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N e w K A R e N wA L K e R p e A R L c o L L e c t i o N


KATESYLVESTER.COM


37 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby Auckland


stephenmarr.co.nz

16 Morrow St, Newmarket Auckland


BELOVED HUSBAND LOYAL FRIEND LEADER ARTIST MENTOR MUSICIAN BEAUTIFUL UNCLE COURAGEOUS VISIONARY WRITER INSTIGATOR ACTIVATOR PIONEER JOKER

In loving memory of Grant Carlise Fell 1961 - 2018 Grant seen here at the 2009 opeing of Louis Vuitton, Auckland wearing suit by Workshop Denim 26


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A creative space to make your mark.


G+R 4 EVA Tena koutou, welcome to Issue 10 of BLKONBLK. This will be the hardest foreword I (Rachael) have ever had to write. On January 27th of 2018 our beloved Publisher, Editor-in-Chief, Founder and my husband Grant Fell succumbed to the brain cancer he had fought so courageously for 3 years with dignity and patience. Maintaining a sense of humour even through the darkest of times, he left a hole in our hearts, but here at Team Black also the sheer determination to work hard and be our best for his legacy. So throughout these pages that follow we hope you enjoy the wonderful work from our loyal teams. I read so many beautiful and amazing tributes to Grant and thank you all who sent us kind words and love. As I read through them many words swirled through these tributes. Words that summed up a man of substance and intelligence. His contributions to the New Zealand’s music and fashion industries just a dent in a life well lived and constantly explored. He was an amazing man of many talents, very loved and respected, generous and kind hearted, supportive, an Encyclopedia of interesting facts, encouraging, a charming gentleman, a warrior, a lover and fighter, cool, a special human who touched so many peoples lives with his twinkly green eyes and warm smile. With Grant nothing was off limits or unachievable and finally, in the words of a friend Huia Ngapho written a few days after Grant left this mortal coil. “I want to acknowledge the loss to our creative industry. There are beautiful, genius ideas that will forever be in the depths of imagination because Grant isn’t here to think them up, and that folks, is a fucking legacy! The heart symbol in this issue is a graphic tribute of love to Grant . RIP Grant Carlisle Fell - gone but never forgotten. Arohanui, Rachael, Grant, Ethan and the Black whanau

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ON THE FRONT

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Photography TRAC EY LE E HAYE S

Photography NATHAN MARTI N

Fashion B R ITTN I M O R R I S O N

Fashion H O LLI E VAN O S E N B R U G G E N

Hair and Makeup J U STI N H E N RY

Hair M O I Z ALLAN D I NA using K EVI N M U R P HY

using M.A.C C O S M ETI C S

Makeup MAK I HAS E GAWA using M.A.C

Model ADAU at C HADW I C K wears

C O S M ETI C S

G IVE N C HY necklace, SAI NT LAU R E NT

Model GAB BY W E STB R O O K-PATR I C K at TH E

chain, D I O R ring, H E R M E S scarf (from TH E

LI O N S NYC wears VE R S U S VE R SAC E dress,

U P STYLE R), H I R O NAE coat,

I SAB E L MARANT and

LU CY FO LK earrings

K E N N ETH JAY LAN E earrings


abrandjeans.com abrandjeans


BLACK CREW PU B LISH E R S & FOU N DE R S Grant Fell Rachael Churchward CO-E DITOR S Rachael Churchward Ethan Butler FASH ION & B EAUTY DI R ECTOR Rachael Churchward FASH ION E DITOR Ethan Butler DESIG N E R Tom Munday Abbey Gould I LLUSTRATION Nina van Lier Tom Munday I NTE R NATIONAL E DITOR-AT-LARG E Paul Empson AUSTRALIAN E DITOR-AT-LARG E David K Shields AUSTRALIAN FASH ION E DITOR-AT-LARG E Sarah Birchley AUSTRALIAN SE N IOR HAI R / B EAUTY E DITOR Justin Henry AUSTRALIAN FASH ION & FEATU R ES E DITOR Chris Lorimer N EW Z EALAN D HAI R E DITOR Greg Murrell at Ryder Salon N EW YOR K E DITOR Hollie Van Osenbruggen ON LI N E B EAUTY E DITOR Gemma Elaine CONTR I B UTI NG WOR DSM ITH KM Marks

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FI LM E DITOR S Natasha Foster Erin Fairs

ON LI N E E DITOR S Rachael Churchward Ethan Butler David K Shields

ADVE RTISI NG MANAG E M E NT Ethan Butler Rachael Churchward ethan@blackmagazine.co.nz rachael@blackmagazine.co.nz

B LKON B LK is published bi-annually on ISSU U by B LK NZ Ltd 1/34 Nordon Place, Remuera, Auckland 1050 +(64) 277514684

Printing by Soar Print Ltd www.soarprint.co.nz Distribution in NZ & Australia by Gordon & Gotch Ltd. International distribution by 8 Point Media

The views expressed in Black Magazine are not necessarily those of the publishers and editors. No part of this digital publication may be reproduced in any way without permission. Thank you. We do not accept unsolicited submissions. All our work is commissioned by our teams. ISSN 1177-2603 ©B LK NZ LTD, 2018 www.blackmagazine.com Instagram @black_mag Facebook.com/blackmagnz Twitter.com/blackmagazine


COMING UP B LK H EARTS 41.I N CASE OF E M E RCE NCY 44.FOR B I DDE N FR U IT 45.TICK TICK B OOM 47.YOU DONT HAVE TO WEAR THAT DR ESS 49.TOO COOL FOR MAR S 50.B R IG HT SPAR K 51.G R EASE MON EY 52.ALL ATTI DU DE 53.R I DDLE M E TH IS 55.M ICKEY MOUSE MARCH 57.DAMSE L I N DISTR ESS(E D) 59.WHAT YOU G ON NA DO AB OUT IT B LK LIST 65.KATE N EWBY 73.WALLACE G OLLANS 79.WHY CANT I HAVE YOU B LK B EAUTY 93.J ESUS CH R IST POSE 101.J E N NY WAS A FR I E N D OF M I N E 111.DO R IG HT WOMAN DO R IG HT MAN 119.LOVE LETTE R TO G RANT B LK FASH ION 129.FE E L R EAL 139.N EW YOR K IS MY DESTI NATION 149.WH ITE FLAG WAR R IOR 159.CAPTU R E M E G E NTLE 169.TH E SEA AN D SH E 183.R E D MOR N I NG LIG HT 197.PAI NTE D FROM M E MORY 215.I M LOOKI NG FOR SOM EON E TO FI N E M E 233.PE R FECT DAR KN ESS

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SHAYNE OLIVER RE-EDITION SS18 AVAILABLE AT www.workshop.co.nz


H EARTS


BLACK HEARTS

I N CAS E OF E M E R G E N CY

Don’t: Break the glass. Do: Adopt a cool sense of detachment, and don a pair of KAR E N WALKE R shades from her collection ‘Lost in Paradise,’ a stylish acknowledgement that although we can’t change our environment, we can distance ourselves from it. Blouse by HAR R IS TAPPE R Photo: Charles Howells Fashion: Rachael Churchward Hair: Carolyn Haslett using Kevin Murphy Makeup: Richard Symons using M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Gemma at TH E OTH E R S Words: KM Marks


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F OR B I D D E N FR U IT

Framed as a sensual, delicous surrender to desire, KAREN WALKER’S latest collection ‘Eden’ invites us to walk the line between pleasure and pain: the classical beauty of a pearl re-imagined with spiky, silver barbs. Blouse by PADDY PERRETT. Photo: Charles Howells Fashion: Rachael Churchward Hair: Carolyn Haslett using Kevin Murphy Makeup: Richard Symons using M.A.C Cosmetics Model: Gemma at The Others Agency. Words: KM Marks 43


BLACK HEARTS

TI CK TI CK B OOM

Rocking the NOM D* ‘Bombshell Dress”, Tyler captures a raw Southern spirit - think Dunedin Sound (not scarfie.) Shoes by ALEXAN DE R WANG from WOR KSHOP. Photo: Ben Loris Blair Fashion: Ethan Butler Hair & Makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics & Kevin Murphy Model: Tyler at R PD Models Words: KM Marks


BLACK HEARTS


YOU D ONT HAVE TO WEAR THAT D R E S S TON I G HT Instead, she wears a tracksuit. Fashion Editor Ethan Butler subverts ISABEL MARANT’S own brand of ‘French Girl Cool’ - travelling somewhere closer to the gritty housing projects of Paris than the quartier Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Tyler at RPD wears blazer, sweater and pants by ISABEL MARANT and shoes by ALEXANDER WANG from WORKSHOP. Socks by NOMD* Photo: Ben Loris Blair Fashion: Ethan Butler Hair & Makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics & Kevin Murphy Model: Tyler at R PD Models Words: KM Marks

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BLACK HEARTS

TOO COOL F OR MAR S

THOM B ROWN E EYEWEAR from MORTI M E R H I R ST Photo: Ben Loris Blair Fashion: Ethan Butler Hair & Makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics and Kevin Murphy Model: Tyler at R PD Models


B R I G HT S PAR K

Defiant electric blue brings a feminine power to the sharp lines of HELEN CHERRY’S latest tailoring. Serve with a side of the political pussy-bow, and step into boots made for kicking dust in the face of any man in your way. Emily at RPD wears suit and blouse by HELEN CHERRY and boots by R.M.WILLIAMS. Photo: Carolyn Haslett Fashion: Rachael Churchward Hair & Makeup: Leisa Welch Words: KM Marks 49


BLACK HEARTS

G R EAS E M ON K EY No trip to Saville Row required for today’s suit. And nope, you don’t need to be Canadian to eschew stuffy menswear codes and rock a head-to-toe denim ensemble. Just add boots. Josh at Unique Models wears denim from WORKSHOP, boots by DR MARTENS and socks by NOMD* Photo: Ben Loris Blair Fashion: Ethan Butler Hair & Makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics & Kevin Murphy Words: KM Marks


A L L AT T I T U D E

Never underestimate the instant confidence-boost that comes with donning a slick pair of shades - or their unique ability to cure (ok, lessen) a hangover. Josh’s gaze scorches in the latest from KAREN WALKER’S ‘Mischief’. Vest by NOM D*, top by WOR KSHOP. Photo: Ben Loris Blair Fashion: Ethan Butler Hair & Makeup: Carolyn Haslett using M.A.C Cosmetics & Kevin Murphy Model: Josh at Unique Models Words: KM Marks 51


BLACK HEARTS


R I D D LE ME TH I S

Ever the film buff, KATE SYLVESTER’S ‘Electric Dreams’ collection takes cues from the Ridley Scott classic, Bladerunner. The result: A very Kate brand of Sci-Fashion, and a pretty bad-ass wardrobe for human and replicant alike. Megan and Emily wear coats and boots by KATE SYLVESTER and trackies by SYLVESTER. Photo: Carolyn Haslett Fashion: Rachael Churchward Hair & Makeup: Leisa Welch Model: Emily (left) at R PD and Megan (right) at Bintang Words: KM Marks 53


M I CK EY M OU S E MAR CH

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Photo: Carolyn Haslett Fashion: Rachael Churchward Hair & Makeup: Leisa Welch Model: Islay at R PD Models wears football top by BAD TH I NG S and shoes by ADI DAS 55


BLACK HEARTS


DAM S E L I N D I STR E S S(E D)

Forget Prince Charming! ABRAND DENIM is rough ‘n’ ready to hit the road. From the enzyme-washed finish down to the sports luxe detailing - and our punkifying safety pins - this jacket ain’t messing around. Photo: Carolyn Haslett Fashion: Rachael Churchward Hair & Makeup: Leisa Welch Model: Tyler at R PD Models wears jacket and swimsuit by AB RAN D DE N I M and boots by R.M.WI LLIAMS Words: KM Marks 57


BLACK HEARTS


WHAT YOU G ON NA D O AB OUT IT Black Magazine Film Editors Natasha Foster (Director) and Erin Fairs (Fashion Editor) team up to create our PRADA and MIU MIU Exclusive. Taking inpiration from the 1970’s cult classic “The Warriors”, the girls portray the luxury brands in a whole new light. Carelfully cast to convey real attitude, the short film is a story of boys versus girls. Turn over the page to watch the film now! PRADA and MIU MIU Spring Summer Collections are available in-store and online

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Director: NATASHA FOSTER Fashion Editor and Co Creative: ERIN FAIRS Cinematographer: TONY LUU 1st AC: ANNE-SOPHIE MARION Hair and Makeup Director: NICOLA BURFORD at ONENINETYNINE using ORIBE and R+CO, SMITH AND CULT and M.A.C COSMETICS Makeup: LEAH TAYLOR and EMMA MOORE Hair: LUKE NICHOLS at DEBUT MANAGEMENT and TARA SUTTON Set Design and Props: CZARINA ARGEL Fashion Assist: NANCY WHISTON Stills/Assistant: ELYSE POTTER Editor: SCOTT HENRY Models: MARINET at IMG, CELIA at DEBUT, SIR , NYA and THAIS at KULT, RICHIE at THE MGMT, HARRY and CASPAR at CHADWICK, JESSE and KHARI at VIVIEN’S Shot on location at THE COMMUNE Sydney, Australia. Special thanks to THE COMMUNE, SCOTT CAVANOUGH, WARREN at AUSTRALIANA FLAGS, RACHEL BROWN and SHAY THOMAS at PRADA/MIU MIU, ANTIQUES ART DESIGN, ROUTE 66, SOUTHERN CROSS CAMERA, lighting supplied by MILES JONES and MATTHEW WILLIS

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You might not see ate ewby ’s art at first. It’s not usually obvious but it’s definitely there. You might have to look high, look low or go round a corner. You might even be standing on it. And that’s the idea. Moving backward and forwards between first observations, the making process, and the physical site, her method is immediate and responsive to the place, events and people around her. Making site-specific work all over the world from Mexico City to Fogo Island to Marfa, Texas, Newby loves being out of her comfort zone, working locally, drawing directly from the locations where her works end up. Originally from Auckland, this year alone sees Newby traversing the globe from NYC to Sydney, Vienna, London, Portland, and Bergen. She talks to Chris Lorimer in Sydney about the poetry of walls, the fascination of walking, the thrill of bricks, and the sculptural nature of words.

Photography KURT BANKS Shot on location at THE ART GALLERY OF NEW SOUTH WALES and COCKATOO ISLAND, Sydney

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‘A rock in this pocket’, 2018 67


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How did you come to be in this year’s Biennale of Sydney? At the end 2016 I was back in NZ for my show (Big Tree. Bird’s Eye) at Michael Lett Gallery and I met up with Biennale curator Mami Kataoka. She was the judge for the Walters Prize in 2012 so that’s how she was first introduced to my work. She told me about her ideas and themes, what she hoped to achieve and said, “I’d love you to be part of it, and I want you to be really ambitious”. She asked me to make a brick work. I was thrilled. A lot of the feedback I had from her through the Walters was incredibly valuable and something I’ve continually thought about. Mami trusts artists and I think that she really sees beyond what they’re doing, how they’re creating and can see the vision for the work. How did you then develop and make the works for the Biennale? In 2016 I’d just worked with Huntley Bricks in New Zealand for my show, and it was a new process. Mami came up with the idea of putting one like it in the convict precinct on Cockatoo Island. It was the perfect place because of its relationship to the surrounding buildings, the fact that it had a thoroughfare feel. You can walk on it; it isn’t something to just stand and look at. I don’t like to become too fixated on things when I make my work, I keep the process open, fluid and responsive or it just gets way too stressful. I give myself the ability to adapt as I go along. For instance, when I was at the Bowral brick plant in NSW getting the piece ready there were a few things I’d planned that I wasn’t able to do, so I had to roll with the punches there. I like to think of what I do as work with the site responsively so I absorb a lot of things in the environment. Whether it’s placed inside or outside I do have to make a lot of decisions towards the very end of the process. I have to pay attention; be on my game to make sure it’s right. How I make the work is as important as what I make. When paths get blocked, when people say no or when there’s miscommunication I have to work with that. I don’t want to throw a tantrum to be heard. I like to incorporate these things into the work because, in the end, I’m more interested in what can happen through the process than if I decided everything a year out. I’m always very surprised at what the work looks like

at the end. After all that, it is what is and I’m happier with it that way because I’ve let factors affect me. What sort of factors did you have to roll with this particular brick work? Brick making isn’t an organic process, it’s an old industry outside of the art world so they do things their way. These particular bricks were taken out early, so by the time I got to them they hadn’t been covered and were pretty dry so I couldn’t just push my ceramic elements into the clay, I had to carve out to put them in. They were dry pressed bricks to begin with, which made them hard to chisel into. And they’d asked, “What colour do you want?” I’d gone for fireman’s red and then we got there and it turns out there’s only one colour if I wanted it done in time: dark brown. What could I do to activate the surface, because it’ll probably be a bit dull if it’s all just dark brown? And that’s when I saw a lot of misfired bricks that were going to be thrown out or sold cheaply with really fascinating unpredictable colours. I got permission to use them and in the final work, they became a major feature. When it came time to install the work, did you plan it out? No, because there are so many bricks and each one weighs a lot, so it’s important to minimize how many times we handle them. When it came time to lay it out, I freestyled it, but I knew where I wanted all the holes to go, where I wanted the puddles to go - and that is where I just had to be the most on the ball, continually communicate and keep my eye on what was happening and what was needed. I just do it by feeling it. I’m trying to listen to what is going on with the work. When using the misfired bricks, lighter and darker, I thought, “This is wild, really painterly” so they ended up throughout the whole piece. Another part of the process was cutting the bricks up as I love quarters and halves and slithers so the surface doesn’t feel regular. I didn’t want it to be like you are on a perfect paving I wanted it to feel a bit odd. It’s a lot of shuffling of bricks around, that’s just inevitable. One whole corner of the work is all holes because I wanted to work with light and shadow and the time of day. Having negative spaces really worked really facilitated that type of depth. I made the ceramic pieces

in response to what I was learning about the brick making in Sydney and they were all made ahead of time in New York. It definitely references walking. I draw a lot of my ideas from just walking through cities. I love potholes. I love frozen puddles. I love chewing gum. I like weird pieces of paper stuck together somehow. I’m always looking at the residue of people living everyday life. Walking is one of the most fascinating things in the world. There’s movement; there’s occupation, and you have to pay attention. It’s really beautiful. While it isn’t a sidewalk, I’ve definitely drawn a lot of ideas from that and I’ve drawn from my previous work in ceramics. So it’s a way to connect these two different things. Emulating is not the right word, but there is a conversation there. With ceramics, I sit, sculpt and walk away, but I can never really get to the sort of scale that I can get with the brick works. What’s the drawcard to working with brick? It’s a big question, I think my interest in bricks stems from making works that have a conversation with the environment. Thinking back to art school I was really interested in using a vocabulary of urban spaces around me. Bricks were a way to have this conversation without introducing anything new, participating in what was already happening. I’d come into it and use it in a playful way. Those works were always badly mortared, sloppy and messy, but I could actually place them outside and some of them would stay there for a long time, like years. People weren’t sure if they were part of the fabric of the city or what they were. They didn’t not make sense. My great-grandfather was the founder of the NZ Bricklayers Union in Avondale and my father showed me walls that my greatgrandfather had made that are still there. There’s something poetic about building a wall. My interest in floors, in sidewalks; it makes perfect sense. I can work on a grand scale and a tiny scale at the same time, creating minuscule detail in something that’s ten by six meters. Working with bricks before they’re fired is absolutely fascinating - it’s such a privilege to get to work with a material that people have developed for hundreds of years. It’s such joy to get to work with a something and not have to make it up myself. I don’t want to just sit and sculpt away; I like to work


with things already in motion. To work with brick once it’s already made but then I make my insertions and develop them further and have them fired industrially. I enjoy making my work when I feel like it’s got more to do with where I am and the process of the product itself. It’s when I get surprised, when I go out of my comfort zone and it’s really important that I’m often feeling a bit unsure about what’s happening, I think that’s a good sign. Tell me about the second work, the wind chime. It’s a large hanging sculpture made in a range of different metals, everything from brass to bronze to silver, so there are lots of different shapes and sized wind chimes. The reason that they’re all different is that they create different sounds. I’ve been making wind chimes for a long time now, but this felt like the pinnacle of my wind chime making, somehow. It’s five lines deep, over 300 pieces. This one doesn’t actually make a sound, but it could and it might. You walk towards it from a distance silhouetted against a view of Sydney through a huge wallsized window in the background. In that sense, it’s almost working in the same way that the bricks are, almost in disguise or camouflage because the work is barely visible. You approach from 60 metres away and then you go underneath it, you can look back and up at it, so there are all these different vantage points to observe it from and it’s not often I get to do that with a work. I didn’t want to hang a bombastic highly visible work. In fact, I think my work is most interesting when it plays off of being almost invisible. I love work outside; I love work that has a conversation with its environment, which is why these chimes hanging against this view of the city was really interesting to me. Now the Biennale of Sydney works are done, what’s next for you? I have a solo show in the Kunsthalle Wien in Vienna in mid-May. Vienna has one of the largest brick industries in Europe. And I’ve decided the brick work I want to do there inside the Karlsplatz venue should be really big. It’s a huge glass pavilion: long and narrow approximately 33 metres x 7 metres. And it’s a very natural idea to work both inside and outside of the

place because of the glass walls. I’m putting a lot of pressure on myself. There will be 6,000 bricks whereas there were only 2,300 for Sydney. What is different about the project in Vienna is that I only want to work with raw material and by that, I mean bricks and collected pieces of glass from around where the exhibition space is. I’ve got my hands on some clay that was actually dug up from under the exhibition building when the subway was renovated years ago. It seems like a beautiful opportunity to work with materials just from that site. Your work is always so well titled; can you tell me about why and how you do that? Words have been such an important part of my practice since my early days of art school and for a long time, they were actually my content. Then I felt like I was coming to rely upon them so now I only have them as titles, and they are such a significant part of the work itself. Much like how I use my materials, I use words as a type of found object or sculpture. I take words from different sources and again as I don’t love sitting there and coming up with something on my own, I try to take words that have already been used somewhere and are somehow in circulation. Often I try to take words from other places. A lot of my titles in the past have come from lines of poetry like Frank O’Hara’s. Most recently I used a line from Eileen Miles, She’s still alive and I got to ask her if I could use it. I’ll even cruise around on YouTube looking at people’s comments. I do like playfulness and I do like humour. I never want my work to feel too serious, and words are a really fantastic way to ease the work into the world in the way that I want it seen and read. Language is such a fantastic thing to work with; I would never waste the opportunity to title a work.

New York that millions of people live beside each other in a high-density space I’m very fascinated with. I can just breathe properly here. I get to really determine my time, how I want to spend it. I also rent a studio here now. Initially, I arrived and took pottery classes and went to the glass workshop and just threw myself into the city to get to know it but now I feel I’ve got a handle on it. It’s a real joy every time I get to trot up there, 10 minutes away from my apartment and just be alone and work and process. I just love getting away from everything, going to my studio and being in my bubble. Just a few months ago I had a work in Central Park, just for a day. I love making temporary works that respond to the environment, that aren’t public sculptures. As much as possible I work in that way and I plan on continuing that.

What do you love the most about being based in NYC? To be honest I had to come to New York to relax, to chill out. People here are fantastic at giving you a lot of space. Everyone lives in apartments, with no backyards to hide out in and so they’re good at sharing the streets and the parks and public transport. There’s a way especially in

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‘I’m actually weirdly exciting’, 2018 71


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At stupid o’clock on the dot, you’ll find her swinging from the rafters. Paying her dues singing jazz standards and covers in Wellington, New Zealand, singer/songwriter

Wallace Gollans found her own

voice and words upon making a move across the ditch. Her lyrics are catchy as hell, songs that can burn into your brain and you’ll find yourself singing them at any random moment. Turns out they also reveal little nuggets of her life told through the intricate wordplay she weaves into poignant singa-long stories. A born performer, she’s known for smooth and sassy hip-shaking onstage moves as much as her honeyed vocal delivery, referencing elements of jazz and hip-hop and soul and blues. She’s also wowing the likes of acid jazz king BBC 6Music’s Gilles Peterson. Wallace sat down with Chris Lorimer in Sydney to talk all things Future Soul, independent music making and the joys of nerding out over online stats.

Photography SCOTT LOWE at DEBUT MANAGEMENT Fashion CHRIS LORIMER Hair and Makeup CHISATO CHRIS ARAI at TALENTLAND using UTOWA, TOM FORD and DELORENZO Shot on location at THE BEARDED TIT, Sydney, Australia


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How did you first discover music? My Dad is really into music. He just used to blast it: blues and soul. So I grew up on Motown and Muddy Waters. He also got me singing from an early age. Dad played football and there’d always be a house party on the weekend post-game. I’d do “Tomorrow” from Annie or “Singing in the Rain” and later I graduated to Cher’s “Believe” at the end of the night for the last sing-a-long There was also my primary school teacher, very strict but she said “I don’t care what you do as long as it’s big bold and beautiful” and I’ve always remembered that. She put me in the school play when I was about five years old. I couldn’t read yet, so I learnt all my lines by listening and memorising them. I had on a tutu, doc martens and a tiara and I had a solo song. She was instrumental in saying ‘this girl needs singing lessons, she’s meant to be on the stage, she has to do this’. I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t performing. Bit of a diva, not a total extrovert, but I just loved being on stage. All my friends would be playing and I’d be taking classes at stage and screen school. They just couldn’t shut me up! [laughs] Later I went to study jazz vocals at Victoria University, it was really intense, and I knew it would be. I only did it for one year and then I made a decision to save up to move to Sydney. Looking back, I’d definitely do that first year again, I met everyone in the scene and I loved studying. After leaving I was doing lots of gigs around town: jazz gigs, background-y gigs and covers gigs. Learning by doing. Thrown in the deep end. When did you start making your original work? I’d dabbled in some writing before I moved over, but I’d never liked anything I’d done. I’m getting better now, better in my ability to discern what’s crap. It’s terrifying to start to show your personal work to the people who play music with you, because they’re your friends and also really accomplished musicians who know instantly if something’s bad or not in the initial demo stages. For me, that’s scarier than releasing something out to a public. By the time you release a track you’re happy with it. I wouldn’t release anything I didn’t like.

When did you decide that you had a song in you? How did you begin to write your own songs? I love singing and performing and you can focus on the specifics of that for a long time but then comes a certain point where someone turns around to ask where’s your original music? I was gigging a lot with a friend who mainly makes his own music, but we’d do R’n’B covers for money on the side. He was really encouraging, pushed me and I wrote my first song, “Vinyl Skip” with him. I got it up on Triple J Unearthed and premiered on a UK music blog. And then once I started, there was nothing better! It’s so rewarding. How did you know what to write about? What’s your writing process? Quite a few of my songs start from weird personal things. A rap in “The Light” by Common inspired “Vinyl Skip”, that first song. There’s a line that I always thought was “let’s spin it slow” and I had this mental image of someone putting on a record too slow. It sounds distorted and it takes longer so you’d get to dance for longer. He actually says “let’s spend it slow” and when I realised it was wrong, I thought I own that now and it can be mine to use. I love coming up with a little idea and then expanding a narrative around it. I love the lyric process and I use word association a lot. I’ll come up with sentences and then I’ll start jamming over a beat in my room. If I’ve got lyrics to work from I always find the song making process a lot easier. I start trying to make the chorus first and the bridge is always last - the piece of the song that’s complimentary but different. Something that’s always stuck with me is when I learned what an oxymoron was. My high school English teacher was incredible and I feel that a lot of my lyric writing connects to the way she taught creative writing. I always remember this particular poem, and it’s sad, about a little girl stepping on a landmine and it describes the way she felt, that it was an eternal instant. I wrote a song about it and I introduce it on stage as my oxymoron song. [laughs] How do you describe the style of music you make now?

So it’s Future Soul, and there are elements of jazz and hip-hop and soul and blues. In my late teens I become obsessed with Erykah Badu who led me to D’Angelo and Jill Scott. I love that Neo-Soul sound but it’s often down tempo and I’m really into energy on stage, having a little bit more to dance to on stage. And I’d also always loved Missy Elliott, A Tribe Called Quest, Biggie and Lil’ Kim. When creating your own music, you want to be something new; you don’t want it to necessarily fit into a particular box. But I do understand that people want to describe things and I want to have my music talked about. I’m also a total fangirl and I have some amazing fellow artists in this genre: Ngaiire, Milan, Alicia Joy, Hiatus Coyote. We love your current release “Neverland”, what’s the story behind that song? When I was working in Wellington I had a great and hilarious manager, Sally. She has a tattoo on her side, a quote from Peter Pan. “It’s below my dignity to climb a tree, I’ll never want to grow up, never grow up. Not me”. The pre-chorus is pretty much that quote and the opening line “At stupid o’clock on the dot” is something she’d always say “I went to bed at stupid o’clock last night”. I heard her say it so much that it’s in my vocabulary now as well. There are some songs that just kind of happen and not always with a nice story behind them but with “Neverland” I love to tell that tale. It’s all about how I hope that I can stay young for as long as possible. You’re currently self-managed. Is that independence important to you? I’m doing everything: booking the flight, the accommodation, making sure we get from a to b at specific times. I’m such a control freak. [laughs] It’s funny too when you do just know your shit, like when I go to a sound check and it’s all “do this and this and this” and I’m wearing cute dungarees and perhaps no one expects me to know what I’m talking about. I’m really chilled out most of the time but when it comes to my music or how it’s presented visually I like the fact that everything visual and auditory, it’s me. I do all my own design and I make all my own merch:


Above and previous: Dress, vest and sunglasses by KAREN WALKER

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everything from pom-pom earrings to posters. I definitely want to delegate more down the track, especially when it comes to the admin, but I do love looking after it all. It’s nice to not have to check in with anyone, just do it. What’s it like releasing your own music as an independent? After I put out my first song, I just kept on releasing as I wrote [laughs], so those were literally the only tracks that I had. And it got to the stage where I just needed to connect them as a whole so I left the first three songs as singles and then I took another four I’d released and added two new ones as an EP. I didn’t want to waste those songs and have them in the body of work. Six tracks is big EP, normally it’s four and the next one will be four, probably! I’ve always wanted to get vinyl pressed, but there is a long wait for that now, so I thought, “Fuck it, I’m going to do cassettes” which fits in well with my aesthetic. I have great turquoise cassette tapes and as much as people say they don’t have a tape player, I ask would you have used a novelty CD if you’d bought one? More likely it’s downloaded onto their phones from ITunes or they listen on Spotify for example. Everything about the industry is digital these days, which is wonderful and it’s so easy connecting with other people now too. Looking at my online stats, I love knowing that there is someone in Latvia listening to my music, for instance. I can see all my top cities, so I’m now more likely to go to say Tokyo to tour because I know I’ve got a definite audience there. Having all that knowledge at your fingertips is so useful. Getting paid for your music is now a little bit harder but I wouldn’t have been able to do anything that I’ve done in a different era. I’d have needed a record label or to be really wealthy [laughs] so it’s amazing being able to DIY everything. And I think lots of people appreciate hearing directly from the artist in person.

And do you still live for that stage? I absolutely love live performance; you never know what’s going to happen. That’s all the good stuff. The problem solving on the spot while I’m still trying to perform and all the things going through my mind. If something goes wrong with the technology and the audience sees something’s wrong, even if I’m not embarrassed they can all begin to feel like that, which is natural reaction. If I can handle it, bring them back, that’s the sort of moment that can make the gig for me. And those are the gigs I remember as well. What’s next for you? I’m going over to travel for two to three months in the UK and to play in Berlin later this year. I was in studio just the other day and recorded a new song so I’m releasing that just before I go and I’ll put out a new EP while I’m away too. I’m pretty excited about going away - there is just so much more appetite for the kind of music I make in those places. It’s also amazing to see how the Australian audience reacts to people doing well overseas, once you come back. We’ve got amazing artists here but it can feel far away and you don’t know if you can compete with other artists in bigger cities until you try. Collectively we’re making really good music here. It’s time to get over it and get it out there.


Dress by KAREN WALKER


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Photography B E N LO R I S B LAI R Fashion ETHAN B UTLE R Makeup J E M MA BAR C LAY Hair SARA ALS O P Model VAN IA at R E D 11 F EATU R I N G TH E LE X U S LC5 00 S P O RT

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WHY CAN’T I HAVE YOU


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Dress by ISSEY MIYAKE from THE SHELTER, shoes by ALEXANDER WANG from WORKSHOP


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DRESS BY ISSEY MIYAKE FROM THE SHELTER, SHOES BY ALEXANDER WANG FROM WORKSHOP

Previous: Dress by ISSEY MIJAKE from THE SHELTER, shoes by ALEXANDER WANG fromWORKSHOP Opposite: Suit by ZAMBESI, belt by R.M. WILLIAMS

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Dress and necklance by ISSEY MIYAKE from THE SHELTER 84


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Jacket by ISSEY MIYAKE from THE SHELTER 86


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Top by KATE SYLVESTER


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Photography TRAC EY LE E HAYE S Fashion B R ITTN I M O R R I S O N Hair and Makeup J U STI N H E N RY using M.A.C C O S M ETI C S Model ADAU at C HADW I C K M O D E LS

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Opening: Coat by RELIGION, ear cuff by MARGIELA from ZAMBESI, earring by UNDERGROUND SUNDAE, ring by HEART OF BONE, bracelets by LUCY FOLK Above: Top by LIFE WITH BIRD, blouse by ZAMBESI, suit from VESUVIUS VINTAGE, broach by SAINT LAURENT, bracelet by DOLCE AND GABBANA from THE UPSTYLER, earrings by UNDERGROUND SUNDAE

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Blazer by SANDRO, coat by PARIS GEORGIA, earrings by DIOR from THE UPSTYLER, bracelet by LUCY FOLK, scarf by ALEXANDER MCQUEEN, top & pants models own

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Previous: Top by AJE, necklace by KARL LARGERFELD, bracelet by CHANEL from THE UPSTYLER, hat by STEPHANIE SPENCER Opposite: Sunglasses by GUCCI, top by LIFE AND BIRD, dress and hat from VESUVIUS VINTAGE, coat by HIRONAE, earrings by NATASHA SCHWEITZER, broach by LAUREN MILENA Digital Operator: RICH MACDONALD Makeup Assist: RAFFAELLA Song Title SOUNDGARDEN 1991

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JENNY WAS A FRIEND OF MINE Photography NATHAN MARTI N Fashion H O LLI E VAN O S E N B R U G G E N Hair M O I Z ALLAN D I NA using K EVI N M U R P HY Makeup MAK I HAS E GAWA using M.A.C C O S M ETI C S Manicurist MAK I SAKAM OTO Model GAB BY W E STB O O K-PATR I C K at TH E LI O N S NYC

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Opening: Jacket by ALEXANDER WANG Above: Jacket by T BY ALEXANDER WANG Opposite: Jacket by THOM BROWNE, gloves by LA CRASIA, earring by KENNETH JAY LANE

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Headpiece by ANYA CALIENDO


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Above: Sweater by IRO, pants by GRETA CONSTANTINE, bracelet by KENNETH JAY LANE, sunglasses by GUCCI Opposite: Headpiece by ANYA CALIENDO, dress by REBECCA VALLANCE

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Top by GRETA

Coat by GRETA CONSTANTINE CONSTANTINE Special thanks to PIER 59 STUDIO and Song Title: SILHOUETTE STUDIO Song Title THE THE KILLERS 2004 KILLERS 2008

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DO RIGHT WOMAN DO RIGHT MAN Photography R U S S F LATT Fashion RAC HAE L C H U R C HWAR D and ETHAN B UTLE R Hair STACY LE E G H I N Makeup K I E K I E STAN N E R S at M.A.C C O S M ETI C S Models AU G U ST, TAI KA and CAIT at TH E OTH E R S AG E N CY


Opening left: Jacket by ABRAND, top by BAD THINGS Opening right: Jacket and jeans by ROLLAS, top by BAD THINGS. This page: Jacket by R.M.WILLIAMS, shirt by ABRAND

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Jeans by ABRAND, top by BAD THINGS, shoes by DR MARTENS, belt by R.M.WILLIAMS

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Top by BAD THINGS, jeans and jacket by ROLLAS, belt by R.M.WILLIAMS

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Photography B O N N I E HAN S E N at D LM Fashion SARAH B I R C H LEY Hair K E I R E N STR E ET at VIVI E N S C R EATIVE using W E LLA P R O Makeup AN NAB E L BARTO N at VIVI E N S C R EATIVE using G U E R LAI N at S E P H O RA Model JAC O B I E N at P R I C I LLA’S M O D E L MANAG E M E NT

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Opening: Blouse and belt by PRADA and skirt by ROMANCE WAS BORN. Opposite: Blouse, pants and dress by BURBERRY and earrings by PETITE GRAND Above: Bodysuit, dress and boots by CHRISTIAN DIOR

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Opposite: Shirt, top, pants, belt and headband by MIU MIU, shoes by BALLY Above: Shirt, coat and shorts by PRADA

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Blouse and boots by BALLY, skirt by PRADA and bag by MIU MIU

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Above: Pants by ZIMMERMANN, bodice by ROMANCE WAS BORN, belt bag by BALLY, heels by PRADA, earrings by PETITE GRAND Opposite: Top by ZIMMERMAN, pants by BALLY, backpack by PRADA and neclace by PETITE GRAND Song Title: DEPTFORD GOFF

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IS MY DESTINATION Photography STE P HAN I E CAM MARAN O Fashion B R ITTN I M O R R I S O N Hair and Makeup J U STI N H E N RY using K RYO LAN O F F I C IAL and O R I B E HAI R CAR E Model CAR LA at I M G M O D E LS

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Opening: Top by KA HE, latex (worn throughout) by EAGLE LEATHER Above: Earrings and dress by LUCILLA GRAY, top by ACNE STUDIOS, gloves by HELENA DONG Opposite: Puffer coat by LUCILLA GRAY, shoes stylists own

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Bodice and skirt by TONI MATICEVSKI

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Top by LAVEE, earrings by UNDERGROUND SUNDAE, leather jacket by ALABAMA BLONDE


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Opposite: Top by GAIL SORRONDA, earring (cross) by UNDERGROUND SUNDAE, cuff earring and hook by LOTT STUDIO Above: Coat and hat by KA HE, pants by ELLERY, glove and sleeve by HELENA DONG, shoes stylists own 145


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Above: Pants by KA HE Opposite: Coat by COREPRET, boots by KA HE Shot at PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO BRUNSWICK Thanks to OLGA at WESTEND HAIR for creating Carla’s wig Song title: SUZANNE VEGA

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Photography STE P H E N TI LLEY Fashion RAC HAE L C H U R C HWAR D Hair SARA ALS O P Makeup K I E K I E STAN N E R S at M.A.C C O S M ETI C S Model F I O NA at 62 M O D E LS

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Opening: Jacket by ISSEY MIYAKE from THE SHELTER Opposite:Top by HELMUT LANG, shoes by ALEXANDER WANG X ADIDAS and sweater around waist by ALEXANDER WANG from WORKSHOP, knit by TAYLOR, tights by BABARA GONGINI from THE SHELTER Above: Jacket by ISSEY MIYAKE from THE SHELTER, pants by HELEN CHERRY, shoes by PALLADIUM, bra by STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB

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Opposite: Knit by MARLE, scarf by ALEXANDER WANG X ADIDAS from WORKSHOP Above: Shirt by WYNN HAMLYN, bodice by STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB, shorts by BARBARA GONGINI and boots by MM6 MAISON MARGIELA from THE SHELTER

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Above: Vest by NOMD*, skirt by TAYLOR, shoes by CONVERSE and shirt by ALEXANDER WANG from WORKSHOP Opposite: Top by ALEXANDER WANG from WORSHOP, bra by BARBARA GONGINI and skirt by ISSEY MIYAKE from THE SHELTER

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Above: Dress and blaxer by HELEN CHERRY, dress by MARLE, top by HELMUT LANG from WORKSHOP, boots by MM6 MAISON MARGIELA from THE SHELTER Opposite: Shoes by ALEXANDER WANG X ADIDAS from WORKSHOP, tights by BARBARA GONGINI and knit by MM6 MAISON MARGIELA from THE SHELTER Song Title: FLOBOTS 2010 Thanks to WHITE STUDIOS

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CAPTURE ME GENTLE Photography NATAS HA FO STE R Fashion E R I N FAI R S Hair N I C O LE KAE using EVO and C LO U D N I N E Makeup AN D R EA B LAC K at R E LOAD AG E N CY using AR MAN I and KAT VO N D Models THAI S at K U LT M O D E LS and B E C CA at VIVI E N’S M O D E L MANAG E M E NT

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Opening: Thais wears bodice by PRADA, jewellery from F+H, bust by MERCER AND LEWIS Above: Rebecca wears dress by CHRISTIAN DIOR, necklace from HARLEQUIN MARKET. Opposite: Coat by BALLY, shoes from ZARA, earrings by ELLERY, necklace by F+H 160


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Coat by BALLY, necklace by F+H, earrings by ELLERY 162


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Above: Rebecca wears: Jacket and pants by CARLA ZAMPATTI, bra by CALVIN KLEIN, jewellery by HARLEQUIN MARKET, hat from THE VINTAGE CLOTHING SHOP Opposite: Dress by IRO, shirt by PRADA, boots by HERMES, earrings by F+H, vintage military hat 165


Dress by MICHAEL LO SORDO, jewellery by F+H 166


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T H E S E A A N D S H E Photography and Fashion KAR E N I N D E R B ITZ E N-WALLE R and D E LP H I N E AVR I L P LAN Q U E E L Hair and Makeup VI R G I N IA CAR D E Model LIV O D R I S C O LL at 62 M O D E LS and M H I wears clothing by P RADA and M I U M I U


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RED MORNING LIGHT Photography S C OTT LOW E at D E B UT MANAG E M E NT Fashion C H R I S LO R I M E R Hair and MAK E U P J E S S B E R G using M.A.C C O S M ETI C S and TI G I Models HAR RY at C HADW I C K M O D E LS and LU LU at C H I C MANAG E M E NT

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Opening: VINTAGE HMONG BLANKET Above: Jeans by TOPSHOP, heels by MIU MIU, top customised by stylist Opposite: Coat and pants by AKIRA, belt by JAC AND JACK, socks and sandals by PRADA

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Above: Choker necklace by KAREN WALKER, top by KATE SYLVESTER, pants by ROMANCE WAS BORN, shoes by ROMANCE WAS BORN X BEAU COOPS Opposite: Vintage jacket by YOHJI YAMAMOTO, shirt by PRADA, vintage jeans by HELMUT LANG

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Above: Shoes and socks by PRADA, vintage kilt Opposite: Coat and skirt by AKIRA, boots by BEAU COOPS 188


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Opposite: Skirt, belt and shorts by PRADA Above: Sweatshirt and pants by DIOR HOMME

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Above: Coat by KATE SYLVESTER,boots by BEAU COOPS Opposite: Top by KATE SYLVESTER

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Above: Coat by KATE SYLVESTER Opposite: Jeans and shoes by CHRISTIAN DIOR

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PAINTED FROM MEMORY Photography DAVI D K. S H I E LD S Fashion JANAI AN S E LM I Hair RAE B O R I B O U N at SYN C using O R I G I NAL AN D M I N E RAL Makeup AN N ETTE MAC K E N Z I E at U N I O N MANAG E M E NT using NAR S at M E C CA C O S M ETI CA Models KAT and SAM at P R I S C I LLAS M O D E L MANAG E M E NT, J UAY and ZAC at F IVE TW E NTY

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Opposite and opening: Outfit by PRADA Above: Coat and shirt by ACNE STUDIOS

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Dress and knit by MAGGIE MARIYLN, broach by MIU MIU

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Opposite: Top, pants, coat and shoes by LACOSTE Above: Hoodie and coat by ACNE STUDIOS

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Opposite: Suit and hat by KAREN WALKER, bodysuit by ATELIER HARLEM Above: Trench by BURBERRY

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Sweater by MATTY BOVAN from MATCHESFASHION. COM and bodysuit by ATELIER HARLEM

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Above: Jacket, skirt and knit by ADER ERROR, shoes by MIU MIU Opposite: Top, shirt and pants by PRADA

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Sweater by MATTY BOVAN from MATCHESFASHION.COM, bodysuit and skirt by ATELIER HARLEM

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Top and shirt by PRADA

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I’M LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO FIND ME Photography LE N N I MATTANJA Fashion DAVI D K. S H I E LD S Hair and Makeup AN N ETTE M C K E N Z I E at U N I O N using NAR S at M E C CA C O S M ETI CA Model O N D R IA HAR D I N at P R I S C I LLAS M O D E L MANAG E M E NT

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Opening: Coat by TRELISE COOPER, skirt by WE ARE KINDRED, bra by CALVIN KLEIN, Boots by KATE SYLVESTER, necklace by TEMPLE OF THE SUN Above: Dress by KATE SYLVESTER, knickers by LONELY Opposite: Coat by TRELISE COOPER, skirt by WE ARE KINDRED, bra by CALVIN KLEIN

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Above: Top by TRELISE COOPER, knickers by LONELY. Opposite: Coat and t-shirt by KAREN WALKER, knickers by CALVIN KLEIN, slides by DOUBLE RAINBOUU, ring by KAREN WALKER JEWELLERY

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Above: Jumper by LONELY, faux fur coat and knickers by KATE SYLVESTER, shoes by SPORTSGIRL, ring by KAREN WALKER JEWELLERY Opposite:Dress by KATE SYLVESTER, knickers by LONELY, slides by PRADA

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Above: Cashmere jumper by THERON, knickers by LONELY, socks by KAREN WALKER Opposite: Sweater by AMI from MATCHES.COM, shoes by SPORTSGIRL, necklace by SUSAN DRIVER

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Dress by WE ARE KINDRED, bra and knickers by LONELY, slides by DOUBLE RAINBOUU, ring by JAMES AND IRISA

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Jumper and knickers by LONELY, jacket by BY JOHNNY, hat by KAREN WALKER

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Slip by KATE SYLVESTER, jumper by WE ARE KINDRED, necklace by SUSAN DRIVER 231


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Photography, Fashion and Grooming: DAVI D K. S H I E LD S Model C H R I S H E N D R I C at D E B UT MANAG E M E NT

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Pants and scarf by KAREN WALKER 234


Jacket by LEVI’S, shorts by DOUBLE RAINBOUU 236


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Parka by DOUBLE RAINBOUU, underwear by CALVIN KLEIN 238


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Sweater and shorts by DRIES VAN NOTEN 240


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Jacket by LEVI’S, shorts by DRIES VAN NOTEN 242


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