promote teamwork and supporting each other, helping them improve their fitness levels while also building their confidence.

According to the most recent data from the 2011 National Survey of Children’s Health, Arkansas ranks 6th for obesity among 10- to 17-year-olds. On top of that, 30 percent of Arkansas’ rural children live in poverty. Children in Save the Children’s Healthy Choices programs enjoy a snack each day in the after-school program.

Children in the Save the Children after-school program at Augusta Elementary exercise outdoors.

“One thing we’re seeing,” said Lauren Faehl, Save the Children Arkansas program director, “is that the kids are becoming advocates for fruits and veggies. The program introduces them to new foods, and now they’re asking their parents for cucumbers and kiwis.” Save the Children hopes that by educating students on nutrition, providing them regular physical activity and engaging their families, students will learn to make healthy choices that reduce their risk for long-term chronic health problems. That’s definitely an agenda worth supporting! To learn more about the program, visit the Save the Children website: savethechildren.org

2013-2014 schools participating in the Healthy Choice after-school program: Earle Elementary Earle, AR

Stewart Elementary Forrest City, AR

William Jefferson Clinton Primary Hope, AR

Augusta Elementary Augusta, AR

Osceola Elementary Osceola, AR

Pine Haven Elementary Bauxite, AR

Miller Elementary & Miller Primary West Helena, AR SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

19


Arkansas Blue Cross President and CEO named to Federal Reserve Bank board of directors

NEWS

Arkansas Blue Cross chief information officer on national committee to improve health care information technology Technology is changing the world and the health care industry is certainly no exception. As handwritten notes and diagnoses give way to computerized charting, Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield’s own Joseph Smith, chief information officer, is on the forefront of these changes. Last year, Joe was on the executive steering committee for the 2013 Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), which released its recommendations in December on how to shape the next generation of health care information exchange (Health IT). The WEDI Foundation, a leading authority on the use of Health IT to improve sharing health care information, developed the report in partnership with more than 200 volunteer experts. Joe also was on the committee for the 1993 WEDI Report, which led to many advancements in the health care industry, including standardized claims forms and the The full Health Insurance Portability and report is Accountability Act (HIPAA). The 2013 WEDI Report is the culmination of a nine-month, public-private effort and will serve as a new roadmap for Health IT throughout the next decade.

available at wedi.org.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, members of the board of directors are selected because they are familiar with the economic and credit conditions of their respective regions. “My recent election to the Little Rock Branch of the Federal Reserve board is interesting and exciting,” said Mark. “I look forward to the opportunity to engage in economic discussions with business leaders from different industries and backgrounds as well as share my perspective related to health care economics.” Mark’s appointment became effective on January 1.

Joe Smith speaks to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. regarding the 2013 WEDI Report recommendations.

Arkansas Blue Cross employees donated 1,451 pounds of goods to Goodwill Industries of Arkansas during their Dress for Success campaign.

20

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

Mark White

2014 Central Arkansas Heart Walk

Arkansas Blue Cross employees donate to help others Dress for Success

®

For the better part of four decades, Mark White, the president and chief executive officer of Arkansas Blue Cross, has been a large part of the company’s financial success. The region’s influential economic body — the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis — took notice. Based on his sound track record, Mark was appointed to the board of directors for the Little Rock branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

Employees collected business clothing, handbags, electronics and other items.

Last year, Goodwill served 8,370 people in Arkansas and placed 1,280 people into competitive employment. In fact, 96 percent of Goodwill’s budget came from the sale of donated goods.

CENTRAL ARKANSAS

Heart Walk

Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield will be well represented at the 2014 Central Arkansas Heart Walk on Saturday, April 26, at Burns Park in North Little Rock. Come visit our tent and pledge to “Live Fearless” and be heart

healthy. We hope to see you and your families there! If you are participating in the Blue and You Fitness Challenge you can earn a checkpoint by participating in the Central Arkansas Heart Walk.

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

21


Arkansas Blue Cross President and CEO named to Federal Reserve Bank board of directors

NEWS

Arkansas Blue Cross chief information officer on national committee to improve health care information technology Technology is changing the world and the health care industry is certainly no exception. As handwritten notes and diagnoses give way to computerized charting, Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield’s own Joseph Smith, chief information officer, is on the forefront of these changes. Last year, Joe was on the executive steering committee for the 2013 Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), which released its recommendations in December on how to shape the next generation of health care information exchange (Health IT). The WEDI Foundation, a leading authority on the use of Health IT to improve sharing health care information, developed the report in partnership with more than 200 volunteer experts. Joe also was on the committee for the 1993 WEDI Report, which led to many advancements in the health care industry, including standardized claims forms and the The full Health Insurance Portability and report is Accountability Act (HIPAA). The 2013 WEDI Report is the culmination of a nine-month, public-private effort and will serve as a new roadmap for Health IT throughout the next decade.

available at wedi.org.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, members of the board of directors are selected because they are familiar with the economic and credit conditions of their respective regions. “My recent election to the Little Rock Branch of the Federal Reserve board is interesting and exciting,” said Mark. “I look forward to the opportunity to engage in economic discussions with business leaders from different industries and backgrounds as well as share my perspective related to health care economics.” Mark’s appointment became effective on January 1.

Joe Smith speaks to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. regarding the 2013 WEDI Report recommendations.

Arkansas Blue Cross employees donated 1,451 pounds of goods to Goodwill Industries of Arkansas during their Dress for Success campaign.

20

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

Mark White

2014 Central Arkansas Heart Walk

Arkansas Blue Cross employees donate to help others Dress for Success

®

For the better part of four decades, Mark White, the president and chief executive officer of Arkansas Blue Cross, has been a large part of the company’s financial success. The region’s influential economic body — the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis — took notice. Based on his sound track record, Mark was appointed to the board of directors for the Little Rock branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

Employees collected business clothing, handbags, electronics and other items.

Last year, Goodwill served 8,370 people in Arkansas and placed 1,280 people into competitive employment. In fact, 96 percent of Goodwill’s budget came from the sale of donated goods.

CENTRAL ARKANSAS

Heart Walk

Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield will be well represented at the 2014 Central Arkansas Heart Walk on Saturday, April 26, at Burns Park in North Little Rock. Come visit our tent and pledge to “Live Fearless” and be heart

healthy. We hope to see you and your families there! If you are participating in the Blue and You Fitness Challenge you can earn a checkpoint by participating in the Central Arkansas Heart Walk.

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

21


42 grants A W A RDED

A healthy meal, an outdoor trail, a piece of medical equipment ... they might not seem to have much in common, but to the Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas, the relationship is clear ... they all are ways to improve the health of Arkansans.

The grant recipients for 2014, by geographic area, are:

Northeast

Statewide

Augusta First United Methodist Church — Food pantry and freezer

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Foundation — Physical fitness in public schools Arkansas Department of Health — Improve care for stroke patients Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance — Regional training Arkansas Trauma Education and Research Foundation, Inc. — Research Baptist Health Foundation — Training on breastfeeding Save the Children Federation, Inc.— Health education University of Arkansas at Little Rock — Pediatric simulation models University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) — Establish dental clinical rotations

Augusta


Cherry Valley


Cherry Valley Food Pantry — Boxed meals Cushman


Cushman United Methodist Church — Food bank Jonesboro


East Arkansas Area Agency On Aging — Health education Food Bank of Northeast Arkansas — Food for seniors Oil Trough


City of Oil Trough — Outdoor exercise equipment West Memphis


UAMS — Increase physician assistants

Crittenden Hospital Association — Health education in local churches

Central

Northwest

Little Rock


Centers for Youth and Families — Nutrition and fitness Easter Seals Arkansas — High-risk infant monitoring Gaines House, Inc. — Health education Single Parent Scholarship Fund of Pulaski County — Health education St. Vincent Infirmary Development Foundation — Obstetric simulation lab NORTH Little Rock

Family Service Agency — Electronic medical records

22

The Foundation recently awarded $2,670,346 in grants to 42 programs throughout the state. The Blue & You Foundation was established in 2001 by Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield to support community organizations that are implementing programs to improve the health of Arkansans. In its 12 years of operation, the Blue & You Foundation has awarded nearly $19 million to 423 healthimprovement projects in Arkansas.

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

Cedarville

Cedarville Public Schools — Dental equipment Fayetteville


Fayetteville School District #1— Running/walking tracks Northwest Arkansas Free Health Center — Dental equipment Washington Regional Medical Foundation — Palliative care UAMS Northwest — Medical education Fort Smith


Donald W. Reynolds Cancer Support House — Gas cards for cancer patients

Northwest (cont.)

Southeast (cont.)

Ozark

Nashville


Franklin County Learning Center — Medical supplies

Community First Wellness — Safety programs

Rogers


Prescott


Samaritan House Community Center — Dental supplies

FoodShare and Opportunity Network — Mobile food pantry

Waldron


Waldron School District — Mental health therapist

Southwest Camden

Southern Arkansas University Tech — Certified nursing assistant scholarships

Hope


Our Lady of Good Hope Catholic Church — Food pantry UA Community College at Hope Foundation — Pediatric simulator Hot Springs


Project Hope — Food bank

El Dorado


South Arkansas Community College — Health education UAMS South — New parent education

Southeast

Texarkana


Texarkana, Ark. Police Department — Safety programs The application deadline for the Foundation’s next funding cycle is July 15, 2014. For more information about the grant application process, visit the Foundation website at blueandyoufoundationarkansas.org.

Crossett


Crossett Elementary School — Walking trail DeWitt


Greater Delta Alliance for Health, Inc. — Worksite wellness programs

CUSTOMER SERVICE NUMBERS May we help? For customer service, please call:

LITTLE ROCK Number (501)

TOLL FREE Number

Medi-Pak® members 378-3062 1-800-338-2312 ® Medi-Pak Advantage members 1-877-233-7022 ® Medi-Pak Rx members 1-866-390-3369 Arkansas Blue Cross members 378-2010 1-800-238-8379 • Pharmacy questions 1-800-863-5561 • Specialty Rx pharmacy questions 1-866-295-2779 Arkansas Blue Cross Metallic members (Gold, Silver, Bronze, Catastrophic) 1-800-800-4298 • Pharmacy questions 1-800-969-3983 Health Advantage members 378-2363 1-800-843-1329 • Pharmacy questions 1-800-863-5567 BlueAdvantage members 378-3600 1-888-872-2531 • Pharmacy questions 1-888-293-3748 Federal Employee members 378-2531 1-800-482-6655

Looking for health or dental insurance? We can help! For individuals, families For employer groups*

378-2937 1-800-392-2583 378-3070 1-800-421-1112

*Arkansas Blue Cross, Health Advantage and BlueAdvantage Administrators of Arkansas

Prefer to speak with someone close to home? Call or visit one of our offices near you: • ArkansasBlue

— Little Rock 2612 S. Shackleford Rd., Suite J 1-501-378-2222

• Fayetteville

516 East Millsap Rd., Suite 103

1-800-817-7726

• Fort

Smith 3501 Old Greenwood Rd., Suite 5 1-866-254-9117

• Hot

Springs 100 Greenwood Ave., Suite C

• Jonesboro

707 East Matthews Ave.

• Little

Rock 601 Gaines Street

• ArkansasBlue

— Pine Bluff 509 Mallard Loop Drive

• Texarkana

1710 Arkansas Boulevard

1-800-588-5733 1-800-299-4124 1-800-421-1112 1-800-236-0369 1-800-470-9621

Visit our websites for more information:

arkansasbluecross.com • healthadvantage-hmo.com blueadvantagearkansas.com blueandyoufoundationarkansas.org

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

23


42 grants A W A RDED

A healthy meal, an outdoor trail, a piece of medical equipment ... they might not seem to have much in common, but to the Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas, the relationship is clear ... they all are ways to improve the health of Arkansans.

The grant recipients for 2014, by geographic area, are:

Northeast

Statewide

Augusta First United Methodist Church — Food pantry and freezer

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Foundation — Physical fitness in public schools Arkansas Department of Health — Improve care for stroke patients Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance — Regional training Arkansas Trauma Education and Research Foundation, Inc. — Research Baptist Health Foundation — Training on breastfeeding Save the Children Federation, Inc.— Health education University of Arkansas at Little Rock — Pediatric simulation models University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) — Establish dental clinical rotations

Augusta


Cherry Valley


Cherry Valley Food Pantry — Boxed meals Cushman


Cushman United Methodist Church — Food bank Jonesboro


East Arkansas Area Agency On Aging — Health education Food Bank of Northeast Arkansas — Food for seniors Oil Trough


City of Oil Trough — Outdoor exercise equipment West Memphis


UAMS — Increase physician assistants

Crittenden Hospital Association — Health education in local churches

Central

Northwest

Little Rock


Centers for Youth and Families — Nutrition and fitness Easter Seals Arkansas — High-risk infant monitoring Gaines House, Inc. — Health education Single Parent Scholarship Fund of Pulaski County — Health education St. Vincent Infirmary Development Foundation — Obstetric simulation lab NORTH Little Rock

Family Service Agency — Electronic medical records

22

The Foundation recently awarded $2,670,346 in grants to 42 programs throughout the state. The Blue & You Foundation was established in 2001 by Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield to support community organizations that are implementing programs to improve the health of Arkansans. In its 12 years of operation, the Blue & You Foundation has awarded nearly $19 million to 423 healthimprovement projects in Arkansas.

BLUE & YOU SPRING 2014

Cedarville

Cedarville Public Schools — Dental equipment Fayetteville


Fayetteville School District #1— Running/walking tracks Northwest Arkansas Free Health Center — Dental equipment Washington Regional Medical Foundation — Palliative care UAMS Northwest — Medical education Fort Smith


Donald W. Reynolds Cancer Support House — Gas cards for cancer patients

Northwest (cont.)

Southeast (cont.)

Ozark

Nashville


Franklin County Learning Center — Medical supplies

Community First Wellness — Safety programs

Rogers


Prescott


Samaritan House Community Center — Dental supplies

FoodShare and Opportunity Network — Mobile food pantry

Waldron


Waldron School District — Mental health therapist

Southwest Camden

Southern Arkansas University Tech — Certified nursing assistant scholarships

Hope


Our Lady of Good Hope Catholic Church — Food pantry UA Community College at Hope Foundation — Pediatric simulator Hot Springs


Project Hope — Food bank

El Dorado


South Arkansas Community College — Health education UAMS South — New parent education

Southeast

Texarkana


Texarkana, Ark. Police Department — Safety programs The application deadline for the Foundation’s next funding cycle is July 15, 2014. For more information about the grant application process, visit the Foundation website at blueandyoufoundationarkansas.org.

Crossett


Crossett Elementary School — Walking trail DeWitt


Greater Delta Alliance for Health, Inc. — Worksite wellness programs

CUSTOMER SERVICE NUMBERS May we help? For customer service, please call:

LITTLE ROCK Number (501)

TOLL FREE Number

Medi-Pak® members 378-3062 1-800-338-2312 ® Medi-Pak Advantage members 1-877-233-7022 ® Medi-Pak Rx members 1-866-390-3369 Arkansas Blue Cross members 378-2010 1-800-238-8379 • Pharmacy questions 1-800-863-5561 • Specialty Rx pharmacy questions 1-866-295-2779 Arkansas Blue Cross Metallic members (Gold, Silver, Bronze, Catastrophic) 1-800-800-4298 • Pharmacy questions 1-800-969-3983 Health Advantage members 378-2363 1-800-843-1329 • Pharmacy questions 1-800-863-5567 BlueAdvantage members 378-3600 1-888-872-2531 • Pharmacy questions 1-888-293-3748 Federal Employee members 378-2531 1-800-482-6655

Looking for health or dental insurance? We can help! For individuals, families For employer groups*

378-2937 1-800-392-2583 378-3070 1-800-421-1112

*Arkansas Blue Cross, Health Advantage and BlueAdvantage Administrators of Arkansas

Prefer to speak with someone close to home? Call or visit one of our offices near you: • ArkansasBlue

— Little Rock 2612 S. Shackleford Rd., Suite J 1-501-378-2222

• Fayetteville

516 East Millsap Rd., Suite 103

1-800-817-7726

• Fort

Smith 3501 Old Greenwood Rd., Suite 5 1-866-254-9117

• Hot

Springs 100 Greenwood Ave., Suite C

• Jonesboro

707 East Matthews Ave.

• Little

Rock 601 Gaines Street

• ArkansasBlue

— Pine Bluff 509 Mallard Loop Drive

• Texarkana

1710 Arkansas Boulevard

1-800-588-5733 1-800-299-4124 1-800-421-1112 1-800-236-0369 1-800-470-9621

Visit our websites for more information:

arkansasbluecross.com • healthadvantage-hmo.com blueadvantagearkansas.com blueandyoufoundationarkansas.org

SPRING 2014 BLUE & YOU

23


SPRING 2014 A publication for the policyholders of the Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield family of companies

Discover Generosity: The First Annual “Give and Get in!” Fundraiser Enjoy an exciting and scientific day at the Museum of Discovery while helping others Live Fearless!

Discover the amazing world of science and give back to your local community all in one fun-filled day. Visit the Museum of Discovery on May 3 and bring one of our suggested donations* (see list of items at right) or make a monetary donation and you’ll get in for free! It’s all part of Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield’s “Give and Get In!” fundraiser for the Second Chance Ranch. Second Chance Ranch is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit program that provides abused, neglected and atrisk youth a caring home while working to resolve any crises in their lives and return them home. MPI 2174 3/14

When WheRE

Saturday, May 3 Noon to 5 p.m. Museum of Discovery 500 President Clinton Ave. #150 Little Rock, AR 72201

page

8

*Suggested Donations:

Toiletries Cleaning supplies School supplies

New clothing items Seasonal items

Welcome to Arkansas Blue Cross!

Know your numbers

page

page

4

10

4 reasons to see your doctor and skip the ER page

12

Blue & You - Spring 2014  

Welcome to Arkansas Blue Cross! - p4 Living Fearless: Fitness instructor Laurel Stabler - p8 Know your numbers - p10 4 reasons to see your d...

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