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WWW.BEAUCOOPS.COM WWW.BEAUCOOPS.COM


NEW SEASON BARBARA GONGINI NOW AT:

www.theshelter.co.nz


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We are now a salon beautifully sustainable hair colour and care designed and made in Italy dedicated to encouraging people to take care of themselves the environment and the things they love.

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Enquiries: sales@gosslingerie.

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FOR EWOR D Kia ora and welcome to BLKonBLK issue #4. This issue represents teamwork: synergies between Aotearoa and Australia, the UK and New York. Our Australian editors Thom Kerr and Justin Henry travelled to New Zealand to shoot Marnie Harris for perhaps the most colourful shoot ever to appear in the pages of Black Magazine and Charles Howells and Rachael Churchward team to shoot one of our all time faves Ashleigh Good and her daughter Emily. Enjoy! Coming soon: The Hand of Fashion Edition #2 and Black Magazine print edition #24 at the end of October Grant, Rachael and the Black Whanau www.blackmagazine.co.nz

facebook.com/blackmagnz twitter.com/blackmagazine pinterest.com/blackmagazine vimeo.com/blktv Instagram: @black_mag

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B L KO N B L K I S S U E # 4

ON THE

COVERS

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Photography: Thom Kerr Fashion Editor: Roxanna Zamani Hair &Make-up: Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative using O&M Hair products and M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Marnie Harris at Unique Model Management

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Photography: Charles Howells Fashion Editor: Rachael Churchward Make-up: Sharlene Cassidy using M.A.C Cosmetics Hair: Tommy Stayton at Stephen Marr using R+Co Model: Ashleigh Good at RPD Models. Ashleigh wears: Jacket by NOM*D, earring by MM6 from The Shelter


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Publishers, Editors-in-Chief Grant Fell & Rachael Churchward grant@blackmagazine.co.nz rachael@blackmagazine.co.nz

Writers Grant Fell, Thom Kerr, Yasmine Ganley, Vernonica Crockford-Pound, Rachael Churchward

Creative Director/Art Director/ Fashion Director Rachael Churchward

Photographers Thom Kerr, Ophelia Wynne, Stephen Langmanis,Tintin Hedberg, Daniel Mattalanna, Mikael Wardhana, Charles Howells, David K.Shields, Damien Nikora, Karen Inderbitzen-Waller, Delphine Avril Planqueel, Lula Cucchiara

Art direction and hand-drawn Intro Pages by Nina Van Lier Graphic design assists Nina Van Lier Wilson Ong NZ Hair Editor Greg Murrell @ Ryder Salon

Contributing Fashion Editors Rachael Churchward, Sara Dunn, Sarah Birchley, Katrina Sheiles, Julie Brook Williams, Justin Henry, Ribal Swang, Samara Wilson, Sarah Starkey, Ella Murphy Contributing Beauty/Hair Editors & Artists

UK Editor Sara Dunn @ Clicks & Contacts

Justin Henry, Iggy Rosales, Frederico Ghezzi, Cecillie Hildebrandt Skaarup, Katsumi Matsuo, Yin Lee, Peter Lennon, Claire Thompson, Chris Coonrod, KieKie Stanners, Miguel Lledo, Constance Bowles, Sharlene Cassidy, Carol Mackie, Tommy Stayton

Australian Editor, Sydney Thom Kerr @ Independent Artist Management

Thanks to: Heta Hudson, Catriona Knapp, Zora Bell Boyd

Australian Editor, Melbourne Justin Henry @Vivien’s Creative Melbourne

BLKONBLK is published by: BLK NZ LTD P.O.Box 68-259 Newton,_ Auckland, New Zealand Ph: + 64 9 817 9601

Australian Fashion Editor Sarah Birchley Australian Hair Editor Iggy Rosales Editor-at-large Paul Empson

www.blackmagazine.co.nz www.facebook.com/Blackmagnz www.twitter.com/blackmagazine Instagram: @black_mag

Online Editor Grant Fell NZ Assistant Fashion Editor Ethan Butler Advertising Grant Fell: +64 21 407 248 E: grant@blackmagazine.co.nz Rachael Churchward +64 21 373 330 E: rachael@blackmagazine.co.nz

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The views expressed in BLKONBLK are not necessarily those of the publishers and editors. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any way without permission. Thank you. We do NOT accept unsolicited submissions.

 

Š BLK NZ LTD, 2015


Japanese Selvedge

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B L K L I S T

H O T D AT E

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What is HOTDATE? HOTDATE Project Space primarily acts as the studio space and home of Hikalu Clarke, Hugo Koha Lindsay, Jono Dunbar and Tristan Marler. It has recently grown to include Wilson Ong and Mordo Barkley. HOTDATE acts as an initiative to provide a practical studio come exhibition space for emerging artists and creative practitioners. The emphasis is on the testing, creating and experimental showcasing of a body of work to the public, which might otherwise not be considered or ‘readied’ for commercial/ institutional gallery installation. Who is involved - outline each artist and describe what each of you does? Hikalu Clarke is a painter who explores how visual information is received and distributed through the digital, concentrating upon how technology “flattens” the space between previously disparate contexts. Hikalu is currently studying his MFA at Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design. Hugo Koha Lindsay is currently interested in the role of text within painting conventions, utilizing mediums that often blur the boundaries between collage, drawing and painting. Hugo is currently studying his MFA at ELAM. Jono Dunbar is an abstract painter who interrogates the act of painting, through colour, varying paint mediums and application techniques in order to “find” an image. Jono is currently studying his MFA at Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design, and also enjoys slappin’ the bass. Tristan Marler is a painter and apprentice tattoo artist at Sunset

Tattoo, and has previously studied carving at AUT. Wilson Ong is a graduate student of Whitecliffe College of arts and design. In 2014 he graduated with a BFA majoring in fashion design and is currently an emerging designer for his eponymous label. He has a strong interest in conceptual fashion, textile development, computer aided design, technology, science and tailoring. All of which culminates theoretically and aesthetically into a design ethos that is further influenced by an approach towards masculine uniform. Mordo Barkley is an artist/ technician whose paintings are described as “post fetish”, illustrating the normalization of the fetish. He predominantly works with found/appropriated material shifting from desirable to discarded objects as raw materials. Tell us about the space - why do you share it and what are the advantages of having a shared space? The most valuable aspect of tertiary education is the constant conversations you have about your practice with your peers, as well a space in which to create work. So the big question after art school was; where can we find a studio space, and how can we keep up the momentum we had during our undergrad studies? As we are all predominantly painters, having other creative practitioners in the space enables conversation to broaden each of our practices, and the creative industries. Different personal histories, mindsets and perspectives force us to think differently and to question our preconceived notions. It’s all about pushing a critical but constructive dialogue that helps

our practices move forward, whilst simultaneously discouraging us from falling into old, unquestioned habits that can lead to a creative practice becoming stagnant. Lucy Hopkins, an Auckland-based freelance stylist, recently held a photoshoot at HOTDATE, and the addition of fashion designer Wilson Ong to the HOTDATE studio team means we are able to encourage a wider conversation. We aim to foster a community by creating new relationships and strengthening old bonds, and hope the HOTDATE family grows to include more motivated and driven individuals as time goes on. Are there any exhibitions or shows coming up that you are either doing together or appearing in separately? We had our first exhibition, Hot Goods, last week with the work of emerging painter Mordo Barkley. His practice deals with the transactions around the production and exchange of painting. Their bright, clean colours disguise the painting’s origin that were in fact once rejected but now stand coveted upon a gallery wall. The next exhibition at HOTDATE, ‘Big City High-Riser 2’ will feature two artists, Nick Staples and Josh Hamilton. The exhibition will explore the notion of art as a supplementary to the actual encounter and experience of art through their sculptural practices. The exhibition will utilize theatrical tools to create an environment that will promote and heighten the social effect of a gallery ‘opening’. We aim to put on a show that will open on the last Friday of every month, which will also be open for viewing on the following Saturday and Sunday.


Auckland is alive with creative spaces and crews - young practioners of art, music, design and creative thinking who are prepared to share environments, in fact, are keen to share so that the creativity can flow between them - that the lines can be blurred and boundaries crossed. Over the next few pages we investigate two of these, starting with the Kingsland-based crew known as ‘Hot Date’.

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B L K L I S T

ON TÜR 30


TÜR is a contemporary collective space on Auckland’s Karangahape Road - The ‘winding ridge of human activity’. The studio is run by contemporary weaver Christopher Duncan who weaves textiles using traditional looms and partner Joseph Yen who uses it as a base for his own clothing label THYEN. Grant Fell talks to Christopher about his love of weaving and Lula Cucchiara shoots the boys and our favourite Model/Dancer Paul Edward Wilson on set for this rad film for BLK TV...

Christopher, you are a weaver! We love weaving and it is a feature of our other digital magazine with the ITC Ethical Fashion Initiative in Africa and Haiti - ’The Hand of Fashion’. How did this start for you, this interest in traditional forms of weaving with a loom? The potential of weaving has always fascinated me. I would look at the looms they had at Massey, and adore the wood used in their construction and the musical movements required to operate them. In Melbourne my journey took me to spend a year on the coast where the national park met the ocean. When I moved my sister sent me a small 1970s Rimu table loom. It was simple but useful for a beginner, and a colleague in the city gifted me a box of old yarn which was a collection of odd colours. I taught myself the basics using the internet as my guide, soon I constructed my own frame loom and created rag yarn using old textiles from the op shop. My journey to weaving happened serendipitously, my progression from a fashion industry based on a numbers game to the starting point of clothing seemed natural, I had to redefine what use my skillset could be, and our space TÜR is a progression of this. What sort of looms do you own and where did you get them from? I use a floor loom, which due to its lifting mechanism is classified a ‘Jack loom’. I bought my loom from TradeMe, there are some people in NZ making looms still, one company is called Ashford, I’ve used their accessories but I needed a larger floor loom so something older

was more suitable. Like me it had come back from Melbourne, so our pairing seemed fortuitous. What fibres/yarns do you use and again where do you source them from? I use a variety of yarns, recently I’ve made use of some beautiful merino from the Canterbury region, which is undyed but coloured specifically like the sheep it originated from, it has a great feel but still retains that woolly smell we grow to love as young people. I import some recycled silk from India, that comes about from the waste produced through the Sari weaving process, the excess yarn is respun by hand, and dyed. It’s really textural and is good to use to stabilise certain points of a textile. Cotton I buy in NZ but it’s manufactured in Italy. I also like to incorporate waste textile into my weaving, This year I’ve collected a lot of fabric offcuts from Lela Jacobs and Jimmy D and have been using them as textural elements in clothing and wallhangings. Talk us through the components of Tür and the differentiation between Joe’s work (Thyen) and yours?TÜR means door in german, it represents the physically large glass door that you enter the space via, but in another sense is the door to our home and creative place. TÜR is our open studio, so quite often we are working on projects during the day and late into the night. We develop our work alongside eachother, throwing ideas around, problem solving, and helping to develop a mutual aesthetic. Joe creates his label THYEN from here, which consists of a jewellery and clothing line.

The jewellery takes an organic approach to form in silver, with heavy betina detailing. His clothing on the other hand focuses on the use of natural fibres, and plays with shapes from his ancestral heritage, but has modern androgynous tones. My work is all handmade in the space, a lot of people stop to observe and interact with the weaving process. The textiles take on a japanese edge whether it be stripes or subtle structural definition, however my textural influence is more about my european experience and blood. Tell us about your studio space in K Road and your preference for bricks and mortar as an alternative to online.Initially we just wanted to open a space where we could work from but he opportunity arose where we could open our processes up to the public and curate a space where our work would be for sale. TÜR also gives us the chance to let other creatives exhibit their work, who are local creatives of like mindedness. K. Rd suited us well because of its diverse culture, and its supportive nature. We have a limited online presence, and no online shopping platform, we believe that there’s still value in having destination spaces, this suits us well as a lot of the projects we work on are artisanal. Who else do you collaborate with? Lela Jacobs, Lula Cucchiara, Thannie Phan, Meighan Ellis, Jett Nichol Biggest influences for you both? Contemporary social and environmental thinking, Japanese design, Ancestral influence.

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Photo: Lula Cucchiara Model: Paul Edward Wilson wears TĂœR at Red 11. Shot at: White Studios See the film here 32


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B L K L I S T

GRAB ME

Unlike Gina Lollobrigida in Robert Leonard’s classic 1955 Italian - French comedy Beautiful but Dangerous Sempre Di’s new ‘Grab style’ sandal is not dangerous at all with its unique cylinder heel ensuring the sandal is very stable and easy to wear - but just like gorgeous Gina there is great

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beauty - a sandal designed with smart day wear in mind - suitable for work - that also translates easily into a night out; whether that be transversing a cobbled piazza in Milano or dining out down under. Striking and buttery soft leather piped straps that wrap around the ankle provide a contemporary

edginess. Bellissimo! The latest Sempre Di collection is available now in quality shoe stores across Australia and New Zealand but the Grab style is exclusive to Superette in New Zealand. Sempre Di official Facebook


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SANS WOMAN

KAREN INDERBITZEN-WALLER

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Sans[seuticals] founder Lucy Marr feels that stylist and photographer Karen InderbitzenWaller is the epitome of a Sans Woman; grounded, honest, hard working and always up for a good time. It was a no-brainer then to have her come on board for the brand’s new campaign, not just to lend her eye and infectious energy, but to also have her own presence and beauty be captured by her number one lady Delphine. Says Lucy: It is always a treat to watch Karen photograph her subjects, sensitive to their position she eloquently draws a fresh perspective, perfectly capturing their essence and personality. A combination of her instinctive timing, the rapport she creates on set, and her ability to draw on references far beyond the fashion and beauty realms, results in imagery that is both captivating and open. Much like Karen herself.

Where did you grow up and how do you think this helped to shape you as a person and an artist? I grew up in New Plymouth where my Swiss grandfather immigrated until I was 5, then moved to Auckland. While New Plymouth was beautiful, it has a stunning landscape, I was always grateful to move to a bigger city where my interest in fashion was able to be developed. I loved fashion magazines from an early age and my mother was also very into fashion and clothes so encouraged me and enabled me to partake from a young age. I think New Plymouth would have been a harder, more remote place to be for getting into my chosen career and I am grateful for the move, it’s no doubt been a key part of my early beginnings as a stylist from the age of 18. Have there been any key female figures during your career who have been particularly life changing/ formative? Locally, I looked up to photographers Cindy Wilson and Melanie Bridge who were both strong forces in the industry and at the time, among so few female photographers working in New Zealand. Internationally, I was heavily inspired by art photographers Nan Goldin and Cindy Sherman, and the writer Anais Nin, all such strong woman who weren’t afraid of sexuality in their work. As someone who has a plethora of rich visual references that span film,

art and fashion, how did you find your own voice? I believe heavily in cross referencing, I never copy. When referencing, I construct a Mille feuille so to speak so the many inspirations become something that is new and uniquely my own. Working with another person helps to keep my vision pure and always heavily edited to arrive at the final result. Having someone who’s not afraid of offending me is essential for me also. When I was younger I was heavily into creative writing and story telling where a drafting process is key. I see my photography work as an extension of that early passion where telling a story is very important and the process of drafting during referencing and research is always present. As a multidisciplinary artist, how do you find balance when wearing so many different hats? I don’t believe that I know any other way so it’s never something I’ve had to struggle with. Why is collaboration an important part of what you do? It’s everything for me. When I first became a photographer, shooting for Pavement magazine, I worked alone. Not long after, I fell in love with someone I had gone to high school with who was also heavily interested in photography. At school (Selwyn College) he had been the top art student and was working as an art director in the film industry and not enjoying it. Together we started

to shoot editorial for Pavement magazine and continued to work as a photography duo up until his death in 2006. A lot of people in our industry, where we were based in Sydney, did not understand how two photographers could shoot simultaneously but I firmly believed it helped us to achieve a cinematic quality. I’m very grateful that I have found another soul mate and collaborator with my wife Delphine since 2007. After Chris’s death I did not see how I could continue to work in the way I felt comfortable, or that I could ever shoot again. I saw that with Delphine’s collaboration and combined vision, my work was the thing that has helped me to continue to exist and create in the only way I know how. What are some of your daily rituals? Coffee, the importance of sunlight on my face, even if only through a window, feeding my thirst of imagery by way of books, magazines and films. Remembering last night’s dreams. Intro by Yasmine Ganley. Interview by Veronica Crockford Pound. Sans[ceuticals] 2015 campaign featuring Karen Inderbitzen-Waller, Georgia Pratt, and K.M Marks photographed by Karen Inderbitzen-Waller and Delphine Avril Planqueel Hair by Matt Benns of Stephen Marr. Makeup by Darya Bing. Sans[ceuticals] website

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S PA C E E X P L O R E R Lucilla Gray has had an eventful year, launching her own label, showing in London, Amsterdam and most recently Auckland. Grant Fell learns the details whilst Russell Kleyn shoots her in her native Wellington. Lucilla, you first came to our attention as the inaugural winner of the Kate Sylvester Design Award. You developed a story that tied into Kate’s SS14 collection ‘West Coast’ Not only succinctly but with panache. Can you tell us about that experience and how it has impacted on the Lucilla Gray brand since? I really enjoyed working with Kate Sylvester and being part of her design team. Working with a concept such as her ‘West Coast’ theme was really interesting. I had to research and find my own point of view on the topic, whilst respecting the Kate Sylvester aesthetic. Working with Kate gave me a better understanding of working conceptually in a commercial context. That year at Massey you also won the Kirkcaldie and Stains Creativity and Innovation Award and Rembrandt Award for Excellence, explain how each award differs and what you did to win them? Both awards recognised different qualities in my graduate collection. The Kirkcaldie and Stains award recognised a creative approach to working with new materials, while the Rembrandt award recognised a high standard of work across the board. The accolades kept coming: you were selected as one of 8 International emerging designers at Next by Modefabriek & Amsterdam Fashion Week in 2014 also – talk us through what happened there…. I was really surprised when I was asked to exhibit my work in Amsterdam. It seemed so far away but it was an 38

opportunity I didn’t want to miss out on. The experience taught me a lot about exhibiting and I got to meet some incredible emerging designers, who I still keep in touch with. You didn’t muck around after that either, deciding to launch your eponymous label at Sommerset House as part of London Fashion Week this year - a brave move and one not common for a young New Zealand designer. Why did you decide to do this, what did it entail and how did it go? I was introduced to my London PR agency after my exhibition in Amsterdam. They encouraged me to do London Fashion Week as part of their group showroom at Sommerset House. It gave me a good feel for Fashion Week - what was expected and what I needed to work on for next season. I received really positive feedback for my collection. It was a great experience. Your first collection, SS15, is more ‘poppy’ in terms of colour and fabrics yet is meritorious for its shape and sihouettes alone – how would you describe the shape/outline that features throughout? I wanted to play with extending the body and exploring the space between the body and the garment. This sense of structure is something people are starting to recognise in my collections. The shapes curve with the body, which is often associated with femininity, but they have a power that is often associated with masculinity. FW16 features a great print on

the Galena Dress, top, Gypsum skirt, Mica dress and top and then a strong Obsidian culotte, dress and Onyx coat. In terms of shape and cuts too, the scuba top and Celestine overskirt and graphite pant are strong graphic shapes. Is this collection closer – in terms of its strength - to what we can expect from Lucilla Gray over the next few collections? You can expect structure and clean cuts to run through my work but I also want to keep exploring and developing the Lucilla Gray aesthetic. I’m looking at exploring new silhouettes and textiles at the moment. You work on a made-to-order basis. Talk us through that… It’s really special to work on a made to order basis for my clientele, as well as doing small production runs for my online store. I am able to offer more variety and exclusivity - it’s all about building a strong product and aesthetic. Who or what is your biggest inspiration? I spend a lot of time absorbed in art and culture, visiting galleries, museums and exhibitions. There’s been some wonderful work on show at City Gallery in Wellington recently. What does the rest of 2015 hold for Lucilla Gray? I’m currently preparing for a solo presentation at New Zealand Fashion Week. Then sending the new collection over to London. Let’s see what else happens!

Lucilla Gray website


B L K L I S T

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Silver leather jacket by Veda. Lace top by All Saints. Collar necklace by Alexis Bittar.


HERE COMES THE SUMNER Photography: Daniel Matallana at Matallana Studios Fashion Editor: Julie Brook Williams Makeup: Miguel Lledo at Artlist NYC using M.A.C Cosmetics Hair: Katsumi Matsuo at ArtMix Creative Model: Lili Sumner at Red 11/Next Models

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Pants by Gerard Derel. Jacket by Carolina Sarria. Top (worn under jacket) by Baby Ghost. Shoes by Camilla & Marc.


Fur and leather jacket by Carolina Sarria. Silver and gem earrings by Alexis Bittar. Black gem earrings by Chelsea de Luca. Ring, model’s own

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Lili Sumner has long been a Black favourite and a part of the broader Black Whanau before she left Aotearoa. In recent times she has met with considerable modelling success based in London where she caught the eye of one Hedi Slimane no less. Grant Fell goes in search of the latest update from Lili in London:

Lili, how old were you when you first started modelling in New Zealand. Well, I was 14 and living in Hawkes Bay when I met Amanda Betts from RED11 on a trip to Auckland. The big city! Then I moved back to Auckland at 16 and started working a bit while I was at school, including shooting a few stories with you two for Black. Tell us about your first photo shoot? I think the first one was with Sara Orme in her studio in Parnell. Immy Wilson styled it and I brought some of my clothes along too. Lili, so much has happened since you left Aotearoa to pursue a career in modelling overseas. Do you think the time you spent learning the ropes here in New Zealand put you in good stead? Yeah of course, I think anytime spent on set and in front of a camera has helped me to gauge what works and how to ‘be’.. whilst shooting. Obviously being chosen by Hedi Slimane, pretty much as a muse and then to walk exclusively for Saint Laurent would be major highlights. Can you talk us though when that first happened, i.e when you first met and how your relationship with Hedi has developed? Sure, I was back in London after a stint at home and had just signed with a new agency, NEXT. They put me on the Eurostar that week to meet Hedi in Paris. It just naturally happened after that, I walked the show a week or so after and have done ever since. I feel pretty stoked to work

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with the Saint Laurent house as their clothes, their music, their whole world of SL is incredible and I’ve met a lot of good friends because of it. Hedi has some kind of quick compass on choosing the right boys and girls to fit his dream world which luckily for us includes personality… I hope. Where do you live in London? Describe your home…I live with three boys from the West Midlands in a flat in East London. One boy being my boyfriend. The house is full to the roof with band gear right now and I can’t find anything. I have a corner with all my books and clothes and we seem to have collected a lot of Elvis memorabilia. I love living in London but I’ve been in and out of town a lot lately. Only spending 2 or 3 days here at a time. So home is a travelling circus for now. Is there a crew of Kiwis there you hang with? Yeah in London and New York there is a huge group of Kiwi’s, it’s lovely but I’m not exclusive… If so, what would you do on an average Friday night? It depends where I am but tomorrow is Friday and we’re driving in a van to Wales for The Green Man festival. I’ve heard it’s going to be pissing down with rain as usual but I’m excited to see what Mark E Smith from The Fall is going to do and see the band Goat for the first time. An average Friday! What are you wearing now as you answer these questions? I wish I was

wearing something wild but I just got home from camping in Spain and I’m unwashed in a long dress that smells curiously like indian incense and some brown suede boots. Time to do some washing. Is there any music on? If so what are you listening to? There’s not except for the racket of market stalls being brought in for the evening outside my window. If there was it would be my new/old favourite Silver Apples. Any current favourite films, docos or dramas? My mum’s new documentary is pretty good (Sumner Bursten), It just screened in NZ - “Some kind of Love”. Are you currently reading any books? My two friends and I just started a book club, so we can drink wine and talk about books on Monday nights. Wild! I recently read Everything is Illuminated and then saw the author himself, Jonathan Safran Foer read from his new work at Shakespeare in Company bookshop - it was thrilling. I’m also in love with with Raymond Carver. Currently I’m reading Janet Frame, her stories of growing up in Otago warm me in a way only tales of home can. How would you describe your own personal style? Lamb dressed up as dandy mutton? I don’t know. Models.com profile


Pants by Gerard Derel. Jacket by Carolina Sarria. Top (worn under jacket) by Baby Ghost. Shoes by Camilla & Marc. Necklace, model’s own

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I WAS A CLOUD Photography: Superteam at Vivien’s Creative Melbourne Fashion Editors: Ribal Swang and Justin Henry Hair & Makeup: Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative Melbourne using O&M Surf Bomb spray and M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Izzy Jarrett at IMG

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Hat and bra by Emily Bye. Leather skirt by Strateas.Carlucci. 49


Leather jacket by Strateas.Carlucci. Swimsuit by Maria Ke Fisherman

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Sweater by Ann Demeulemeester. Bra by Calvin Klein.

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Sweater by Ann Demeulemeester. Bra by Calvin Klein.

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Sunglasses by Onkler. Sheer top by Strateas.Carlucci. Bra by Calvin Klein.

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Sunglasses by Onkler. Sheer top by Strateas.Carlucci. Bra by Calvin Klein.

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Sweater by Ann Demeulemeester. Bra by Calvin Klein.

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Sunglasses by Onkler. Sheer top by Strateas.Carlucci. Bra by Calvin Klein.

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Sweater by Ann Demeulemeester. Bra by Calvin Klein.

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Opposite page: Sheer top, bra and pants by Strateas.Carlucci. This page: Sweater by Ann Demeulemeester. Bra by Calvin Klein.

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Sweater by Ann Demeulemeester. Bra by Calvin Klein.

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Leather hat by Emily Bye.

Shot at: Superteam Studios Thanks to: Dexter Lee 61


THE GIRL WHO FELL TO EARTH Photography: Tintin Hedberg at Hell Studios.com.au Hair & Makeup: Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative Melbourne using Kevin.Murphy and Makeupforever Cosmetics Model: Charlotte Jane at Maverick Models 62


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4 Shot at: Hell Studios Assistant: Ryan Creevey Thanks to: Olga at West End Hair and Shari-Lee Bromley

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I’M NOT THAT IMPRESSED Photography: Thom Kerr Fashion Editor: Roxanna Zamani Hair &Make-up: Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative using O&M Hair products and M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Marnie Harris at Unique Model Management

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Dress by Stolen Girlfriends Club. Harness by D.W.N.S. Latex thigh-high tights by Whipshhh. Boots by Alexander Wang from Workshop. Bracelet by Vanessa Moe. Latex gloves, stylist’s own. 71


Dress by Stolen Girlfriends Club. Plastic dress by Roxanna Zamani. String visor and plastic neckpiece by JoJo Ross. Latex thigh-high tights by Whipshhh. 72


Hair dress by World. Plastic dress by Roxanna Zamani. Heels by Alexander Wang from Workshop. 73


Dress by Jorge Alfaro. PVC top with plastic overlay by Haryono Setiadi. Harness by Blu Blank. Latex gloves, stylist’s own. Headpiece by Vanessa Moe. Heels by Goran Horal. 74


Jacket by Jorge Alfaro. Skirt by Miriam Seddiq. Latex pant and half glove by Whipshhh. Headpiece by Vaness Moe. Heels by Goran Horal. 75


Jumpsuit by Camilla & Marc. Latex skirt by Whipsshh. Cape by Roxanna Zamani. Latex gloves, stylist’s own 76


Bodysuit by Kay Goss. String dress by JoJo Ross. Brief by American Apparel. Latex gloves, stylist’s own 77


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Photo Assist: Aaron Burgess Photo Assist: Anton Maurer Photo Assist: Kingy Hsu Photo Assist: Bas van Est Hair Assist: Lenard Johnson Make-up Assist: Liz Hyun Special Thanks to Olga at: Westend Hair for extension and colour Shot at Kingsize Studios

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Dress by Homage. Beaded neckpiece by Mariam Seddiq. Harness by Blue Blank. Bracelet by Vanessa Moe. Latex half glove by Whipshhh. 79


This page: Bomber jacket and pants by Louis Vuitton. T-shirt by Gant. Wristbands by John Hardy. Opposite page: Knit by Gant. Trench coat by Jack Huang. 80


STRAIGHT UP Photography: Thom Kerr Graphic Illustrations: Daniel Aristizabal Arias & Thom Kerr Fashion Editor: Sarah M Birchley Hair: Iggy Rosales using Fudge Professional Beauty: Carol Mackie using M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Jay Barwick at IMG 81


Coat and pants by Prada. Shirt by House of Cards. Wristbands by John Hardy. 82


Coat by Prada. Shirt by House of Cards. 83


Bomber jacket by Emma Mulholland. Pants by House of Cards. Earring by Natasha Scchweitzer. 84


Jacket by Jack Huang. T-shirt by MRP. Pants by Gant. 85


Blazer and shirt by Louis Vuitton. Shorts by House of Cards. Sunglasses by Limedrop. 86


Pants by Louis Vuitton. Hoodie by MPR. Backpack by Prada. Wristbands by John Hardy. 87


I GOT YOU BABE Photography: Charles Howells Fashion editor: Rachael Churchward Make-up: Sharlene Cassidy using M.A.C Cosmetics Hair: Tommy Stayton at Stephen Marr using R+Co Assistant Fashion Editor: Ethan Butler Models: Ashleigh Good at RPD and Emily Good-Charalampou

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Ashleigh wears: Top and dress by Zambesi. Eyewear by Miu Miu from Mortimer Hirst, High St. Emily wears: Jumper by Workshop.

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Jacket and pants by Acne from Workshop. Tops by Zambesi. Sneakers by adidas. Rings by Zora Bell Boyd Jewellery


Long jumper, knit cape and earring by MM6 from The Shelter. Shirt by Kate Sylvester. Gloves (worn throughout) stylist’s own.

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Jacket by Acne from Workshop. Hat by Reinhard Plank from The Shelter. Tie by Kate Sylvester.


Coat by Acne from Workshop. Bodysuit (worn underneath) by Kay Goss. Dress by NOM*d. Necklace by MM6 from The Shelter. Sneakers by adidas.

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Top by Zambesi. Bra by Kay Goss. Culottes by Taylor. Sneakers by adidas. Rings by Zora Bell Boyd Jewellery.


Jumpsuit and earring by MM6 from The Shelter. Slides by Marc by Marc Jacobs from Workshop. 95


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Jacket by Acne from Workshop. Swimsuit by OYE and earring by MM6 from The Shelter. Skirt by Helen Cherry. Belt by NOM*d from stylist’s archive. Key from White Studios


Shirt by Marc by Marc Jacobs from Workshop. Tie by Kate Sylvester. Earring by MM6 from The Shelter.

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Leather apron worn over shoulder, top and skirt by Kate Sylvester. Pants by Zambesi. Shoes by Cinzia Araia from The Shelter. 98

Fashion Assist: Zeenat Wilkinson Photo Assist: Veronika Gulyayeva Shot at: White Studios


Swimsuit by Moeva and jacket by Barbara Gongini from The Shelter. Culottes by Helen Cherry. Heels by Alexander Wang from Workshop

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H O R I Z O N TA L A T O R Photography: Mikael Wardhana Fashion Editor: Samara Wilson at Sync Productions and Management Hair & Makeup: Constance Bowles Model: Gem at Work Agency Dress by Ae'lkemi


Dress by Alex Perry. 102


Skirt (worn as top) by Prism. Dress by Faddoul. Brief by American Apparel.

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Dress by Ae'lkemi

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Skirt by Rachel Gilbert. Bra by Calvin Klein. Veil, stylist’s own. 106


Coat by Ellery. Veil, stylist’s own.

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Dress by Toni Maticevski. Headpiece by Hatmaker Jonathon Howard. 108


Coat by Ellery. Stylist’s own veil.

Fashion Assist: Irene Matteucci Post Production: Mikael Wardhana

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Vintage T-shirt by Milk It from Asos. Skirt by Prada.

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A M A Z E A LITTLE

Photography: Superteam at Vivien’s Creative Melbourne Fashion Editor: Katrina Sheiles Hair & Make-up: Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative Melbourne using Kevin.Murphy and Stila Cosmetics Model: Claire Collins at IMG

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Knit by Dion Lee. Skirt by Akira. Boots by Caterpillar from Asos

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Jacket by Christopher Esber.

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Jacket and skirt by Mat Lee.

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Top by Gary Bigeni.

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Dress by Christopher Esber.

Shot at: Superteam Studios Thanks to: Dexter Lee 117


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I WON’T ASK YOU AG A I N Photography: Superteam at Vivien’s Creative Melbourne Fashion Editors: Ribal Swang and Justin Henry Hair & Makeup: Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative Melbourne using Kevin.Murphy and Stila Cosmetics Model: Gabby Dover at IMG All clohing: Strateas.Carlucci

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Jade wears: Denim jacket by Topshop. Shirt by Levi’s. Jeans by Cocurata.

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GIRRRL GANG

Photography: Damien Nikora Fashion Editor: Rachael Churchward Makeup: Sharlene Cassidy using MAC cosmetics Hair: Katie Fell Models: Mary at RPD, Jade at Unique, Wednesday and Coco at 62, Nina Van Lier at Black

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Nina wears: Jacket by Cocurata. Jeans by Neuw. Shoes by Dr Martens.

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Opening page - Mary wears: Eyewear by Oliver Peoples from Mortimer Hirst, High St. This page: Nina wears: Her own beanie and hoodie dress

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Mary wears: Overalls by Rolla’s and jacket (tied around waist) by Neuw. Sneakers by Nike, model’s own

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Mary wears: Overalls by Rolla’s and jacket (tied around waist) by Neuw

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Wednesday wears: Hat by Reinhard Plank from The Shelter. T-shirt by Abrand. Vintage scarf, stylist’s own.

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Wednesday wears: T-shirt by Abrand. Jeans by Levi’s. Sneakers by MM6 from The Shelter. Vintage scarf, stylist’s own

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Mary wears: Jacket by Cocurata

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Mary wears: Jacket by Cocurata. Jeans by Neuw Denim. Belt from Workshop archive Sneakers by Nike, model’s own

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Coco wears: Top by Cocurata Shirt by Abrand and shorts by Neuw. Stockings, stylist’s own. Sneakers by adidas, model’s own.

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Coco wears: Top by Cocurata. Shirt by Abrand.

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Coco wears: Hat by Reinhard Plank from The Shelter. Top by NOM*d.

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Coco wears: Hat by Reinhard Plank from The Shelter.Top by NOM*d. Pants by Zambesi. Shoes by Mobi from The Shelter. Cuff from Workshop archive.

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Jade wears: Denim jacket by Cocurata. Jeans and Denim jacket (worn around waist) by Levi’s. Belt and cuff from Workshop Archive

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Jade wears: Denim jacket by Cocurata. Jeans and Denim jacket (worn around waist) by Levi’s. Belt and cuff from Workshop Archive

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Sneakers by MM6 from The Shelter.

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Nina wears: Her own beanie and hoodie dress. Shoes by Dr Martens

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Wednesday wears: Hoodie by Nom*d. Vest by Current/Elliot from The Shelter.

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Wednesday wears: Hoodie by Nom*d. Jeans and vest by Current/Elliot, long sleeve top by Jimmy D and sneakers by MM6, all from The Shelter.

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Jade wears: Denim jackets by Topshop. Shirt by Levi’s. Jeans by Cocurata.

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Jade wears: Denim jacket by Topshop. Shirt by Levi’s

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EXPR E SS WAY Photography: David K Shields Fashion Editor: Sarah Starkey at Work Agency Hair: Chris Coonrod at Union Management Mak-up: Claire Thompson at Company1 Model: Lara Carter at Priscilla’s

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Shirt by Maison Scotch. Top by Lonely Hearts. Hat created by stylist. Earring by Karen Walker. Tie by Acne.

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Pants by ACNE. Roll neck sweater by Standard Issue. Bra by Christie Nicole. Heels and gloves by Prada. Hat, stockings and headscarf, stylist’s own.


Coat by Miu Miu. Cardigan by Kate Sylvester. Shorts by Sonia Rykiel from Style Bop. Earring by Karen Walker. Stockings, stylist’s own. Shoes by Chie Mihara.

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Top, jacket and trousers by Acne. Shirt by Maison Margiela. White badge by Emma Mulholland. Silver badge by Lucy Folk. Headscarf, stylist’s own.


Top by Emma Mulholland. Jacket by Christian Dior. Pants by Dress Up. Heels by Prada. Earring by Karen Walker. Headscarf and stockings, stylist’s own.

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Top (with brooches) by Prada. Shirt by Balenciaga. Choker, stylist’s own


Jacket by Kate Sylvester. Earring by Karen Walker. Shirt by Prada. Roll neck sweater by Acne. Badge, stylist’s own

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Top, jacket and trousers by Acne. Shirt by Maison Margiela. White badge by Emma Mulholland. Silver badge by Lucy Folk. Shoes by Chie Mihara socks, gloves and headscarf, stylist’s own. Badge (on headscarf) by Prada.

ocks and


Roll neck sweater by Standard Issue. Bra by Christie Nicole. Gloves by Prada. Hat and headscarf, stylist’s own.

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ELEMENTS Photography: Stephen Langmanis Fashion Editor: Sara Dunn Hair: Frederico Ghezzi and Cecilie Hildebrandt Skaarup Makeup: Yin Lee using M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Margarita Pugkova at Elite London Watch the film here!

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Opening page: Jumpsuit by Kenzo, shoes by Celine. This page: Dress and knickers by Yohji Yamamoto. Scarf by Issey Miyake. Boots by Prada


Shirt and trousers by Celine. Trainers by Nike.

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Bra by American Apparel. Trousers by Loewe. 163


Dress by Louise Alsop. 164


Harness by Daniel Politt. 165


Gilet, skirt and belt by Marni. Boots by Prada. 166


Jumpsuit by Yohji Yamamoto. Boots by Prada. 167


THE DAY DR E A M TITLE Photography: David K Shields Fashion Editor: Ella MPhotography: urphy David K Shieds Hair: Peter Lennon atFashion Company 1 Ella Murphy Editor: Make-up: Claire Thompson at Company Hair:Peter Lennon at1 Company 1 Model: FernandaMakeup: at Priscilla’s Claire thompson at Company 1 Model: Fernanda at Pricislla’s

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Opening page: Coat by Coach. Hat by Fabrique Vintage. Earrings by Kenneth Jay Lane and necklace (worn on hat) by Ben Amun both from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels . This page: Shirt by Gucci. Pants by Christan Dior. Boots by Prada. Earrings by Julie Sandlau from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels


Dress by Louis Vuitton. Neck tie by Ohiko. Earring (worn as broach) by Gerard Yosca from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels 171


Pants by Karen Walker. Dress by Gucci. Shoes by Prada. Earrings by Julie Sandlau and ring by Julie Vos both from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels


Dress and skirt by Christian Dior. Earrings by Julie Sandlau from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels


Dress and skirt by Christian Dior. Earrings by Julie Sandlau from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels


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Coat by Coach. Skirt by Tome. Heels by Ellery. Socks by Prada.


Dress by Anna Sui and pants by Giambattista Valli both from Stylebop.com. Earrings by Gripoix from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels. Ring by Bulgari. Shoes by Ellery.

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Dress and necklace by Louis Vuitton.


Kaftan by Celine

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LET M E DREAM BEFORE YOU WAK E U P Photographvy: Ophelia Wynne Fashion Editor: Sara Dunn Hair & Makeup: Tine Ibsen using Mitch Stone Essentials Model: Maria K at IMG London Casting: Simon Lewis at Cast & Elect

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Trousers by Celine. Bikini top by Stella McCartney

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Vintage t-shirt from Rokit. Bikini bottom by Melissa Odabash

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Capelet by Missoni. Bikini by Eres. Sunglasses by Linda Farrow for Markus Lupfer.

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Shirt and swimming costume by Mara Hoffman. Leather skirt by Temperley. Sunglasses by Linda Farrow for Markus Lupfer. 185


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Kaftan by Celine

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Dress by Saint Laurent. Sunglasses by Linda Farrow. Skates by Rio Roller.

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Necklaces by Broken Fab. Trousers by Miguelina

Fashion Assist: Felicity Gray

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FUTURE CITY

NEW MEXICO BASED ARTIST MICHAEL JANTZEN CREATES THE KIND OF ART THAT DREAMS ARE REALLY MADE OF. HIS IMAGINATIVE SCULPTURE AND CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS SPEAK TO A FUTURE WHERE BOTH THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE HOME LIVE HAND IN HAND ARCHITECTURE AT ONE WITH NATURE.


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THOM KERR: HOW WOULD YOU BEST DESCRIBE WHAT YOU DO? MICHAEL JANTZEN: I CONSIDER MYSELF TO BE AN ARTIST/DESIGNER WHO OFTEN USES ARCHITECTURE AS MY ART FORM. MOST OF MY WORK MERGES ART, ARCHITECTURE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SUSTAINABLE DESIGN. HOW DO YOU COMBINE THE WORLDS OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN YOUR WORK? I HAVE DONE THIS IN VARIOUS WAYS. IN SOME CASES I HAVE EXPLORED WAYS IN WHICH TO PUSH THE ENVELOPE OF ARCHITECTURE INTO NEW KINDS OF FORMS THAT DEFINE NEW KINDS OF FUNCTIONS, AND NEW KINDS OF STRUCTURES. SOME OF THESE EXPLORATIONS HAVE INVESTIGATED NEW WAYS OF CREATING INTERACTIVE ARCHITECTURE. SOME OF THIS INTERACTIVE ARCHITECTURE CAN BE MANIPULATED BY PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD THROUGH THE INTERNET. OTHER PROJECTS HAVE PLAYED WITH THE SYMBOLISM OF ARCHITECTURE AND DEVELOPED INTO MORE CONCEPTUAL AND FANCIFUL STRUCTURES AND PHOTOMONTAGES. WHAT ARE THE THEMES YOU EXPLORE IN YOU WORK? INTERACTIVITY, FUNCTIONALITY, CONCEPTUAL SYMBOLISM, DECONSTRUCTION, FANTASY, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY. HOW MUCH DOES YOUR ENVIRONMENT INSPIRE YOUR WORK? MOST OF MY WORK IS INSPIRED BY MY ENVIRONMENT SINCE I AM ALWAYS TRYING TO REINVENT IT IN WAYS THAT WOULD ACCOMMODATE MY IDEAS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL INTERVENTIONS. I OFTEN MENTALLY PLACE MY ART, ARCHITECTURE, AND DESIGNS INTO VARIOUS KINDS OF ENVIRONMENTS TO SEE IF THEY ARE COMPATIBLE, AND THEN BUILD MODELS THAT ARE PHOTOGRAPHED AND PHOTO SHOPPED INTO THE ACTUAL SCENES. DO YOU HAVE A FAVOURITE ARTWORK OR SERIES? WHY? I LIKE SEVERAL SERIES LIKE MY HOUSE AS A METAPHOR SCULPTURES THAT PLAY WITH THE SYMBOLIC ASPECTS

OF THE IMAGE OF A HOUSE. ALSO MY DECONSTRUCTING THE HOUSES AND CHURCHES SERIES OF PHOTOMONTAGES THAT QUESTION THE PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL STABILITY OF THESE ICONIC IMAGES IN OUR SOCIETY. I AM WORKING NOW ON A SERIES OF SCULPTURES THAT I LIKE A LOT THAT ARE BASED ON THE CREATION OF A VERY UNUSUAL FANCIFUL ARCHITECTURE, WHICH LOOKS AT HOW STRUCTURES MIGHT LOOK IF THEY WERE MADE FOR USE IN OTHER THEORETICAL WORLDS. HOW DO YOU HOPE PEOPLE RESPOND TO YOUR WORK? I HOPE THEY HAVE FUN WITH THE FANCIFUL WORK, AND I HOPE THAT IT INSPIRES THEM TO THINK MORE CREATIVELY ABOUT THEIR OWN LIFE. I HOPE THAT THE MORE PRACTICAL AND FUNCTIONAL WORK HELPS TO MAKE THE PHYSICAL WORLD A BETTER PLACE FOR ALL OF HUMANITY THROUGH ENERGY EFFICIENCY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION TECHNIQUES. WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE PART OF THE CREATIVE PROCESS? WATCHING THE IDEAS UNFOLD INTO REALITY AND FINALLY SEEING THE FINAL RESULTS. WHICH ARTISTS INSPIRE YOU? MANY DO BUT THE TOP OF MY LIST WOULD HAVE TO BE MY WIFE ELLEN JANTZEN, AND ANISH KAPOOR! WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON? I AM ALWAYS WORKING ON SEVERAL PROJECTS AT ONCE. I AM DEVELOPING A NEW DESIGN FOR A PREFABRICATED, MODULAR, ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDING SYSTEM. AT THE SAME TIME PLAYING WITH SOME NEW PHOTOMONTAGES, A NEW KIND OF INTERACTIVE ARCHITECTURE, AND ALSO BUILDING SOME SMALL SCULPTURES THAT EXPLORE AN ARCHITECTURE FOR OTHER WORLDS. IN ADDITION I AM DESIGNING SOME PUBLIC ART STRUCTURES THAT COLLECT AND STORE RAINWATER, AND GATHER ENERGY FROM THE SUN FOR THE COMMUNITIES IN WHICH THEY ARE BUILT. 197


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3D TR EATS DANIEL ARISTIZテ。AL ARIAS HAS DEVELOPED QUITE THE CULT FOLLOWING FOR HIS NEON CANDY COLOURED POP ART. HIS SURREALIST ILLUSTRATIONS AND 3D DESIGNS ARE INSPIRED BY MULTIPLE GENRES MIXED IN WITH VARIOUS CHILDHOOD DREAMS THAT HAVE STAYED WITH HIM FROM THE PAST. WE TALK AESTHETICS WITH THE DESIGNER FROM HIS HOMETOWN CITY OF

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THOM KERR: FOR SOMEONE WHO HAS YET TO SEE YOUR WORK, HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE AESTHETIC? I WOULD SAY IT’S COLOURFUL POP SURREALISM. FULL OF GEOMETRY, SIMPLICITY AND NOSTALGIA AT IT’S CORE. HOW DID YOU GET STARTED WITH ILLUSTRATION AND DESIGN? WHEN I STARTED COLLEGE I REALLY DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO STUDY. I CHOSE JOURNALISM FIRST, BUT I SOON REALISED IT WASN’T MY CRAFT. I LOVE MOVIES AND WANTED TO STUDY FILMMAKING, BUT IN MEDELLÍN THERE’S NO PLACE TO STUDY IT. SO GRAPHIC DESIGN WAS THE OTHER OPTION AND I BELIEVE I MADE THE RIGHT CHOICE. AFTER THAT I FURTHERED MY EDUCATION IN BARCELONA WHERE I STUDIED MOTION GRAPHIC DESIGN. HOW MUCH IS CREATED DIGITALLY AS OPPOSED TO DRAWN BY HAND? THE FINAL RESULT IS DIGITAL, BUT I ALWAYS START ON PAPER. I HAVE SEVERAL NOTEPADS - THEY’RE REALLY MESSY TO BE HONEST. THEY’RE FULL OF DOODLES AND RANDOM IDEAS. I DRAW THE SKETCHES AND CREATE A BASIC IDEA IN ILLUSTRATOR AND BREATHE THEM TO LIFE USING THE PROGRAM CINEMA 4D. WHERE WERE YOU BORN AND WHERE ARE YOU NOW BASED? I WAS BORN IN MEDELLÍN, COLOMBIA, AND I’M STILL LIVING THERE. WHAT IS THE DESIGN SCENE LIKE IN COLOMBIA? I THINK THERE ARE LOT OF TALENTED PEOPLE, BUT I BELIEVE THAT THERE’S NOT A GOOD VIBE AMONG THE DESIGNERS. A LOT OF ENVY AND EGO PROBLEMS - THERES NO REAL SENSE OF A DESIGN COMMUNITY AND THAT SUCKS. YOU’VE GOT A STRONG FOLLOWING ON SOCIAL MEDIA, WHAT YOU THINK OF THE NEW DIGITAL AUDIENCE ERA? I THINK IT’S A GREAT WAY TO GET YOUR VOICE AND STYLE OUT THERE.

NOW MORE THAN EVER IS THE TIME WHEN WE CAN CONNECT WITH ANYONE IN THE GLOBE, SHOW OUR WORK, OUR AESTHETICS AND I THINK THAT IN A WAY THIS HAS DEMOCRATISED THE WORLD OF ARTS AND DESIGN. IT DOESN’T MATTER ANYMORE WHERE YOU LIVE, YOUR WORK CAN TAKE YOU PLACES AND THATS AMAZING. WHAT INSPIRES YOUR CREATIONS? I MUST CONFESS IT’S MOSTLY DREAMS AND RANDOM IDEAS. I FOLLOW AND READ ABOUT ART AND VARIOUS ARTISTS IN GENERAL. SURREALISM, CUBISM, DADAISM, FUTURISM. I STUDY ALL OF THESE GENRES - THEY ARE THE BEST SOURCE OF INSPIRATION. MOVIES AND FASHION ARE HUGE FOR ME AS WELL, BUT THE MAIN INSPIRATION POINTS ARE RANDOM THOUGHTS THAT POP IN MY MIND, LIKE MEMORIES OF DREAMS AND THINGS THAT I USED TO IMAGINE WHEN I WAS A KID. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVOURITE PROJECT TO DATE? I THINK I WILL HAVE TO SAY THE 36 DAYS OF TYPE PROJECT - IT WAS A GREAT WAY TO EXPLORE DIFFERENT VISUAL STYLES AND IT WAS THE TURNING POINT IN MY CAREER. WHAT IS YOUR ULTIMATE CAREER GOAL? TO TRAVEL THE WORLD THANKS TO MY WORK. I WANT TO WITNESS MULTIPLE CULTURES AND WAYS OF LIVING AND NEVER LOSE THE JOY OF CREATING NEW WORK. WHAT CAN WE EXPECT TO SEE FROM YOU IN THE FUTURE? WELL I’M CREATING COOL FASHION ILLUSTRATIONS AND I WILL TEACH A CLASS ON SKILLSHARE, SO STAY TUNED. I’M ALSO WORKING ON SOME ANIMATIONS FOR THE END OF THE YEAR AND IF YOU’RE HEADING DOWN TO BARCELONA NEXT MAY I’LL BE A SPEAKER AT OFFF BARCELONA 2016!

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ONE SUMMER I N PÉR IGOR D NOIR BLACK PHOTOGRAPHERS KAREN INDERBITZEN-WALLER AND DELPHINE AVRIL PLANQUEEL HAVE SPENT THE SECOND HALF OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SUMMER ENSCONCED IN THE PROVENCAL GLORY OF PÉRIGORD IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE. THE REGION IS DIVIDED INTO FOUR SUB-REGIONS: VERT (GREEN), BLANC (WHITE), POUPRE (PURPLE) AND NOIR (BLACK). THE GIRLS OF COURSE STAYED IN PÉRIGORD NOIR! WE HAVE LONG BEEN FANS OF THEIR ART, ARCHITECTURE, LANDSCAPE AND PORTRAITURE PHOTOGRAPHY, ALMOST AS MUCH AS THEIR FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY, SO WE ASKED THEM TO CAPTURE A PHOTO ESSAY OF THE REGION. THE WIDER AREA IS STEEPED IN HISTORY; ITS 147 PREHISTORIC SITES DATING FROM THE PALAEOLITHIC ERA AND PEPPERED BY NO LESS THAN 25 DECORATED CAVES. MORE RECENTLY, ITS ROMANTIC AIR HAS INSPIRED JULIA STUART TO WRITE THE MATCHMAKER OF PÉRIGORD, MICHAEL CHRICHTON TO SET PART OF TIMELINE IN 1357 PÉRIGORD. IN 1970, CLAUDE CHABROL FILMED HIS CLASSIC THRILLER LE BOUCHER THERE WITH REFERENCESTO THE TOWN OF SARLAT. FILM PÉRIGORD NOIR PERHAPS! 214


Roger, age 106

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Sunflowers


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Open window


Lost sweatshirt

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Red slide


Paper Flowers

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Honneur A Nos Elus


Country slides

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Dinosaur


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Gaspard le Chat


Bag lady

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Aux Travaillers


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