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The Missioner (ISSN 1521–5148) is published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary preserving the classical tradition of Anglicanism since 1842. 2777 Mission Rd., Nashotah, WI 53058–9793, Tel.: 262.646.6500.

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Nashotah, WI 53058 Permit No. 1 Michaelmas 2009 Vol 26, No 1

You make the Snow Angels. We form the Priests. Epiphany Term at Nashotah House, Jan. 11–15 Courses appropriate for S.T.M. and D.Min. students.

Yearning for God’s Audience: Interpreting Job for Today

with the Rev. Timothy Johnson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew, Nashotah House

Catechesis Reawakened

with the Rev. William Blewitt, Ph.D., and the Rev. Lee Nelson

From the Womb to the Tomb: A Theological View of Issues in Bioethics

For more information or to register for classes, visit www.nashotah.edu or contact Carol Klukas, Director of Admissions, at admissions@nashotah.edu or 800.627.4682.

The

with the Rev. Daniel A. Westberg, D. Phil., Research Professor of Ethics and Moral Theology, Nashotah House

The Newsletter of Nash0tah H0use

Missioner

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ver since I was young, I have been fascinated by great places of worship—churches and cathedrals. But my fascination was dimmed somewhat when I understood how long it took to build many of them. For instance the Washington National Cathedral took 83 years to build. St. Peter’s Basilica, in Rome, took 120 years to build, and many medieval cathedrals took even longer. None of those who conceived the plans for these cathedrals and began their construction lived to see them completed or to worship in them. I say that my enthusiasm for these buildings was dimmed because, being a little bit of a “Type A” personality, I like to see projects go from conception to completion while I am still around to see them, and even while I am still able to remember the excitement of beginning them. In the project that led to the installation of the beautiful and inspiring west windows in the Chapel and the new Chapter Room and other renovations that we dedicated during the Eucharist on September 10, I have not been disappointed. In 1 Kings, chapter 8, we read about the completion and dedication of the Temple of King Solomon. The Temple that Solomon dedicated was the dream of his father, David. But God did not allow David to see the building of the Temple in his lifetime. And, indeed, the people of Israel had worshiped in a tent—the Tabernacle—from the time of their Exodus from Egypt until the reign of Solomon. Generations who longed to see the building of the Temple did not see it come to pass. As we reflect on the church buildings we know—from great cathedrals to the Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin at Nashotah House—we might well ask, as Solomon did, “But will God really dwell on earth? The heavens, even the highest heaven, cannot contain you. How much less this temple I have built!” (1 Kings 8:27). In the Old Testament, God consented for his presence to dwell in a building made with human hands. In the New Testament, from the time of Pentecost on, God only dwells in a temple He Himself has made—and that temple is us. “Don’t you know,” the Apostle Paul asks, “that you yourselves are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit lives in you?” (1 Corinthians 3:16). In the Old Testament, the Jews built a building in which God could dwell. As Christians we build church buildings as a means of helping God to come to dwell in us. We build churches, and they are precious to us, because they are the places where we encounter God in the Sacrament of Baptism and in the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. They are places where we kneel and pray, and God does His work in

At the Bookstore

From the Dean

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front

back

ommemorating the 125th anniversary of Michael the Bell and the Preaching Cross at Nashotah House, the Mission Bookstore is proud to offer hand-painted ceramic Christmas ornaments, featuring these iconic fixtures of Nashotah House. To order, call Chardy at the Mission Bookstore at 262.646.6529.

$22 ea.

Son of House Publishes Translation, Study of Julian of Norwich

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us.  The building is precious not primarily because of what it is, but because of what God does there.  As we begin this new school year at Nashotah House, I am reminded that this House is a place where God is building His Temple. The physical beauty of our campus and the Chapel are tools God uses in His work. But the most precious thing is that God is using the ministry of this place to form those He has called to become priests and leaders in His Church. They, in turn, will carry that ministry into congregations and affect untold numbers of people in whose lives God desires to build His Temple. As I told our incoming class of new students during this year’s Orientation: “Your being here gives purpose to why I am here. I count it an enormous privilege to be a part of what God is going to do in your lives while you are at Nashotah House.” All of you who read The Missioner also have a part in this wonderful ministry of forming priests and leaders—laborers in building God’s Temple, the Church. I thank you for the part you are playing and invite your continued prayers and support for this important work.

The Very Rev. Canon Robert S. Munday, Ph.D. Dean & President

r. John-Julian, OJN, ’57, has published two books this year on Julian of Norwich, the 14th century English mystic whose Showings, Rowan Williams has written, “may well be the most important work of Christian reflection in the English language.” The Showings, also known as her Revelations, are Julian’s distillation of twenty years of reflection upon a series of visions of the Crucified Christ she received while deathly ill. Similarly, The Complete Julian of Norwich (Paraclete: 2009) is the product of John-Julian’s almost 30 years of daily reflection on Julian’s Showings, including a scholarly analysis of the mystic’s great themes and the historical and theological backdrop against which she wrote and reflected. “She lived in a terrible century,” Fr. John-Julian says. “The Black Death, schism. And the overwhelming preoccupation of Christian spirituality then was with death and judgment. In the face of all that, Julian gave display to a kind of optimism. She put sin in its place, by remembering the absolute, unqualified character of God’s love. There’s no way we can qualify that love, and she knew it. “There’s also a tension in Julian: how can we hold together a perfectly good God and a world full of sin? Julian grapples with that tension—and she leaves it unresolved. And that willingness of hers to leave it unresolved is what [Thomas] Merton said made her, along with John Henry Newman, one of the two greatest English theologians.” The monk-scholar, who returns to his alma mater every day for Morning Prayer and Holy Eucharist, founded the Order of Julian of Norwich in Norwich, Connecticut, in 1985. Since 1991 the Order, which now has a waiting list for oblates, has maintained its monastery in Waukesha, Wisconsin. In addition to The Complete Julian, the Episcopal priest has rendered a new translation of the longer text of Julian’s Showings which is included in Love’s Trinity (Liturgical Press, 2009). Both books are available from the Mission Bookstore; for these and other titles by Fr. John-Julian, call the Bookstore at 262.646.6529. For more information about the Order of Julian of Norwich, visit www.orderofjulian.org. 

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The

Missioner New Students Arrive at House

Biddings & Bindings

published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary in the catholic tradition of Anglicanism since 1842.

Ordinations & Appointments The Rev. Phillip L. Anderas, ’09, was ordained Deacon on September 15, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Alexander Greene, Diocese of Chelmsford. The Rev. Charles L. Day, ’71, is Rector of All Saints Anglican Church, 1404 Hawk Pkwy., Unit 306, Montrose, CO 81401. The Rev. Randall C. K. Day, ’85, is Rector of St. Mark’s Church, P. O. Box 39, Los Olivos, CA 93441. The Rev. Ronald E. Drummond, ’04, is Rector of St. Stephen’s Church, 7452 Precinct Line Rd., Hurst, TX 76054. The Rev. Frank R. Dunaway, III, ’09, was ordained Priest on June 25, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Edward H. MacBurney for the Diocese of Quincy. The Rev. Mark E. Evans, ’09, was ordained Priest on June 28, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Russell E. Jacobus, Diocese of Fond du Lac. The Rev. Scott Evans, ’09, was ordained Deacon on May 30, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. William H. Love, Diocese of Albany. The Rev. Christopher J. Guptill, ’09, was ordained Priest on August 29, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Diocese of Fort Worth. The Rev. Andrew J. Hanyzewski, ’09, was ordained Priest on August 16, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Edward S. Little, Diocese of Northern Indiana. He is Priest-in-Charge of St. Francis Episcopal Church, 237 East 1200 North, Chesterton, IN 46304; and Priestin-Charge of St. Andrew’s by the Lake Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 8766, 1007 Moore Rd., Michigan City, IN 46361. The Rev. J. Douglas Moyer, Jr., ’09, is Assistant at Christ Episcopal Church, 435 Court St., Reading, PA 19601. The Rev. Richard T. Palmer, Ph.D., ’08, was ordained Deacon on May 9, 2009, by the Most Rev. Larry L. Shaver, Diocese of Mid-America of the Anglican Province of America. He is Deacon-in-Charge of Holy Nativity Anglican Church, 2495 N. Cole St., Lima, OH 45801. The Rev. Joel A. Prather, ’09, is Curate of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, 6400 Stonebrook Pkwy., Frisco, TX 75034.

The Rev. Scott A. Seefeldt, ’07, is Rector of Trinity Episcopal Church, 111 Sixth St., Baraboo, WI 53913. The Rev. Micah W. Snell, ’08, was ordained Priest on September 12, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Diocese of Forth Worth. The Rev. Scott D. Walker, ’08, was ordained Priest on June 29, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. William H. Love, Diocese of Albany. He is Priest-in-Charge of St. Alban’s Anglican-Episcopal Church, 3–6–25, Shiba-Koen Minato-ku, Tokyo 105–0011, Japan.

Retirements The Rev. John B. Pahls, Jr., ’73 (STM ’05), retired on July 1, 2009, as Assisting Priest and Parish Liturgist at Grace & St. Stephen’s Church, Colorado Springs, CO 80903.

Necrology The Rev. Ralph B. Krueger, ’46, died December 8, 2008, age 85. The Rev. Canon Stephen J. Dibble, ’53, died October 11, 2008, age 84. The Rev. W. Keith Hedrick, ’79, died December 10, 2008, age 68. The Rev. Frederick D. Edghill, ’68, died April 25, 2009, age 78. The Rev. Robert B. Leve, ’56, died February 22, 2009, age 78. The Rev. Paul D. Wolfe, ’78, died March 4, 2009, age 58. The Very Rev. Joseph W. Hirsch III, ’70, died August 24, 2009, age 65. The Rev. Hal S. Daniell, Jr., ’79, died July 25, 2009, age 79. +May the souls of the faithful departed, by the mercy of God, rest in peace.+

The Black Monk was here.

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he legendary ghost of Nashotah House is on the haunt again, this time with a camera. Can you tell where he’s skulking now? If you can identify the architectural detail, the liturgical obscurity or the hidden corner of our campus featured in the photograph at left, e-mail your answer to sschlossberg@nashotah.edu. The first respondent to correctly identify the Black Monk’s subject will be appropriately honored (as it were) in the next issue of The Missioner. 

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publisher The Very Rev. Dr. Robert S. Munday editor The Rev. Steve Schlossberg associate editor Mr. Tim Kasza copy editor Mrs. Sandy Mills photographer Mrs. Shawna Collins archivist The Ven. Thomas Winslow address 2777 Mission Road Nashotah, Wisconsin 53058–9793 telephone 262.646.6500 email nashotah@nashotah.edu website www.nashotah.edu

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In this issue:

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St. Mary’s Chapel Restored, Rededicated

Michael the Bell and Preaching Cross Turn 125

Student Scholar Wins Prize

Nashotah House Alumni Walking Apart Together

Biddings & Bindings

Myanmar Connection Continues to Thrive

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ixteen new students and their families joined the Nashotah House community this August, including those from Episcopal Dioceses and Anglican jurisdictions as various as Albany, Central Florida, Dallas, Fond du Lac, Fort Worth, Southwest Florida, Springfield, AMiA, CANA, and the Diocese of Rangoon in the Anglican Province of Myanmar. This is the second consecutive year in which a student from Myanmar has joined the community as a student, and like Fr. Saw Samuel Nyan Lynn last year, Moses Htaw was introduced to Nashotah House by a Son of the House, the Rev. David Hogarth. A member of the Class of 1964, Deacon Hogarth serves as Assistant to the Vicar of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Rangoon, The Rev. David Hogarth and Moses Htaw ministering chiefly to the ex-patriate community, and also as an adjunct faculty member of Holy Cross Seminary, where he has taught Old Testament, New Testament, Psalter, Homiletics, Moral Theology, Ascetical Theology and, he says with a laugh, “wherever else they have a gap.” How much of what he teaches at Holy Cross did he learn at Nashotah House? “Every bit of it,” the Deacon says. “Moses will return to teach at Holy Cross when he leaves Nashotah House,” he says. “He will be training clergy what he learns here. And that’s who the Archbishop is sending to Nashotah House: those who will be leading.” Though full scholarships have been offered to his students at other U. S. seminaries, the Anglican Archbishop of Myanmar has decided instead to send his students to Nashotah House. And Deacon Hogarth, who helps the Archbishop to identify the most promising and academically able of those students for study abroad, does more than ship those students off to the House. He accompanies them here, joins them for their week of orientation, and sees that they are surrounded with a good support system in the United States. “The experience of coming here from Myanmar is overwhelming,” he says. “The airplanes, the credit cards, the women in short skirts—they need help processing all of that.” The Deacon also takes responsibility for funding their tuition out of his own savings. “I joke,” he says, “only half-jokingly, that I do the Burmese Program here just in order to give me an excuse to visit Nashotah House twice a year. “Obviously,” he says, “this place got to me. And I love to see that it still forms others the way it formed me.” 

On the Cover:

The steeple of the Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin, celebrating her 150th birthday this year. Photo by Shawna Collins.

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Bless, O Lord, this House, set apart for the glory of thy great Name,

and the benefit of thy holy Church. —from the Daily Prayer for Nashotah House.

To Walk Apart Together

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An Episcopal Priest Reflects on the 2009 Commencement Exercises

ashotah House is an interesting place these days, in many Among the graduating seniors present were some who were ways. I can’t think of another institution that has as much being deployed to Episcopal congregations, and some going to of a stake in the unfolding (and eventual outcome) extra-mural Anglican parishes. Yet, in spite of these apparent of the Anglican soap opera as Nashotah. It lives right on the tensions, I have to say, there was a spirit of underlying unity and fault line. When I matriculated in 1986 as part of a relatively charity that was, all things considered, quite remarkable. large class, one of us was a Moravian and two were Canadian The next day we gathered in the Roman Catholic parish Anglicans. The class two years ahead of church of St. Jerome for Commencement and us had one member who was African and Mass. The liturgy was at the same time solemn another from Hong Kong (or was it Taiwan? and festive, dignified and joyful. One of those I forget). The class two years behind us in the congregation was a member of the Class included a Lutheran. Every one else was a of 1999, now a former Episcopal priest and member of the Episcopal Church. Over the a lay member of that very parish (soon to years, the percentage of African students has avail himself of the Pastoral Provision). The increased, as has the number of Americans preacher, who did a splendid job, was none who are members of “extra-mural” Anglican other than Dr. James I. Packer, a scholar and bodies. teacher who is in fact an Anglican priest but is This was made poignantly clear in the more widely known and revered in the wider Prayers of the People during the Alumni evangelical world than within Anglicanism. Day Mass. Every day, the Nashotah House (He’s probably still choking on the incense!) community prays aloud by name for about Dr. Packer also has the distinction of having a half- dozen of its alumni, on a rota been recently (and apparently without effect) determined by alphabetical order. On this deposed from the ordained ministry by the particular day, the list included both the Bishop of New Westminster (Anglican The Rev. Daniel H. Martins, ’89, is Rector Bishop of Fort Worth (Southern Cone), who of St. Anne’s Episcopal Church in Warsaw, Church of Canada). Once again, despite was present in the congregation, and the Indiana. These reflections are excerpted from cracks in our koinonia that perhaps ought his blogsite, Confessions of a Carioca, http:// Rector of one of the parishes that has elected cariocaconfessions.blogspot.com. to have utterly desiccated the spirit of the to remain in TEC, and is therefore presently gathering, there was a palpable sense of unity suing said bishop. In what other context than the celebration of in that eucharistic assembly. the Eucharist could such an anomaly even be countenanced, let I’m not entirely clear on what any of this means. But I have alone treated as quite routine? no intention of surrendering its value as a sign—a sign to me, at Later that day, I was honored to be part of a panel discussion least, if to no one else—that there are more chapters of this story, that also included the Suffragan Bishop of Dallas, the Bishop that we know less of it than we think we do, that it’s possible for of Fort Worth, and one of his priests (this time one who is Anglican Christians who have deeply divergent perspectives to be accompanying him on the journey to wherever it is they are not only civil to each other, but to outdo one another in showing going). In the audience were some quite “mainstream” Episcopal love—that it is possible, in fact, to “walk apart together.” I am bishops and clergy, some part of the “realignment,” and some proud of the larger Nashotah community for allowing itself, even who have left Anglicanism altogether to “swim the Tiber.” if unwittingly, to be such a hopeful sign.

The 2010 Ramsey Society Pilgrimage

The Passion Play at Oberammergau and other ecclesiastical highlights of Germany for Anglicans

Hosted by the Rev. Canon Arnold Klukas & the Rev. Lawrence Bausch Frankfurt • Cologne • Berlin • Leipzig • Nuremberg • Munich • the Black Forest For a complete brochure, contact Connoisseurs Tours at 800.856.1045. The Ramsey Society. A fellowship of giving. A fellowship of prayer. Visit www.ramseysociety.org today.

Student Wins AABS Award for Exegetical Paper

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esiring to be Justified: An Examination of the Parable of the Good Samaritan” has been selected as the best exegesis paper in the 2009 Anglican Association of Biblical Scholars Student Paper Competition. The prize-winning paper was first drafted last fall by the Rev. Colin Ambrose, ’09, for a reading course in the Parables of Luke taught by Dr. Garwood Anderson, Nashotah House’s Associate Professor of New Testament and Greek. An attempt to recover the soteriological meaning of a parable which has been almost universally interpreted to have only an ethical meaning, the paper “brings fresh insights to very well-traveled ground,” says Dr. Anderson. “And Colin engaged in theological exegesis rather than a mere exercise in descriptive historical criticism. This is an ‘old-fashioned’ approach to biblical exegesis which, happily, is once again on the vanguard of biblical studies. It shows that scholarly exegesis and serious theology belong together. And it’s an approach to the Bible as Scripture, which I hope is increasingly the hallmark of what we do at Nashotah House.” “The paper owes its success to the constant encouragement and direction I received from Dr. Anderson,” says Fr. Ambrose. “He told me about the [AABS] competition and encouraged me to submit it, and working with him to improve it was a wonderful way to finish my time at the House. It’s very much a testimony to Dr. Anderson’s love of teaching and his commitment to his students.” 

Right: The Rev. Colin Ambrose and his wife Trisha at the Easter Vigil in St. Mary’s Chapel.

Past, Present Future The Chapel of St.&Mary the Virgin: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow The

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n September 10, Nashotah House celebrated the 150th birthday of the Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin with a Sung Eucharist and Service of Rededication. Our Dean and President, the Very Rev. Canon Robert S. Munday, preached; the Rt. Rev. Edward L. Salmon, Jr., Chairman of the Board of Trustees, administered the blessing and asperges (below) to the newly renovated Chapel and its vesting room. Thanks to the overwhelming generosity of several donors, the historic Chapel, its vesting room and sacristy were refurbished this spring and summer by Conrad Schmidtt Studios of New Berlin, Wisconsin, and World of Wood of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. Exterior work, such as tuck-pointing and sealing the stonework of the chapel, and interior work, such as the installation of hand milled stalls in the vesting room, restored the physical and spiritual keystone of our campus to her original beauty. But the crowning laurel of the project was the installation of two new stained glass windows on the west wall (right), one dedicated to Our Lord Jesus Christ, the other to his Blessed Mother, our Chapel’s namesake.

Students Join Scholars Program in Canterbury

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he Rev. David Adams, ’09, and Mr. Jason Collins, ’11,

were selected from applicants from around the world to spend two and a half weeks this June as participants

in the Canterbury Scholars Program. Joining 33 other Anglican students and newly-ordained clergy from four continents, the two

Sons of the House participated in daily worship and Bible studies at the Cathedral, and took in lectures delivered by Anglican

Bishops and scholars engaging such topics as the Five Marks of Anglican Mission, Anglican Identity and Cultural Context, the

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Authority of Scripture, and Interfaith Dialogue and Conflict. They also joined a pilgrimage to Bishopsbourne (Richard Hooker’s parish), followed the footsteps of St. Augustine on the seven-mile Pilgrim’s Way from Richborough to Canterbury, and enjoyed high tea in Lambeth Palace. Along with meeting the Archbishop of Canterbury (left, with Fr. Adams and Mr. Collins), the high point for Collins was a prayer meeting at the Shrine of St. Thomas Beckett in Canterbury Cathedral. “The group circled Beckett’s shrine and we all prayed individually in our native languages,” Collins says. “There were about twenty different languages spoken as we worshipped the risen Lord together. It was as if we were witnesses to Pentecost.” “The experience broadened our understanding of global Anglicanism,” Adams says. “And we both hope that the friendships we made in Canterbury are going to become partnerships for mission.”  photo courtesy Conrad Schmidtt

Class of 2009

The Preaching Cross

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nstalled at Nashotah House in the same year as Michael the Bell, the Preaching Cross is another icon of the House, marking the original location of the Chapel of St. Sylvanus (bottom right) which has since been removed to the bluff overlooking Upper Nashotah Lake. Once free-standing as pictured below, the Preaching Cross has since been enclosed by the stone walls joining Lewis and Kemper Halls. Cleaned, refurbished and its walls tuck-pointed last fall thanks to a gift of the Distance-Learning Class of 2008, the Preaching Cross continues to testify to the missionary roots of Nashotah House, her storied history of sending students on local preaching missions, and the enduring commitment of the House to the Gospel and the mission of the Church. 

Above: the Easter Vigil as seen from the chancel of St. Mary’s Chapel, with a view of the west wall before the installation of the new windows. Below: the Chapel Garden, the ongoing gift of Mrs. Peg Winslow.

Dean Carver and Professor Riley at the Preaching Cross, c. 1887.

The Preaching Cross today.

Can You Help Nashotah House Maintain Her Legacy? 10 Projects from $250. 1. Transplant one of our beautiful trees—$250.

2. Rebuild the staircase to the Preaching Cross—$1500.

4. Plant a new basketball post and hoop at the Peaks—$1200.

6. Recarpet the dining area of the Refectory—$8000.

8. Buy a new deck for one of our mowers—$2000.

10. Install a powerpoint projector and screen for Distance-Learrning Classes in the Refectory—$1500.

3. Rebuild the staircase to the Shelton Hall Apartment #4—$800. 5. Recarpet any one of our three classrooms—$2500. 7. Buy a new computer and printer for our Sacristy—$2000. 9. Repair blacktop around our manhole covers—$2300.

For more information about these and other projects and how you can help, contact Fr. Bill Easterling, Associate Dean for Administration, at beasterling@nashotah.edu or 262.646.6518.

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Michael the Bell

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s St. Mary’s Chapel celebrates its 150th birthday, Michael, the one-ton bell roosting in the rugged tower just outside the Chapel, turns 125. And the two icons of the House enjoy something more than a physical proximity. Since its dedication on the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels, 1884, Michael has been calling the Nashotah House community to prayer three times each day, and as its hammer swings, the whole campus and every member of our community falls hush at the tolling of the Angelus. This is how the Daily Office begins every morning and evening in St. Mary’s Chapel—with a big bell ringing out a hymn of the Incarnation. And that explains why an old bell, a stone chapel with all its beautiful stained glass and woodwork are so highly prized at Nashotah House. It’s because we worship God Incarnate. It’s because we remember that the Holy Spirit has made his temple in creatures of flesh and blood; and even creatures of stone or glass or brass—even creatures of Bread and Wine—have an office in the worship of God and a share in the ministry of glorifying his Holy Name. Sharing the same birthday at Nashotah House, Michael the Bell and the Preaching Cross will be rededicated next month, fittingly enough, on the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels.

photos courtesy Conrad Schmidtt

Clockwise from lower left: The vesting room as it was before renovation; the door from the Cloister to the new vesting room; the door from the new vesting room to the chapel; the Rt. Rev. Donald Parsons, 14th Dean of Nashotah House, censing the High Altar.

I worship the Creator of

matter who became matter for my sake, who willed to take his abode in matter; who worked out my salvation through matter. Never will I cease honoring the matter which wrought my salvation!

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—John of Damascus

Treatise on the Divine Images, 1.16

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uilt as a successor to the Red Chapel, the Chapel of St. Sylvanus, whose name it was to have adopted, the Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin was so named at the request of a donor. Ground was broken for the new chapel in 1859 by the first Missionary Bishop of Liberia, the Rt. Rev. John Payne, and its cornerstone laid by the first Missionary Bishop of the Episcopal Church, the Rt. Rev. Jackson Kemper.

Continuity through time.

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he great tradition that first built this seminary in 1842 endures today at Nashotah House. But that great tradition antedates the House it built. It is the Apostolic tradition, the faith once delivered to the saints. And that faith, kept here in all its fullness, does something more than endure at Nashotah House today. It thrives at Nashotah House. And it is forming a new generation of priests ready, willing and empowered to carry the Gospel to a world perishing for want of it.

Continuity through time.

T

he great tradition that first built this seminary in 1842 endures today at Nashotah House. But that great tradition antedates the House it built. It is the Apostolic tradition, the faith once delivered to the saints. And that faith, kept here in all its fullness, does something more than endure at Nashotah House today. It thrives at Nashotah House. And it is forming a new generation of priests ready, willing and empowered to carry the Gospel to a world perishing for want of it.

Michael the Bell

A

s St. Mary’s Chapel celebrates its 150th birthday, Michael, the one-ton bell roosting in the rugged tower just outside the Chapel, turns 125. And the two icons of the House enjoy something more than a physical proximity. Since its dedication on the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels, 1884, Michael has been calling the Nashotah House community to prayer three times each day, and as its hammer swings, the whole campus and every member of our community falls hush at the tolling of the Angelus. This is how the Daily Office begins every morning and evening in St. Mary’s Chapel—with a big bell ringing out a hymn of the Incarnation. And that explains why an old bell, a stone chapel with all its beautiful stained glass and woodwork are so highly prized at Nashotah House. It’s because we worship God Incarnate. It’s because we remember that the Holy Spirit has made his temple in creatures of flesh and blood; and even creatures of stone or glass or brass—even creatures of Bread and Wine—have an office in the worship of God and a share in the ministry of glorifying his Holy Name. Sharing the same birthday at Nashotah House, Michael the Bell and the Preaching Cross will be rededicated next month, fittingly enough, on the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels.

photos courtesy Conrad Schmidtt

Clockwise from lower left: The vesting room as it was before renovation; the door from the Cloister to the new vesting room; the door from the new vesting room to the chapel; the Rt. Rev. Donald Parsons, 14th Dean of Nashotah House, censing the High Altar.

I worship the Creator of

matter who became matter for my sake, who willed to take his abode in matter; who worked out my salvation through matter. Never will I cease honoring the matter which wrought my salvation!

10

—John of Damascus

Treatise on the Divine Images, 1.16

B

uilt as a successor to the Red Chapel, the Chapel of St. Sylvanus, whose name it was to have adopted, the Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin was so named at the request of a donor. Ground was broken for the new chapel in 1859 by the first Missionary Bishop of Liberia, the Rt. Rev. John Payne, and its cornerstone laid by the first Missionary Bishop of the Episcopal Church, the Rt. Rev. Jackson Kemper.

The Preaching Cross

I

nstalled at Nashotah House in the same year as Michael the Bell, the Preaching Cross is another icon of the House, marking the original location of the Chapel of St. Sylvanus (bottom right) which has since been removed to the bluff overlooking Upper Nashotah Lake. Once free-standing as pictured below, the Preaching Cross has since been enclosed by the stone walls joining Lewis and Kemper Halls. Cleaned, refurbished and its walls tuck-pointed last fall thanks to a gift of the Distance-Learning Class of 2008, the Preaching Cross continues to testify to the missionary roots of Nashotah House, her storied history of sending students on local preaching missions, and the enduring commitment of the House to the Gospel and the mission of the Church. 

Above: the Easter Vigil as seen from the chancel of St. Mary’s Chapel, with a view of the west wall before the installation of the new windows. Below: the Chapel Garden, the ongoing gift of Mrs. Peg Winslow.

Dean Carver and Professor Riley at the Preaching Cross, c. 1887.

The Preaching Cross today.

Can You Help Nashotah House Maintain Her Legacy? 10 Projects from $250. 1. Transplant one of our beautiful trees—$250.

2. Rebuild the staircase to the Preaching Cross—$1500.

4. Plant a new basketball post and hoop at the Peaks—$1200.

6. Recarpet the dining area of the Refectory—$8000.

8. Buy a new deck for one of our mowers—$2000.

10. Install a powerpoint projector and screen for Distance-Learrning Classes in the Refectory—$1500.

3. Rebuild the staircase to the Shelton Hall Apartment #4—$800. 5. Recarpet any one of our three classrooms—$2500. 7. Buy a new computer and printer for our Sacristy—$2000. 9. Repair blacktop around our manhole covers—$2300.

For more information about these and other projects and how you can help, contact Fr. Bill Easterling, Associate Dean for Administration, at beasterling@nashotah.edu or 262.646.6518.

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Student Wins AABS Award for Exegetical Paper

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esiring to be Justified: An Examination of the Parable of the Good Samaritan” has been selected as the best exegesis paper in the 2009 Anglican Association of Biblical Scholars Student Paper Competition. The prize-winning paper was first drafted last fall by the Rev. Colin Ambrose, ’09, for a reading course in the Parables of Luke taught by Dr. Garwood Anderson, Nashotah House’s Associate Professor of New Testament and Greek. An attempt to recover the soteriological meaning of a parable which has been almost universally interpreted to have only an ethical meaning, the paper “brings fresh insights to very well-traveled ground,” says Dr. Anderson. “And Colin engaged in theological exegesis rather than a mere exercise in descriptive historical criticism. This is an ‘old-fashioned’ approach to biblical exegesis which, happily, is once again on the vanguard of biblical studies. It shows that scholarly exegesis and serious theology belong together. And it’s an approach to the Bible as Scripture, which I hope is increasingly the hallmark of what we do at Nashotah House.” “The paper owes its success to the constant encouragement and direction I received from Dr. Anderson,” says Fr. Ambrose. “He told me about the [AABS] competition and encouraged me to submit it, and working with him to improve it was a wonderful way to finish my time at the House. It’s very much a testimony to Dr. Anderson’s love of teaching and his commitment to his students.” 

Right: The Rev. Colin Ambrose and his wife Trisha at the Easter Vigil in St. Mary’s Chapel.

Past, Present Future The Chapel of St.&Mary the Virgin: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow The

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n September 10, Nashotah House celebrated the 150th birthday of the Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin with a Sung Eucharist and Service of Rededication. Our Dean and President, the Very Rev. Canon Robert S. Munday, preached; the Rt. Rev. Edward L. Salmon, Jr., Chairman of the Board of Trustees, administered the blessing and asperges (below) to the newly renovated Chapel and its vesting room. Thanks to the overwhelming generosity of several donors, the historic Chapel, its vesting room and sacristy were refurbished this spring and summer by Conrad Schmidtt Studios of New Berlin, Wisconsin, and World of Wood of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. Exterior work, such as tuck-pointing and sealing the stonework of the chapel, and interior work, such as the installation of hand milled stalls in the vesting room, restored the physical and spiritual keystone of our campus to her original beauty. But the crowning laurel of the project was the installation of two new stained glass windows on the west wall (right), one dedicated to Our Lord Jesus Christ, the other to his Blessed Mother, our Chapel’s namesake.

Students Join Scholars Program in Canterbury

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he Rev. David Adams, ’09, and Mr. Jason Collins, ’11,

were selected from applicants from around the world to spend two and a half weeks this June as participants

in the Canterbury Scholars Program. Joining 33 other Anglican students and newly-ordained clergy from four continents, the two

Sons of the House participated in daily worship and Bible studies at the Cathedral, and took in lectures delivered by Anglican

Bishops and scholars engaging such topics as the Five Marks of Anglican Mission, Anglican Identity and Cultural Context, the

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Authority of Scripture, and Interfaith Dialogue and Conflict. They also joined a pilgrimage to Bishopsbourne (Richard Hooker’s parish), followed the footsteps of St. Augustine on the seven-mile Pilgrim’s Way from Richborough to Canterbury, and enjoyed high tea in Lambeth Palace. Along with meeting the Archbishop of Canterbury (left, with Fr. Adams and Mr. Collins), the high point for Collins was a prayer meeting at the Shrine of St. Thomas Beckett in Canterbury Cathedral. “The group circled Beckett’s shrine and we all prayed individually in our native languages,” Collins says. “There were about twenty different languages spoken as we worshipped the risen Lord together. It was as if we were witnesses to Pentecost.” “The experience broadened our understanding of global Anglicanism,” Adams says. “And we both hope that the friendships we made in Canterbury are going to become partnerships for mission.”  photo courtesy Conrad Schmidtt

Class of 2009

Bless, O Lord, this House, set apart for the glory of thy great Name,

and the benefit of thy holy Church. —from the Daily Prayer for Nashotah House.

To Walk Apart Together

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An Episcopal Priest Reflects on the 2009 Commencement Exercises

ashotah House is an interesting place these days, in many Among the graduating seniors present were some who were ways. I can’t think of another institution that has as much being deployed to Episcopal congregations, and some going to of a stake in the unfolding (and eventual outcome) extra-mural Anglican parishes. Yet, in spite of these apparent of the Anglican soap opera as Nashotah. It lives right on the tensions, I have to say, there was a spirit of underlying unity and fault line. When I matriculated in 1986 as part of a relatively charity that was, all things considered, quite remarkable. large class, one of us was a Moravian and two were Canadian The next day we gathered in the Roman Catholic parish Anglicans. The class two years ahead of church of St. Jerome for Commencement and us had one member who was African and Mass. The liturgy was at the same time solemn another from Hong Kong (or was it Taiwan? and festive, dignified and joyful. One of those I forget). The class two years behind us in the congregation was a member of the Class included a Lutheran. Every one else was a of 1999, now a former Episcopal priest and member of the Episcopal Church. Over the a lay member of that very parish (soon to years, the percentage of African students has avail himself of the Pastoral Provision). The increased, as has the number of Americans preacher, who did a splendid job, was none who are members of “extra-mural” Anglican other than Dr. James I. Packer, a scholar and bodies. teacher who is in fact an Anglican priest but is This was made poignantly clear in the more widely known and revered in the wider Prayers of the People during the Alumni evangelical world than within Anglicanism. Day Mass. Every day, the Nashotah House (He’s probably still choking on the incense!) community prays aloud by name for about Dr. Packer also has the distinction of having a half- dozen of its alumni, on a rota been recently (and apparently without effect) determined by alphabetical order. On this deposed from the ordained ministry by the particular day, the list included both the Bishop of New Westminster (Anglican The Rev. Daniel H. Martins, ’89, is Rector Bishop of Fort Worth (Southern Cone), who of St. Anne’s Episcopal Church in Warsaw, Church of Canada). Once again, despite was present in the congregation, and the Indiana. These reflections are excerpted from cracks in our koinonia that perhaps ought his blogsite, Confessions of a Carioca, http:// Rector of one of the parishes that has elected cariocaconfessions.blogspot.com. to have utterly desiccated the spirit of the to remain in TEC, and is therefore presently gathering, there was a palpable sense of unity suing said bishop. In what other context than the celebration of in that eucharistic assembly. the Eucharist could such an anomaly even be countenanced, let I’m not entirely clear on what any of this means. But I have alone treated as quite routine? no intention of surrendering its value as a sign—a sign to me, at Later that day, I was honored to be part of a panel discussion least, if to no one else—that there are more chapters of this story, that also included the Suffragan Bishop of Dallas, the Bishop that we know less of it than we think we do, that it’s possible for of Fort Worth, and one of his priests (this time one who is Anglican Christians who have deeply divergent perspectives to be accompanying him on the journey to wherever it is they are not only civil to each other, but to outdo one another in showing going). In the audience were some quite “mainstream” Episcopal love—that it is possible, in fact, to “walk apart together.” I am bishops and clergy, some part of the “realignment,” and some proud of the larger Nashotah community for allowing itself, even who have left Anglicanism altogether to “swim the Tiber.” if unwittingly, to be such a hopeful sign.

The 2010 Ramsey Society Pilgrimage

The Passion Play at Oberammergau and other ecclesiastical highlights of Germany for Anglicans

Hosted by the Rev. Canon Arnold Klukas & the Rev. Lawrence Bausch Frankfurt • Cologne • Berlin • Leipzig • Nuremberg • Munich • the Black Forest For a complete brochure, contact Connoisseurs Tours at 800.856.1045. The Ramsey Society. A fellowship of giving. A fellowship of prayer. Visit www.ramseysociety.org today.

The

Missioner New Students Arrive at House

Biddings & Bindings

published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary in the catholic tradition of Anglicanism since 1842.

Ordinations & Appointments The Rev. Phillip L. Anderas, ’09, was ordained Deacon on September 15, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Alexander Greene, Diocese of Chelmsford. The Rev. Charles L. Day, ’71, is Rector of All Saints Anglican Church, 1404 Hawk Pkwy., Unit 306, Montrose, CO 81401. The Rev. Randall C. K. Day, ’85, is Rector of St. Mark’s Church, P. O. Box 39, Los Olivos, CA 93441. The Rev. Ronald E. Drummond, ’04, is Rector of St. Stephen’s Church, 7452 Precinct Line Rd., Hurst, TX 76054. The Rev. Frank R. Dunaway, III, ’09, was ordained Priest on June 25, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Edward H. MacBurney for the Diocese of Quincy. The Rev. Mark E. Evans, ’09, was ordained Priest on June 28, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Russell E. Jacobus, Diocese of Fond du Lac. The Rev. Scott Evans, ’09, was ordained Deacon on May 30, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. William H. Love, Diocese of Albany. The Rev. Christopher J. Guptill, ’09, was ordained Priest on August 29, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Diocese of Fort Worth. The Rev. Andrew J. Hanyzewski, ’09, was ordained Priest on August 16, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Edward S. Little, Diocese of Northern Indiana. He is Priest-in-Charge of St. Francis Episcopal Church, 237 East 1200 North, Chesterton, IN 46304; and Priestin-Charge of St. Andrew’s by the Lake Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 8766, 1007 Moore Rd., Michigan City, IN 46361. The Rev. J. Douglas Moyer, Jr., ’09, is Assistant at Christ Episcopal Church, 435 Court St., Reading, PA 19601. The Rev. Richard T. Palmer, Ph.D., ’08, was ordained Deacon on May 9, 2009, by the Most Rev. Larry L. Shaver, Diocese of Mid-America of the Anglican Province of America. He is Deacon-in-Charge of Holy Nativity Anglican Church, 2495 N. Cole St., Lima, OH 45801. The Rev. Joel A. Prather, ’09, is Curate of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, 6400 Stonebrook Pkwy., Frisco, TX 75034.

The Rev. Scott A. Seefeldt, ’07, is Rector of Trinity Episcopal Church, 111 Sixth St., Baraboo, WI 53913. The Rev. Micah W. Snell, ’08, was ordained Priest on September 12, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker, Diocese of Forth Worth. The Rev. Scott D. Walker, ’08, was ordained Priest on June 29, 2009, by the Rt. Rev. William H. Love, Diocese of Albany. He is Priest-in-Charge of St. Alban’s Anglican-Episcopal Church, 3–6–25, Shiba-Koen Minato-ku, Tokyo 105–0011, Japan.

Retirements The Rev. John B. Pahls, Jr., ’73 (STM ’05), retired on July 1, 2009, as Assisting Priest and Parish Liturgist at Grace & St. Stephen’s Church, Colorado Springs, CO 80903.

Necrology The Rev. Ralph B. Krueger, ’46, died December 8, 2008, age 85. The Rev. Canon Stephen J. Dibble, ’53, died October 11, 2008, age 84. The Rev. W. Keith Hedrick, ’79, died December 10, 2008, age 68. The Rev. Frederick D. Edghill, ’68, died April 25, 2009, age 78. The Rev. Robert B. Leve, ’56, died February 22, 2009, age 78. The Rev. Paul D. Wolfe, ’78, died March 4, 2009, age 58. The Very Rev. Joseph W. Hirsch III, ’70, died August 24, 2009, age 65. The Rev. Hal S. Daniell, Jr., ’79, died July 25, 2009, age 79. +May the souls of the faithful departed, by the mercy of God, rest in peace.+

The Black Monk was here.

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he legendary ghost of Nashotah House is on the haunt again, this time with a camera. Can you tell where he’s skulking now? If you can identify the architectural detail, the liturgical obscurity or the hidden corner of our campus featured in the photograph at left, e-mail your answer to sschlossberg@nashotah.edu. The first respondent to correctly identify the Black Monk’s subject will be appropriately honored (as it were) in the next issue of The Missioner. 

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publisher The Very Rev. Dr. Robert S. Munday editor The Rev. Steve Schlossberg associate editor Mr. Tim Kasza copy editor Mrs. Sandy Mills photographer Mrs. Shawna Collins archivist The Ven. Thomas Winslow address 2777 Mission Road Nashotah, Wisconsin 53058–9793 telephone 262.646.6500 email nashotah@nashotah.edu website www.nashotah.edu

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In this issue:

10 12 13 14

St. Mary’s Chapel Restored, Rededicated

Michael the Bell and Preaching Cross Turn 125

Student Scholar Wins Prize

Nashotah House Alumni Walking Apart Together

Biddings & Bindings

Myanmar Connection Continues to Thrive

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ixteen new students and their families joined the Nashotah House community this August, including those from Episcopal Dioceses and Anglican jurisdictions as various as Albany, Central Florida, Dallas, Fond du Lac, Fort Worth, Southwest Florida, Springfield, AMiA, CANA, and the Diocese of Rangoon in the Anglican Province of Myanmar. This is the second consecutive year in which a student from Myanmar has joined the community as a student, and like Fr. Saw Samuel Nyan Lynn last year, Moses Htaw was introduced to Nashotah House by a Son of the House, the Rev. David Hogarth. A member of the Class of 1964, Deacon Hogarth serves as Assistant to the Vicar of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Rangoon, The Rev. David Hogarth and Moses Htaw ministering chiefly to the ex-patriate community, and also as an adjunct faculty member of Holy Cross Seminary, where he has taught Old Testament, New Testament, Psalter, Homiletics, Moral Theology, Ascetical Theology and, he says with a laugh, “wherever else they have a gap.” How much of what he teaches at Holy Cross did he learn at Nashotah House? “Every bit of it,” the Deacon says. “Moses will return to teach at Holy Cross when he leaves Nashotah House,” he says. “He will be training clergy what he learns here. And that’s who the Archbishop is sending to Nashotah House: those who will be leading.” Though full scholarships have been offered to his students at other U. S. seminaries, the Anglican Archbishop of Myanmar has decided instead to send his students to Nashotah House. And Deacon Hogarth, who helps the Archbishop to identify the most promising and academically able of those students for study abroad, does more than ship those students off to the House. He accompanies them here, joins them for their week of orientation, and sees that they are surrounded with a good support system in the United States. “The experience of coming here from Myanmar is overwhelming,” he says. “The airplanes, the credit cards, the women in short skirts—they need help processing all of that.” The Deacon also takes responsibility for funding their tuition out of his own savings. “I joke,” he says, “only half-jokingly, that I do the Burmese Program here just in order to give me an excuse to visit Nashotah House twice a year. “Obviously,��� he says, “this place got to me. And I love to see that it still forms others the way it formed me.” 

On the Cover:

The steeple of the Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin, celebrating her 150th birthday this year. Photo by Shawna Collins.

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E

ver since I was young, I have been fascinated by great places of worship—churches and cathedrals. But my fascination was dimmed somewhat when I understood how long it took to build many of them. For instance the Washington National Cathedral took 83 years to build. St. Peter’s Basilica, in Rome, took 120 years to build, and many medieval cathedrals took even longer. None of those who conceived the plans for these cathedrals and began their construction lived to see them completed or to worship in them. I say that my enthusiasm for these buildings was dimmed because, being a little bit of a “Type A” personality, I like to see projects go from conception to completion while I am still around to see them, and even while I am still able to remember the excitement of beginning them. In the project that led to the installation of the beautiful and inspiring west windows in the Chapel and the new Chapter Room and other renovations that we dedicated during the Eucharist on September 10, I have not been disappointed. In 1 Kings, chapter 8, we read about the completion and dedication of the Temple of King Solomon. The Temple that Solomon dedicated was the dream of his father, David. But God did not allow David to see the building of the Temple in his lifetime. And, indeed, the people of Israel had worshiped in a tent—the Tabernacle—from the time of their Exodus from Egypt until the reign of Solomon. Generations who longed to see the building of the Temple did not see it come to pass. As we reflect on the church buildings we know—from great cathedrals to the Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin at Nashotah House—we might well ask, as Solomon did, “But will God really dwell on earth? The heavens, even the highest heaven, cannot contain you. How much less this temple I have built!” (1 Kings 8:27). In the Old Testament, God consented for his presence to dwell in a building made with human hands. In the New Testament, from the time of Pentecost on, God only dwells in a temple He Himself has made—and that temple is us. “Don’t you know,” the Apostle Paul asks, “that you yourselves are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit lives in you?” (1 Corinthians 3:16). In the Old Testament, the Jews built a building in which God could dwell. As Christians we build church buildings as a means of helping God to come to dwell in us. We build churches, and they are precious to us, because they are the places where we encounter God in the Sacrament of Baptism and in the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. They are places where we kneel and pray, and God does His work in

At the Bookstore

From the Dean

C

front

back

ommemorating the 125th anniversary of Michael the Bell and the Preaching Cross at Nashotah House, the Mission Bookstore is proud to offer hand-painted ceramic Christmas ornaments, featuring these iconic fixtures of Nashotah House. To order, call Chardy at the Mission Bookstore at 262.646.6529.

$22 ea.

Son of House Publishes Translation, Study of Julian of Norwich

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us.  The building is precious not primarily because of what it is, but because of what God does there.  As we begin this new school year at Nashotah House, I am reminded that this House is a place where God is building His Temple. The physical beauty of our campus and the Chapel are tools God uses in His work. But the most precious thing is that God is using the ministry of this place to form those He has called to become priests and leaders in His Church. They, in turn, will carry that ministry into congregations and affect untold numbers of people in whose lives God desires to build His Temple. As I told our incoming class of new students during this year’s Orientation: “Your being here gives purpose to why I am here. I count it an enormous privilege to be a part of what God is going to do in your lives while you are at Nashotah House.” All of you who read The Missioner also have a part in this wonderful ministry of forming priests and leaders—laborers in building God’s Temple, the Church. I thank you for the part you are playing and invite your continued prayers and support for this important work.

The Very Rev. Canon Robert S. Munday, Ph.D. Dean & President

r. John-Julian, OJN, ’57, has published two books this year on Julian of Norwich, the 14th century English mystic whose Showings, Rowan Williams has written, “may well be the most important work of Christian reflection in the English language.” The Showings, also known as her Revelations, are Julian’s distillation of twenty years of reflection upon a series of visions of the Crucified Christ she received while deathly ill. Similarly, The Complete Julian of Norwich (Paraclete: 2009) is the product of John-Julian’s almost 30 years of daily reflection on Julian’s Showings, including a scholarly analysis of the mystic’s great themes and the historical and theological backdrop against which she wrote and reflected. “She lived in a terrible century,” Fr. John-Julian says. “The Black Death, schism. And the overwhelming preoccupation of Christian spirituality then was with death and judgment. In the face of all that, Julian gave display to a kind of optimism. She put sin in its place, by remembering the absolute, unqualified character of God’s love. There’s no way we can qualify that love, and she knew it. “There’s also a tension in Julian: how can we hold together a perfectly good God and a world full of sin? Julian grapples with that tension—and she leaves it unresolved. And that willingness of hers to leave it unresolved is what [Thomas] Merton said made her, along with John Henry Newman, one of the two greatest English theologians.” The monk-scholar, who returns to his alma mater every day for Morning Prayer and Holy Eucharist, founded the Order of Julian of Norwich in Norwich, Connecticut, in 1985. Since 1991 the Order, which now has a waiting list for oblates, has maintained its monastery in Waukesha, Wisconsin. In addition to The Complete Julian, the Episcopal priest has rendered a new translation of the longer text of Julian’s Showings which is included in Love’s Trinity (Liturgical Press, 2009). Both books are available from the Mission Bookstore; for these and other titles by Fr. John-Julian, call the Bookstore at 262.646.6529. For more information about the Order of Julian of Norwich, visit www.orderofjulian.org. 

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The Missioner (ISSN 1521–5148) is published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary preserving the classical tradition of Anglicanism since 1842. 2777 Mission Rd., Nashotah, WI 53058–9793, Tel.: 262.646.6500.

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Nashotah, WI 53058 Permit No. 1 Michaelmas 2009 Vol 26, No 1

You make the Snow Angels. We form the Priests. Epiphany Term at Nashotah House, Jan. 11–15 Courses appropriate for S.T.M. and D.Min. students.

Yearning for God’s Audience: Interpreting Job for Today

with the Rev. Timothy Johnson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew, Nashotah House

Catechesis Reawakened

with the Rev. William Blewitt, Ph.D., and the Rev. Lee Nelson

From the Womb to the Tomb: A Theological View of Issues in Bioethics

For more information or to register for classes, visit www.nashotah.edu or contact Carol Klukas, Director of Admissions, at admissions@nashotah.edu or 800.627.4682.

The

with the Rev. Daniel A. Westberg, D. Phil., Research Professor of Ethics and Moral Theology, Nashotah House

The Newsletter of Nash0tah H0use

Missioner


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