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BLOOM

ISSUE 3 | FALL '19 | FREE

NUTRITION for FERTILITY

OVERWHELMED WITH LIFE? ASK LEESA!

ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS WHAT ARE THEY & WHAT ARE THEIR EFFECTS DURING PREGNANCY?

FERTILITY & ACCUPUNCTURE

ARE YOU GETTING ENOUGH

IRON?

CLIMBING OUT OF THE

DARKNESS

CATCHING BABIESÂ IN UGANDA A MIDWIFE'S JOURNEY IN UGANDA

COVER IMAGE BY LITTLE WHITE ROSE PHOTOGRAPHY


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Birth Announcements SEND

YOUR

BIRTH

ANNOUNCEMENTS TO

BLOOMFAMILYWELLNESS@GMAIL.COM

TO

BE

PUBLISHED

IN

BLOOM MAGAZINE

THATCHER WILLIAM LOWES May 28, 2019 at 1:44am

7lbs 5oz, 51cm. Born at the Pomeroy Hotel in Dawson Creek with midwives Haley and Sonje. Welcomed by mommy Jenessa Lowes and daddy Brandon Lowes.

Photo by Catharine Anne Photography

BENJAMIN TANNER ZINGRE June 4th, 2019 at 3:39pm

8 lbs 11oz, 55.25cm. Born at the Dawson Creek & District Hospital supported by Labours Eve doula Karli. Welcomed by mommy Jade and daddy Cliff. Younger brother to Theo Zingre.

Photo by Captured By Katie

HANNAH LYNN CURTIS June 9th, 2019 at 11:51am

8 lbs 2 oz. Born at the Dawson Creek & District Hospital. Welcomed by mommy and daddy, Todd and Michelle, and big brother Holden.

Photo by Captured By Katie


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BLOOM M A G A Z I N E

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NORTHERN B.C FAMILY FOCUSED MAGAZINE

CATCHING BABIES IN UGANDA

02 ASK LEESA How and why to step back from obligations and work to maintain your mental and physical health

04 CLOTH DIAPERING Dawson Creeks only cloth diapering retailer and cleaning service

12 ACUPUNCTURE AND FERTILITY Fertility problems and infertility may be more common than you think. A recent study shows that 11.5% to 15.7% of Canadian couples experience infertility. That's almost one in six couples.

24 IRON? ARE YOU GETTING ENOUGH?

Feeling tired all the time? It could be more than just the exhaustion of your daily grind. Read on to learn about the signs and symptoms of iron deficiency.

30 EXCLUSIVE!

ENDOCRINE DISTRIBUTORS What are they and what are their effects during pregnancy?

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NUTRITION FOR FERTILITY

FERTILITY AND ACCUPUNCTURE

Got “baby” on the brain? Prepping for pregnancy can be crucial for optimal fertility.

Fertility problems and infertility may be more common than you think. A recent study shows that 11.5% to 15.7% of Canadian couples experience infertility. That's almost one in six couples.

36 CLIMBING OUT OF THE DARKNESS A story of overcoming postpartum depression

bloomfamilywellness@gmail.coim

www.bloomfamilywellness.com


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Dear Leesa, I feel like I have taken on too much with work/life commitments and now it is negatively impacting my mental health. How do I step back from all of these commitments? This would entail dropping some major projects that no one else is going to take over. Signed, Overwhelmed With Life

Ask L e e s a Leesa Leroy is a counsellor, a teacher, a wanderer, an academic, a feisty woman, and a mother. She will be contributing to the “Ask Leesa” column in Bloom’s magazine. This is a space where folks can submit questions, comments, or concerns pertaining to parenthood, mental health, or life in general. Leesa will do her best to respond both factually, and empathically. Please submit to: leesaleroy@hotmail.com

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Dear Overwhelmed With Life Combining scientific research with decades of experience as a medical physician, Dr. Gabor Mate discusses the stress-disease connection in his book When the Body Says No . Disease and mental illness can be the body’s way of saying 'no' to what the mind cannot or will not acknowledge. If you are so overwhelmed by work and life tasks that your mental wellbeing is negatively impacted, I can only imagine what the stress is doing to your physical body. Cortisol is our body’s main stress hormone; it is what triggers the “fight-flightfreeze” response when our body believes it is in danger. Although your body is not in actual danger, too much stress creates too much cortisol in your body. Too much cortisol in your body can lead to a number of health problems including: anxiety, depression, insomnia, headaches and digestive complications. Lack of balance in a person’s life can often lead to excess stress. If we look at a whole person in terms of having physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional realms, if one or more of these quadrants are under or over utilized, it can throw the whole person out of whack. If a person solely focuses on their mental well-being, and neglects the other three areas, for example, they will still find themselves struggling as all four quadrants of a person need to be nourished in order to be healthy. One way to nourish oneself is through self-care. Self-care refers to an individual actively caring for one’s well-being, health and happiness. How a person does this is unique to them. Common selfcare activities may include: having a relaxing bath, reading a book, listening to music, or going to the gym. Self-care often keeps people in isolation, which can spiral mental health issues to become worse and more complicated. Which is why it is also important to discuss the importance of community care. Community care is realizing you are not a burden, and allowing other people to help care for you in times of stress or overwhelming mental health crisis. Community care is referring to friends, family, coworkers or acquaintances checking in on you. Community care is utilizing professional supports, like your midwife, family doctor, psychiatrist, ER nurses, counsellors, or the mental health and addictions team at the public health office. Blavity.com states “solitary revitalization is superhuman. 2

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It is yet another expectation that we can do more than we were built for.” You are encouraged to ask for personal support and create a care team for yourself. more

for

others,

while

Hi, My name is Michelle and I recently gave birth to a beautiful baby girl named Hannah.  

simultaneously

everybody to take a step back and take time for themselves, but if your mental health is adversely impacted, your body is telling you to slow down and take some time for 'you'. Somehow you need to be realistic about what you can and cannot do and need to let some things go, even if you know nobody will pick up the slack. The process in which you decide to give things up depends on you. Perhaps you can rate the importance of each commitment on a scale of 1-10 and give up the tasks that are attributed with a lower numbered score, or give up the commitments that are causing you the most stress currently. Keep in mind that saying to

everything

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is you

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BLESSING NEST

neglecting yourself. I would not recommend to

'yes'

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Hanna's

It sounds like you are a big hearted person who does

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to

exist,

opportunities that may give you joy and pleasure and may even reduce your levels of stress. Saying 'no' is a skill that many people lack. The earlier a person learns to say 'no', the better.

I'd like to share with you some experiences with my birth journey in Dawson Creek.   This little community has so many wonderful resources, fueled by so many passionate, knowledgeable women. I’ve received a wide array of services from Bloom Pregnancy and Wellness Clinic, to the personal,  professional care at Dawson Creek and District Hospital and fabulous Dr. Popa.   The care has been outstanding!   However, I would like to share my experience with a gem of an entrepreneur.   This quirky lady has a passion for celebrating and embracing the growth of our children.  Her name is Oline Bridges and she has a multitude of services to offer.   Oline is a Registered Prenatal Yoga Instructor and holds yoga classes at Deep Physio.   I joined her prenatal class, where her care and enthusiasm for each women was tangible.  I felt focused and centered, she taught me to trust and listen to  my body.   Oline then welcomed me into her studio for a comprehensive prenatal massage that my body, at 37 weeks gestation, so achingly required. She recently resurfaced an old talent of sculpting! Oline created the most heartfelt belly cast imaginable.   She lovingly layered my belly cast in plaster, blessed garments, enveloping it with the colours of the sky, and encrusting it with gems. Lastly she lined it with baby sheep skin.   This work of art, as pictured in the background, became Hannah's beautiful 'blessing nest.'   What  a wonderful experience and a beautiful keep sake for us to cherish.  I applaud this little community and all the passionate women we have caring for each other.  

A heartfelt thank you, Michelle and Hannah

Leesa Leroy (B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed. in Counselling) currently lives in San Diego, California with her husband and two boys. 3


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THE CLOTH DIAPER PLACE Monthly Newsletter

services

RETAIL

CLEANING SERVICE

RENTAL

Retail and rental services to meet your cloth diapering needs made by Canadian companies L'il Helper and Apple cheecks

Full wash & dry of our products for contract clients or washing of your products with a delivery option

Not ready to make a full investment? Check out our rental options.

DAWSON CREEK WELCOMES THE CLOTH DIAPER PLACE by Joan Diebert I am from Richmond ON, a small town west of Ottawa, where I went to school to become a pharmacy technician and had a great 10-year career! I switched gears and entered the finance industry for a couple of years until we moved to Dawson Creek where I have been a stay-at-home wife & mom. I am half Inuk, and grew up in Cape Dorset, NU until I was 8. I thought it was a great idea to move back north in my 20’s. I traveled to Iqaluit and Rankin Inlet, then settled in Cambridge Bay, NU for 4 years and then back again to Cape Dorset to be closer to the family I had lost touch with! 4


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A LITTLE DIAPER INFO... 20 billion disposable diapers  are added  to landfills each year, creating, about 3.5milliontonsof waste.

I loved my time in Nunavut as an adult, the bonds created will last a lifetime, and the memories will be with me forever. Some of those memories and experiences shaped who I am today, and I would say that part of that is what started us on this cloth diapering journey. I met my husband a few years later in Cape Dorset, NU and it was there that I realized my desire and need to cloth diaper. Sadly, in all seasons we would see dirty diapers strewn about, being eaten by dogs and ravens, which had a lot to do with garbage collection differences in these 2 hamlets. Without letting each other know, James and I had already made up our minds back then, that we did not want that for our planet. 2017 was an intense year for us, we got married, we found out that I cannot conceive on our own, and finally, we also moved out of the north, to Dawson Creek, all within the first 6 months. We let the news sink in for a long while, while we settled into a new life and routine. By fall we decided to plan some family gatherings to celebrate our marriage, move and a graduation. On St. Patrick's Day, in the middle of the planning chaos of how we would get our spread out family together, I received a message from a family member living in Cape Dorset; we had an opportunity to adopt.

Although disposable diapers need to be exposed to oxygen and sunlight to decompose, they do not degrade well in a landfill. What's more, disposable diapers take about 500 years  to decompose. The millions of tons of untreated waste added to landfills each year through plastic diapers can contaminate ground water. The average child uses more than 2,700 diapers in the first 12 months. Disposable diapers tend to cost 20-25 cents each, so you’re looking at between $550 and $900 a year not including wipes.

The average cloth diaper investment is $20 per diaper. 24 diapers=$480.00 initial investment. Plastic packaging used in disposable diapers results in 3.5 billion gallons of oil used to produce 18 million disposable diapers each year

Visit The Cloth Diaper Place at Bloom Pregnancy and Wellness Clinic 101-10300 10th Street Dawson Creek, BC

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Immediately after we knew the adoption would take place and that both parties had agreed, I asked my husband how he felt about cloth diapering. As with many things, we creepily had the same images in our heads of the disposables being eaten by ravens and being dumped in places that they just should NOT be! Within the first week of knowing we would be given this amazing blessing, I bought my first cloth diaper. The rest is history! I can tell you right now, that it was a saving grace for me over the next few months; for anyone who has ever been through the adoption process, or struggled with infertility, having tangible items to hold is VERY special. Cloth diapers were mine! I had the newborn diapers washed and ready to go even before the birth mom came, and before the nursery was NEAR started. I just could not wait to have our little one in cloth!

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Ad space

Fast forward to right now, a year later, our entire little family are very grateful for making this decision. RJ sleeps straight through the night and better because of how well cloth absorbs vs. disposable diapers. When baby sleeps through the night, mommy and daddy do too! We have bought and tried multiple styles and brands of diapers. Modern cloth diapers have come a very long way, and the technology of these is still changing and improving daily. But we have now found the routine that works for us. We love sharing our cloth journey with people, and the more we shared our experiences the more we found that passion to help others on their journey, and that is how our new “baby” The Cloth Diaper Place – Dawson Creek, came to be. I started doing some research and found that cloth diaper services were in demand to support this shift from single use disposable diapers to multiple use cloth diapers. I also realized that as the cloth diaper technology changes, it creates the need for increased education and support with individual cloth diapering needs. Dawson Creek needs this! With all this in mind and with support from my husband, I looked at what it would take to get my own cloth diaper service off the ground. What washer and dryers are needed, what diaper brands work best for home vs. a service. I want the world, the environment, the next generation of kids, to benefit from cloth diapers. Here at The Cloth Diaper Place – Dawson Creek, I want to bring my experiences, services and passion to you and your family!

By Joan Deibs Mother of Ronan and owner of The Cloth Daiper Place Bloom Pregnancy & Wellness Clinic suit 101 10300-10th street Dawson Creek, B.C

Photo Credit Corinna Lynn Photography

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Evidence-based, patient-focused.

Move Better. Feel Better. Live Better. Chiropractic care can help with many prenatal and post-partum issues. We are experienced with treating pregnancy related lower back and sciatic pain, as well as nursing related neck and upper back tension. We also provide pediatric care, tongue and lip tie diagnosis and pelvic floor rehabilitation with a certified MUTU pro.

Dawson Creek 250-782-7040 1112 - 102nd Ave (unit 1) www.squiresfamilychiropractic.com squireschiropractic@gmail.com

Photo credit Little White Rose Photography

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NUTRITION

FOOD FOR FERTILITY Written by: Michaela Wandling, RHN

Got “baby� on the brain? Prepping for pregnancy can be crucial for optimal fertility. Developing a healthy lifestyle, for both partners, is ideal for supporting reproductive systems and a successful conception. By switching to a more whole food, nutrient dense approach, there will be improved hormonal function, optimal ovulation, egg- and sperm-health and blood health, which all support healthy fetal development. Essentially, improving your diet to provide the building blocks needed for the development of a healthy baby is key. Pregnancy requires increased requirements of calories,

protein, vitamins and nutrients. Before conceiving, it can be important to stock up on your nutrient stores that could have been depleted by oral contraception or poor diet and lifestyle choices. When possible, it is ideal to choose organic food options as these will not contain the harmful toxic chemicals used on fruits and vegetables or potential antibiotic and hormones used on livestock that non-organic sources may be tainted with. Female hormonal balance is delicate and needs support. Here is a list of some important baby-making nutrients to kick start your fertility.

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BALANCE Protein: The amino acids found in proteins are the building blocks of our bodies. Adequate intake is needed to ensure your baby is also receiving enough for cell and tissue development. Food sources: Fish, poultry, eggs, nuts and seeds, grains, legumes, bone broth.

Essential Fatty acids: This nutrient is essential for hormonal balance, increased cervical mucus, healthy ovulation, and increasing blood flow to the reproductive organs therefore maintaining a healthy uterus. Food sources: Flaxseed, walnuts, chia seeds, hemp seeds, cod liver oil, salmons, sardines, halibut.

Saturated fats/Cholesterol: Hormone production requires fats. It is important to add healthy fats to your diet to maintain hormonal balance and therefore contributing to optimal fetal development. Food sources: coconut oil, grass fed butter, ghee, grass- fed organic meats.

Vitamin A: This nutrient is needed for fertility and for healthy development of a fetus’s organs including eyes, brain, heart and respiratory system. Food sources: liver, grass fed butter and meats, cod liver oil, carrots, sweet potato, kale, spinach, broccoli, eggs.

Vitamin D: Helps the body create sex hormones which will affect hormonal balance and ovulation. Food sources: Eggs, fatty fish, cod liver oil and sunshine.

Vitamin E: This vitamin is a known antioxidant which helps protect sperm and egg DNA. It also improves sperm health and motility. Food Sources: Sunflower seeds, almonds, olives, spinach, papaya, dark leafy greens.

Choline: Adequate supply of choline helps to prevent neural tube defects and will enhance brain development of a fetus. Food Sources: Wild salmon, chickpeas, split peas, navy beans, eggs, grass-fed beef, turkey, chicken, cauliflower, Brussel Sprouts, cabbage.

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WELLNESS

Folate: Having sufficient Folate helps prevent birth defects and minimizes the risk of prenatal complications and anemia. Food Sources: Liver, lentils, Chickpeas, asparagus, spinach, black beans, collard greens. Iron: Higher amounts of iron are needed during pregnancy due to increased overall blood needed to deliver oxygen and nutrients to your baby. Iron will also support healthy ovulation and egg health. Food sources: Liver, grass-fed beef, lentils, spinach, sesame seeds, kidney beans, pumpkin seeds, blackstrap molasses, clams, oysters, mussels (it is better to avoid shelfish however during pregnancy). Ensuring you are eating foods that contain these vitamins and nutrients is a great way to start healing and replenishing your body in order to prepare for pregnancy. Our bodies are very intelligent and know when we are deficient in nutrients, therefore potentially making it harder to conceive. By using whole foods to nourish our bodies we can support overall health and make it easier for reproduction to happen.

Michaela is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist and works with the belief that everyone has unique nutritional needs. She has a holistic perspective and considers the whole person and how the body, mind, and spirit interact. With taking this all into account, Michaela provides customized and unique nutritional guidance for her clients based on their lifestyle, diet and health goals. Since faced with her own health issues relating to her cycles and hormones, Michaela has become very interested in using proper

nutrition to help balance hormones, improve fertility and prepare the body for pregnancy. She is excited to share this knowledge with future clients and support them by creating an individualized journey that will improve all aspects of their lives and leave them feeling rooted.

Fertility Morning Smoothie

Ingredients • 1 Cup Milk (Almond, Hemp, Coconut, etc.) • 1 Tbsp Flax Seed • 1 Tbsp Molasses • 1 tsp Maca Powder • 1 Handful of dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale or collards • ¼ Cup Frozen Cauliflower • ¼ Cup Frozen Berries • ½ Frozen Banana • ¼ an Avocado • 1 Scoop High quality Protein Powder

Directions: Combine all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend until desired consistency. Depending on power of the blender you may need to add more liquid.

Learn more about Rooted Holistic Healing or book in with Michaela by visiting www.rootedholistichealing.ca Rooted Holistic Healing is located at Bloom Pregnancy & Wellness Clinic: 101-10300 110th street Dawson Creek, B.C

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Home birth/out-of-hospital birth Water birth Hospital births Gentle caesarian sections 6 weeks postpartum care

Midwives are experts in healthy pregnancy and birth In British Columbia, registered midwives offer primary maternity care to healthy pregnant clients and their newborn babies from early pregnancy, through labour and birth, until about six weeks following delivery. They practice evidence-based, client-centered maternity and newborn care and are an established part of the British Columbia health care system. Midwives listen, observe, educate, guide and care. They order and interpret tests and screen for physical, psychological, emotional and social health. They are with clients during pregnancy, labour and birth, normal and complicated. They catch babies. They do home visits after the baby is born. They help with breastfeeding and adjusting to life with a new baby. They work together and with other health professionals. (MABC).

Sonje Juul Owner B.C Registered Midwife

Haley Hayner B.C Registered Midwife

To request care visit www.dawsoncreekmidwifery.com 11


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ACUPUNCTURE AND FERTILITY by, Katie Johnston, R.Ac

Fertility problems and infertility may be more common than you think. A recent study shows that 11.5% to 15.7% of Canadian couples experience infertility. That's almost one in six couples. With some personal fertility highs and lows, I have found myself passionate about helping to educate and provide treatment for couples dealing with this emotional struggle. The overwhelming anguish and sense of loss men and women experience in the fertility process is an unwelcome motivator, driving couples to search for help in their areas.

This includes home remedies, fertility drugs, IVF, donor eggs and embryos and closest to home for me, Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Modern healthcare has vastly expanded the options available for couples struggling to conceive and for this we are fortunate.  Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has a recorded history of 2500+ years, which is dated to be the third oldest form of medicine. The fact the TCM has existed for thousands of years, and is still used today is a testament to its value as a form of healthcare. 

A recent study shows that 11.5% to 15.7% of Canadian couples have infertility. That's almost one in six couples.

Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has a recorded history of 2500+ years, which is dated to be the third oldest form of medicine. 12


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Approaching the trimesters Seeking treatment throughout the trimesters of pregnancy has many benefits which many moms are completely unaware of. We are happy to provide relief for all of the upheavals of pregnancy.

The first trimester

Acupuncture is used to help prevent miscarriage and provide a stabilizing effect on the pregnancy, balance the endocrine system, and regulate hormones. Acupuncture helps to minimize nausea, morning sickness, fatigue, migraines, bleeding and spotting.

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The second trimester Acupuncture is used to regulate the digestive, nervous, and endocrine systems, all of which are necessary to maintain a healthy pregnancy. Acupuncture helps to alleviate heart burn, hemorrhoids, edema, elevated blood pressure, and stress.

The third trimester Acupuncture is used to regulate the musculoskeletal system to provide relief from sciatica, backache, pubic and joint pain, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Treatment during this trimester also encourages the proper positioning of the baby for birth and helps normalize labour.

Proper positioning would include breech presentation, which is best treated with acupuncture and moxibustion at 34-36 weeks and cleared by your midwife or doctor. Research shows that women who use acupuncture experience shorter labour times with fewer complications, reduced rate of caesarean, and less need for the use of oxytocin, pain medications and epidurals. Sessions in the last months of pregnancy are intended to soothe anxiety, relieve fatigue, and ensure that the pregnant woman maintains good physical and psychological condition.

DURING THE PREPARATION FOR CHILDBIRTH, ACUPUNCTURE CAN: • induce labour when term or medically indicated • promote relaxation of the perineum • stimulate uterine contractions and breastmilk production

Enhancing Postpartum Healing Regardless of how your baby was born, acupuncture and TCM can help your postpartum healing recovery. In China, it was customary for the new mother to spend 30 days resting indoors while being cared for by her family. While this is unlikely in today’s culture, there are a few traditions we can carry on such as Mother Warming. Mother Warming is a simple technique that uses moxibustion. Moxibustion itself is a plant/herb (mugwort) used to warm specific acupuncture points. It is typically used on the lower back and abdomen 4-5 days after delivery to speed the recovery process. East Asian medicine can also be used to stop persistent bleeding postpartum, help stabilize emotions, stop night sweats and reduce perineal pain and scar pain.

Photo credit Little White Rose Photography

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Increase Lactation

Herbal Prescriptions

From herbal suggestions, dietary suggestions and acupuncture itself, we can make recommendations to help encourage restricted milk supply and have had great success doing so. Acupuncture can also help aid and relieve mastitis, a very painful condition where the milk ducts become clogged.

During pregnancy, the Qi and blood are found in abundance in the body, necessary to support the growing fetus. You see this manifest directly in thicker hair which is directly related to blood. During delivery much Qi and blood is lost, leaving the mother in a deficient state.  We see this manifest as hair loss, clearly indicating the need to build up blood. Other symptoms include low energy, poor sleep, heart palpitations, irritability, poor breast milk production, anxiety, etc.  Herbal medicine is a superior way to bring the body back into balance, and should begin as soon as possible post-delivery.

Relieve Aches & Pains Labour and birth are akin to running a marathon, or even an ultra-marathon for some. Many folks experience muscle soreness and fatigue following the birth itself. As the aches and pains from the birth diminish, many new parents experience tightness in the neck and shoulders from so much time spent nursing their baby, and looking down at your precious little newborn. This is effectively addressed by acupuncture and various forms of bodywork including cupping and gua sha. Qua sha is a technique used that involves scraping the skin to improve circulation of blood and lymph, reducing muscular and fascial restrictions.

Regulating Hormones

As your hormones shift and begin to settle back into a routine, acupuncture can help re-establish healthy menstrual cycles. This is helpful if you are wanting to have space between your births or are ready to start trying to become pregnant again. Heavy flow, irregular cycles, painful periods, and symptoms of PMS are all things that can be addressed with acupuncture and herbal medicine. By regulating the hormones we can also directly and positively impact postpartum depression by working with the nervous system, immune system and balance various neurotransmitters in the intracephalic neuronal synapses.

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Sheng Hua Tang (generating and transforming decoction) is a standard formula given in China and Taiwan for up to two weeks immediately following childbirth for retention of lochia and abdominal pain. Its actions are moving and warming blood in the uterus (cold instruments used during childbirth introduce cold into the uterus, impeding blood flow and production), and causing contractions in the uterus to aid in the discharge of lochia (vaginal discharge of blood, mucous, and uterine tissue, which occurs for 4-6 weeks following childbirth). 

By moving out stagnation, nourishing the blood and Qi, women can quickly recover, and breast milk production will be much improved. Results will be seen as improved energy, mood, reduction in pain in the lower abdomen.

Shen Hua tang generates and transforms, meaning it generates new blood (and therefore milk) and transforms stasis, ensuring the uterus is clear, clean, and warm after birth. It also improves immunity of the mother and the entire body is positively affected. Postpartum fever and depression are greatly improved or relieved. This can also be used for women post miscarriage or termination to ensure complete discharge of tissues and healing of the uterus.

TREATING INFANTS WITH ACUPUNCTURE Many moms and infants suffer through a trying stage called colic. Colic is defined as episodes of crying for 3 hours a day 3 days a week. We know colic generally goes away after 6 weeks on its own, however this can be a very long, exhausting and sometimes depressing 6 weeks for Mom and Dad. Some believe colic is caused from gastrointestinal cramping, causing swollen and poor activity of bowel movements such as constipation. When we treat infants we give them a spleen massage along either side of the spine. Most babies don’t make a fuss during this process and find it quite relaxing. When we treat for colic we insert tiny, when I say tiny I mean it, needles into specific acupoints to calm down their nervous system, improve their digestion and nourish their spleen and stomach.

Photo credit Little White Rose Photography

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Babies haven’t gone through as much physical and mental trauma and their vital energy, or Qi, is very keen, so they tend to respond very quickly and most will enjoy coming back because they know it helps relieve their symptoms. We recommend bringing them twice a week for two weeks and then we move forward accordingly from there. Acupuncture is a very safe and effective way to treat colic and brings me so much pleasure in my practice.

WHEN SHOULD YOU COME SEE US? Ideally, we would love to see you around 24 weeks postpartum. If you are really finding yourself needing treatment before then we are always here to help heal, and please bring your newborns with you! We love a good baby snuggle. However, it is not uncommon for many moms out there to have postpartum symptoms present themselves one to two years later; seeking the proper treatment after postpartum will help resolve issues later on and promote faster healing. You’ll be thanking yourself in the long run. Another added benefit we provide at The House of Healing is a prenatal discount to all expecting and postpartum moms and an even larger discount for paediatric acupuncture. We understand the process and we’re here to help. We do package discounts for anyone seeking and recommend them to fertility patients. It’s never to late to come in and treat yourself too the many amazing health benefits acupuncture has!

MIDWIFERY CARE MATERNITY PHYSICIAN WALK-IN MATERNITY CLINIC DOULA SUPPORT CHILDBIRTH CLASSES BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT POSTPARTUM CARE PHOTOGRAPHY COUNSELING SERVICES WORKSHOPS BIRTH POOL RENTALS ULTRASOUNDS 3D/4D/HD CLOTH DIAPERS HOLISTIC NUTRITION Simeon Kondev once said, “I feel like every project I work on is a dream project, so long as I am learning.”

Written by Katie Johnston, R.Ac

Owner of The House of Healing in Dawson Creek thehouseofhealingclinic.com

#101 10300 10TH STREET DAWSON CREEK, B.C (250)784-0516 WWW.BLOOMFAMILYWELLNESS.CA PHOTO CREDIT SEVAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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S U P P O R T

Birth Pool Rentals

labourseve@gmail.com Dawson Creek, B.c (250)719-1326

Less pain and higher satisfaction with the birth experience Less medication use for pain relief—this may be important for people who want or need to avoid epidurals or narcotic medications during labour Less use of artificial oxytocin and possibly shorter labours Higher rates of normal vaginal birth Less use of artificial oxytocin and possibly shorter labours Lower rates of episiotomy Higher rates of intact perineum, especially in high-episiotomy settings Possibly lower rates of severe tears (3rd or 4th degree), especially in highepisiotomy settings Possibly lower rates of postpartum hemorrhage -Evidence Based Birth 15


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A MIDWIFE'S JOURNEY TO UGANDA

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Catching Babies in Uganda, Africa BY JULIETTE MUDRA. STUDENT MIDWIFE During my time in Uganda, I was fortunate enough to work in three hospitals; I was placed at Lira Regional Referral Hospital Hello! Some of you may remember me for 2 weeks, Mbale Regional Referral from last fall, while I was completing my Hospital for 3 weeks, and Kawempe third year clinical midwifery placement Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda's with Sonje at Dawson Creek Midwifery. capital city, for a week. While Mbale and Perhaps I shared with you that I was Lira are rural hospitals with 20-30 births heading to Uganda for six weeks in May per 24 hours, Kawempe's maternity unit and June; having just returned, Sonje is one of the busiest in the country; on has asked me to write about my average, 100 births per day take place on experiences to share with you! this maternity ward. For perspective, Even if I wasn't involved in your care, I Dawson Creek Hospital has, on average, think learning about maternity care 1 birth per day! systems in other countries is I feel incredibly fortunate to have fascinating, so do read on! experienced

such a variety of care settings which gave me an opportunity to work with many birthers of all ages and socioeconomic demographics, and with low, high, and, if I may add, very high risk pregnancies. I caught 25 babies while I was in Uganda, several of which needed resuscitation at birth, and cared for many severely ill mothers with a variety of conditions such as eclampsia, malaria, HIV, tuberculosis, uterine rupture, severe anemia in pregnancy, and postpartum hemorrhage. As the majority of my time in Uganda was spent in Mbale, I would like to highlight my learning while placed there. 16


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During our first week in Mbale, there were four maternal deaths. From the end of February until mid June, there were 27 maternal deaths at the Mbale Regional Referral Hospital, yielding an average of approximately 6 maternal deaths per month. The most recent Ugandan maternal death rate statistic from 2018 reports 336 maternal deaths per 100,000 deliveries; in other words, in Uganda 0.336% of women die during childbirth. If, on average, there are around 9000 babies per year born at MRRH (as reported by senior administrators), this means the maternal death rate at MRRH is 0.8%. Mbale’s maternal death rate is 2.4 times higher than the national rate.

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The alleyway next to the Mbale Hospital labour ward. Women spend most of their labour in this area, sometimes for days they labour outside. The only time they come into the hospital is 1) if it rains 2) they need to be assessed (every 4 hours) 3) they are giving birth 4) they are medically or obstetrically unwell / compromised.

The causes of death listed for these 27 women are not varied; repeatedly, cause of death is listed as “hypovolemic shock, secondary postpartum hemorrhage, severe anemia”. After spending a month here, this common cause of death is unsurprising. I have witnessed the struggle to obtain blood from the blood bank (and have selfishly used my “white privilege” to procure units of blood for patients). I have helplessly held the hand of actively bleeding women, knowing there is no blood available, and have listened to case reviews of some of these women's deaths days later. I have arrived on the postnatal unit, where 30 to 40 birthers and their attendants are crowded together, beds touching, bodies mashed together, to find only one midwife, or perhaps no midwife present on the unit. How would someone having a secondary hemorrhage obtain the medical care they need in such conditions? I have spent time in the high dependency unit (HDU) where women with severe postpartum hemorrhages are sent for close monitoring. Yet, there is no staff assigned to this six bed unit (the sole midwife assigned to the postnatal unit is also supposed to attend to the clients in HDU), nor are there stocked anti-hemorrhagic medications. Instead of being an ICU for severely compromised postpartum mothers, seizing, bleeding, gasping women who desperately need one-to-one nursing care are left alone in a room to be forgotten. A woman whose birth I attended was admitted to HDU - she watched three of her neighbors die and later told me she thought she would have a similar fate by virtue of being in that room. Pregnancy related mortality is due to three delays: (1) deciding to seek appropriate medical help for an obstetric emergency; (2) reaching an appropriate obstetric facility; and (3) receiving adequate care when a facility is reached. While the delays that occur outside were evident, the delay in receiving adequate care while in MRRH was multifaceted and the most surprising to someone who has worked within hospitals for the last seven years. Not only would the delays happening in Ugandan hospitals be unacceptable in Canada, they would be shocking. No operating room availability because of a power outage or blood shortage. An actively bleeding birther with a placenta previa having to wait for an emergency csection because there is no stretcher for transport to the O.R. Seizing, eclamptic women waiting for their attendants to return with antihypertensive medications. Anesthetists taking their lunch break when there is a woman with a ruptured uterus waiting for surgical care. Despite being taught about these delays, it was astonishing to experience first hand. I found myself comparing how emergencies were handled in Uganda to how I think they would have been managed in Canada. In Uganda, health workers casually standing around waiting for O.R. availability as a uterus ruptures and a fetal heart rate disappears.

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In Canada, the woman would have had a c-section hours prior for the often cited reason “failure to progress” or more appropriate term "obstructed labour", maybe a family member or care provider wondering if the woman was a victim of rising cesarean section rates in developed countries. Having a nursing background, I often found myself examining the clinical setting and events occurring within the Lira and Mbale Regional Referral Hospitals with a public health lens. On our first day in Lira, as we were touring the postnatal ward, the head nurse stated, “We have a problem with sepsis”. I can see why: no running water on the wards and no means of sanitizing clinicians’ hands between patients; postpartum beds that are touching; babies in the neonatal care unit lying adjacent to one another on adult sized beds; cracked vinyl mattresses; clients on an inconsistent or inadequate course of antibiotics due to insufficient staffing levels and/or supplies; porous floors that never seem to be clean; health care workers breaking the sterile field in the O.R. - these are just a few examples of infection risks observed while working in Lira and Mbale. Of all the ways to improve clinical outcomes, the one that seems the easiest to me would be to increase health care workers' access to hand sanitation. I felt like I was taking a trip back to the 1800s when the Hungarian physician Ignaz Semmelweis discovered the use of hand sanitation in obstetrical clinics which drastically reduced the incidence of puerperal fever, and therefore the maternal mortality rate. While financing the cost of plumbing for running water on the units may be unachievable, frequent barrels of water with a spigot and

Juliette (myself) and baby Juliette The stern looking woman in the background is the baby's grandmother, who despite her frown, was thrilled to have me take a photo with her granddaughter. She insisted the baby be named after me, following the care I provided her daughter while in labour.

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drainage basin placed throughout the units could take the place of a tap and sink. Furthermore, alcohol rub is not that expensive and should be on the list of essential supplies needed on hospital units. In my opinion, respecting the principles of asepsis is as important as oxytocin in reducing morbidity and mortality on obstetrical wards. To say that I am leaving Uganda with a newfound appreciation of our Canadian hospitals and health care system at large is an understatement; I now realize I won the birth lottery jackpot by being born in Canada. Uganda is not without its beautiful moments, despite the sometimes apocalyptic conditions on the wards. The origin of the word midwife, “with woman”, aptly describes the reason I was drawn to this profession. Even in Uganda, half a world away from Canada, immersed in an entirely different culture, across language barriers and despite my “otherness” as a muzungu, I am still able to find ways by which I can stand by women’s sides in a supportive role and help them navigate their birth experiences.

The women in Uganda are so powerful and resilient, navigating an, at times, perilous health care system with so much grace, strength, and gratitude. There was the woman who, after three days of labouring on the ward, decided she’d had enough of “them scaring me”, grabbed my hand, and walked away, preferring to give birth in peace outside behind the bushes next to the ward. 18


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There was the grandmother of a client who I had helped lift onto a stretcher for her emergency cesarean, who later, while waiting for her daughter to reappear from the operating room, held a stethoscope in place so I could auscultate the heartbeat of a newborn (unrelated to her) as I provided ventilation and a classmate recruited more help. The sister-in-law who cautiously revealed to me that my client had not taken any HIV prophylaxis during pregnancy. The sister who learned how to mix HIV antiviral medications for her newborn niece. The auntie who softly encouraged her niece to keep pushing through 7 vacuum pop-offs before a cesarean section was finally called, then later gave me daily updates on her great-nephew’s recovery from “fits� (seizures) while in the neonatal special care unit. The client with the coulevaire uterus and intrauterine fetal death whose face lit up with a smile every day I came to visit her during her two week hospital stay, despite the incredible loss of her firstborn, a beautiful little boy. These women have shown me that even in the most dire conditions, there is always something you can find to be grateful for, and I have MUCH in life to be grateful about.

Labour ward in Mbale

Women give birth on these beds with little to no privacy. Within 30 minutes of the birth they are mobilized to a wooden bench, where they sit waiting for an hour of observation for hemorrhage to pass. Often there is more than one woman waiting for a labour bed to either give birth or have a labour assessment. 19


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In Lira

there were MANY nursing and midwifery students on the maternity ward; we later learned that some of them did not have permission to be on the unit. There were no clinical instructors with these students; at times there were 20 or more students at one time on a three bed labour ward. We spent much of our time teaching these students, as there was no one there with them.

Typical birthing table

and resuscitation warmer in Uganda. The warmer was broken; when it was turned on it incessantly alarmed and the user was unable to modulate the heat it radiated. You had to be very careful when resuscitating that the baby did not overheat as there were no temperature probes monitoring the neonate's skin temperature.

Myself, my instructor

Angela Spencer, two of my classmates, and two Ugandan healthcare workers - a midwife and a medical student on the ward in Mbale.

A Ugandan

woman (in yellow) whose grace and determination to be treated respectfully during her labour and birth amazed me. She told me, "They (the local staff) are scaring me. You will help me give birth safely." On this particular day, the maternity ward was in complete chaos. She took one look at the apocalyptic conditions on the ward, grabbed my hand, and led me outside to a quite space beside the ward so that she could labour in peace. She is 9cm dilated in this photo, still smiling and wanting to take a photo with me. After a respectful conversation, she eventually came inside to give birth, but left the hospital a few hours afterwards.

Article cover picture

A Ugandan woman from Lira and her newborn. I cared for her antenatally; she was severely pre-eclamptic receiving no care because no one was aware of her condition. No one had taken her blood pressure on arrival at the maternity ward because there was no blood pressure cuff available. When I discovered her blood pressure was elevated (at its highest, 212/130, confirmed on two separate readings, with normal being less than 140/90) I spent the day with her providing   one-to-one care. I definitely drew on my nursing skills and previous experience working with high risk pregnancies on this day. It was interesting to see the differences between Ugandan and Canadian guidelines for treatment of preeclampsia. 20


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LEAKING OR SPILLING OF MILK FROM THE BREAST OR BOTTLE SUCKING BLISTERS OR CALLOUS NOISY FEEDING, CLICKING, SLURPING, SNAPPING MATERNAL OR INFANT PAIN REFLUX COLIC SLOW WEIGHT GAIN, FAILURE TO THRIVE INFANT SLIDES OFF THE NIPPLE CHOMPING OR CHEWING AT THE NIPPLE TONGUE OR JAW TREMORS Â FALLS ASLEEP AT THE BREAST BEFORE FULLY FED BABY SHOWS SIGNS OF STRESS AT THE BREAST SPUTTER, GAGS AND CHOKES BREAST REFUSAL PICKY NURSER (WILL ONLY NURSE IN SPECIFIC POSITIONS AND LOCATIONS ) INCOMPLETE BREAST DRAINAGE THRUSH OR BACTERIAL INFECTION

www.bloomfamilywellness.ca 2 1


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POSTPARTUM BODIES Written by: Sylvie Piche

You've just been through the miracle of life Although beautiful, it most certainly can take a physical and psychological toll. A lot has happened in the last nine months; hormonal and body composition changes are just the tip of the iceberg. In preparation for delivery, the hormone relaxin is released during pregnancy to help relax the pelvic joints and ligaments as well as soften and widen the cervix. The pelvic joints and ligaments will loosen and expand so baby can pass through the birth canal. Your core muscles have to stretch over the growing baby. They can become weaker, and less effective at supporting and moving your body. Once stretched, those muscles might not be able to return to their original length and shape after birth. Your growing uterus and the extra weight you gain during pregnancy can throw off your balance, change your posture, and put a strain on your back. Although aches and pains are pretty common (and completely normal) during pregnancy, you don’t need to continue dealing with these issues postpartum! As a kinesiologist, as well as being Level 1 certified in Functional Movement Systems, I’m trained in looking at human movement. I work alongside physiotherapists, and more closely with Jordana Moxon, our women’s health physio, in treating pre- and postnatal women. I’ve recently completed my Postnatal Fitness Specialist certification, and I am excited to help all mommas through their health and fitness journey. Whether your goal is to return to movement pain free, return to sport, or run a 10K, I’m confident we can reach those goals together! During our initial session together, we'll assess and discuss topics such as diastasis recti, pelvic floor function and breathing mechanics as needed. Together we’ll make sure to bring the muscles back online and feel good again. As your trainer, I also want to know what motivates you. What are your health and fitness goals? Are there any factors that might get in the way of you reaching your goals? How much time do you have to focus on you and your workouts? Through subsequent sessions together, we will safely and progressively build a strength and conditioning program tailored to your individual needs. Lastly, a very important aspect I feel needs to be addressed is to change the conversation around postpartum bodies. Enough talk about getting your ''body back''. I mean where did your body even go? How about we talk about feeling good again? Or feeling strong and self assured in your own skin again? You'll be pleasantly surprised that once we stop focusing on the physical aspects of health and fitness and focus on how you're feeling, the rest will follow suit. Once a postpartum body, always a postpartum body, but that doesn't mean we can't be strong and feel confident again! I look forward to working with you in the gym!

SYLVIE PICHE

Kinesiologist Personal TrainerPost Natal Fitness Specialist Deep Physio 250 719 8425 www.deepphysio.com

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Feeling tired all the time? It could be more than just the exhaustion of your daily grind. Read on to learn about the signs and symptoms of iron deficiency.

Iron: Are you Getting Enough? B Y

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While most parents feel worn out by the end of the day, feeling exhausted all the time could be a sign that your iron is low. Keeping your iron levels in a healthy range is really important for keeping your body healthy.

What is Iron? Iron is a mineral that plays an important role in keeping you healthy and energized. More specifically, iron is an important part of a protein called hemoglobin, which is what helps your body move oxygen in your blood to the many cells in your body that need it.

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Unfortunately, many women do not get enough iron and have reduced iron stores. In fact, around 9% of Canadian women aged 19-49 years have depleted iron stores, but many more are at risk.

What are the Risk Factors for Low Iron Levels? Heavy menstrual loss Often caused by hormonal contraception and IUDs Gastrointestinal (GI) conditions such as Crohn’s disease, Colitis, Celiac Disease, or H. pylori infection Frequent blood donation Sports, in particular, endurance sports such as cross country skiing and long distance running Vegetarian, vegan, or mostly plantbased diets. The type of iron found in plant-based food is not as easily absorbed by our bodies. 24


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From Iron Deficiency to Iron Deficiency Anemia - What’s in a Name? Iron Deficiency - this is when your iron stores are reduced. If not identified and corrected, it can lead to Iron Deficiency Anemia. Iron Deficiency Anemia - this condition is less common than Iron Deficiency, but it’s more serious. In Iron Deficiency Anemia, your red blood cells become smaller than normal and paler than usual. There are a variety of other types of anemia as well, but they are less common than Iron Deficiency Anemia.

What are the Symptoms: Whether it’s Iron Deficiency or Iron Deficiency Anemia, the symptoms are usually quite similar. People with Iron Deficiency Anemia are likely to have more symptoms and they are likely to be

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more severe compared to people with Iron Deficiency. Signs and Symptoms that you may have Iron Deficiency or Iron Deficiency Anemia: Low energy, weakness/fatigue Frequent illnesses or infections Cold intolerance (the feeling like you can’t get warm) Shortness of breath on exertion or with exercise Fast or irregular heartbeat Headaches Irritability Cravings to eat ice chips Adverse pregnancy outcomes (such as low birth weight, preterm delivery) Cracks or sores on corners of mouth If you have risk factors and symptoms, please go to your primary care provider to discuss getting your iron levels checked.

Depending on the results a few different treatments may be recommended: Moderately low levels of iron can often be corrected through diet, with or without the use of an iron supplement.

Very low levels of iron or Iron Deficiency Anemia is often treated first with a high dose iron supplement and then more long-term with an iron rich diet. High dose iron supplements are notorious for causing stomach discomfort shortly after being ingested. Unfortunately, to improve absorption, it is best to take them on an empty stomach and with a source of vitamin C (such as a glass of orange or grapefruit juice).

How To Get Enough Iron: Iron foods fall into two categories: heme iron (animal foods) and non-heme iron (plant foods). Heme iron sources include beef, pork, lamb, liver, fish, poultry. Our bodies absorb this type of iron better than nonheme iron sources. Non-heme iron sources include: lentils, chickpeas, beans, dried apricots, and fortified cereals. Our bodies absorb more non-heme iron from foods when we combine them with heme-iron containing foods (lentils and beef in a stew) and when we combine them with vitamin C rich foods (chickpea salad with tomatoes). For a more complete list of food sources of iron please visit https://www.dietitians.ca/Downloads/Fac tsheets/Food-Sources-of-Iron.aspx

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How Much Iron Do I Need?

* Intake recommendations are from a combination of food and supplements **Vegetarians need almost twice as much iron compared to non-vegetarians.

In addition to the types of iron and how to increase their absorption, there are also several factors that can reduce the amount of iron you can get from your food. These include: -Tannins in coffee and teas - Phytates found in whole grains and legumes - Calcium-rich foods

What Does This Mean for Me? If you do not have problems with your iron levels, and you eat a lot of iron rich foods, there is no reason to adjust your eating pattern to help your body increase the amount of iron it absorbs. However, if you have some of the risk factors listed above, or if you have an Iron Deficiency or Iron Deficiency Anemia, it may become important to adjust the timing of when you eat certain foods and

drinks so you can make it easier for your body to get as much iron from the food you eat as possible. Working with a Registered Dietitian to optimize your iron intake and absorption can help improve iron levels and prevent Iron Deficiencies.

About the Author: Lindsay is a Prince George -based Registered Dietitian, wife, mother, athlete, and lover of nourishing food and coffee. She is a Clinical Dietitian with more than a decade of experience and she recently started a small consulting practice focusing on Sports Nutrition and Plant-based Diets. For healthy living inspiration follow her Instagram @lindsay_vandermeer_rd

Lindsay Van der Meer, MHS, RD www.dietitianonthemove.ca @lindsay_vandermeer_rd

References: Alberta Health Services (2016). Nutrition Guideline Healthy Term Infants and Children: Iron. Retrieved from: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/as sets/info/nutrition/if-nfs-ng-healthyinfants-key-nutrients-iron.pdf Statistics Canada (2015). Iron Sufficiency of Canadians. Retrieved from Canadian Health Measures Survey https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/82003-x/2012004/article/11742-eng.htm Dietitians of Canada (2019). Managing Iron Deficiency. Retrieved from http://www.unlockfood.ca/en/Articles/V itamins-and-Minerals/Managing-IronDeficiency.aspx Dietitians of Canada (2019). What You Need To Know About Iron. Retrieved from: http://www.unlockfood.ca/en/Articles/V itamins-and-Minerals/What-You-NeedTo-Know-AboutIron.aspx#.Vs8sWpMrKRs

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Don't get caught in the cold Have your furnace serviced regularly with Avtech

www.av-tech.ca 250-219-5220 1436 – 102 Ave Dawson Creek, BC V1G 2C9

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WHY DO YOU TRAIN BY COACH DAN

Last night I was told I get short tempered or irritable when I don’t train. That got me thinking about why I started working out and why I train now. I don’t train so I can compete. I don’t train to be the best in the gym (I am not, far from it. We have some amazing athletes in the gym.) There is nothing wrong with competing. The commitment and discipline required are commendable. Those traits are something I strive to emulate. I am just not a competitive person. I train, because when I don’t, I go back to the way I used to be. For as long as I can remember, I've battled depression and anxiety. I always put a big emphasis on the depression, but now looking back, I see the anxiety was probably the main reason for the depression. You know the feeling you would have on the first day of school? I would have that every Monday. My anxiety affected my quality of life, e.g. I only started driving later in life due to panic-like symptoms from the mere thought of driving a vehicle.

"FOR AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER, I'VE BATTLED DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY. I ALWAYS PUT A BIG EMPHASIS ON THE DEPRESSION, BUT NOW LOOKING BACK, I SEE THE ANXIETY WAS PROBABLY THE MAIN REASON FOR THE DEPRESSION. "

I found the only way to deal with my anxiety was by drinking. I felt 'normal' when drinking. No fear. The drinking was followed up with extreme guilt and depression, for days. Needless to say I spent my 20’s wracked with guilt and hungover. Couple that with a weight problem and a back injury, and it leads to a very unhappy person. Several years ago I found myself in a job with a lot of physical activity and away from a lot of junk food. Still not eating great, and drinking way too much, however the change was enough to start to feel better. Enough to start that ball rolling. At the end of that summer I came across a cookbook called Practical Paleo. It's a book I've recommended to many since that time. This book awakened a curiosity in me and it was the catalyst to where I am now. I heard the word CrossFit for the first time in that book. It is where I heard that the food we eat, exercise, and lifestyle can have tremendous effects on your mental well being and your physical self. It was through this book and starting my CrossFit journey that I got off anxiety, depression and sleeping pills. Pills that I'd been on since 18. It was through these lifestyle changes that my cholesterol problem was reversed. I was within weeks of having to start medication for that too. It was through all of this that I found myself anxiety-free and happy. I train to be the best version of myself. To be happy. To keep my back healthy and strong. To keep the pills away. I train because I like this version of Danny and I didn't before. So next time I find myself getting irritable or down on myself for not being top of the class, when I don’t have enough time to train, I will think about what I have written here. I will ask myself, "What is my top priority?" For you, it might be different, but for me, it is so my family and the people I care about, myself included, get the best version of me.

CROSSFIT DAWSON CREEK Coach Dan: 250-219-8874 dan@crossfidawsoncreek.com

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October is National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month, and October 15 is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day. Grieving parents are encouraged to light a candle at 7 p.m. in their respective time zones to create a wave of light around the world in memory of babies lost to pregnancy and infant loss. The candles are left burning for at least an hour. Throughout the week bereaved parents, along with family and friends, unite with each other and others across the world to commemorate the lives of babies who died during pregnancy, at or soon after birth, and in infancy. Â

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Endocrine disruptors : what are they and what are their effects during pregnancy? Élyse Caron-Beaudoin, PhD

Élyse is a postdoctoral fellow at the Université de Montréal – School of Public Health. She has been working in the Peace River Valley since 2016. Her research focuses on the impacts of environmental contaminants on health, especially during pregnancy, with particular attention on endocrine disruption.

When the team at Bloom asked me to write an article for their magazine, I was very excited to share some information about my favourite area of expertise: endocrine disruptors. These substances are a hot topic in science, particularly in toxicology and environmental health, but it has also reached the mainstream audience. Not a month goes by without seeing some over-the-top titles such as: your face cream is giving you cancer! The pesticides are making you infertile! In recent years, several scientists (such as myself) have denounced the laxity surrounding the regulation of endocrine disruptors. But first, what do we mean by endocrine disruptors? The term endocrine refers to the hormonal system. The hormones in our bodies (e.g estrogen, testosterone, prolactin, thyroid hormones, etc.) regulate important physiological processes. This is also true during pregnancy! Lots of different hormones such as estrogen and progesterone are implicated in regulating the menstrual cycle (and ovulation). During pregnancy, Human Chorionic Gonadotropin, or HCG (this is the substance that is measured in a pregnancy test),

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ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORSÂ

produced by the placenta and the corpus luteum in the early days of a pregnancy, has many roles including protecting the fetus from the mother’s immune cells. Estrogen production during pregnancy increases greatly, and is a key player in placental development, as well as in establishing the blood circulation between the uterus and the placenta. Thyroid hormones, produced by the mother and the fetus, are critical for the development of the fetal and neonatal brain. Endocrine disruptors are any substance, natural or synthetic, that disrupts the synthesis, metabolism or transport of natural hormones. One of the first cases that struck the imagination and was the gateway for the study of endocrine disruptors is that of the insecticide DDT. This was used in several countries to fight against all kinds of insect pests, including mosquitoes carrying malaria. An American biologist, Rachel Carson, began in the late 1950s to take an interest in the dangers of DDT, when several birds died in Cape Cod after heavy use of DDT. She has written one of her best selling books describing how DDT enters the food chain and accumulates in adipose tissue. In Silent Spring, she relates the endocrine disrupting effects of DDT. Among other things, the exposure of birds to DDT decreased the activity of an enzyme, carbonic anhydrase, which is a key enzyme in eggshell formation. As a result, the shells were thinner and more fragile, so the eggs were very often damaged, and the reproductive success of several species was greatly affected. The work of several scientists, including Rachel Carson, led to the ban of DDT in the 1970s. Are human populations also exposed to endocrine disruptors, and if yes, is this exposure associated with any negative health outcomes? So far, we know that these substances have the ability to change the hormonal balance of several species, including humans, and that this imbalance is at the root of many diseases. We also know that human populations are exposed in various ways to these compounds. Endocrine disruptors are found in cosmetics (e.g paraben), plasticizers (e.g Bisphenol A), everyday products, pesticides, etc. Endocrine disruptors have been found in maternal and cord blood, as well as in the urine of pregnant women and in breast milk. A lot of endocrine disruptors can pass through the placenta,

therefore exposing the fetus. However, exposure to an endocrine disruptor (or any other environmental contaminant) does not necessarily mean a negative health outcome will be caused by this exposure. This will depend on the levels of exposure to this contaminant, as well as its capacity to be toxic. In the field of endocrine disruptors, we don’t have all the information required to be certain of a cause and effect relationship between exposure to these substances and negative birth outcomes.

What we know is that exposure to endocrine disruptors has been associated with altered reproductive function, increased incidence of some cancers such as breast cancer, preterm birth, low birth weight babies, neurodevelopmental delays in children, impacted immune function and obesity. These health outcomes are often multifactorial, but exposure to endocrine disruptors may contribute to the development of those pathologies. Another challenge scientists are facing when investigating the impacts of these substances, is that the potential health consequences of exposure to endocrine disruptors may happen later in life.

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ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS

But, how are we exposed to endocrine disruptors? Ingestion of food, dust and water, and the inhalation of particles in the air and through the skin are the main exposure pathways. These substances can also be transferred from the pregnant woman to the fetus or baby through the placenta and breastfeeding. Can we lower our exposure to endocrine disruptors? Unfortunately, because endocrine disruptors are present in a variety of products used everyday, it is very difficult to significantly lower our exposure. There are endocrine disruptors-free alternatives that you can use for most of your skincare and cleaning products. Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been measured in diapers, so switching to cloth diapers might be something to consider.

The situation of endocrine disruptors is somewhat comparable to the tobacco industry in the 1950s, or the petrochemical industry and climate change. This industry alone is the main contributor to the rise in greenhouse gases and therefore to climate change. 97% of scientists agree on the human origin of climate change, and we have countless amount of data from thousands of studies across the world that point towards the same explanation. Despite this broad consensus, the petrochemical industry and the few climatoseptics manage to market around a doubt that, in fact, does not exist.

When absorbed in the body, an endocrine disruptor can decrease or increase normal hormone levels (left), mimic the body's natural hormones (middle), or alter the natural production of hormones (right). National Institute Of Environmental Science

So, what are the take home messages here? The endocrine system is complex and involved in a myriad of physiological processes. There are about 800 compounds reported as endocrine disruptors, but many others have not yet been studied. It is not because an endocrine disruptor is present that it poses a real health risk; it depends, among other things, on the concentration. Epidemiology studies in human populations show that exposure to endocrine disruptors may be an additional risk factor for the development of certain pathologies. However, because of the challenges surrounding the study of endocrine disruptors, there are not a lot of studies establishing a causal link between exposure and health outcomes. Finally, some populations are identified as potentially more sensitive to endocrine disruptors (eg children, pregnant women), and the most effective way to reduce our exposure is through robust regulation, which requires a collective effort from the population and government. References: Rouillon, S., Deshayes-Morgand, C., Enjalbert, L., Rabouan, S., Hardouin, J. B., Migeot,V., & Albouy-Llaty, M. (2017). Endocrine Disruptors and Pregnancy: Knowledge, Attitudes and Prevention Behaviors of French Women. International journal of environmental research and public health, 14(9), 1021. Diamanti-Kandarakis, E., Bourguignon, J. P., Giudice, L. C., Hauser, R., Prins, G. S., Soto, A. M., ... & Gore, A. C. (2009). Endocrine-disrupting chemicals: an Endocrine Society scientific statement. Endocrine reviews, 30(4), 293-342. Meeker, J. D. (2012). Exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors and child development. Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine, 166(10), 952-958. Stefanidou, M., Maravelias, C., & Spiliopoulou, C. (2009). Human exposure to endocrine disruptors and breast milk. Endocrine, Metabolic & Immune Disorders-Drug Targets Formerly Current Drug TargetsImmune, Endocrine & Metabolic Disorders), 9(3), 269-276. Li, L. X., Chen, L., Meng, X. Z., Chen, B. H., Chen, S. Q., Zhao, Y., ... & Zhang, Y. H. (2013). Exposure levels of environmental endocrine disruptors in mother-newborn pairs in China and their placental transfer characteristics. PloS one, 8(5), e62526. Dodson, R., Nishioka, M., Standley, L., Perovich, L., Brody, J., & Rudel, R. (2011). Chemical analysis of household and personal care products for endocrine disruptingcompounds and other chemicals of emerging concern. Epidemiology, 22(1), S243-S244.

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warm up from the cold

HOMEMADE PUMPKIN SPICE LATTE RECIPE Ingredients 2 cups of milk 3 tbsp of pure pumpkin puree 2-3 tbsp of sugar (depending on how sweet you want it) 1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice blend, plus more for garnish 1 tbsp pure vanilla extract 1/2 cup of strong brewed coffee or hot espresso sweetened whip cream cinnamon sticks (for garnish) whole cloves (for garnish) Step 1. Combine the milk, pumpkin puree, sugar, pumpkin pie spice and vanilla extract in a saucepan. Step 2. Place over medium heat until hot, but don’t boil. Step 3. Whisk milk mixture vigorously until it’s foamy, about 30 seconds. Step 4. Pour coffee or espresso into 2 large mugs. Step 5. Divide the milk mixture and pour each half into the mugs. Step 6. Top with whipped cream. Add a sprinkle of pumpkin pie spice, cloves and cinnamon sticks for garnish.

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THE HOME BIRTH OF Miriam Elizabeth Glenn

by Anne Glenn In the earliest of hours, I gave birth to our third child. We have named her Miriam Elizabeth. We were at home, safe and well. My husband Coleman and my mother Beth did the work of supporting me, carrying me through the hard with their words of encouragement, reminders of love and steady hands. Our girl came in her own time, in her own way, her labour definitely unique and wild. She was posterior, meaning lots of back labour as she worked to come down, and irregular contractions, varying significantly in timing and intensity. It was a good thing we’d planned to be at home, because we never would have made it anywhere else. When she came, she came fast through the waters; I birthed in a tub, and she came entirely en caul, in her bag of waters. She was born into my hands and I lifted her up out of the water and lifted her caul off of her and she took her first breaths in a room full of joy. There are so many unknowns and uncertainties at birth. I believe profoundly that it is not inherently a medical event, but, like death, a sacred life event. And like in death, it is a transition between worlds and in that holy space, life and death, heaven and earth, the spiritual and the natural reach out and touch, just for an instant, and that instant holds eternity. The news that we were pregnant filled me with such joy, but as we shared that news it was often met with fear - a fear born of love, of care, but fear nonetheless. Navigating that fear has been a challenge and a theme in this season. How I choose to hold and manage other people’s fears and make decisions for myself and this child has been a constant tension. I am so, so grateful for the love and support of those closest to us, for the people who have chosen to set aside their own fear and what they would choose for us to instead hear our hearts and see our needs and help us move through this transition with joy.

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Choosing to birth at home is not for everyone. I truly

of my husband, who was the partner I needed and

believe each birthing person has the right to choose to

wanted through this birth. Miriam and I are both

birth where they feel safe, supported and cared for. We

physically well, but also spiritually, emotionally well.

were able to choose to birth at home with the support of

Oh, there is all of the usual hard of postpartum, but it is

a wide range of birth and medical professionals. Many of

wonderfully, blessedly normal, and we are privileged to

my regular care team went out of their way to offer

be able to relax into this stage and enjoy it.

support, assistance and care as we planned for this birth. Our back up team of OBs provided us with the support and planning we needed to ensure that we could choose to go into the hospital at any point in the process. Our family doctor made house calls to check on us and offer care and support. My oncologist and home care nurse provided excellent ongoing care. The birth consultant we worked with offered invaluable support as we prepared for and moved through labour and birth. Looking back, it is so clear that this was the best choice for us, and I am so grateful for the support of so many

Thank you, for all of your prayers and love. Thank you for your support and encouragement. Thank you, for those who held vigil through the hours we laboured on Monday until she was born on Tuesday, for those who have brought meals, for those who wrote and coloured the affirmations that filled our birthing space, for those who were on call for support at any point of the process, for those who heard our frustrations with navigating a system that at times was more intent on my paperwork

who encouraged us that we could choose to birth at

than my personhood, for those who encouraged us to

home well.

continue to search for the care we needed, for those who offered support and love even as we made

This was the smoothest, least stressful, easiest of my

decisions that might differ from theirs, for the quilts and

births, and by far the easiest and smoothest recovery. I

blankets, onesies and teething rings, for the beads and

have spent the last four days just soaking in Miriam’s

flowers and words, oh the beautiful words, of those who

presence with us, enjoying all of my children around me,

gathered to surround us in a circle of love as we waited

resting in the care of my mother and glowing in the gaze

and waited.

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CLIMBING OUT OF THE DARKNESS By Alana Oikonen I remember how at first my husband and I held her almost all the time. She slept in our arms and we took three hour shifts holding her through the night because that just somehow seemed like the right choice. She was so small, so vulnerable, who could possibly let her go? So, we fumbled our way through the first few months, as all parents do. We opted to use disposable diapers instead of the planned cloth, at least at first so we could just get used to changing diapers in general. I struggled to establish a breast milk supply via pumping when we were unable to breastfeed the 'traditional' way. We finally figured out how to get our baby to sleep in a bassinet, not our arms. Somewhere in these first few months, the other ‘thing’ I brought home with me after my daughter’s birth started to creep into my life. I started to become irritable and anxious. I was borderline obsessive about pumping enough milk to feed my daughter, completely determined to not give her any more formula. I was 'that woman' who literally cried over spilt milk when I dropped a bottle full of freshly expressed milk. I began to get really snappy and easily frustrated. I hated when my husband seemed to be able to do things I couldn’t. Why didn’t the baby cry when he changed her diaper? Why would she settle down to sleep with him, but not me? All of these negative emotions led to some pretty ridiculous arguments, after which I would storm off and cry alone in the bedroom.

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Crying became a norm; for the baby and for me. I pumped milk for hours every day. Often I would be sitting at my ‘pumping station’, my daughter in her little bouncy chair, pumping for 45 minutes while she screamed the whole time. I would try talking to her, and rocking the chair with my foot – all to no avail. I had several days where I felt like I was about to lose it – as in completely lose my mind and do something I would regret. I’d end up calling my husband, in tears, begging him to come home and take the baby for me because I just couldn’t deal with one more minute of being stuck at home, alone, in the dead of winter with a baby who obviously (in my mind) hated me. Perhaps you’re reading this and thinking – wow, what a horrible mother. Or maybe you’re thinking – I felt that way too. Perhaps you might even be thinking – that woman sounds like she’s mentally ill. And that last piece, that’s the truth. I was ill. When I’d gone home after the birth of my daughter, I had brought home a baby, and I had also gone home with postpartum depression and anxiety. I just didn’t know it yet. I had also thought postpartum depression would be more… depressing. That I would be stuck on a couch, with no motivation to do anything and crying at the drop of a hat. Instead I was so frustrated and angry. Everything irritated me. I wanted help with the baby, but when my husband could do things easily and I couldn’t I just hated him and I hated myself. I was mean to my husband and short tempered. At the 4 month check-up the doctor who saw us was not my regular doctor. She was someone I had never met before, or even seen at the office. I knew going into the appointment that I was still not feeling well. Things were not getting better. My anxiety about producing enough breast milk was still incredibly high. I was barely making it through the day with pumping and a crying baby without freaking out. I often yelled and I have never been much of an angry person. One of my regular clients at work calls me ‘Smiley’, but I certainly wasn’t smiling much anymore. The doctor did a perfectly good job of checking out my equally perfect, healthy baby. But you know what she didn’t do? Ask me anything about how I was doing. I had been sitting there, in one of those completely uncomfortable plastic chairs, holding my chubby, squirmy baby and waiting. Waiting for the moment when she was going to ask me about my mental health (which my regular doctor had done at our previous 2 month check-up). The words were swirling around in my head, dancing on the tip of my tongue, just waiting to pour out. But she never asked. And I never told.

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Instead I sat there realizing this was the end of the appointment, and she wasn’t going to ask, and I had that feeling. That weighty feeling of knowing I should say something, but I couldn’t. The words weren’t just caught in my throat, they were caught in my brain. They were trapped in the mass of chaotic thoughts I had about myself and my situation; that I was not a good mother, that I should be able to make myself feel better, that this would just go away if only I worked harder to ‘think positive’, that this doctor would judge me horribly for admitting I sometimes got so angry at my baby I yelled at her, that I felt inadequate and incompetent, and that I would never get it together. I don’t remember leaving the doctor’s office. To be honest a lot of my memories of those early months with my daughter are kind of patchy, or missing altogether. Like a blurry photograph where you can barely make out what’s happening and certainly can’t see any of the details. I do remember having a conversation with myself about how I needed to try harder, I needed to be more positive. I was young, educated, had support, had a nice home and enough money to get out of the house and do things with my baby. I worked in mental health for cripes sake! I could fix this – nay I should fix this! II didn’t fix it. It got worse. It got scary. I started to have intrusive thoughts. I thought about how useless I was and how I should just leave and never come back. I thought about hurting my baby. I thought about hurting myself.

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THE FIRST STEP WAS THE HARDEST, WHICH IS A SOMEWHAT TRITE PHRASE THAT’S USED TO TALK ABOUT MANY TYPES OF JOURNEYS – BUT FOR ME IT WAS TRUE. Before my next appointment I did one of the best and bravest things I have ever done. I told my mom I needed to ask for help, that I should have already asked for help, but I hadn’t. I had her come to my appointment with me to make sure I got those words out: “I am not well. I need help.” She did get those words out. Thank goodness. Because I really needed help. Having my mom there and my regular doctor to talk to took that lump out of my throat and stilled some of the chaos in my mind. It was still hard to say the words. It is hard to admit what feels like a failure, for anyone, at any time. I am ever grateful for having a family that supports me, particularly my husband and my mother who have been with me every step of the way on this difficult journey through postpartum depression and anxiety. I am also glad my doctor took my concerns seriously – he gave me medication, but he also gave me support. He was calm and rational. He let me know I could call the office and see him if I felt worse. He let me know that my thoughts of hurting my baby or myself were serious and if I ever felt I was going to act on those thoughts I should go the ER right away. He made a follow up appointment for two weeks later to monitor me closely. These are things a good doctor should do. The first step was the hardest, which is a somewhat trite phrase that’s used to talk about many types of journeys – but for me it was true. Finally telling someone, a professional outside my family was a huge step. It was the first step to recovery and finding ‘myself’ again.

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If you are reading these words and seeing yourself in them- I wish I could tell you my journey after seeing the doctor was easy, but I can’t. My daughter is almost five years old now. And my experience with postpartum depression and anxiety is only now coming to a close. I had another baby after my daughter, and went through perinatal mental health issues all over again, but worse (if you can believe it). I did make it through though and so can you. I highly recommend talking to the amazing women at Pacific Post Partum Support Society (PPPSS), who have an amazing website (http://postpartum.org/) with lots of information about perinatal mental health issues. If you happen to live in the Vancouver area, they also provide peer support groups. If you are like me and live in the north, they provide phone and text support: toll free phone support at 855255-7999 or text support at 604-255-7999 (please see their website for hours of operation). Contacting PPPSS was the first step I took when my symptoms of postpartum depression came back with my second child – they supported me by calling regularly and helping me find resources in my community. Recovery from any mental health issue involves many factors. It’s about building resources and tools to help yourself. For me, I used a peer support group, medication, exercise, and a lot of selfcompassion. I learned to re-evaluate my expectations for myself and for my children. I let go of some things I had previously thought were important because they were causing me too much stress and anxiety. I worked with my husband and started asking for help. I was able, over time, to be thankful for that help, not jealous and insecure. I learned that being vulnerable and talking openly with my husband, my mother, and other close supportive people about my struggles was not a weakness – it was brave and a true sign of strength. I learned to recognize the cues for when I was starting to get overwhelmed and began asking for help before I exploded. I still miss the cues sometimes. I still yell at my kids and then regret it later. Recovery is not perfection. I am recovered from postpartum mental health issues, but I still have bad days, or bad moments. That’s just life.

When we bring a baby home from the hospital, we expect to bring joy and happiness home with us. If we are realistic, we know that our lives are about to change and that things will be hard. Some of us, however, bring something a little extra home with us in the form of a perinatal mental health issue, such as postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder from birth trauma, or other mental health issues. If you or anyone you know is experiencing postpartum depression, or any other perinatal mental health issue, know that you can reach out for help. You are not a ‘bad mother’, or a ‘bad person’. You are ill. And just like you would see a doctor for any other illness, you can see a doctor for this as well. You are not alone. With help from health care professionals, family, and other community supports, you can recover.

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Bringing Home Ronan An adoption story

We started calling him “our little Superman” because Superman is adopted too, you know!

The birth story of our son RJ is very unique, and so very special to us! We adopted our amazing son through family adoption, on my side of the family, from Cape Dorset, Nunavut. We were asked if we would be able to adopt on March 17th, 2018 -how lucky! Just one week later I bought my first cloth diaper (see the cloth diaper article) and we found out he was going to be a boy. We started calling him “our little Superman” because Superman is adopted too, you know!

RJ’s birth mother, Lala, came to stay with us 2 months prior to his birth. It was very quiet during her stay here; we joked that we weren’t sure she was going to even tell us if she were to go into labour, but we found out she would on the morning of July 25th. My husband had gone to work that morning at 6AM, so when I heard a knock at our bedroom door, I was confused. It was Lala knocking to let me know that her water had broken! Well, knowing I was going to be a mom in the next 24-48 hours kind of had me freaked out, but I stayed calm. I called my husband to let him know, and at around 10:30AM we decided to go in and check how things were progressing. The nurses at the maternity ward were very welcoming and checked everyone’s health.

With nothing happening very quickly, they asked us if we would be more comfortable at home and getting some rest. I very specifically remember the nurse reassuring us by saying, if you are uncomfortable physically (Lala) or emotionally (both of us) at all, then come on back and we will take care of you. We went home and Lala was amazing at staying calm; as her contractions got worse, I needed a lot of reassurance on how she was doing, but she was so confident that she didn’t want to tell me too often! So of course I got uncomfortable, and after driving around the city via the DGR a of couple times, we went back into the hospital at 4:30PM. The nurses suggested Lala may like the bath tub, as it helped with the contractions. I explained that in the Inuit culture, we are generally very private people, so I wasn’t sure that Lala would want to be in the tub, but she surprised me by saying she would. The nurses also took cue, and only came in every hour to check on the baby’s heartbeat, and allowed Lala and I to work through her contractions on our own. Lala tried laughing gas once and hated it, she refused ANY medication! My husband came to the hospital after he was done work, and kept the nurses company, while I kept Lala company, working through the contractions. My husband and I are forever grateful and so proud of Lala for the way she brought RJ into this world!

by Joan Diebert

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BY TASTE OF HOME

PUMPKIN COOKIE POPS INGREDIENTS: 1/2 cup butter, softened

DIRECTIONS: 1. In a large bowl, cream butter and sugars until light

3/4 cup packed brown sugar

and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Beat in

1/2 cup sugar

pumpkin. Combine the flour, baking powder,

1 large egg, room temperature

baking soda and cinnamon; gradually add to

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

creamed mixture and mix well (dough will be soft).

1 cup canned pumpkin

2. Drop dough by 2 tablespoonfuls, 2 inches apart,

2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

onto greased or parchment paper-lined baking

1 teaspoon baking powder

sheets. Insert sticks into dough. Insert a gumdrop

1 teaspoon baking soda

piece into the top of each for the pumpkin stem.

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

3. Bake at 350° F, until set and lightly browned

30 wooden pop sticks

around the edges, about 14-16 minutes. Remove

1/3 cup green gumdrops, halved

to wire racks to cool.

lengthwise

4. For icing, in a large bowl, combine confectioner's sugar, meringue power and water until smooth.

ICING 4 cups confectioner's sugar

Remove 1/2 cup to another bowl; cover and set aside. 5. Stir orange food colouring into remaining icing.

5 tablespoons water

Spread or pipe over cookies. Let stand for 30

3 tablespoons meringue powder

minutes or until icing is set and dry.

Green and orange paste or gel food colouring

6. Tint reserved icing with green food colouring; use this icing to pipe leaves and vines.

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AUGUST 22, 2019

VOL. 29

Q&A

IN THIS ISSUE

What is the biggest struggle about running a business from home? (KS) Getting everything done in a day. There are only so many hours and I put my family first; I love it that way but it takes up a lot of time! Not leaving much room for two businesses forces me to be super efficient with nap times and evenings! (AMO) Working from home is tough because you stay at home so the house chores are always right in front of your face. I try and get most of my work done while my son is at preschool which is a little less than 3 hours a day. I can’t tell you how many times I've just told myself I’d start work after I've folded this load of laundry or once I’ve cleaned the bathroom and before I know it it's time for pick up!

WHAT INFORMATION DOES A BOSS BABE WANT?

WE ASKED OUR FOLLOWERS ON SOCIAL MEDIA WHAT

Who do you look up to / who inspires you in those moments when you are feeling less than motivated/creative?

INFORMATION WE COULD

(AM) Jillian Harris. From her sense of style, parenting two young children, being one heck of a boss babe, and constantly doing her best to be as real and raw as possible. I find her relatable, funny and inspiring. When I am feeling extremely demotivated or uninspired I find that watching her IG stories, or checking out a new post on either her FB/IG page or website, usually helps me to feel motivated again.

WOULD FIND HELPFUL IN

What is one of the best tips you've been given in business that might help someone else? (KS) I was told "If you don't love doing it, source it out. Time is money and if your spending your time doing things you don't love that don't make you money, then source it out!" I calculated what my hourly rate should be and then I weighed tasks like laundry and cleaning against that; is it worth it to do those tasks instead of making that wage? If the answer is no, I find someone to pay to do it. Good thing cleaning is therapeutic to me or else I'd be paying a lot of people!

GATHER THAT THEY

DIFFERENT AREAS OF THEIR LIVES. BY A FEW OF YOUR FELLOW DCBOSSBABES: AMANDA MORGAN (AMO), KAITLIN SEVIER (KS) AND ALICIA MICHETTI (AM).

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VOL. 29 (AM) I was doing a LIVE video of Journey Tree last year and out of nowhere one of the twins threw up all over me! (AMO) If you watch my Instagram story on Fridays you probably know. I have no child care on Fridays which has now turned into balloon delivery day, with my poor child crammed into his carseat surrounded by balloons. I think he likes it lol! Mom fail every time on repeat!

Time saving recommendations for tracking finances in business (AM) If you are able to - hire a bookkeeper. I use Alyssa Woodman out of Grande Prairie (JADA Bookkeeping).  This has been by far one of the most beneficial investments I have made in my business. She keeps me sane, on task, and up to date on the financial side of things in my business.    Quickbooks has also been a saviour (Alyssa and I use it together so she is able to show me things that she is working on and I am able to create invoices and enter info if need be). I love that there is an app and I can create invoices and enter data on the spot.

PHOTO BY MARTIN R. SMITH

(AM) When I was first starting Journey Tree, Natasha Cortez graciously met with me to chat and gave me some very helpful advice. The most helpful and memorable thing she said was to always remember the acronym K.I.S.S - Keep It Simple Sweetie. When I find myself over thinking, be it on trying to create a new product, a post for social media, or anything else in my business, I have often thought back to this advice and am able to step back and simplify the matter at hand.

How & when do you fit in self care? (AM) I do my best to try to find time for self care at least two times a week if not more. It has taken me a while to accept and realize that I am a much better mom and a much more productive business owner when I make time to take care of myself first.  I had to come to terms with asking for help from others, whether it’s to watch the kids or utilizing the child minding at Fitness 4 Life gym in order to get this done. Making time for self care has done wonders for all aspects of my life.    (AMO) I feel like I have pretty good self awareness, I know that I need time to myself in order to function well and to be creative. My business pushes me to be an extrovert which I am naturally not. So, I crave alone time and space to recharge my batteries . I run even if it's only for 20 mins and try and get up at least an hour before my son and after my husband leaves for work so I can have some just me myself and I time!

Tell us the funniest moment you have experienced so far with running your business while momming to your little one/ones (KS) My sitter had to cancel last minute and I had to take my 1 year old son to a lunch meeting with me. I brought a small spatula for him to play with and keep him distracted. He ended up flinging it all across the table and poured a full glass of water into my lap! Thank goodness it was just water but it was quite uncomfortable for the remainder of the meeting.

OUR VISION

Inspiring, motivating, teaching and helping women in our area to collectively inspire others while gaining knowledge, tools, motivation and inspiration to help grow their businesses and nourish their souls. We do so by providing workshops, LIVE videos, social media content, monthly “Featured #DCBossBabes”, and much more.#wefixeachotherscrowns

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Best apps for a small business? (KS) Google calendar I can access my calendar from anywhere I have a signal. I sync my calendar to my family's and know exactly what is happening when. It is the most effective timemanagement tool I've used. (AMO) Laura Dyck introduced me to Canva a few years ago and I’ve been hooked! It's a layout specialist in such a user friendly app that you can also use on your desktop.   (AM) Planoly (ensure you set aside some time to mass load content to use this app to the best of its ability) and Lightroom (with Jillian Harris Presets) are the two I use most often. I find they are user friendly and make posting social media content regularly much easier.

What is one piece of advice you would give to a mama who is thinking of starting up her own business? DUPLICATE (AMO) My First tip for e veryone across the board would be put thought into your outfit the night before. Always clean, ironed and a proper fit. Secondly, I would say dress to suit your personality, if you hate wear a dress, don’t! My mom has always said “It’s always better to be over dressed than underdressed!”This advice has always lead me in the right direction when selecting an outfit. AND don’t overlook the shoes, or the nice sock if you are in Dawson Creek in the winter.

What does a typical day look like for you? What is your best wardrobe advice for dressing for a job interview or meeting with a client? (AMO) My first tip for everyone across the board would be put thought into your outfit the night before. Always clean, ironed and a proper fit. Secondly, I would say dress to suit your personality. If you hate wearing a dress, don’t! My mom has always said “It’s always better to be over dressed than underdressed!”This advice has always led me in the right direction when selecting an outfit. AND don’t overlook the shoes, or the nice socks if you are in Dawson Creek in the winter.

((AM) Wake up, make protein pancakes with the twins, tidy up while they play, play time or head in to the gym, business planning / work during their nap, lunch, playtime (or work on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at Squires Family Chiropractic, then supper, and bedtime routine. (AMO) Wake up, have my large coffee with protein powder in peace and quiet. Post to my social media accounts, make Charlie breaky and head off to school drop off.  Break a sweat and work. Pick up Charlie, have lunch, usually pick up printing from Tiger. Depending on the season take Charlie to hockey, golf or soccer. Make dinner. Bath, book or family game and bed for Charlie.  Followed by paper trimming and trashy reality TV!

Workshop 2

BALANCE SEPTEMBER 14, 2019 9:00 AM-12:30 PM BLOOM PREGNANCY & WELLNESS CLINIC SUITE 101-10300 10TH STREET, DAWSON CREEK, B.C GO TO

WWW.DCBOSSBABES.CON TO REGISTER

TOPIC LIST MENTAL HEALTH PHYSICAL WELLNESS RELATIONSHIP COACHING NUTRITION

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WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE PUBLISHED IN BLOOM MAGAZINE? WE ARE ACCEPTING ADDITIONS TO OUR WINTER '19 ISSUE WRITTEN BY ALFIE BURNS

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BLOOM Magazine Fall '19  

A family minded magazine with a focus on pregnancy, birth and parenthood in Northern British Columbia.

BLOOM Magazine Fall '19  

A family minded magazine with a focus on pregnancy, birth and parenthood in Northern British Columbia.

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