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FOREWORD Tena koe and welcome to issue 28 of Black Magazine. 2017 has been a year of change. The Inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States has thrust the partisan nature of democracy in America to centre stage. The rest of the world now watches the ensuing events in real time via every accessable social media channel. Here in New Zealand our own people placed their faith in a centre-left coalition government lead by Jacinda Ardern, a truly modern, young female Prime Minister who aims to lead our country with core principles of social responsibility and transparent democratic processes, not just by the capitalist imperative . Good and bad the people have spoken. Here at Black our change has been less dramatic but still change indeed. We have for some time been in discussions about sustainability within our print production process. With changes to the print publishing model across the globe and our digital world now very prevalent we have asked ourselves many questions. What changes can Black explore to reduce our carbon footprint? What will make us different and relevant in the world of print? We needed to find a printing partner that has an established sustainable ethos that would enable our sustainability goals. We discovered Soar Print, New Zealand’s only Carbon Zero Printer. Soar Print provides a production service that allows us to embrace and enhance our sustainability goals as a magazine publisher. So as we wind up 2017 for our summer holidays we are confident we are well on track to lightening our environmental footprint during 2018. To our loyal readers enjoy this issue flavoured with bespoke content and see you in 2018. Nga mihi, Rachael, Grant, Ethan, and the Black Whanau.

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VIVA GLAM

S I N C E 19 9 4 , E VERY CEN T FROM THE SELLING PRICE O F V I VA G L A M LIPSTICK AND LIPGL ASS HAS GONE TOWARD HELPING WOMEN, MEN AND CHILDREN LIVING WITH A N D A F F EC T E D BY H I V / A I D S . M A C C O S M E T I C S .C O. N Z / G L A M

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BLACK CREW Publishers Co Editors-in-Chief Grant Fell & Rachael Churchward grant@blackmagazine.co.nz rachael@blackmagazine.co.nz Creative Director Rachael Churchward Fashion & Beauty Director Rachael Churchward Deputy & Fashion Editor Ethan Butler ethan@blackmagazine.co.nz Design Director Abbey Gould International Editor-at-Large Paul Empson Australian Editor-at-Large David K Shields Australian Editor & Senior Hair/ Beauty Editor Justin Henry at Vivien’s Creative Australian Fashion Editors Sarah Birchley Chris Lorimer Australian Features Editor Chris Lorimer New Zealand Hair Editor Greg Murrell at Ryder Salon U K Editor Sara Dunn

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Advertising Management Grant Fell Rachael Churchward Ethan Butler David K Shields Black Magazine is published bi-annually by BLK NZ Ltd 1/34 Nordon Place, Remuera, Auckland 1050 +(64) 2137 3330 Real View digital management by Soar Print Ltd Printing & Realview Management by Soar Print Ltd www.soarprint.co.nz Distribution in NZ & Australia by Gordon & Gotch Ltd. International distribution by 8 Point Media Mobile Version backmagazine.partica.co.nz The views expressed in Black Magazine are not necessarily those of the publishers and editors. No part of this digital publication may be reproduced in any way without permission. Thank you. We do not accept unsolicited submissions. All our work is commissioned by our teams.

Publishing Advisor Stuart Shepherd

ISSN: ISSN 1177-2603 ŠBLK NZ LTD, 2017

Online Editors Grant Fell Rachael Churchward Ethan Butler David K Shields

www.blackmagazine.com Instagram @black_mag Facebook.com/blackmagnz Twitter.com/blackmagazine HTTP://Blackmagazine.Partica.co.nz


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CONTENTS B LACK Star Workshop Imports I Want My Sparkle Wo-man Up! Runaway Boy Don’t Touch Me Democracy In Fashion I Have Social Disease Too Loud? Too Bad

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B LACK List Paul Capsis Yuki Kihara Stellar Luna

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B LACK Beauty Painting Silhouettes

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B LACK Fashion These Colours Don’t Run Simple Days Mountains To Move Game Changer All Souls Avenue Scars To Your Beautiful Blue Sky Mine No Sleep Til’ Brooklyn The Endless Sea

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84 94 106 122 134 142 152 168 182


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COVERS

Photography LUC B RAQU ET

Photography PAU L E M P SON

Photography TI NTI N H E DB E RG at H E LL

Fashion SARAH B I RCH LEY

Fashion SARA DU N N

STU DIOS

Hair K E I R E N STR E ET at VIVI E N’S CR EATIVE

Hair P ETE R LUX at TH E WAL G ROU P

Fashion TH I BAU LT B R I E R E

using W E LLA P RO AN Z

Makeup AN ITA K E E LI NG at ON E

Hair and Makeup J USTI N H E N RY at

Makeup KATI E ANG US at JAN E ARTI STS

R E P R E S E NTS

VIVI E N’S CR EATIVE

MANAG E M E NT

Model JAM I LLA HO O G E N BO OM at WOM E N

using OR I B E HAI R CAR E and K RYOLAN

using M.A.C C OS M ETICS

MANAG E M E NT PAR I S wears jacket and shirt

C OS M ETICS

Model YSAU N NY B R ITO at E LITE PAR I S

by CH R I STIAN DIOR, hoodie by BAS E RANG,

Model H I R SCHY G RACE at N E XT

wears CH R I STIAN DIOR

medals by US AR MY from C OSTU M E STU DIO

MANAG E M E NT PAR I S wears VIVI E N N E W E ST WO OD

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GREEN WITH BLUE, THE RULES ARE NEVER TRUE, RUNAWAY BOY? BOO-HOO! SOCIAL IS ME, DENIM DEMOCRACY IS FREE. SPARKLE SPARKLE, IT’S NOT A DEBACLE. FUR FUR FUR, WHO SAID IT WAS HERS? TOO LOUD? TOO BAD! DON’T BE SAD. DON’T TOUCH ME! Photography B E N LOR I S B LAI R Fashion ETHAN B UTLE R Hair M ICHAE L M E N DE L at MORGAN AN D MORGAN Makeup AB B I E GAR DI N E R using M.A.C C OS M ETICS Model HAR RY at 62 MODE LS and E M MA AT R E D 11 MODE LS Thanks to W H ITE STU DIOS

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Jacket by HELMUT LANG , blouse by VANESSA BRUNO bag by ISABEL MARANT from WORKSHOP

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I WANT MY SPARKLE

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Denim by ABRAND and NEUW , glitter by M.A.C COSMETICS earring by ZORA BELL BOYD


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WOMAN UP!

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Emma and Harry wear coat, hat, top, skirt and eyewear by KATE SYLVESTER AW18 boots by ACNE STUDIOS from WORKSHOP , leather by NEUW

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RUNAWAY BOY

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KAREN WALKER JEWELLERY


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DON’T TOUCH ME

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Coat, dress, top and gloves by NOM*D AW18 , boots by KATE SYLVESTER AW18 Earrings by ZORA BELL BOYD


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“JEANS REPRESENT DEMOCRACY IN FASHION” - GIORGIO ARMANI

Harry wears overalls by ABRAND , coat by ZAMBESI Emma wears jackets and jeans by ABRAND, ROLLAS and NEUW

KAREN WALKER JEWELLERY 42


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“I HAVE SOCIAL DISEASE” - ANDY WARHOL

ZAMBESI AW18 44


TOO LOUD? TOO BAD! Harry wears leather pants and jacket by WORKSHOP AW18. Emma wears dress by HELEN CHERRY AW18 , boots by ACNE STUDIOS from WORKSHOP

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IT’S 3.30 PM ON A WEDNESDAY AND I’M DOWN THE PUB, THE SHAKESPEARE IN SURRY HILLS, WITH PAUL CAPSIS. HEAD TO TOE IN A ROMANCE WAS BORN PRINT SUIT AND RAINBOW VELVET BOOTS, HE’S OWNING THE ROOM, CHARMING THE REGULARS: WHETHER WHITE COLLAR, BLUE COLLAR, OR IN A LEATHER JACKET THEY CAN’T STOP THEMSELVES WATCHING, SIPPING THEIR PINTS WHILE HE POSES FOR OUR CAMERA - AND THAT IS THE CAPSIS WAY, HE JUST DRAWS YOU IN.

Words and Fashion CH R I S LOR I M E R Photography DAVI D K. S H I E LDS Make-up and Hair J E S S B E RG Shot on location at TH E S HAK E S P EAR E HOTE L, Surry Hills, Sydney, Australia

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Jacket by ALICE MCCALL, album: “Janis” by Janis Joplin, 1975

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Jacket and trousers by ROMANCE WAS BORN, shirt by TRELISE COOPER, ring and cuff (worn throughout) model’s own

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A myriad of outfit changes later his energy is not lagging, such is his performance background and dedication to character, even when acting as himself. It’s the same with our interview, peppered with stories, “35 years of shit, it’s a lot!” and not all about him, Capsis seems to remember everything and everyone he’s ever met and, the word obsession comes up a lot too. Half Greek, half Maltese, Capsis is Surry Hills born and bred. Raised in his Maltese grandmother’s house till he left aged 20, he literally moved down the street and still lives in the neighbourhood. A gender-bender diva of stage and screen with an incredible voice and presence, Capsis has never shied away from challenging roles. Equally at home onstage as the MC in Cabaret or depicting his own grandmother in Angela’s Kitchen, he is still even now stopped in the street and recognised as Johnny/Tula, his co-starring role alongside Alex Dimitriades’ Ari in 1998’s Head On. Described as a “gospel-shrieking force of nature” and “strong yet deceivingly fragile powerhouse”, he delights in interpreting his favourite offbeat divas including, of course, Janis Joplin, the one who for him started it all. Now Capsis is soon to revisit another of his favourite roles, Quentin Crisp, touring across Australia next year in Resident Alien. Lets start by talking about you as a child. What was growing up like? I liked to be on my own as a kid, I used to talk to myself a lot, and I had a very vivid imagination. I loved my imaginary world and I was always there, never in present time. I thought everything was so boring

and suburban so I’d have to imagine things. I also hated getting older. School forced me to engage with other kids, so I was woken up out of my imaginary world only to find I was in a brutal violent existence. Kids shattered my world really. I wasn’t prepared. I had a lot of fear as a kid; I was afraid of the dark, I used to wet the bed. Everything seemed so scary and I think it had to do with religion: “the devil’s going to grab you”. I’ve had a lot of religion in my life, unfortunately (laughs). Until my early teens, I had it forced on me, mainly from my Maltese grandmother because she was religious and we lived in her house. Something I remember about church was there was such little joy; instead there was guilt and control. And I was one of those kids that used to pray; I’d beg God for all sorts of things. I believed in prayer. Now I can’t ever call myself an atheist but what I do believe in is a spirit and a power, energy and what I don’t believe for one second is that a powerful creator hates me or disapproves of me. And how did you discover acting? When I saw theatre for the first time, it was with my Auntie and cousins. I was nine and we went to see a production of Rumpelstiltskin at the Sydney Opera House, which had just opened, so in late 1973. I remember being completely engrossed in the story and was really affected by it. A couple of years later I went with that same Auntie and cousins to see Jesus Christ Superstar at the Capitol Theatre. It was a revelation: music and people singing live, telling a story. Watching the performers, being intrigued by the idea that people sit in a room and watch something over there on the thing called a stage and when the lights went dark other people came out in costumes. Then age 16 I saw Colin

Friels, Judy Davis and Annie Byron in Miss Julie and the Bear at the Nimrod Downstairs with a school group. It was a matinee, and I fell in love with theatre that afternoon. My proximity to their acting, to the three of them, this thing they did was beyond magic. It was a skill. And I wanted to do that. I’ve always loved costumes too… I was completely crazy for the nuns in their habits; I was obsessed with that, the mystery of what was underneath. I loved films and certain people on television, like Bette Davis. I was drawn to the strong female from a very young age. Speaking of strong women in life, you created an ode to Maltese grandmother in your Angela’s Kitchen. How did come about?

your your play that

I hadn’t done anything that personal before. I always had the veneer of the performer or character. A year after my grandmother’s death, I started to think about the idea and the politics of it started to get me, less about the person I’d been grieving and more about migration and immigrants and our story here. There were no plays about Maltese anything so this was the driving force in the end, that in Australia we still have this issue with who we really are. Migrants bring new things to Australian culture but there are there are huge groups of new Australians that are still outsiders. Some arrived in the 70s, some like my family from the 20s, but they still feel outside, not quite a part of the picture, whatever that picture is meant to be. You also have a deep love for Janis Joplin, a major influence for you, how did you discover her? I have no idea why a 12-year- old Catholic/Greek orthodox Maltese/

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Greek Australian would become completely and utterly obsessed with Janis Joplin! I’ve thought about that a lot. Something about what I went through at school, something about her voice, her daring, her personality as a woman who didn’t give a flying fuck about anybody or anything. Her voice and the pain and the things she accessed, grabbed me as a kid and got me through. I was a fan of Suzi Quatro. I had a crush on her - a ballsy chick in rock’n’roll who wore leather outfits and played a big bass guitar. She’d stand with her legs apart in boots and chains. She was playing a character in an act: a glitter rock leather bike queen and I was fucking crazy for her. When I read about her, I’d often see the line “Suzi Quatro is the new Janis Joplin” and I wondered, “Who is Janis Joplin if Suzi Quatro is the new her?” Then one night my mother’s very worldly boyfriend was with my brother in the kitchen and he started talking about people in rock and roll. My brother was obsessed with KISS and Sam was trying to talk to him about other music. I was in my little room playing with my toys and then I heard him say “Janis Joplin”. Well! I didn’t even leave my room, my ears were pricked. He started describing her, “Janis Joplin used to walk onstage with a bottle in her hand and a tit sticking out. She used to swear and take drugs”. “She sounds so scary!” I thought as a little Catholic boy with Catholic guilt, “Who’s this wild crazy woman?” Later that week I went into the city. I was strictly allowed to go into the city for one hour, to catch the bus from Crown Street and come back home within that hour. I’d go to Gould’s in Pitt Street; a tiny secondhand bookshop with a distinct smell about it that also had old vinyl, looking for Suzi Quatro records cheap. That day in the window there was a book, Janis by David Dalton, with a picture of a woman like she was burning in Hell, all in red, red light

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and screaming into the microphone. I went into the shop and said to the lady, “Excuse me is that book about Janis Joplin?”. She handed it to me and I opened to the black and white photos in the middle and that was it, my life changed. I obsessed about this new world; Janis was only dead six years when I discovered her. And through her I learnt about Billie Holiday, Bessie Smith, blues and soul. I’ve still got that book. For a long time when I was a kid I use to have a reoccurring dream that I saved Janis, but at the moment I’m saving her I wake up. That went on for a long, long, long, long time. People have said, “You have to do a Janis Joplin show” for years. But no, it’s too special for me. It’s a bit like becoming my grandmother, I don’t want to just get up there now and do what other people do. It has to be something more theatrical. I’d imbue these stories with something else - like I’m praying at the back of the church but I’m actually reading my copy of Going Down With Janis, which was all about her sex and drugs, half of which I’m not sure I even believe! I love that story. Nowadays you probably could have looked all that up online. We didn’t have the Internet when I was a kid but we had those bookshops and the library and I loved old things and people that inspired me from different times. I was crazy for Gould’s, saving my pocket money and I also still have most of that vinyl that I bought there, though the covers are completely crumbling, the records are scratched. In a way I’m glad I’m not a kid now, I’d never be in present time. I’d be consuming new information constantly, down the rabbit hole. Now someone can access a voice from different time periods. They can discover a Quentin Crisp, someone from the

20s, or find someone from 500 years ago who was a painter, or a monk! So much great stuff that has now come to light that would have never ever have been seen otherwise. I can go down these rabbit holes though now. Maybe I’ll spend a whole day watching Jerry Lewis interviews. At the moment I’m obsessed with Jerry Lewis, just in interviews, because he was such a weird man. You’re about to reprise your role as Quentin Crisp soon, how is he still interesting to you? In my life Quentin was large in terms of me being a fan and being intrigued by him but never in a million years did I think I’d play him. You don’t imagine in your teens when you have an obsession about a person that you’ll do something that’ll be connected to him. The initial call came to play Quentin and I was like, “Really, me?!” I couldn’t see the connection; I thought we couldn’t be more different: I’m young to play him at age 90 (when he first became known he was already 57). I’m a wog and Quentin is Anglo. But the thing about him was that he was somebody that I looked up to and was so interesting. I questioned it then I read the script, and then when I said yes, I was in and the obsession started. Quentin is in my scrapbooks from my teens: magazine photos of him in a suit with makeup and hair scrolled up, quite an extraordinary man. The more I read about him the more I realised I have a lot of similarities with this man. Quentin is still a mentor, somebody I look up to. He teaches me how I can possibly be in my later life. In my 50s, or my 90s. Lastly Paul, with so much under your belt already, what do you want to do next?


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I like to think that my future is more writing and maybe a book. I like the idea of being solitary, of not performing, or perhaps directing. I want to deliberately set aside time not just to rest but to think and plan and hopefully use the fact that I’ve achieved some things to make other things happen, to be more of a person who creates and initiates and makes. How I am and how my grandmother raised me to be is when we work we work. I don’t do anything easy and I don’t do anything by halves, whatever the work is I throw myself in and I become immersed. My approach to it is work and every now and then it’s fun. And when it’s fun it’s amazing and you don’t want it to end. Being a performer is such a big thing in my life and it’s given me such beautiful gifts. I could never have imagined my life when all those dreadful things in the past were happening. You have to hang in there. Life does get better, that’s the truth.

Jacket and trousers by ROMANCE WAS BORN, slippers by BEAU COOPS X ROMANCE WAS BORN, bowtie stylist’s own

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Shirt by KATE SYLVESTER, jacket by TRELISE COOPER

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YUKI KIHARA IS AN ARTIST AND CURATOR WITH VERY SPECIFIC POINT OF VIEW. BORN OF A SAMOAN MOTHER AND JAPANESE FATHER AND IDENTIFYING AS FA’AFAFINE, SHE HAS ALWAYS HAD TO FIGHT FOR HER SENSE OF PLACE. SHE IS OUTSPOKEN, PASSIONATE, AND TENACIOUS, SHE IS BOTH OUTSIDE AND INSIDE THE SYSTEM, CHANGING THINGS FROM WITHIN.

Words CH R I S LOR I M E R Photography SC OT T LOW E at DE B UT

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‘Whakatū freezing works, Heretaunga’ (2017) From the series ‘Te taenga mai o Salome [The arrival of Salome]’ (2017) Courtesy of Yuki Kihara, MTG Hawke’s Bay Tai Ahuriri and Milford Galleries Dunedin

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I first met Yuki in the early days of studying our fashion design degree together, aged 18. After years apart, as she has a habit of gaining interesting and often farflung residencies, we find ourselves in the same place at the same time once more to do this interview and shoot her portrait for Black. Internationally her work is considered thoughtful and provocative, a distinctive voice in World Art. Her latest undertakings, one on each side of the Tasman see her as a curator working to amplify another’s story and then as an artist revisiting a key character that she adopts to shed light on messages of her own. Where were you born? I was born Samoa and grew up moving between Apia, Jakarta, Osaka, and various parts of Aotearoa. I first arrived in Aotearoa / Niu Sila / New Zealand from Samoa as a teenager, when my brother and I began attending an all-boys boarding school in Te Ūpoko o te Ika Wellington. Before arriving into Aotearoa I knew nothing about Maori people or the Treaty of Waitangi. It was during boarding school I learnt that Samoan and te reo Maori were very similar so I asked my family if I could take reo Maori classes and they said no because ‘there’s no future in it’. I was also surrounded by a predominantly Pakeha environment where fellow students often spoke about how there were no ‘real full-blooded Maoris left’, but they loved performing the haka, which I thought was hypocritical. I often heard ignorant comments about Maori people from both Samoan and Pakeha communities (and still do), but I refused to believe them. And besides, at that time I was (and still am) being criticised for being a

fresh from Samoa, of mixed race and a Fa’afaine. There were times I just wanted to leave to escape all the negativity but my family continued to push me to settle in Aotearoa so I could have a better future. I found it really scary as a teenager at that time. It was a struggle just to survive. After high school, you were initially drawn to studying fashion, how did you discover art? What was it that drew you to the idea of being an artist and no longer a designer? I actually wanted to enrol and study to become an artist but my parents opposed it so instead I studied fashion design and technology at Wellington Polytechnic (now Massey University). Upon reflection I realised the clothes I was producing were more like wearable art using cloth as a sculptural material. This wasn’t reflective of training students to be more ready-to-wear so they were industry-ready after graduation. You could say the first group of artists I studied were fashion designers: Rei Kawakubo, Issey Miyake, Lamine Kouyaté (Xuly.Bet), JeanPaul Gaultier, and John Galliano. I was interested in designers who questioned, challenged and subverted standards of beauty. I also saw fashion shows as a form of theatre and mise-enscène where the models were actors in masquerade, despite the fact that they’re primarily used as a marketing tool to sell merchandise where the actual profit is being made via cosmetics and handbags. As I’d also grown up exposed simultaneously to both Samoan and Japanese culture I approached the concept of fashion and dress differently than my other classmates. I still often make my own clothes and draw on fashion dramaturgy in my art practice now.   What draws you to a context when you’re making work?

For me, it’s the idea that informs the medium. So whatever medium best expresses and does justice to the idea is what I choose to work with. It’s about my audience and how they experience life in general.   You have led a very independent career; do you consider yourself outside of the gallery system?  Yes, I do. I’ve always felt like I’ve had to work harder in order to be recognised as a serious artist. I recently came to grips with the fact that the international reception of my work is very different from how it is received in Aotearoa. In Aotearoa I feel undermined as a Pacific artist with a migrant background in an art world structured to elevate artists who are white cis-gendered men. I’m sometimes accused of selling out as an artist of colour and being a Fa’afafine because there are those in Aotearoa who think it’s not possible that I would draw critical attention based on the merit of my work alone. These are just some of the issues I’ve had to deal with in the gallery system that places value on art based on a western hierarchical system, separating art from life by making it a capitalist commodity in our society. As a result I’ve been making an effort to decolonise the way I work in the hope that it will make an impact in the gallery system, even in a small way.   Is it important to have a gallery represent you? I don’t think there is a right or wrong way for an artist to exist in the world, and that includes whether they have gallery representation or not. At this point in my career I mainly need a dealer gallery to assist with admin due to growing demand. Before I had a dealer I had to oversee the packing, crating, freighting – including import

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and export - for all my artworks nationally and internationally including all the paperwork that went with it, which is very time consuming and took me from making art. That’s just a fraction of what I do as an artist (without even touching on funding applications, research and development, production and post-production of artworks, production meetings, contracts, residencies, commissions, lectures and workshops, public speaking engagements, international travel and numerous projects running concurrently at any given time) I live a very busy life, often quite stressful at times, so having a gallery rep helps take a load off my shoulders. I’ve learnt over the years that it’s best for me to work with people who understand my work and the direction I want to take in my practice, compared to being one of a repeat roster of rotating exhibitions. That doesn’t elevate me in new directions I want to take my art.  Famously your series “Fa’afafine: In a Manner of a Woman” was shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in 2008: a series of nude self-portraits. How did this work and the exhibition come about? I don’t call them self-portraits as I’m masquerading as characters other than myself. As Yuki I wouldn’t dare do many of the things you see in my photographs! But by assuming a role I’m more prepared to take on the challenge in becoming someone else. I met with a curator from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, I think, in 2006. They had come to watch my dance production presented at Musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac in Paris. After the show we were backstage and the conversation started from there. There hadn’t been a contemporary art exhibition from the Pacific at The Met prior to my solo show there, so

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it was great given that the Pacific was a somewhat underrated region in contemporary World Art. When did you begin curating? I became a curator because I wanted to be a catalyst in providing a platform for marginalised voices and ideas to be heard and made visible in the public sphere. I wanted to find other ways I could convey my ideas further. My first curatorial project was in 2002 with a group show entitled dTail, co-curated with artist Ani O’Neill at Auckland’s Mataora Gallery during the Ponsonby Fashion Festival and supported by Creative New Zealand.   Do you feel it’s also important to self-identify as a queer or Pasifika? Not at all, if there is such a thing as a Pasifika subject matter then what is a Pakeha subject matter? I see myself first and foremost as an artist and every other label is secondary.   Having said that, is what you’re doing creating visibility for both communities? Is that important to you? Yes, I felt that there were things that needed to be said, that hadn’t been given the platform, especially from indigenous peoples within the queer community often dominated by the point of view of gay white men. I curated a group show about Fa’afafine that coincided with the 2007 Love Life Fono hosted by the NZ Aids Foundation. I also cocurated with Australian Aboriginal curator Jenny Fraser a group exhibition “Hand in Hand” featuring over 30 indigenous artists from Oceania, jointly presented between Performance Apace and Boomalli Aboriginal Artists Co-Operative during 2008 Sydney Pride Week.  

Your latest curatorial project ”Project Banaba” with Banaban scholar and artist Katerina Teaiwa has just shown at Carriageworks in Sydney. How did you meet the artist and become the curator for this piece?   I met Katerina in 2004, after seeing ‘Kainga Tahi Kainga Rua’ at Wellington’s ADAM Art Gallery which brought her research together with the artistic direction and work of Brett Graham, and we kept in touch. I initially began to pursue research and development for ‘Project Banaba’ with with Shelley Jahnke, Katerina and her scholar sister Teresia in 2013. We spoke to a Pākeha agriculture lecturer in Palmerston North about how farms across the country were guilty of benefiting from phosphate extracted from the island of Banaba. The story is that from 1900 to 1980 the British Phosphate Commissioners – owned collectively by Australia, NZ and Britain – mined Banaba, in what is now the Republic of Kiribati. The phosphate was manufactured into superphosphate fertiliser and topdressed onto farms across Australia and NZ. As a result of the extensive mining operation, the island was rendered uninhabitable and the Banabans were relocated to the island of Rabi in Fiji. The lecturer in question replied to us by saying “It was worth the sacrifice to feed the rest of the world”. And sadly our NZ funding application didn’t work out. I knew this project was too good to drop in the ‘failed’ folder however and I was still pissed off at that ignorant comment, so two years later, I regrouped with Katerina about exhibiting at Carriageworks in Sydney where we would focus more on Australia’s mining history in Banaba. In 2016, on Katerina’s advice, I went to Geelong in Victoria to inspect one of factories that processed the phosphate. The sheer size of it helped me realise the


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enormity of the operation, and the circulation of Banaban phosphate ending up in our food chain including Samoa, where often eaten NZ-export off-cut mutton flaps partly contribute to a 90% obesity rate. Katerina is doing a brilliant job as an artist and she should leave academia and be one - or at least do both. It’s her calling, the ideas and research translated so well as an installation.   And now a new series of your own work ‘Te taenga mai o Salome [The arrival of Salome]’ has just opened at MTG Hawke’s Bay. You first created and depicted the Salome character in Samoa in 2002, what brought her back?   I always wanted to produce a project that would shed light on different facets of Samoa by visiting other places that would form as a mirror to its history. ‘Te taenga mai o Salome’ will be one of several iterations where Salome travels in order to draw transnational connections to and from Samoa. In a previous 2013 series, we see Salome at the departure lounge of the Faleolo International Airport in Upolu, Samoa. Locals have mixed reactions to this place because it’s where we greet or farewell friends and family, often starting a new life in a diaspora.  In Heretaunga, it was important to me that the project spoke to local audiences first before anyone else. As I also engage in performing arts, it was natural to me to look into the history of performing arts in the region, particularly from the local iwi, Ngati Kahungunu. I learnt about the late Tama Tūranga Huata ONZM, who was Ngāti Kahungunu and Ngāti Porou, and is considered a central guru in the renaissance of Maori performing arts. I was also interested in his artistic crosscultural approaches, as he studied

African history and dance, and was artistic director of the Takitimu Festival. He integrated Tikanga Māori into pan-Pasifika aesthetics: culturally and spiritually linking his people to others across the Moana Pacific through the ancestral journey of the Takitimu waka, believed to have carried the ancestors of the Ngāti Kahungunu people from various parts of the Moana — including Sāmoa. When I saw Huata reaching out to Samoa, I felt that in return I needed to reach back to him as a Samoan, and how I was going to do that became the question that helped establish what my project was going to be. Salome was the perfect character for this because she directs our focus to various issues at hand, whether they are cultural, social, spiritual, economic or political. The audience engages with the world through her lens, and where Salome had visited prior to arrival in Heretaunga gives us clues to what she could be thinking or feeling, as she considers Paul Gauguin’s questions: “Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going?” Who else in the art sphere do you admire?   My sister’s pencil drawing of our family dog; my brother’s acrylic paintings of people; and my mum’s watercolour painting of flowers growing in her garden.  What’s next, Yuki? What are your hopes for your future?   To be happy.

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‘Apple orchard, Heretaunga’ (2017) From the series ‘Te taenga mai o Salome [The arrival of Salome]’ (2017) Courtesy of Yuki Kihara, MTG Hawke’s Bay Tai Ahuriri and Milford Galleries Dunedin

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STELLAR LUNAR AKA STELLA LEUNG MAKES PICTURES OF COOL GIRLS IN SPOOKY SITUATIONS. FROM HER BEGINNINGS IN DIY ZINE-MAKING AND MERCH FOR LOCAL HARDCORE BANDS, SHE’S PROGRESSED TO HAVING SELL OUT SHOWS OF HER PEN AND INK SINGLE EDITIONS AND PAINTING LARGE-SCALE WALLS AND RAMPS FOR THE LIKES OF VANS AND THE SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE. NOW, THANKS TO A RECENT SHOULDER TAP BY PRADA TO BE ONE OF AN ILLUSTRIOUS GIRL GANG OF ILLUSTRATORS, HER WORK “FATALE” HAS BEEN COMBINED, COLLAGED AND PRINTED ACROSS THE FORTHCOMING SPRING ‘18 READY-TOWEAR COLLECTION, AND LEUNG MAY NOT BE ABLE TO CLAIM ANONYMITY MUCH LONGER. Words CH R I S LOR I M E R Photography RAY RANOA

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Hong Kong born, Leung’s family moved to Sydney’s Northern Beaches in 1992 at just a year old. Now 26, she dwells in her Inner West home studio dreaming darkly and drawing, always in black, never in colour. Bringing together her obsessions with occultism, counter culture and 18th century Romanticism, her punk rock femme fatales live in a nocturnal world where witches, demons and teenage girls co-exist, often in harmony. How did you first discover art and that you could draw? Like any kid I just really enjoyed drawing and spent most of my time doing that more than anything else. There’s nothing else quite as satisfying as finishing a drawing that you’re proud of. What was it that drew you to the idea of being an artist? As I mentioned before, I just love to draw and wanted to do it for a living from a young age. I think a lot of people have dreams as children that don’t always seem realistic later on in life and end up giving up or are told that they should take more ‘realistic’ routes for stability and financial comfort. That idea of living and working under someone else’s terms never appealed to me. Being an artist means you are free to create the world you want to live in and have an outlet for selfexpression that not many other occupations allow. What other artists do you love or admire? Pre-Raphaelite painter John W. Waterhouse, Romanticist painter Francisco Goya, Patti Smith, and my friend Chris Yee. He works in ink and paper just like me but what I love the most about his work is how free he

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is. I’m quite rigid and planned in the way that I draw but he allows himself the freedom of not trying to make the figures look too perfect. There is a lot of movement and humour in his work as well.

history. It’s really weird how things have turned out for me career-wise because I’ve never really been into fashion. But I think what’s come from this collaboration has been really positive. 

Do you have signature elements in your work?

Your next art show is at Books Kinokuniya in Sydney in January ’18 – what can you share with us about it?

The images I draw are usually set in a nocturnal landscape. Its very rarely daytime. I love the mystery and eeriness of the night. How do you come up with the strong imagery you are renowned for? I think in order to create a memorable image it needs to be one simple idea made up of many small details. It should grab someone’s attention and it should be easy for them to interpret what it’s about. I don’t like using tons of metaphors or symbolism in my work for this reason. While I don’t want the viewer to take my work at face value, I think it’s important not to overanalyse art. Drawing is a form of therapy for me too, as I’m not good with words, if I spent all this time coming up with a complicated idea to make some sort of controversial statement, it wouldn’t feel genuine to me. What I draw often is a mix of subconscious memories either from my teen years, a film I saw or any time in my life where I’ve felt something significant, whether it was feeling angry, powerful, uncomfortable or just content.  How did your image end up as part of a Prada collection? They emailed me. It came as a complete surprise. And what has that meant for you personally and for your career? I never expected to be part of Prada

My show will be called ‘This Place Called Death’. It is a collection of ink paintings depicting a small town in the midst of human extinction. People come to terms with their final days, sharing their space with creatures once thought to only exist in fiction. This body of work explores the feeling of existing in a world you don’t feel like you belong in and whether you choose to accept your circumstances or challenge them in order to make the world something you want to be a part of. It sounds a bit morbid but my intention with this show is to be as honest as possible and in that respect, I hope that it empowers others in some way through the subtle humour scattered throughout each piece.  And you’re also making music now, playing bass in your band Potion. How did the band come about? I’ve wanted to play in a band since I was really young but I didn’t really commit to learning to play an instrument or trying to make that dream a reality until I met Lee, my boyfriend, who is the main songwriter in Potion. I introduced him to a lot of doom metal when we met six years ago and we decided it would be really cool to collaborate on something creative together. We met our drummer Chris last year and we get along really well and love all the same types of music, so it just worked out perfectly.


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What music do you like? Doom, 90’s metal and grunge. My favourite bands are L7, Melvins and Deftones. How does making music differ from making your art?  It’s very different in the sense that I can collaborate with other people to create something, where as drawing and painting is a very solitary act. Being in a band requires a lot of moving and travelling around which I never really need to do as an artist working from my home studio. It can sometimes be daunting for me because I spent a lot of time by myself when I’m drawing. A lot of my friends have been making music and playing in bands since they were in high school and I’m really new to it all so there’s a lot of surprises but I generally really love it. What do you like about being in a band? I actually love the social side of it, meeting people and talking to them after the shows. Generally performing is something very new and unfamiliar to me, I’ve always hating public speaking or performing in front of crowds so I managed to kind of overcome that fear from being in a band. How do you feel when you perform?  A little nervous but mostly excited to play. Lastly, what are your goals for the future? Where do you see yourself going with the work? I’d like to go into animation with my work. I’d like to explore that as much as I possibly can.

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LA Beauty


Painting

Silhouettes

Photography CHAR LE S HOW E LLS Fashion RACHAE L CH U RCH WAR D Hair G R EG M U R R E LL at RYDE R using OR I B E Makeup R ICHAR D SYMON S using M.A.C C OS M ETICS Models EVA, ROS I E and M I LLA, CHAR LOT TE at U N IQU E MODE LS

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Opening: Shirt by BENJAMIN ALEXANDER This page: Jacket by NOM*D

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Top by ISSEY MIYAKE from THE SHELTER

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Dress by HELEN CHERRY


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Shirt by BENJAMIN ALEXANDER Fashion and Production Assist LAURA LOPEZ LOPEZ Thanks to WHITE STUDIOS Song title: Will Holland, 2014

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LA Fashion


These Colours Don’t Run

Photography PAU L E M P SON Fashion SARA DU N N Hair P ETE R LUX at TH E WALL G ROU P Makeup AN ITA K E E LI NG at ON E R E P R E S E NTS Model JAM I LLA HO O G E N BO OM at WOM E N MANAG E M E NT PAR I S

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Opening: Jacket by ONAR over jacket by US ARMY from COSTUME STUDIO, top by PRINGLE, trousers by ALICE MCCALL, metal dog tags by US ARMY from COSTUME STUDIO. Opposite: Vintage jumpsuit Stylist’s own by US ARMY, top by THEORY, sunglasses by IZIPIZI, belt by BLACK & BROWN, boots by CHRISTIAN DIOR. This page: Coat, t-shirt, belt and scarf by CHRISTIAN DIOR, metal dog tags and army medals by US ARMY from COSTUME STUDIO

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Tank from COSTUME STUDIO over tank by THEORY, vintage jumpsuit around waist by US ARMY from COSTUME STUDIO, sunglasses by ILLESTEVA

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Coat, t-shirt, skirt, belt, boots and scarf by CHRISTIAN DIOR, metal dog tags and army medals by US ARMY from COSTUME STUDIO Opposite: Jumpsuit by DAVID KOMA, over tank by SAMPLE-CM, metal dog tags and beret by US ARMY by COSTUME STUDIO

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Dress worn as coat by STELLA MCCARTNEY, shirt by FILLIPA K, trousers by EUDON CHOI, metal dog tags by US ARMY from COSTUME STUDIO, ring by RATHEL WOLF, belt by BLACK & BROWN, boots by CHRISTIAN DIOR Song title: Iron Maiden 2006

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Simple

Days

Photography LUC B RAQU ET Fashion SARAH B I RCH LEY Hair K E I R E N STR E ET at VIVI E N’S CR EATIVE using W E LLA P RO AN Z Makeup KATI E ANG US at JAN E ARTI STS MANAG E M E NT using M.A.C C OS M ETICS Model YSAU N NY B R ITO at E LITE PAR I S

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Opening: Dress, choker and earrings by CHRISTIAN DIOR, boots (throughout) stylists own This page: Shirt by NEVENKA, skirt by TONI MATICEVSKI

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Opposite: Shirt by AAIZEL, hat by NICK FOUQUET This page: Top by AAIZEL

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Bodice and skirt by TONI MATICEVSKI

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This page: Bra by CHRISTIAN DIOR, pants and jacket by NEVENKA Opposite: Dress by NEVENKA

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Top and pants by AAIZELH Hair assist: YOSHI SU Song title: Babyface, 1996

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Mountains To Move

Photography DAVID K. SHIELDS Fashion CHRIS LORIMER Hair RAE BORIBOUN at SYNC Makeup TRACY TERASHIMA at DEBUT MANAGEMENT Models ONDRIA HARDING at PRISCILLA’S MODELS & DILLON STOREY at CHADWICK MODELS Onria wears CHRISTIAN DIOR CRUISE 2018 Dillon wears DIOR HOMME SPRING 2018

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Shot on location at GOVETTS LEAP LOOKOUT, Blue Mountains National Park, NSW, Australia Song title: Gavin Degraw, 2009

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GAME CHANGER

Photography CHAR LE S HOW E LLS Fashion RACHAE L CH U RCH WAR D Hair B E NJAM I N JAM E S at RYDE R using R + C O Makeup R ICHAR D SYMON S using M.A.C C OS M ETICS Model TAB ITHA at 62 MODE LS

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Opening: Blazer by UMA WANG from THE SHELTER Opposite: Boots, pants and dress by MARQUES ALMEIDA from THE SHELTER, top by ZAMBESI This page: Jeans by ABRAND over pants by ZAMBESI, top by HENRIK VIBSKOV from THE SHELTER over top by ZAMBESI, boots by ALEXANDER WANG from WORKSHOP

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Opposite: Jumpsuit by ALEXANDER WANG and coat by SHRIMPS from WORKSHOP, top by ZAMBESI This page: Top by MARQUES ALMEIDA from THE SHELTER over top by ZAMBESI

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Opposite: Top by NOM*D under jumpsuit by HELEN CHERRY This page: Top by KAY GOSS, under dress by MM6 MAISON MARGIELA from THE SHELTER, pants by ZAMBESI, boots by ALEXANDER WANG from WORKSHOP

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This page: Jeans by ROLLAS, belt by KATE SYLVESTER, boots and shirt by MARQUES ALMEIDA from THE SHELTER Opposite: Jacket by NOM*D, shirt by HELMUT LANG from WORKSHOP, bustier by ZAMBESI, leather pants by WORKSHOP

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This page: Dress, top and pants by ZAMBESI, boots by ALEXANDER WANG from WORKSHOP, hat by WYNN HAMLYN X HELEN KAMINSKI Opposite: Blazer by KATE SYLVESTER, pants by WORKSHOP, boots and top by MARQUES ALMEIDA from THE SHELTER Fashion and Production Assist: LAURA LOPEZ LOPEZ. Thanks to WHITE STUDIOS Song title: Johnny Gill, 2014

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All Souls

Avenue

Photography TI NTI N H E DB E RG at H E LL STU DIOS Fashion TH I BAU LT B R I E R E Hair and Makeup J USTI N H E N RY at VIVI E N’S CR EATIVE using OR I B E HAI R CAR E and K RYOLAN C OS M ETICS Model H I R SCHY G RACE at N E XT MANAG E M E NT PAR I S

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Opening: Shirt by FAITH CONNEXION, top by KIM WEST. Opposite: Leather jacket by JAYNE PIERSON, dress by ASHLEY ISHAM This page: Fur parka by CHARLOTTE B, top by PRITCH LONDON, shoes by GANOR DOMINIC

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This page: Leather jacket by FAITH CONNEXION, top PRITCH LONDON, skirt S DRESS Opposite: dress by VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

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Opposite: Top by ROLAND MOURET, jeans by FAITH CONNEXION, shoes stylist’s own Song title: The Cult, 1985

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Scars

to

your

Beautiful

Photography NATAS HA FOSTE R Fashion E R I N FAI R S Hair HO ON K I M Makeup MAR E E S PAG NOL Model TUT TA at K U LT MODE LS

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Jumpsuit by CAMILLA AND MARC, corset belt by BABY LIKES TO PONY, mask by MAXX BLACK vintage CHANEL cuff and rings from AMELIA ROSE JEWELLERY

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This page: Jacket by CARLA ZAMPATTI, bra by MAXX BLACK, waspie from BABY LIKES TO PONY, boots by CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN, vintage jewellery by AMELIA ROSE JEWELLERY Opposite: Dress by TONI MATICEVSKI, corset belt by BABY LIKES TO PONY, boots and bag by BALLY, earrings by ALLESANDRA RICH vintage CHANEL cuff and rings from AMELIA ROSE JEWELLERY

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Shirt and boots by BALLY, skirt by CAMILLA AND MARC, bra by MAXX BLACK, vintage PRADA case from THE VINTAGE LUGGAGE COMPANY vintage CHANEL cuff and rings from AMELIA ROSE JEWELLERY

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Jacket by MARNI, bra and suspender belt from MAXX BLACK, boots by BALLY, jewellery by AMELIA ROSE JEWELLERY. Photo Assist: RYAN PETER. Producer: OLGA LEWIS Thanks to the boys at FAT 57 CUSTOMS Song title: Alessia Cora, 2015

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Blue

Sky

Mine

Photography and Fashion KAREN INDERBITZEN-WALLER and DELPHINE AVRIL PLANQUEEL Hair SEAN PATRICK MAHONEY for STEPHEN MARR Makeup KIEKIE STANNERS at M.A.C COSMETICS Model CHELSEA at CLYNE MODELS

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Opening: Hat by RORY WILLIAM DOCHERTY, earrings by ACNE STUDIOS from WORKSHOP, shirt by MARQUES ALMEDIA from THE SHELTER, pants by FINAU PANI. This page: Dress and head wrap by RORY WILLIAM DOCHERTY, earrings by ZELDA MURRAY

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Jacket, shirt and pants by HARMAN GRUBISA, top worn under by LAHAINA LIMACO, earring by ACNE STUDIOS from WORKSHOP

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Opposite: Visor by BRIXTON, jacket and trousers by KAREN WALKER, top by PENNY SAGE, vintage earrings stylist’s own. This page: Trench by PENNY SAGE, earring by ACNE STUDIOS from WORKSHOP, skivvy and knickers by KATE SYLVESTER

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Hat by RORY WILLIAM DOCHERTY, earring by ACNE STUDIOS from WORKSHOP, shirt by MARQUES ALMEIDA from THE SHELTER, pants by FINAU PANI

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Trouser suit by KOURTNEY ANDREW, top underneath by PENNY SAGE, cloche baskets by KO STORE from THE SHELTER, vintage earrings stylist’s own

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Jacket and trench by HARMAN GRUBISA, earrings by ZELDA MURRAY, skirt by MARQUES ALMEIDA and shoes by BERNHARD WILLHELM from THE SHELTER, cloche baskets by KO STORE, from THE SHELTER

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Head wrap and skirt by RORY WILLIAM DOCHERTY, earrings by ZELDA MURRAY, jacket and trousers by HELEN CHERRY, door stops worn as belt by KO STORE from THE SHELTER Song title: Midnight Oil, 1990

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NO SLEEP

BROOKLYN

Photography NICK KRASZNAI Fashion RIKA WATANABE Hair GONN KINOSHITA Makeup AKIKO OWADA Art Direction ALEX SLAVYCZ Illustration YU CHEN Models MONA MASTUOKA at IMG NYC, KEISUKE ASANO at NEXT MANAGEMENT NYC

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TIL’

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Opening: Necklace by EDDIE BORGO. This page: Mona wears jacket by DIESEL, top by HELMUT LANG, jeans by FRAME DENIM. Keisuke wears Vintage windbreaker from SEARCH AND DESTROY, t-shirt by ACNE

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Opposite: Mona wears bikini top by ERES, lace up jeans by TRIPP NYC, boots by TIMBERLAND X DSM, necklace by EDDIE BORGO, rings (throughout) by ICARUS & CO, choker (throughout) model’s own. Keisuke wears skirt by TRIPP NYC, white t-shirt by CALVIN KLEIN, necklace by EDDIE BORGO This page: Jacket by RAF SIMONS, model’s own shirt

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Opposite: Model’s own choker. This page: Mona wears hoodie by PALACE, vintage tank from SEARCH AND DESTROY. Keisuke wears t-shirt by ACT LIKE YOU KNOW

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Opposite: Jacket by DIESEL, top by HELMUT LANG. This page left: Dress by DSQUARED2, stockings by FALKE, shirt by RAF SIMONS. This page right: Mona wears pants by ISABEL MARANT, vintage t-shirt from SEARCH AND DESTROY. Keisuke wears windbreaker by DIESEL, pants by VERSACE

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Mona wears bodysuit by LA PERLA, choker and shorts model’s own Keisuke wears shorts by CALVIN KLEIN

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Mona wears top by VETEMENTS, bodysuit by WOLFORD earrings by KENNETH JAY LANE, boots by DSQUARED2. Keisuke wears vintage t-shirt from SEARCH AND DESTROY, pants and belt by VETEMENTS, necklace by EDDIE BORGO, sneakers by ADIDAS Song title: Beastie Boys, 1986

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The

Endless

Sea

Photography SC OT T LOW E at DE B UT MANAG E M E NT Fashion CH R I S LOR I M E R Hair and Makeup (Lucy) AN N ET TE MCK E N Z I E at U N ION for NAR S at M EC CA C OS M ETICA (Hannah) J E S S B E RG using M.A.C C OS M ETICS and TIG I Models HAN NAH and LUCY at CHADW ICK MODE LS

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Opening: Coat and trousers by KATE SYLVESTER, bodysuit by ABRAND, boots by BEAU COOPS Opposite: Bodysuit and jeans by ABRAND, earrings by EBONNY MUNRO, belt stylist’s own This page: Coat and jumpsuit by MIU MIU

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Opposite: Jacket by KATE SYLVESTER, sunglasses by ADAM SELMAN X LE SPECS This page: Jacket and jumpsuit by MIU MIU

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This page: Jacket by NEUW, vintage corset and skirt by VIVIENNE WESTWOOD courtesy of HELEN FOSTER, boots by BEAU COOPS Opposite: Vintage cap by VIVIENNE WESTWOOD courtesy of HELEN FOSTER, jacket by KAREN WALKER

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Jumpsuit by GSTAR, boots by BOOHOO

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Dress by GARY BIGENI, boots by BEAU COOPS Song title: Iggy Pop, 1979

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