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The Missioner (ISSN 1521–5148) is published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary preserving the classical tradition of Anglicanism since 1842. 2777 Mission Rd., Nashotah, WI 53058–9793, Tel.: 262.646.6500.

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Nashotah, WI 53058 Permit No. 1 Advent 2009 Vol 26, No 2

Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow! Epiphany Term at Nashotah House January 11–15, 2010 Yearning for God’s Audience: Interpreting Job for Today

with the Rev. Timothy Johnson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew, Nashotah House

Catechesis Reawakened

with the Rev. William Blewitt, Ph.D., and the Rev. Lee Nelson

From the Womb to the Tomb: A Theological View of Issues in Bioethics

with the Rev. Daniel A. Westberg, D. Phil., Research Professor of Ethics and Moral Theology, Nashotah House

Missioner

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For more information or to register for classes, visit www.nashotah.edu or contact Carol Klukas at admissions@nashotah.edu or 800.627.4682.

The Newsletter of Nash0tah H0use


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his fall, the leader for our annual retreat was the Rt. Rev. Donald J. Parsons, Professor Emeritus of New Testament and former Dean and President of Nashotah House, who went on to serve as Bishop of Quincy from 1973-1988. Now 87 years old, he is as active and as keen of mind as men 30 years his junior—and full of wisdom and wit. It is always a delight when Bishop Parsons is with us! The theme of Bishop Parsons’ retreat meditations was Christ’s Ascension—the event that a few Christians actually go to church and celebrate on the Thursday before Pentecost Sunday, but that is overlooked and undervalued by many. In his addresses, Bishop Parsons talked about the significance of the Ascension—how it demonstrates the reality of Christ’s Incarnation. If God entered the world by taking on flesh in the Incarnation, and if he was crucified, died, was buried, and rose again on the third day, then unless he was to begin his earthly reign at that point, his earthly existence had to have an end. And that end was his Ascension back to heaven, where he sits at the right hand of the Father. Of course, some today mock the idea of a literal Ascension, just as they disparage the necessity of a bodily Resurrection. One skeptic has gone so far as to say that, if Jesus went up into the sky, and even if he traveled at the speed of light, then he would still have a long way to go even to leave our galaxy, so he can’t be in heaven (wherever that is). But if Jesus was going to return to the Father in heaven, how should he have gone? Should he have simply disappeared? No, that might have signified that he was an illusion or a ghost. Should he have gone down into the earth? What would that have signified to those who witnessed it? No, he ascends, which his

You Can Help the House Maintain Her Legacy

From the Dean

Ten Projects from $250. 1. Transplant one of our beautiful trees—$250.

2. Rebuild the staircase to the Preaching Cross—$1500. Project Adopted!

4. Plant a new basketball post and hoop at the Peaks—$1200.

6. Recarpet the dining area of the Refectory—$8000.

8. Buy a new deck for one of our mowers—$2000.

10. Install a powerpoint projector and screen for Distance-Learning Classes in the Refectory—$1500.

3. Rebuild the staircase to the Shelton Hall Apartments—$800. 5. Recarpet any one of our three classrooms—$2500. 7. Buy a new computer and printer for our Sacristy—$2000. 9. Repair blacktop around our manhole covers—$2300.

disciples would have known signified going to a higher, better place. Similarly, in saying that Christ is now seated at the right hand of the Father, the aim isn’t to tell us about the arrangement of the furniture in heaven; it is to tell us that Jesus, who has ascended, now reigns with the Father’s favor and authority. The Ascension demonstrates the reality and the physicality of the Resurrection. If Jesus’ body still remained in a tomb outside Jerusalem, then the Resurrection is merely a metaphor for the immortality of the soul. But if Jesus rose bodily then he had to ascend if he was to leave this world. But, of course, Christ did ascend and 10 days later sends the Holy Spirit to indwell and empower his Church. Sitting there listening to Bishop Parsons’ meditation, I had a sense of what it must have been like to listen to the Apostle Paul teach one of the New Testament churches about the meaning of Christ’s Ascension for the very first time. It was a blessed moment. It transcended time and space. And during that moment it didn’t matter whether we were in the first century or the twenty-first century—we were simply Christians. We’re doing a new/old thing—an ancient/future thing— at Nashotah House. It is called Christianity. And it feels great!

For more information about these and other projects and how you can help, contact Fr. Bill Easterling, Associate Dean for Administration, at beasterling@nashotah.edu or 262.646.6518.

Limited Edition Ornaments at the Bookstore

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ommemorating the 125th anniversary of Michael the Bell and the Preaching Cross at Nashotah House, the Mission Bookstore is proud to offer this hand-painted ceramic Christmas ornament, featuring these iconic fixtures of Nashotah House. This ornament is collector quality and constitutes one in a continuing series of Nashotah House Christmas ornaments. To order yours, call Chardy at the Mission Bookstore at 262.646.6529.

$22 each (while supplies last).

Remember your leaders, who spoke the word of God to you. Consider the outcome of their way of life and imitate their faith. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever (Hebrews 13:7–8).

front The Very Rev. Canon Robert S. Munday, Ph.D. Dean & President

back

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The

Missioner

Biddings & Bindings

published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary in the catholic tradition of Anglicanism since 1842.

Ordinations The Rev. Jeffery A. Stubbs, ’09, was ordained Priest on September 26, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Diocese of Fort Worth. The Rev. John H. Munson, ’92, was restored to the Priesthood on June 15, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Diocese of Fort Worth. He had voluntarily resigned from the ministry in 1995 for reasons not affecting his moral character. He worships at St. Laurence Church in Grapevine, TX. Mr. George F. Niebling IV, matriculated ’95, was ordained Subdeacon in the Orthodox Church on October 18, 2009, and serves at St. Peter Orthodox Church in Fort Worth, TX. He is a doctoral candidate at the university of North Texas where he is completing a dissertation on Rose Hill College.

Appointments

The Rev. Timothy M. Matkin, ’02, is Vicar of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church, 500 N. Austin, Comanche, TX 76442, and Vicar of Trinity Episcopal Church, 459 N. Patrick St., Dublin, TX 76446. The Rev. Robert M. Lewis, ’07, is Rector of Church of the Advent, 1125 SW Hwy. 484, Dunnellon, FL 34432.

Retirements The Rev. John P. Roof, ’66, retired as Rector of St. Augustine’s Church, Danville, IN.

Necrology

The Rev. Charles A. Hough IV, ’07, is Rector of St. Paul’s, 415 E. California St., Gainesville, TX 76241. The Rev. John W. Jordan, ’06, is Associate Rector of St. Laurence, 519 N. Kimball Ave., Southlake, TX 76092.

The Rev. Canon John H. Heidt, DD, ’57, died October 23, 2009, age 77. +May the souls of the faithful departed, by the mercy of God, rest in peace.+

publisher The Very Rev. Dr. Robert S. Munday editor The Rev. Steve Schlossberg associate editor Mr. Tim Kasza copy editor Mrs. Sandy Mills photographer Mrs. Shawna Collins archivist The Ven. Thomas Winslow address 2777 Mission Road Nashotah, Wisconsin 53058–9793 telephone 262.646.6500

The Black Monk was here.

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he Rev. Daniel Cannon, ’07, Priest-in-Charge of Christ Church, East Tawas, Michigan, was the first to correctly identify last issue’s subject—a detail (the archangel’s eyes) from the St. Michael window in St. Mary’s Chapel (left). “After years of sitting opposite to St. Michael in the chapel,” Fr. Cannon writes, “I could never forget those peaceful eyes on the stained glass.” Can you tell where the Black Monk is skulking now? If you can identify the architectural detail, the liturgical obscurity or the hidden corner of our campus featured in the photograph at right, e-mail your answer to sschlossberg@nashotah.edu. The first respondent to correctly identify the Black Monk’s subject will be named in the next issue of The Missioner. 

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email nashotah@nashotah.edu website www.nashotah.edu

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Michael & Preaching Cross Rededicated

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ourteen students matriculated on the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels this October, following a threeday retreat led by the Rt. Rev. Donald Parsons, eighth Bishop of Quincy and 14th Dean of Nashotah House. Entitled “The Ascension of Our Lord: A Neglected Feast,” the retreat explored the implications that the Dean Robert Munday with our Matriculants (L–R): John Hellrung, ascended Lord’s carrying Sam Keyes, Moses Htaw, Nathaniel Kidd, Roy Allison, Shane Gormley, his humanity into eternity Rusty Dahler, Wesley Evans, Lance Wallace, Jonathan Kanary, Donald McConnell, Meredyth Albright and James Brzezinski. Not pictured: has for pastoral ministry and Jon Milliken. living the Christian life. “As Jesus goes into heaven,” the Bishop remarked, “he takes with him the scars of death. He takes also the growing into perfection he did as a human being and his experiences in the flesh. So we do too carry these things with us into eternity. None of our experiences here in the flesh are wasted.” Immediately preceding the Holy Eucharist and Matriculation service, Dean Robert Munday led the community in a service rededicating Michael the Bell and the Preaching Cross (below), both of which are celebrating their 125th birthdays this year at Nashotah House. 

In this issue: House Hosts Historic Ecumenical Conference

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New Students Matriculate

Dr . Johnson Publishes Monograph on Job

Black Monks Take One on Chin Academic Convocation Boasts First D.Min. Graduate

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Biddings & Bindings

The procession departs the rededicated Preaching Cross (above) to circle the garth and reach Michael the Bell (right). The bell tolls out the Angelus three times each day at Nashotah House, calling the community to prayer.

On the Cover:

Facing east on Mission Avenue from Nashotah House, at sunrise. Photo by Shawna Collins

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“In the Footsteps of Tikhon and Grafton”

The Rev. Canon John H. Heidt, 1932–2009

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ommencing on October 8 with a Pontifical Mass celebrated by the Rt. Rev. Russell E. Jacobus, successor to the See of Blessed Charles Grafton of Fond du Lac, the Anglican-Orthodox Conference at Nashotah House drew a large crowd of attendees and an extraordinary constellation of Anglican and Orthodox figures, including the Most Blessed Jonah, OCA Archbishop of Washington, D. C., and Metropolitan of All America and Canada. “In the Footsteps of Tikhon and Grafton” was a threeday discussion of the historical, theological and missional issues which have united and divided Anglican and Orthodox Christians, and concluded with the signing of a Concordat between Nashotah House and St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in Crestwood, New York, whose Chancellor, the Very Rev. Chad Hatfield, is a Son of the House. “Together we can take the work and witness of our forefathers who have gone before us to reclaim the voice of Christian orthodoxy,” Fr. Hatfield said. “Not to do so would be to fail to build upon the foundations of both seminaries and the two traditions they represent. Now is the time to act boldly and together we will, in common witness to the truth of the Gospel of our Lord, God and Savior, Jesus Christ. May it be blessed!” Named for two 19th century luminaries and personal friends who did much to initiate the Anglican-Orthodox dialogue in their own day, Blessed Tikhon of Moscow and Bishop Charles Chapman Grafton of Fond du Lac, the conference enjoyed the presence of the Most Rev. Robert Duncan, Archbishop of the Anglican Church in North America; the Rt. Rev. Melchizedek, Orthodox Bishop of Pittsburgh; the Rt. Rev. Edward L. Salmon, Jr., retired Bishop of South Carolina; the Rt. Rev. Frank Lyons, Anglican Bishop of Bolivia; and the Rev. Stephen Platt, General Secretary of the Fellowship of St. Alban and St. Sergius.

photos courtesy Michael W. Howell

House Hosts Anglican-Orthodox Conference

Having grown up being discipled by an Episcopal priest who graduated from Nashotah House, the faith he revealed to me—the faith he enkindled in my soul—is the same faith that I bear now. —The Most Blessed Jonah

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DVDs of the Anglican-Orthodox Conference are now available from the Mission Bookstore for $15.00 each (price includes s/h; WI residents subject to state tax). To order yours, call Chardy Booth at 262.646.6529.

Excerpts from his Doctor of Divinity Degree Citation orn in Madison, Wisconsin, and raised in Milwaukee, John Harrison Heidt received the Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale University in 1954 before spending three years at Nashotah House under the tutelage of professors Donald Parsons, Arthur Vogel, Boone Porter and Homer Rogers. He received a Bachelor of Divinity degree and later the Master of Divinity degree. In 2007, he observed the 50th anniversary of his ordination to the diaconate and the priesthood. After ordination Fr. Heidt served Christ Church, New Haven, Connecticut, St. Mary’s Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and St. Barnabas Church, Denton, Texas. In 1964, he married Katherine Preston Heidt, who is currently a Trustee of Nashotah House and the recipient of an honorary degree in 2006. He and Katherine are parents of five children—all committed AngloCatholics. Their eldest son, Michael, is a priest and their youngest daughter, Teresa, served as a missionary in Lima, Peru. In 1968, Father Heidt accepted a call as Episcopal Chaplain at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and taught on the faculty of Marquette University. In the Diocese of Milwaukee he was a Residentiary Canon of All Saints’ Cathedral, Examining Chaplain to the Bishop, Chairman of Diocesan Commission on Urban Affairs, President of the Diocesan Clergy Association and a member of the diocesan departments of College Work, Christian Social Relations and Evangelism. In 1972, he returned to England for more advanced study, this time staying for 18 years. For his dissertation, “The Social Doctrine of Henry Scott Holland,” Fr. Heidt was awarded a Ph.D., for which the Most Rev. Michael Ramsey served as one of his

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examiners. Fr. Heidt served for 16 years as Vicar of Saints Philip and James in Up Hatherley, Cheltenham, where he introduced the Cursillo Movement to England and held weekends for unchurched young people. During this time in England, he became a member of the Society of the Holy Cross and a Benedictine Oblate of Alton Abbey. The Heidts returned to the United States in 1996 when Father Heidt accepted a call as rector of Christ Church in Dallas. He retired in 2003 and accepted the appointment as Canon Theologian for the Diocese of Fort Worth. Canon Heidt was a prolific writer and author and served as editor of the bimonthly magazine, “Forward in Christ.” This past Friday, October 23, 2009, God called his faithful servant home. May God receive him into the arms of His mercy, into the blessed rest of everlasting peace, and into the glorious company of the saints in light!  On the Saturday following Convocation, one of Fr. Heidt’s former parishioners, the Rt. Rev. Keith L. Ackerman, presented Fr. Heidt’s degree to Mrs. Heidt in Texas.

Experience Nashotah! March 3–6, 2010

hether you’re discerning a call to ministry or considering the possibility of attending seminary, there’s no better place to retreat from the cares of the world and begin to contemplate your call than Nashotah House. A three-day feast of worship, classroom experience, private reflection and candid discussion with our students, faculty and staff, Experience Nashotah! is expressly designed for prospective students like you. Your only cost of attending Experience Nashotah! is your own travel expenses. Nashotah House will provide you and your spouse three nights’ lodging and all meals, from breakfast on Thursday through breakfast on Saturday. Don’t miss this chance to put the ancient Benedictine way of prayer, study and reflection to work for you. For more information, contact Carol Klukas, Director of Admissions, at admissions@nashotah.edu.


Academic Convocation 2009

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Historic Document Signed by St. Vladimir’s & Nashotah House

House Graduates Doctor of Ministry

n a service that included an address by the Rt. Rev. David Bruce MacPherson, the awarding of four honorary doctoral degrees (including one, posthumously, to the Rev. Canon John Heidt), and the graduation of a cohort of M.A. Min. distancelearners, Nashotah House conferred its first Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) degree upon the Rev. Stephen Samples (right), Rector of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Enid, Oklahoma.

Doctors of Divinity, honoris causa (L-R): the Rt. Rev. Donald Frederick Harvey, Bishop of Eastern Labrador and Newfoundland (retired); the Rt. Rev. David Bruce MacPherson, Bishop of Western Louisiana; and the Rev. Dr. Jeremy Patrick Sheehy, former Principal of St. Stephen’s House, Oxford.

Accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in 2007, Nashotah House’s D.Min program “offers advanced education to clergy and other ministry leaders in areas for which Nashotah is famous—namely, liturgy and spirituality,” says Dean Robert Munday. “And like every other academic program at Nashotah House, it fortifies the faith and deepens the spirituality of its students through common prayer and worship.” Designed to develop skills in congregational and ministerial leadership, the program’s major areas of concentration include Biblical Exposition, Liturgy and Worship, Spirituality, and Congregational Development. For more information about this and other continuing education programs at the House, contact Carol Klukas at admissions@nashotah.edu.

Left: Fr. Chad Hatfield of St. Vladimir’s and Fr. Robert Munday of Nashotah House. Above: The Most Blessed Jonah and Bishop Edward L. Salmon, Jr., signing the Concordat.

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Concordat

hereas the oldest ongoing ecumenical dialogue is between Anglican and Orthodox Christians, dating from the formation of the Russo-Greek Committee of 1862; and hereas the Fellowship of St. Alban and St. Sergius was founded in 1928 to pray and work for Christian unity and to provide Christians of the Orthodox and Western traditions a deeper understanding of one another’s spirituality, theology, and worship; and hereas this great legacy owes much to prominent Anglican and Orthodox theologians and hierarchs associated with both Nashotah House and St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary; including St. Tikhon of Moscow, Bishop Charles Chapman Grafton, Archpriest Georges Florovsky, Isabella Hapgood, Protopresbyter Alexander Schmemann, Archbishop Michael Ramsey, Protopresbyter John Meyendorff, Archbishop Robert Runcie, Metropolitan Kallistos Ware and Bishop Robert Terwilliger; and

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hereas this 20th anniversary of the Glorification of St. Tikhon recalls our common legacy and quickens our mutual desire to see it continued; e, therefore, of St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary and Nashotah House Theological Seminary pledge ourselves to a mutual fellowship of prayer and learning in the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit. n witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands this October 10th in the year of our Lord two thousand nine.

The Most Blessed Jonah Archbishop of Washington, D.C. Metropolitan of All America and Canada President of the Board of Trustees St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary The Very Reverend John Behr Dean St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary The Rev. Dr. Samples (second from left) with our second graduating class of Distance-Learners (L-R): Thomas Malionek, Kimberley Anne Talbot, Scott Charles Evans, Cynthia Kendrick Stansbury, Vernon H. Barber, Jr., Robert Nelson Smith and H. B. W. Schroeder. Not pictured: John Charles Metcalf and Ernest R. Buchanan.

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The Very Reverend Chad Hatfield Chancellor St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary

The Right Reverend Edward L. Salmon, Jr. Bishop of South Carolina (retired) Chairman of the Board of Trustees Nashotah House Theological Seminary The Very Reverend Canon Robert S. Munday Dean and President Nashotah House Theological Seminary The Right Reverend Keith L. Ackerman Bishop of Quincy (retired) Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees Nashotah House Theological Seminary


Anglicans & Orthodox, Then & Now

St. Laurence Cup

Sacred Heartbreaker Anglicans Fall to Romans 14–6

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Left: The infamous “Fond du Lac Circus,” so-called by its critics because it was the first time Bishops of the Episcopal Church had been photographed wearing copes and mitres, which at that time (1900) was considered scandalously Romish. The occasion was the consecration of R. H. Weller as Bishop Coadjutor of Fond du Lac, at which a number of bishops from local Episcopal dioceses were in attendance. A far more meaningful symbol of catholicity than the spectacular vestments, however, was the presence of Bishops of the Polish National and Orthodox churches, including Tikhon (far right), then Orthodox Bishop of Alaska and the Aleutian Islands. Right: the Circus at Nashotah House, 2009. (L–R): the Rev. Jack Gabig, the Rt. Rev. Frank Lyons; the Rt. Rev. William Wantland, the Rt. Rev. Melchizedek, the Rt. Rev. Keith Ackerman, the Rev. Stephen Platt, the Rt. Rev. Edward Salmon, Jr., the Very Rev. Chad Hatfield, the Most Rev. Robert Duncan, the Very Rev. Robert Munday, Brother Gregory Stevens and the Most Blessed Jonah.

Johnson Publishes Study of Job

Novel Thesis Distinguishes Monograph

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n October 27, the faculty, staff and students of Nashotah House gathered in the library to toast the Rev. Dr. Timothy Johnson, Associate Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew, upon the publication of his first book. An adaptation of his doctoral dissertation, Now My Eye Sees You: Unveiling an Apocalyptic Job (Sheffield-Phoenix, 2009) is a literary analysis which argues that Job is best read not as Wisdom literature, the genre to which it is usually assigned, but as Apocalyptic literature. For all its many literary anomalies, Johnson argues, it is the apocalyptic tradition in Hebrew literature that shaped its composition and consequently yields its most fruitful reading. “Two matters regarding Dr. Johnson’s book are worth noting here,” observed Dr. Garwood Anderson, Nashotah House’s Academic Dean and Associate Professor of New Testament and Greek. “FIrst, Sheffield Press is a distinguished series for this work. Sheffield, both the University biblical studies department and the press it houses, have made their mark especially in the burgeoning field of the literary analysis of the Bible. So to be selected for this series with what is essentially a literary analysis of Job is a matter of distinction. “Further, the editor of the Hebrew monograph series, David J. Clines, is quite possibly the foremost Job scholar

he Black Monks of Nashotah House fell to the students of Sacred Heart School of Theology and St. Francis Roman Catholic Seminary in a hard-fought football game played on October 18 before a screaming crowd of several. The loss was the first in six years for the fabled Black Monks, who entered the game hobbled by a recent rash of catastrophic injuries, graduations and ordinations. “It’s a hard loss to swallow,” said disconsolate Black Monks Coach and Quarterback Mark Polley, ’11, who during pre-game warm-ups aggravated an old injury to his shoulder suffered while swinging a thurible. “It would be one thing to lose to a bunch of Jesuits. Even a bunch of Dominicans. But Franciscans! I always thought Franciscans were supposed to be harmless.” Successor to the famed Lavabo Bowl, Nashotah House’s perennial contest against the Saints of Seabury-Western Theological Seminary until the Illinois school terminated its M.Div. program in 2008, the St. Laurence Cup pits Covenant

Franciscans preaching without words as Monks fail to convert first down.

Partners Nashotah House and Sacred Heart School of Theology against each other for possession of the St. Laurence Trophy. The two schools formed a sister school relationship in 1981, pledging to remember each other in prayer during celebrations of the Eucharist, to include each other in liturgical celebrations, to share each other’s facilities and programs and to work together for the common good. After the game, both teams joined in a service of Solemn Vespers in the Chapel of St. Francis Seminary. 

Students of St. Francis and Nashotah House with the St. Laurence Trophy the gift of Fr. Query, Fr. Lee Nelson and St. Laurence Church, Fort Worth.

Can You Help Nashotah House Help the House Maintain Her Legacy!

Surviving members of the two teams pose after the game with the coveted St. Laurence Cup, a gift from Fr. William A. Crary, Jr., ’76, and Fr. Lee M. Nelson, ’05, of St. Laurence Church in Grapevine, Texas.

in the world today, having written a definitive multi-volume commentary in the Word Biblical Commentary series and countless other studies. Thus, again, it is a matter of further distinction to publish a monograph on Job in this series, and indeed a monograph with a bold and compelling thesis. “Dr. Johnson has distinguished himself with this accomplishment,” Anderson concluded, “and in doing so, he has distinguished us.”

The 2010 Ramsey Society Pilgrimage

The Passion Play at Oberammergau and other ecclesiastical highlights of Germany for Anglicans

Hosted by the Rev. Canon Arnold Klukas & the Rev. Lawrence Bausch Frankfurt • Cologne • Berlin • Leipzig • Nuremberg • Munich • the Black Forest For a complete brochure, contact Connoisseurs Tours at 800.856.1045. The Ramsey Society. A fellowship of giving. A fellowship of prayer. Visit www.ramseysociety.org today.

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Anglicans & Orthodox, Then & Now

St. Laurence Cup

Sacred Heartbreaker Anglicans Fall to Romans 14–6

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Left: The infamous “Fond du Lac Circus,” so-called by its critics because it was the first time Bishops of the Episcopal Church had been photographed wearing copes and mitres, which at that time (1900) was considered scandalously Romish. The occasion was the consecration of R. H. Weller as Bishop Coadjutor of Fond du Lac, at which a number of bishops from local Episcopal dioceses were in attendance. A far more meaningful symbol of catholicity than the spectacular vestments, however, was the presence of Bishops of the Polish National and Orthodox churches, including Tikhon (far right), then Orthodox Bishop of Alaska and the Aleutian Islands. Right: the Circus at Nashotah House, 2009. (L–R): the Rev. Jack Gabig, the Rt. Rev. Frank Lyons; the Rt. Rev. William Wantland, the Rt. Rev. Melchizedek, the Rt. Rev. Keith Ackerman, the Rev. Stephen Platt, the Rt. Rev. Edward Salmon, Jr., the Very Rev. Chad Hatfield, the Most Rev. Robert Duncan, the Very Rev. Robert Munday, Brother Gregory Stevens and the Most Blessed Jonah.

Johnson Publishes Study of Job

Novel Thesis Distinguishes Monograph

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n October 27, the faculty, staff and students of Nashotah House gathered in the library to toast the Rev. Dr. Timothy Johnson, Associate Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew, upon the publication of his first book. An adaptation of his doctoral dissertation, Now My Eye Sees You: Unveiling an Apocalyptic Job (Sheffield-Phoenix, 2009) is a literary analysis which argues that Job is best read not as Wisdom literature, the genre to which it is usually assigned, but as Apocalyptic literature. For all its many literary anomalies, Johnson argues, it is the apocalyptic tradition in Hebrew literature that shaped its composition and consequently yields its most fruitful reading. “Two matters regarding Dr. Johnson’s book are worth noting here,” observed Dr. Garwood Anderson, Nashotah House’s Academic Dean and Associate Professor of New Testament and Greek. “FIrst, Sheffield Press is a distinguished series for this work. Sheffield, both the University biblical studies department and the press it houses, have made their mark especially in the burgeoning field of the literary analysis of the Bible. So to be selected for this series with what is essentially a literary analysis of Job is a matter of distinction. “Further, the editor of the Hebrew monograph series, David J. Clines, is quite possibly the foremost Job scholar

he Black Monks of Nashotah House fell to the students of Sacred Heart School of Theology and St. Francis Roman Catholic Seminary in a hard-fought football game played on October 18 before a screaming crowd of several. The loss was the first in six years for the fabled Black Monks, who entered the game hobbled by a recent rash of catastrophic injuries, graduations and ordinations. “It’s a hard loss to swallow,” said disconsolate Black Monks Coach and Quarterback Mark Polley, ’11, who during pre-game warm-ups aggravated an old injury to his shoulder suffered while swinging a thurible. “It would be one thing to lose to a bunch of Jesuits. Even a bunch of Dominicans. But Franciscans! I always thought Franciscans were supposed to be harmless.” Successor to the famed Lavabo Bowl, Nashotah House’s perennial contest against the Saints of Seabury-Western Theological Seminary until the Illinois school terminated its M.Div. program in 2008, the St. Laurence Cup pits Covenant

Franciscans preaching without words as Monks fail to convert first down.

Partners Nashotah House and Sacred Heart School of Theology against each other for possession of the St. Laurence Trophy. The two schools formed a sister school relationship in 1981, pledging to remember each other in prayer during celebrations of the Eucharist, to include each other in liturgical celebrations, to share each other’s facilities and programs and to work together for the common good. After the game, both teams joined in a service of Solemn Vespers in the Chapel of St. Francis Seminary. 

Students of St. Francis and Nashotah House with the St. Laurence Trophy the gift of Fr. Query, Fr. Lee Nelson and St. Laurence Church, Fort Worth.

Can You Help Nashotah House Help the House Maintain Her Legacy!

Surviving members of the two teams pose after the game with the coveted St. Laurence Cup, a gift from Fr. William A. Crary, Jr., ’76, and Fr. Lee M. Nelson, ’05, of St. Laurence Church in Grapevine, Texas.

in the world today, having written a definitive multi-volume commentary in the Word Biblical Commentary series and countless other studies. Thus, again, it is a matter of further distinction to publish a monograph on Job in this series, and indeed a monograph with a bold and compelling thesis. “Dr. Johnson has distinguished himself with this accomplishment,” Anderson concluded, “and in doing so, he has distinguished us.”

The 2010 Ramsey Society Pilgrimage

The Passion Play at Oberammergau and other ecclesiastical highlights of Germany for Anglicans

Hosted by the Rev. Canon Arnold Klukas & the Rev. Lawrence Bausch Frankfurt • Cologne • Berlin • Leipzig • Nuremberg • Munich • the Black Forest For a complete brochure, contact Connoisseurs Tours at 800.856.1045. The Ramsey Society. A fellowship of giving. A fellowship of prayer. Visit www.ramseysociety.org today.

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Academic Convocation 2009

I

Historic Document Signed by St. Vladimir’s & Nashotah House

House Graduates Doctor of Ministry

n a service that included an address by the Rt. Rev. David Bruce MacPherson, the awarding of four honorary doctoral degrees (including one, posthumously, to the Rev. Canon John Heidt), and the graduation of a cohort of M.A. Min. distancelearners, Nashotah House conferred its first Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) degree upon the Rev. Stephen Samples (right), Rector of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Enid, Oklahoma.

Doctors of Divinity, honoris causa (L-R): the Rt. Rev. Donald Frederick Harvey, Bishop of Eastern Labrador and Newfoundland (retired); the Rt. Rev. David Bruce MacPherson, Bishop of Western Louisiana; and the Rev. Dr. Jeremy Patrick Sheehy, former Principal of St. Stephen’s House, Oxford.

Accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in 2007, Nashotah House’s D.Min program “offers advanced education to clergy and other ministry leaders in areas for which Nashotah is famous—namely, liturgy and spirituality,” says Dean Robert Munday. “And like every other academic program at Nashotah House, it fortifies the faith and deepens the spirituality of its students through common prayer and worship.” Designed to develop skills in congregational and ministerial leadership, the program’s major areas of concentration include Biblical Exposition, Liturgy and Worship, Spirituality, and Congregational Development. For more information about this and other continuing education programs at the House, contact Carol Klukas at admissions@nashotah.edu.

Left: Fr. Chad Hatfield of St. Vladimir’s and Fr. Robert Munday of Nashotah House. Above: The Most Blessed Jonah and Bishop Edward L. Salmon, Jr., signing the Concordat.

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Concordat

hereas the oldest ongoing ecumenical dialogue is between Anglican and Orthodox Christians, dating from the formation of the Russo-Greek Committee of 1862; and hereas the Fellowship of St. Alban and St. Sergius was founded in 1928 to pray and work for Christian unity and to provide Christians of the Orthodox and Western traditions a deeper understanding of one another’s spirituality, theology, and worship; and hereas this great legacy owes much to prominent Anglican and Orthodox theologians and hierarchs associated with both Nashotah House and St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary; including St. Tikhon of Moscow, Bishop Charles Chapman Grafton, Archpriest Georges Florovsky, Isabella Hapgood, Protopresbyter Alexander Schmemann, Archbishop Michael Ramsey, Protopresbyter John Meyendorff, Archbishop Robert Runcie, Metropolitan Kallistos Ware and Bishop Robert Terwilliger; and

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hereas this 20th anniversary of the Glorification of St. Tikhon recalls our common legacy and quickens our mutual desire to see it continued; e, therefore, of St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary and Nashotah House Theological Seminary pledge ourselves to a mutual fellowship of prayer and learning in the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit. n witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands this October 10th in the year of our Lord two thousand nine.

The Most Blessed Jonah Archbishop of Washington, D.C. Metropolitan of All America and Canada President of the Board of Trustees St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary The Very Reverend John Behr Dean St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary The Rev. Dr. Samples (second from left) with our second graduating class of Distance-Learners (L-R): Thomas Malionek, Kimberley Anne Talbot, Scott Charles Evans, Cynthia Kendrick Stansbury, Vernon H. Barber, Jr., Robert Nelson Smith and H. B. W. Schroeder. Not pictured: John Charles Metcalf and Ernest R. Buchanan.

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The Very Reverend Chad Hatfield Chancellor St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary

The Right Reverend Edward L. Salmon, Jr. Bishop of South Carolina (retired) Chairman of the Board of Trustees Nashotah House Theological Seminary The Very Reverend Canon Robert S. Munday Dean and President Nashotah House Theological Seminary The Right Reverend Keith L. Ackerman Bishop of Quincy (retired) Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees Nashotah House Theological Seminary


“In the Footsteps of Tikhon and Grafton”

The Rev. Canon John H. Heidt, 1932–2009

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ommencing on October 8 with a Pontifical Mass celebrated by the Rt. Rev. Russell E. Jacobus, successor to the See of Blessed Charles Grafton of Fond du Lac, the Anglican-Orthodox Conference at Nashotah House drew a large crowd of attendees and an extraordinary constellation of Anglican and Orthodox figures, including the Most Blessed Jonah, OCA Archbishop of Washington, D. C., and Metropolitan of All America and Canada. “In the Footsteps of Tikhon and Grafton” was a threeday discussion of the historical, theological and missional issues which have united and divided Anglican and Orthodox Christians, and concluded with the signing of a Concordat between Nashotah House and St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in Crestwood, New York, whose Chancellor, the Very Rev. Chad Hatfield, is a Son of the House. “Together we can take the work and witness of our forefathers who have gone before us to reclaim the voice of Christian orthodoxy,” Fr. Hatfield said. “Not to do so would be to fail to build upon the foundations of both seminaries and the two traditions they represent. Now is the time to act boldly and together we will, in common witness to the truth of the Gospel of our Lord, God and Savior, Jesus Christ. May it be blessed!” Named for two 19th century luminaries and personal friends who did much to initiate the Anglican-Orthodox dialogue in their own day, Blessed Tikhon of Moscow and Bishop Charles Chapman Grafton of Fond du Lac, the conference enjoyed the presence of the Most Rev. Robert Duncan, Archbishop of the Anglican Church in North America; the Rt. Rev. Melchizedek, Orthodox Bishop of Pittsburgh; the Rt. Rev. Edward L. Salmon, Jr., retired Bishop of South Carolina; the Rt. Rev. Frank Lyons, Anglican Bishop of Bolivia; and the Rev. Stephen Platt, General Secretary of the Fellowship of St. Alban and St. Sergius.

photos courtesy Michael W. Howell

House Hosts Anglican-Orthodox Conference

Having grown up being discipled by an Episcopal priest who graduated from Nashotah House, the faith he revealed to me—the faith he enkindled in my soul—is the same faith that I bear now. —The Most Blessed Jonah

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DVDs of the Anglican-Orthodox Conference are now available from the Mission Bookstore for $15.00 each (price includes s/h; WI residents subject to state tax). To order yours, call Chardy Booth at 262.646.6529.

Excerpts from his Doctor of Divinity Degree Citation orn in Madison, Wisconsin, and raised in Milwaukee, John Harrison Heidt received the Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale University in 1954 before spending three years at Nashotah House under the tutelage of professors Donald Parsons, Arthur Vogel, Boone Porter and Homer Rogers. He received a Bachelor of Divinity degree and later the Master of Divinity degree. In 2007, he observed the 50th anniversary of his ordination to the diaconate and the priesthood. After ordination Fr. Heidt served Christ Church, New Haven, Connecticut, St. Mary’s Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and St. Barnabas Church, Denton, Texas. In 1964, he married Katherine Preston Heidt, who is currently a Trustee of Nashotah House and the recipient of an honorary degree in 2006. He and Katherine are parents of five children—all committed AngloCatholics. Their eldest son, Michael, is a priest and their youngest daughter, Teresa, served as a missionary in Lima, Peru. In 1968, Father Heidt accepted a call as Episcopal Chaplain at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and taught on the faculty of Marquette University. In the Diocese of Milwaukee he was a Residentiary Canon of All Saints’ Cathedral, Examining Chaplain to the Bishop, Chairman of Diocesan Commission on Urban Affairs, President of the Diocesan Clergy Association and a member of the diocesan departments of College Work, Christian Social Relations and Evangelism. In 1972, he returned to England for more advanced study, this time staying for 18 years. For his dissertation, “The Social Doctrine of Henry Scott Holland,” Fr. Heidt was awarded a Ph.D., for which the Most Rev. Michael Ramsey served as one of his

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examiners. Fr. Heidt served for 16 years as Vicar of Saints Philip and James in Up Hatherley, Cheltenham, where he introduced the Cursillo Movement to England and held weekends for unchurched young people. During this time in England, he became a member of the Society of the Holy Cross and a Benedictine Oblate of Alton Abbey. The Heidts returned to the United States in 1996 when Father Heidt accepted a call as rector of Christ Church in Dallas. He retired in 2003 and accepted the appointment as Canon Theologian for the Diocese of Fort Worth. Canon Heidt was a prolific writer and author and served as editor of the bimonthly magazine, “Forward in Christ.” This past Friday, October 23, 2009, God called his faithful servant home. May God receive him into the arms of His mercy, into the blessed rest of everlasting peace, and into the glorious company of the saints in light!  On the Saturday following Convocation, one of Fr. Heidt’s former parishioners, the Rt. Rev. Keith L. Ackerman, presented Fr. Heidt’s degree to Mrs. Heidt in Texas.

Experience Nashotah! March 3–6, 2010

hether you’re discerning a call to ministry or considering the possibility of attending seminary, there’s no better place to retreat from the cares of the world and begin to contemplate your call than Nashotah House. A three-day feast of worship, classroom experience, private reflection and candid discussion with our students, faculty and staff, Experience Nashotah! is expressly designed for prospective students like you. Your only cost of attending Experience Nashotah! is your own travel expenses. Nashotah House will provide you and your spouse three nights’ lodging and all meals, from breakfast on Thursday through breakfast on Saturday. Don’t miss this chance to put the ancient Benedictine way of prayer, study and reflection to work for you. For more information, contact Carol Klukas, Director of Admissions, at admissions@nashotah.edu.


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Missioner

Biddings & Bindings

published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary in the catholic tradition of Anglicanism since 1842.

Ordinations The Rev. Jeffery A. Stubbs, ’09, was ordained Priest on September 26, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Diocese of Fort Worth. The Rev. John H. Munson, ’92, was restored to the Priesthood on June 15, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Diocese of Fort Worth. He had voluntarily resigned from the ministry in 1995 for reasons not affecting his moral character. He worships at St. Laurence Church in Grapevine, TX. Mr. George F. Niebling IV, matriculated ’95, was ordained Subdeacon in the Orthodox Church on October 18, 2009, and serves at St. Peter Orthodox Church in Fort Worth, TX. He is a doctoral candidate at the university of North Texas where he is completing a dissertation on Rose Hill College.

Appointments

The Rev. Timothy M. Matkin, ’02, is Vicar of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church, 500 N. Austin, Comanche, TX 76442, and Vicar of Trinity Episcopal Church, 459 N. Patrick St., Dublin, TX 76446. The Rev. Robert M. Lewis, ’07, is Rector of Church of the Advent, 1125 SW Hwy. 484, Dunnellon, FL 34432.

Retirements The Rev. John P. Roof, ’66, retired as Rector of St. Augustine’s Church, Danville, IN.

Necrology

The Rev. Charles A. Hough IV, ’07, is Rector of St. Paul’s, 415 E. California St., Gainesville, TX 76241. The Rev. John W. Jordan, ’06, is Associate Rector of St. Laurence, 519 N. Kimball Ave., Southlake, TX 76092.

The Rev. Canon John H. Heidt, DD, ’57, died October 23, 2009, age 77. +May the souls of the faithful departed, by the mercy of God, rest in peace.+

publisher The Very Rev. Dr. Robert S. Munday editor The Rev. Steve Schlossberg associate editor Mr. Tim Kasza copy editor Mrs. Sandy Mills photographer Mrs. Shawna Collins archivist The Ven. Thomas Winslow address 2777 Mission Road Nashotah, Wisconsin 53058–9793 telephone 262.646.6500

The Black Monk was here.

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he Rev. Daniel Cannon, ’07, Priest-in-Charge of Christ Church, East Tawas, Michigan, was the first to correctly identify last issue’s subject—a detail (the archangel’s eyes) from the St. Michael window in St. Mary’s Chapel (left). “After years of sitting opposite to St. Michael in the chapel,” Fr. Cannon writes, “I could never forget those peaceful eyes on the stained glass.” Can you tell where the Black Monk is skulking now? If you can identify the architectural detail, the liturgical obscurity or the hidden corner of our campus featured in the photograph at right, e-mail your answer to sschlossberg@nashotah.edu. The first respondent to correctly identify the Black Monk’s subject will be named in the next issue of The Missioner. 

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email nashotah@nashotah.edu website www.nashotah.edu

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Michael & Preaching Cross Rededicated

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ourteen students matriculated on the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels this October, following a threeday retreat led by the Rt. Rev. Donald Parsons, eighth Bishop of Quincy and 14th Dean of Nashotah House. Entitled “The Ascension of Our Lord: A Neglected Feast,” the retreat explored the implications that the Dean Robert Munday with our Matriculants (L–R): John Hellrung, ascended Lord’s carrying Sam Keyes, Moses Htaw, Nathaniel Kidd, Roy Allison, Shane Gormley, his humanity into eternity Rusty Dahler, Wesley Evans, Lance Wallace, Jonathan Kanary, Donald McConnell, Meredyth Albright and James Brzezinski. Not pictured: has for pastoral ministry and Jon Milliken. living the Christian life. “As Jesus goes into heaven,” the Bishop remarked, “he takes with him the scars of death. He takes also the growing into perfection he did as a human being and his experiences in the flesh. So we do too carry these things with us into eternity. None of our experiences here in the flesh are wasted.” Immediately preceding the Holy Eucharist and Matriculation service, Dean Robert Munday led the community in a service rededicating Michael the Bell and the Preaching Cross (below), both of which are celebrating their 125th birthdays this year at Nashotah House. 

In this issue: House Hosts Historic Ecumenical Conference

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New Students Matriculate

Dr . Johnson Publishes Monograph on Job

Black Monks Take One on Chin Academic Convocation Boasts First D.Min. Graduate

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Biddings & Bindings

The procession departs the rededicated Preaching Cross (above) to circle the garth and reach Michael the Bell (right). The bell tolls out the Angelus three times each day at Nashotah House, calling the community to prayer.

On the Cover:

Facing east on Mission Avenue from Nashotah House, at sunrise. Photo by Shawna Collins

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his fall, the leader for our annual retreat was the Rt. Rev. Donald J. Parsons, Professor Emeritus of New Testament and former Dean and President of Nashotah House, who went on to serve as Bishop of Quincy from 1973-1988. Now 87 years old, he is as active and as keen of mind as men 30 years his junior—and full of wisdom and wit. It is always a delight when Bishop Parsons is with us! The theme of Bishop Parsons’ retreat meditations was Christ’s Ascension—the event that a few Christians actually go to church and celebrate on the Thursday before Pentecost Sunday, but that is overlooked and undervalued by many. In his addresses, Bishop Parsons talked about the significance of the Ascension—how it demonstrates the reality of Christ’s Incarnation. If God entered the world by taking on flesh in the Incarnation, and if he was crucified, died, was buried, and rose again on the third day, then unless he was to begin his earthly reign at that point, his earthly existence had to have an end. And that end was his Ascension back to heaven, where he sits at the right hand of the Father. Of course, some today mock the idea of a literal Ascension, just as they disparage the necessity of a bodily Resurrection. One skeptic has gone so far as to say that, if Jesus went up into the sky, and even if he traveled at the speed of light, then he would still have a long way to go even to leave our galaxy, so he can’t be in heaven (wherever that is). But if Jesus was going to return to the Father in heaven, how should he have gone? Should he have simply disappeared? No, that might have signified that he was an illusion or a ghost. Should he have gone down into the earth? What would that have signified to those who witnessed it? No, he ascends, which his

You Can Help the House Maintain Her Legacy

From the Dean

Ten Projects from $250. 1. Transplant one of our beautiful trees—$250.

2. Rebuild the staircase to the Preaching Cross—$1500. Project Adopted!

4. Plant a new basketball post and hoop at the Peaks—$1200.

6. Recarpet the dining area of the Refectory—$8000.

8. Buy a new deck for one of our mowers—$2000.

10. Install a powerpoint projector and screen for Distance-Learning Classes in the Refectory—$1500.

3. Rebuild the staircase to the Shelton Hall Apartments—$800. 5. Recarpet any one of our three classrooms—$2500. 7. Buy a new computer and printer for our Sacristy—$2000. 9. Repair blacktop around our manhole covers—$2300.

disciples would have known signified going to a higher, better place. Similarly, in saying that Christ is now seated at the right hand of the Father, the aim isn’t to tell us about the arrangement of the furniture in heaven; it is to tell us that Jesus, who has ascended, now reigns with the Father’s favor and authority. The Ascension demonstrates the reality and the physicality of the Resurrection. If Jesus’ body still remained in a tomb outside Jerusalem, then the Resurrection is merely a metaphor for the immortality of the soul. But if Jesus rose bodily then he had to ascend if he was to leave this world. But, of course, Christ did ascend and 10 days later sends the Holy Spirit to indwell and empower his Church. Sitting there listening to Bishop Parsons’ meditation, I had a sense of what it must have been like to listen to the Apostle Paul teach one of the New Testament churches about the meaning of Christ’s Ascension for the very first time. It was a blessed moment. It transcended time and space. And during that moment it didn’t matter whether we were in the first century or the twenty-first century—we were simply Christians. We’re doing a new/old thing—an ancient/future thing— at Nashotah House. It is called Christianity. And it feels great!

For more information about these and other projects and how you can help, contact Fr. Bill Easterling, Associate Dean for Administration, at beasterling@nashotah.edu or 262.646.6518.

Limited Edition Ornaments at the Bookstore

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ommemorating the 125th anniversary of Michael the Bell and the Preaching Cross at Nashotah House, the Mission Bookstore is proud to offer this hand-painted ceramic Christmas ornament, featuring these iconic fixtures of Nashotah House. This ornament is collector quality and constitutes one in a continuing series of Nashotah House Christmas ornaments. To order yours, call Chardy at the Mission Bookstore at 262.646.6529.

$22 each (while supplies last).

Remember your leaders, who spoke the word of God to you. Consider the outcome of their way of life and imitate their faith. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever (Hebrews 13:7–8).

front The Very Rev. Canon Robert S. Munday, Ph.D. Dean & President

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The Missioner (ISSN 1521–5148) is published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary preserving the classical tradition of Anglicanism since 1842. 2777 Mission Rd., Nashotah, WI 53058–9793, Tel.: 262.646.6500.

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Nashotah, WI 53058 Permit No. 1 Advent 2009 Vol 26, No 2

Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow! Epiphany Term at Nashotah House January 11–15, 2010 Yearning for God’s Audience: Interpreting Job for Today

with the Rev. Timothy Johnson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew, Nashotah House

Catechesis Reawakened

with the Rev. William Blewitt, Ph.D., and the Rev. Lee Nelson

From the Womb to the Tomb: A Theological View of Issues in Bioethics

with the Rev. Daniel A. Westberg, D. Phil., Research Professor of Ethics and Moral Theology, Nashotah House

Missioner

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For more information or to register for classes, visit www.nashotah.edu or contact Carol Klukas at admissions@nashotah.edu or 800.627.4682.

The Newsletter of Nash0tah H0use


The Missioner Advent 2009