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FEBRUARY 2013 Issue • 301

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AMY LYNN AND THE

GUNSHOW THIS POWERHOUSE MUSICAL DUO ARE READY TO TAKE OVER

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ON THE COVER Amy Lynn and the Gunshow have been an underground sensation for years. Now, they’re ready to step into the spotlight and bring their brand of fun, powerful soul music to the masses. 2 BLEEP


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MATT FRANK

This talented artist has been crafting the images of modern Godzilla and Transformers that are taking the comic world by storm. And we’re lucky enough to chat with him about what it’s like to work with monsters everyday.

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Kiss and MAKE-UP

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RORY LYONS

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You’ve seen Jerrad Trahan’s work on the pages of BLEEP for months but now it’s his turn for the spotlight. And, as luck would have it, he brings three women who are used to being behind-the-scenes and gives them their moment to shine as well. That’s why we are crazy about this very-talented dude. This UK beat-maker has been creating music for Ibiza for years. He’s back with an all new song and we’ve got a FREE DOWNLOAD for you! BLEEP 3


Letter from the Editor February is a big month of loving. In the pop culture world, we love the Grammys and the Oscars. It’s the pentacle of the awards season and the evenings that usually provide us with a few moments to talk about the next day. There’s also that whole Valentine’s Day thing too, which I find to be the most divisive of all the holidays. Think about it. People who are in relationships take advantage of it, people who are single make a very loud to-do out of it being “single awareness day,” and everywhere you turn, there are little red hearts reminding us we are supposed to be in love and little candy hearts reminding us we should be fatter. Regardless of what side of the fence you land on with this holiday, I think it’s exciting Photo courtesy of Edward Miskie and we’ve got a pair of love-birds on our cover www.therearegiants.com this month. Amy and Alex Hamlin front Amy Lynn and the Gunshow and having been to a few of their concerts, I can tell you they are a musical force. Not only can she belt out the witty lyrics of their songs, but he leads their dynamic band, complete with a horn section and two of the most fun backing singers you will find out there today. So whatever film wins Best Picture and whether Katy Perry finally wins a Grammy or not (really, she had five number 1 singles on an album and she hasn’t won a Grammy? Come on.), February is hopefully a month that will fill you up with something other than chocolate hearts and the early Easter candy you know you’re already eating. Fall in love with some of these new artists. Oh, and “Community” is finally back on TV. If that doesn’t give you something to love this February, nothing will.

Ryan Brinson Editor-in-Chief

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A SHAMELESS PLUG: CHECK ME OUT ON WWW.THEREAREGIANTS.COM IN A FEATURE ABOUT HOW MEN SHOULD BE MAINTAINING THEIR BEARDS. IT’S A FUN FEATURE FOR A REALLY COOL WEBSITE AND I HAD A GREAT TIME DOING IT.


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OMG

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BLOGGER WE LOVE

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A new theatre company is emerging in California and we’ve got the scoop on their first show that will make you say ‘OMG.’

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This month’s ‘Blogger We Love’ has a knack for ‘scout’ing the freshest looks on a thrifty budget. Check out Justin Livingston and www.scoutsixteen.com.

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THOMAS KASP

After spending time guest-starring on TV shows, Thomas has a new movie coming out and is ready for his turn to shine. BLEEP 5


ANOTHER BEN HUMENIUK CARTOON!

Editor-in-Chief Ryan Brinson Editor at Large Julie Freeman Design/Decor Editor Lisa Sorenson Culture Editor Rachael Mariboho Business & Audience Development Manager Sarah Rotker Cartoonist Ben Humeniuk Cover Photography by Matt Tolbert Feature Editors: Juan Lerma Writers: Amy Lane Danielle Milam Laura Seitter Alex Wright Feature Contributors: Katherine Morgan All articles and photos are the property of the writers and artists. All rights reserved. 6 BLEEP


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‘OMG’ A NEW THEATRE COMPANY EMERGES

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here’s a new theatre company in San Francisco that’s showcasing a new and exciting theatrical pointof-view. “OMG, I Love That Show!” Productions is a freshly formed platform for new, unknown and rarely seen musicals - giving audiences the opportunity to experience theatre in a fresh and vibrant environment. For their inaugural production, “OMG!” will be presenting Disenchanted!, a critically acclaimed, award-winning show moving Off Broadway later this year. Disenchanted! features your favorite storybook princesses kvetching about the exploitation they’ve suffered in today’s animated films and theme parks. Snow White, the original ‘pissed off princess’, and her band of angry royal friends (including Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Belle, Hua Mulan, Pocahontas, The Little Mermaid, Rapunzel, and The One Who Kissed The Frog), unite to tell the truth about ‘happily-ever-after’ in a riotous vaudeville that has played to nothing but packed houses, rave reviews and standing ovations in NYC, Los Angeles, Orlando, and throughout the Northeast and Midwest. Ryan Cowles, the Founder & Executive Producer of “OMG, I Love that Show!” Productions is ecstatic for the debut of his theatre Company. “I started “OMG!” to bring attention to a facet of musical theatre that seldom receives a lot of attention outside major urban areas and markets. The San Francisco East Bay has an enormous thriving theatre community but so many of the companies focus on

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(and are very good at) presenting the main stage big Broadway musicals. After moving back to the Bay Area and being involved with the best companies in the area, I saw a need for a different kind of theatre experience.” Cowles says that different kind of theatre experience is in the presentation of non-traditional shows. “We hope that our company will serve as a platform for unknown and rarely seen musicals giving new shows a venue to be seen, and audiences the opportunity to experience theatre in a fresh, intimate and vibrant environment,” he said. “Shows like


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Hairspray and West Side Story are incredible shows, written for a large stage and larger houses. Our shows were written smaller casts and for intimate spaces, bringing the audience into the story with us like a fly on a wall. An equally exciting, but entirely different experience in the theatre.” So what’s the end-game of ‘OMG’? Cowles said, “The biggest dream I have for ’OMG!’ is for us to eventually have our own full time performance space. It would allow us a lot more control and flexibility in our programming and offerings. In the meantime, I have

a lot of mini dreams for us to achieve. Including the resources and funds to produce a full 4 show season, a workshop series to help develop new shows from local playwrights, and a scholarship fund for high school and college students.” Disenchanted! runs from February 15-24 at the Lesher Center for the Arts in Walnut Creek, Calif.. More information and tickets are available at: WWW.DISENCHANTEDPRINCESSES.COM.

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2012 WAS PRETTY INCREDIBLE...

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...2013 IS GONNA BE EVEN BETTER. BLEEP 11


the

List

by Rachael Mariboho

Since we are in the midst of awards season, we at Bleep decided to devote the first list of 2013 to our favorite film scores. This year’s academy award nominees for best musical score—Anna Karenina, Argo, Life of Pi, Lincoln, and Skyfall—join an extraordinary list of great Oscar nominated scores. And my personal favorite film score this year, Cloud Atlas, joins an amazing list of film scores that have been overlooked by the academy. For those who might question why scores like Jaws and Star Wars are not listed, it is because this is a list of favorites, not most iconic film scores. If you are looking for beautiful, uplifting, moving music, then check out five of our favorite film scores of all time.

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Legends of the Fall

James Horner is probably most famous for composing the music for a little film called Titanic. However, his score for this Brad Pitt led film is powerful and tragic and projects both the beauty of the unconsumed space of the film’s setting and the quiet moments of love exchanged between family members.

Dragonheart

Randy Edelman’s score for Dragonheart is one of the most moving pieces of music ever composed. It doesn’t matter that the movie is about a talking dragon (voiced by Sean Connery); this score transcends the film and is one of the most beautiful and uplifting pieces of music composed for a modern film.

Croutching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

Tan Dun won an Oscar for this haunting score that most precisely reflects the magical fight scenes and the drama of having to let go of one’s soulmate.

Schindler’s List

John Williams Oscar winning score simultaneously conjures feelings of hope and despair from the first notes of the violin in film’s main theme song. Never has a piece of music so perfectly matched the story it is representing.

The Mission

Ennio Morricone’s ethereal score for The Mission is as close to perfection that a composer can get. Listen to “The Falls” or “Gabriel’s Oboe,” the iconic pieces from this incredible work.

TITUSS BURGESS COMFORTABLE NEW ALBUM AVAILABLE NOW ON REVERB NATION

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REEL LIFE

by Alex Wright

Going through a break-up

I

broke up with my manager. It was a tough decision, but I felt like it was time to move on. The first thing she asked was the awkward and dreaded question of doom: was there someone else? I assured her that no, no, of course not. In truth, I had met someone. Nothing had happened, yet, but our meeting did involve dinner and a short chat about our possible future. After all, my OM (old manager) and I weren’t really committed—at least not on paper anyway. I had resisted signing the contract and forging that strong three-year commitment, because, well, I wasn’t really sure if I wanted to be exclusive. So, technically, I was completely free to meet with whomever I wanted. The meeting went splendidly. He treated me different than my OM—there were no snide remarks, no rude passive aggressive comments. He made me feel comfortable. I could be myself. I found myself fantasizing about what it would be like to be with this new, more established, exciting manager. Oh, the potential partnership! Oh, the possibilities! Oh, the promising client-roster! Out of fairness to my OM, I had to call things off. She didn’t take it well. She cursed at me, threatened me, and told me I was making a big, big mistake; all of these things furthered my resolve to leave, and comforted my heart in knowing I was making the right decision. This current relationship was filled with negative energy, an emotional wormhole that was sucking out everything creative and vibrant from my life. The final straw in our relationship was when she threw down the relationship gauntlet: get plastic surgery or I won’t submit you. After the breakup, I had to call our mutual friends and fill them in—after all, there is no “manager

status” on Facebook. I contacted photographers, retouchers, makeup artists, hairstylists and the whole beauty and industry gamut that had become part of my world once I affiliated myself with my OM. They were surprisingly supportive; in fact, every single one of them told me I was making the right decision and that I deserved better than what my current OM was offering me. A few of them told me they had vacillated several times about whether to call me privately and tell me to get out, that I was in an abusive relationship that was only going to get worse. They had seen what she could do. It was ugly. To be fair, a handful of them had hinted to me her potential for craziness: an acting coach told me that my OM tended to be very demanding and critical, and that I needed to remain firm in my identity and self-worth. I even ran into an ex-client of hers: she shook her head and told me to get out, unless I wanted to get hooked to diet pills and sacrifice relationships with all those close to me. Two headshot photographers, in the middle of a shoot, whispered to me to run for the hills, that it would be better for me to be alone than to be with her. I’m in a much better place now, I’m happy to say. My conversations with friends revolving my current manager relationship (where did you meet, how long have you been together, is it going well), tend to be light-hearted and full of hope and optimism. I’m sure there will be emotional relationship baggage lurking in the corner of my managerial mind for quite awhile—trust issues and whatnot—but for the time being, I’m just thrilled to be where I am and with whom I’m with.

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AN EDITOR’S OPINION by Ryan Brinson

A double-standard: Les Miserables In 2012, there was an incident where a Broadway performer posted her less-than favorable thoughts on the Public Theater’s Central Park production of Into The Woods. After a few opinionated members of the theatre community made a huge deal about it and inflated the situation to the point that Playbill was reporting it as “news” (a failure on the part of Playbill), it became a constant topic of conversation in the theatre community. The consensus in the was that performers in such a tightknit field should be supportive of each other no matter what. I understand that sentiment and while I actually don’t think there was anything wrong with the initial Twitter comment, I do understand the concept of being there for each other, especially in an industry that produces a lot of sub-par shows but employs world-class talent. But this Christmas, I watched as the same people who barked, tweeted and blogged about supporting each other went to task at letting the world know how much they disliked Les Miserables, a stage show turned into a film and employing many of the stage community in roles and as extras. Where did that concept of support go? It’s a different medium, but the point is the same. I find it incredibly hypocritical. I thought the movie was a triumph in filmmaking and it brought a musical into the lives of people who

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might never have been exposed to one, much in the way “GLEE” and “Smash” do on television. The Golden Globes and Academy Awards seem to agree as the film garnered multiple trophies at the Globes and multiple nominations at the Oscars. Rather than making quips about an actor that “can’t sing” or a close-up shot that was distracting, perhaps we in the artistic community should be supportive of big-budget musicals being made at all. In a time when movie studios only produce remakes and sequels, a slow, operatic period film got made, again employing many from the theatrical community. If it’s going to be about being supportive of people in the community, then that doesn’t exclude when the art jumps from stage to screen.


My Take

by Laura Seitter

And the winner is... In May of 1929 the first Academy Awards ceremony was held at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles, California. The 270 attendees paid only 5 dollars for a ticket, and the ceremony lasted a mere 15 minutes. Since that inaugural event, award shows have evolved, becoming a staple of Hollywood culture and a benchmark against which to measure artistic success and recognition. We adore awards season because of the glamorous fashion and glitzy parties, and we watch eagerly while the players sweep across the red carpet and give tear-stained acceptance speeches. At the center of it all, however, award shows are competitions where actors, writers, producers, and films are pitted against one another to see who will come out on top. Two of the largest and most anticipated shows bookend each year’s award season; The Golden Globe Awards and the Academy Awards both honor creative advances and performances on the screen. The Golden Globe Awards, bestowed by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, include categories dedicated to television. The Academy Awards are by and large considered to be the last word in film recognition. Voted and presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Oscars have traditionally been considered more prestigious and garnered a larger audience than the Golden Globes. As viewership demographics change, however, the competition is ignited not between filmmakers, but between the awards shows themselves. In the past few years, the Golden Globes has carefully cultivated their show, drawing in more viewers and gaining credence with the Hollywood elite. Perhaps their greatest asset is their reputation as a more modern, relaxed gathering. Countering the stiff, serious air of the Oscars, the Golden Globes is essentially a party where our favorite celebrities rub elbows and exchange fake smiles. Of course, the Globes offer attendees alcohol, which inevitably adds a little honesty and comedy to the festivities. Speaking of comedy, when the 2013 Golden Globes

aired last month, there was little doubt that first-time hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler would steal the show. Their natural repartee and biting witticisms hit the exact right note with audiences - something the Oscars has failed to do these past several years. Viewership of the annual telecast has suffered greatly due to a long line of hosts that failed to live up to the high expectations of the role, set by classic comedians like Bob Hope and Johnny Carson. For the 2013 Academy Awards, producers are punting in a different direction with Seth McFarlane, with whom the only guarantee is that someone will end the night offended. In truth, the choice to hire McFarlane to host the Oscars is ironic: Hollywood’s biggest night will be emceed by one of the biggest names in – not film - but television. The point illustrates one of the most important differences between the Oscars and the Globes. The Golden Globes include categories that reward stellar work in television, ushering new audiences into the fold. For various reasons – the poor economy being one – cinema ticket sales have dropped drastically and viewers have turned toward television. Celebrated writers and actors have also found new challenges and opportunities on the smaller screen, creating some pretty incredible shows recently. The Golden Globes continue to grow in popularity and prestige because they acknowledge the burgeoning artistic medium. The Oscars, on the other hand, appear ever more selfimportant and out of touch. Nonetheless, millions of us tune in to awards season each year for that very reason; Hollywood is a world in and of itself, independent of the common structures of everyday life. Those of us on the outside watch in awe, and jump into the competition to cheer for our favorite actors and grumble when Ben Affleck doesn’t get due credit. Both the Academy Awards and the Golden Globes are also in the competition, vying for credibility and appeal. Perhaps next year the People’s Choice Awards should feature a category for Favorite Awards Show?

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CREATIVEpages

Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, & the Prison of Belief by LawrenceWright Danielle Milam

3 OUT OF 5 SCIENTOLOGY PYRAMIDS “This is not a church or a religious organization. Scientology is a machine for manipulating human beings.” – Norbert Blum (German labor minister) Scientology: True religion or one of the most creative hoaxes of all time? This is the question the world has been asking for the last 40 years. Lawrence Wright’s new book, Going Clear, delves deep into that very question. Written from a reporter’s perspective, Wright gathers all the evidence for and against this religion and lets the reader make his or her own judgment. Is the book completely unbiased? No. However, after learning about the unfounded doctrines and hearing the stories of human rights violations so deeply engrained in Scientology, I can’t blame Wright for letting his true feelings show. One must respect L. Ron Hubbard, founder of Scientology and prolific science fiction writer, for his creative genius in the same way one respects Hitler for his ability to blind an entire nation to his true agenda. Hubbard, like most artists, became bored with his current creative medium. U n f o r t u n a t e l y, instead of trying out poetry or visual art, he turned his creativity towards founding a new religion based on “science.” Many of the core beliefs of the church are too fantastical to be true. This isn’t surprising since they are made by a science fiction author. They

speak of an alien race that has inhabited our bodies and are seeking freedom. The point of Scientology is to allow our spiritual self to go clear, or rise above the limitations of the physical world. As Wright presents the evidence, it just doesn’t add up. If Scientology lets you move beyond physical barriers, why was Hubbard considered legally blind? Why did he die? Not to worry, the Scientologists have an answer for everything. They claim Hubbard left his body to move to a higher spiritual existence. Most disturbingly, are the numerous reports of psychological and physical abuse within the organization. Not only are children kept out of formal education, many Scientologist sign a billion year contract of service to the group. They are housed on compounds where they are kept away from nonscientologists and the outside world. When they err, they are forced away from their families and must complete a sentence of manual labor. The saddest part is they believe they deserve these punishments. With Tom Cruise as the public face of Scientology, it’s easy to write the church off as one of those silly Hollywood things. Through this book, I’ve learned there is a much darker side to the church that needs to be exposed. My criticism of Wright is that he writes the book as a reporter. At times it can be dry and disjointed, as he continues to throw out evidence without letting the reader absorb its full meaning. That said, he has tackled an incredibly complex system and done it well. MUST READ FOR: ANYONE INTERESTED IN RELIGION OR CULTS, HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCATES, AND EVERYONE WHO WATCHED THE TOM CRUISE/ MATT LAUER INTERVIEW OR SAW TOM JUMPING ON OPRAH’S RED COUCH. Want more book reviews? Check out www.daniellesviews.blogspot.com

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thenatural

ARTIST

by AMY LANE

Let’s have a Quihi?

Quihi. It’s a word most have never heard, but for some it’s a permanent mark on the calendar—twice a month. And for another group—this one word conjures many special moments. Perhaps memories of a loved one long gone or a rite of passage—a first kiss or a room finally filled with five generations of relatives. My advice, if you go looking for it, is to expect to get lost. Literally and figuratively. The Quihi Gun Club of Quihi (KWEE-hee), Texas was organized in 1890. The town, population of about 100, is an Alsatian community not found on most maps. It’s located between the towns of Castroville and Hondo, 40 miles west of San Antonio. Regulars cite The Quihi Gun Club as the oldest, continuallyrun dancehall and gun club in the world. My first trip here was like stepping into another time and place. It didn’t feel backward--it felt more like coming home. The hall rests in the middle of nowhere—and fits the true definition of that phrase. Miles of dirt road will lead you to a sign that is completely invisible at night until you’ve gone the wrong way, put your headlights on the T in the road like spotlights and read a small sign etched in wood that simply says “Quihi” with an arrow pointing right. Driving closer to the hall, you begin to see foreshadowing of a dazzling display of lights shining out through the windows. The hall is built on six foot tall cedar posts and on

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the corner next to the entrance you can see the water mark and date of the most recent, devastating flood. I heard countless stories from the current keeper of the Gun Club, Clyde Muennink. He’s been coming to the hall for the past 45 years and running it for 19. “I got married here. I’ve seen a lot of folks come and go…a lot that can’t come any more,” Muennink said. “ I’ve met a lot of friends here and I’ve even been in Vegas and gotten recognized by strangers on the street.” With a smile, he told me the original oak flooring is as “smooth as a baby’s butt. Once you dance here, you won’t ever want to dance anywhere else.” Time, many boots and maybe even the floods have worn the floor so soft that dancers glide on it effortlessly. I expected to find only older couples, but the dance floor was filled with every age imaginable. Instead of being ensconced in the past, members of the club—about 1000—have embraced youth while holding fast to tradition. The band plays a mixture of old and new country with dashes of a 14 year old’s playlist thrown in. The older crowd welcomes the new generation of dancers to the floor. As Muennink said, “it’s where they learn to wiggle.” While the hall is lively, history seeps through each seam of the soft oak wood floors. Walls are covered with classic black and white photographs proudly bearing last names under them like, “Tschirhart,” “Haby,” and “Friesenhahn.” This is one of the oldest German social clubs around. The dangers created by


this isolated landscape and bands of Indians caused the founding members to make one of their goals, “to perfect members in the use of a rifle.” Its slogan “Schutzen, Gesellschaft and Freiheit,” (Shooting, Fellowship and Freedom) is enacted through the gun club at their two annual competition shoots. Regulars flock faithfully to the second and fourth Saturday dances each month. Dianne and Kent Keeton were married at the Quihi Gun Club and recently celebrated their 25th anniversary here. Dianne’s family is from the area and she fondly recalls the social traditions of her parents’ time, “until 1955, you still had to speak German!” It’s certainly a slice of Americana that’s rapidly disappearing from the cultural landscape. Kent said the first time he came to Quihi, “I walked up these steps, looked at the hall and thought I’d died

and gone to heaven.” Amid the changing times and homogenization of areas as stubborn as rural Texas, Quihi Gun Club and dancehall maintains its identity and continues to thrive rather than just survive. The hall has been enlarged four times and even a flood in May 2010 that covered the precious wood floors in two feet of water and six inches of silt couldn’t silence the music. Clyde Muennink and his wife immediately got to work sweeping out the water and fanning the old wood round-the-clock. The flood roared in on a Sunday, but the hall hosted a festive event the following Friday thanks to tireless efforts from volunteers led by Clyde. “ I told myself, come hell or high water—we’re gonna dance!” BLEEP 19


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OUR NEW YEAR’S GIFT TO YOU? SPECIAL EDITION RE-ISSUES WITH NEW COVERS, NEW PHOTOS AND MORE

CLICK ON THE ISSUES ABOVE TO CHECK THEM OUT! BLEEP TM

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CREATIVITY. UNCENSORED.


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MATT FRANK INTERVIEW BY DANIELLE MILAM

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I’ve always been fascinated by Matt Frank’s artwork. I would sit behind him in high school creative writing class, completely ignoring the teacher but entranced by the fluid motion of Matt’s pencil on simple lined paper. He would create stories through pictures effortlessly. I would surreptitiously glimpse at his paper throughout class, trying to guess how his story would end. Inevitably, his stories would involve Godzilla, and inevitably, the teacher would tell him to put Godzilla away. Little did any of us know that one kid’s classroom drawings would turn into a successful career with the fourth-largest U.S. comic book company in America: IDW Publishing. I sat recently sat down with Matt to talk about how he turned his childhood dream into a reality.

improve my skills. I never thought I’d be “sought after” the way I am today but I figure it’s all just a result of trying to improve each day and using the community to judge my art. DM: How did you start working for IDW? MF: I heard about IDW acquiring the Godzilla license late last year and, being a fan, I began badgering the editor, Chris Ryall, since he had hired me for another project a few years ago. Since I was fairly well known on the Internet as a Godzilla fan-artist, I managed to squeeze in doing alternate covers for each issue of the new comic. When those proved very popular, IDW allowed me to co-write and draw an entire issue.

DM: You are required to create. How do you stay inspired? DM: You’ve always been a huge Kaiju (Japanese word MF: When you’re a big geek like me, your brain is for monster) fan. Did you ever imagine you’d be a constantly on fire with creative forces. I play a lot of sought-after artist for this community? video games, I read a lot of books and comics, I watch MF: I’ve been drawing kaiju simply because I love a lot of zany Japanese TV, I constantly stay inspired. them and have used them as a medium with which to That’s a big factor in keeping the fire burning. If 24 BLEEP


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I’m about to work on a new comic, I’ll go research whatever it is that I’ll be drawing. Then I’ll start doodling and sketching to get a feel for the subject matter and find a way to put my own spin on it while keeping it recognizable. Then it’s on to the actual art, which is a whole other process itself. DM: A lot of the time you are recreating creatures that already exist in the comic book universe. How do you put your own spin on it? MF: That’s a tough one. It’s hard to consciously set yourself apart from others creatively, but one trick is drawing in a style that you think looks good, but that doesn’t look too much like a standard style and doesn’t look too much like any specific, previously established style. Besides the good ol’ paper, pencils and pens, I sometimes use coloring programs like Photoshop and my Wacom drawing tablet, which hooks up to the computer, to make sure my viewpoint comes across. DM: You have a huge fan base - people who come to signings for your work. What is that like? MF: Strange and startling and wonderful. I still can’t believe that so many people find my work engaging. Still, as master artist William Stout told me, “It’s the best job in the world.” People who admire you for your skills like that — it’s practically addictive. I have to be careful, though. If I get too big of an ego, people won’t like me or my work as much.

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DM: What experience do you want people to have through your art? MF: Excitement, fun, a childlike fervor of raw hyperactive enjoyment, and maybe a little something extra that they didn’t expect. After finishing the first issue of GODZILLA: LEGENDS, Matt jumped into the world of TRANSFORMERS for the majority of 2012. He completed work on “Flash Forward,” a story for the Transformers Collector’s Club official magazine, around February, then drew the interiors for two more Transformers-themed one-shots later that year: SPOTLIGHT: TRAILCUTTER and the wonderfully over-the-top crossover MARS ATTACKS THE TRANSFORMERS. He also began work on the new videogame KAIJU COMBAT with game designer Simon Strange (who had worked on the previous Godzilla fighting games). The game raised over $100,000 on Kickstarter.com and has been adding more and more monstrous characters each week! At the end of 2012, Matt also achieved his lifelong dream of visiting the Land of the Rising Sun with his girlfriend, Morgan. He got to spend time with many of his heroes and idols of the Japanese film and entertainment industry, and to top it all off, asked his lady love to marry him while at the top of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, one of the tallest skyscrapers in the country.


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CREATIVITY UNCENSORED by lindsey brooke shotwell

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AMY LYNN AND THE GUNSHOW HAVE BEEN MAKING MUSIC IN NEW YORK FOR YEARS. IN 2013, THEY LOOK TO TAKE THEIR UNIQUE BRAND OF SOULFUL AND SASSY MUSIC TO A WIDER AUDIENCE. WHERE ARE YOU FROM/WHERE DID YOU TWO MEET? I am originally from Connecticut and Alex is from upstate New York. We met doing a European production of Grease Das Musical in Zurich, Switzerland. I was playing “Rizzo” and Alex was in the pit playing the sax and clarinet. We met at the after party where a full out dance off ensued. We’ve been together ever since. WHAT DID YOU DO CAREER-WISE BEFORE YOU STARTED THE GUNSHOW? We both are still active in other areas of entertainment. I have been doing the Radio City Christmas Spectacular in New York City for the past 6 years along with different projects. Alex does many tours in Europe and the US with other bands throughout the year. 2013 though is all about The Gunshow. WHAT WAS THE CATALYST BEHIND THE GUNSHOW? Well, when Alex and I first met, I asked him if he would

be willing to help me put together a CD to showcase my voice. The solo album was just the start of Alex and I working together. After we realized we wouldn’t kill one another working together, we thought it would be worth a shot if we started working on our own stuff. Soon thereafter we formed a band and there you have it. WHERE DOES YOUR PARTICULAR SOUND COME FROM? WHY DID YOU ASSEMBLE THE TYPE OF BAND YOU DID? When we started this band, we were looking for music that used a lot of horns and had soulful singing, irresistible grooves and pop oriented songs. At the time, we were already listening a lot to the 4 CD box set of Otis Redding put out by Rhino. Something about those songs really got through to us. Part of it is just how simple and yet interesting all of those songs are; each one designed to stick in the listener’s head. We also listen a lot to other bands with horns like Earth Wind & Fire, Tower of Power, Chicago, and James Brown. But those bands typically have one or two guitars, an instrument we decided we would not BLEEP 33


have in the group. Otis Redding recordings put less emphasis on the guitar and that just worked better for us. So that tradition just held a heavier influence over us.

the time the two of us are finished with it. Once we get the song completed, the next step is for Alex to arrange it for our band of three horns, three vocals, keys, bass and drums. There are quite a bit of original songs and arrangements that have not made it to a DESCRIBE YOUR SOUND IN THREE WORDS. second public performance because they didn’t vibe Soul, Sass, & Horny. Um…because we have a horn right with the audience. We figure the audience knows section. best in terms of what song is a “keeper” or destined for the “trash bin/recycle heap” In our collaborations with WHAT COMES FIRST: THE LYRICS OR THE MUSIC? other songwriters, our style of collaboration varies. When it’s just Alex and I, the whole process usually starts with a simple idea for a chorus or a verse that HOW HAS THE BAND EVOLVED SINCE YOU BEGAN one of us will bring to the writing session. From there, PERFORMING? we brainstorm about the melody, harmony, groove, The band is constantly evolving, even the cast of tone and what the lyrics and song is generally about. characters. Our guys are such incredible musicians On rare occasions one of us will come to the writing that they are constantly being booked so far in session with a complete song with lyrics. Whatever advance for other projects. So we work with different is presented will likely be dramatically different by sets of musicians. After each performance, Alex and I

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have a high level meeting and discuss what’s working and what’s not. Ultimately though, the more we play, the tighter we get as a unit.

CHECK OUT “CLEARLY IT’S ME” BY AMY LYNN AND THE GUNSHOW ON YOUTUBE BELOW.

YOU RECENTLY SHOT YOUR VIDEO FOR “CLEARLY IT’S ME.” WHAT WAS THAT LIKE? Fucking awesome. We had all our friends and family there. It was a huge party. And the director and his crew were super easy to work with. We really are pleased with the final product. What makes you stand out from the rest of the musicians in New York? Oh, I don’t know what that is. But what I do know is we don’t take ourselves too seriously and our goal is to make good music with our friends. WHAT’S NEXT? Touring, a full length album, and hopefully a Christmas album.

W W W.AMYLYNNANDTHEGUNSHOW.COM

WHAT’S YOUR DREAM? I wouldn’t mind holding a Grammy. But what I really want is for this to be Alex and I’s fulltime gig and travel the world together sharing our music. BLEEP 37


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talking movies & television with

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WHERE DID YOU GROW UP? I was born and raised in the Windy City. Chicago, Illinois.

school would put on musicals and plays, and it was there that I first began acting, entertaining, and also emulating the late John Ritter. It was a great feeling.

AT WHAT POINT DID YOU KNOW YOU WERE AN ACTOR? When I was younger, my elementary school had a great theater program. I loved being part of the plays and I would always rehearse in front of my family and try to get their attention away from the TV. It was mostly a hobby until when I was 10. A lot of my friends began auditioning for a national acting school. I wanted to give it a shot and I ended up being the only one out my friends to be accepted. I started taking weekly acting classes in downtown Chicago. It was a thrilling experience walking the streets of downtown Chicago at such a young age. I was 10 years old, and taking acting classes amongst adults. It made me feel like a grown up and it allowed me to develop into an outgoing person at a young age. I was respected by these peers because of my talent, and this was a warming and validating experience. It was during those classes that I began to consider myself an actor.

WHEN DID YOU MOVE TO LA? WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT LIVING IN LA? After a few months spent actually learning acting as a craft in acting classes, I was chosen to represent the acting school in a national talent competition in LA. I came out here with the school and was able to showcase my talent to local industry members and agents. I was received very well, and was encouraged to try auditioning in LA for the summer. I came out for the summer and I’ve been here since. My favorite thing about LA is the people and also the coast. Its such an incredible place to live because it offers everything. I get the opportunity to swim, surf, tan, and even ski, all within short distances. LA offers a lot of great adventures for me.

WHAT WAS THE FIRST GIG WHERE YOU FELT LIKE YOU WERE DOING WHAT YOU WERE MEANT TO DO? It was definitely during my first guest starring role on “Cold Case.” I felt completely at ease with the whole WHAT WAS THE EARLIEST ACTING YOU process of portraying a character on camera. It was REMEMBER DOING? AT SCHOOL, AT HOME? the first moment of truth after all of my training. I got The earliest that I began acting was at school. As a little lost in the scenes and the dialogue while everything kid, I loved watching John Ritter in “Three’s Company” else zoned out. It felt like time had slowed down and reruns. I would spend my afternoons watching him I could get lost in the scene. The feeling that an actor and pretty soon I began to study him closely. I wanted gets while on camera is incomparable. Each and every to be able to make people laugh like he could. My gig I’ve had since has taught me so much more and BLEEP 43


showed me that this is where I belong.

enjoy. Its an adventure movie that will keep kids of all ages glued to the screen and it also features an HOW DID “SPACE WARRIORS” COME ABOUT? all-star adult cast that parents will enjoy watching. It Last summer, I got a big opportunity to audition for follows a group of kids competing against each other a feature film with a lot of talented people. I went in competition at space camp when a real life space through several auditions in order to land the part. emergency occurs and the kids jump into action. Its After the initial meeting where I read for Hunter, each a really enjoyable movie and will be great family fun. consecutive meeting had more and more people in Catch it in theaters this spring. the room. It all culminated in a final chemistry read for the director and producers. At a chemistry read you WHO’S CAREER DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY? are mixed and matched with different actors to see I’m a huge fan of Leo Dicaprio. I think he is a brilliant how well you work together. I went in and read with actor in that he challenges himself with every role Thomas Horn. Reading with someone as talented as and he picks multi-dimensional characters to play. He Thomas, made the audition seem easier. Our director, is always so exciting to watch and I love studying him. Sean McNamara, was very easy going and a blast to Every character that he has ever played becomes so read for. A couple of weeks later I was on a plane to memorable and I think he has a great talent and he Space Camp! fully explores it in every one of his projects. Im also a fan of Ryan Gosling and Brad Pitt. WHAT PART OF FILMING MOST SURPRISED YOU? A couple of things stood out to me. We got to try out WHAT INSPIRES YOU? all of the astronaut simulators and then film on them. Many things inspire me. I’m inspired by my role That was a blast. But the most surprising thing is models. I’m inspired by my constant will to learn and how tight-knit the cast became. Especially the older, improve. I’m inspired by my goals and my desire for more experienced actors. They were very warm and my hard work to pay off. I’m a motivated person. friendly and treated everyone equally. That made for a great work environment. WHAT’S YOUR DREAM? My dream is to continue making movies and to be a WHAT CAN WE EXPECT FROM THE FILM? regular on a series. I want to play memorable roles “Space Warriors” is a movie for the whole family to and have my work appreciated. 44 BLEEP


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Jerrad Trahan Dallas Makeup Artist Jerrad Trahan has always delivered beautiful work. In fact, the last seven issues of Bleep Magazine feature his makeup. While beautiful work it may be, Jerrad usually has to execute the vision of the Stylist, Creative Director, or Photographer. I wanted to see what he could come up with when left to create whatever he wanted. What resulted was a bride, an owl, and a pin up. Three women that are normally found behind the scenes, were brought in front of the camera and given a transformation to remember. Jennifer de Socarraz-Fleming, is a recent bride as well as the PR Co-Chair for the Dallas chapter of Fashion Group International. The owl is an observer, much like a photographer. Nicollette Mollet was the photographer of this feature, and for the first time, the model. Cassandra Willis’ job as a fashion stylist is to make the model look beautiful. This time around, Cassie stunned as the most beautiful transformation. In this feature, Jerrad explains the motive and inspiration behind each look. For more information and a photo gallery of Jerrad’s work, please visit: WWW.JERRADTRAHANBEAUTY.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICOLLETTE MOLLET CREATIVE DIRECTION AND MAKEUP BY JERRAD TRAHAN FASHION STYLING AND WRITING BY JUAN LERMA HAIR STYLING BY JAKE BRISCOE PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS ASHLEY AMANDA STUART, ASHLEIGH TRIBBLE MODELS: JENNIFER DE SOCARRAZ-FLEMING, NICOLLETTE MOLLET, CASSANDRA WILLIS 48 BLEEP


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Jennifer wears her own engagement ring and custom bridal gown designed by Ashlee Brooks Collection. Earrings provided by Couture Rocks Fine Jewelry.

“I chose Jennifer to be my bride because just two weeks prior to our shoot, in big Dallas fashion, became one herself. I was inspired by the love she is now a part of, so I used cool, spring tones to bring out a trendier side of the bride.� 50 BLEEP


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Nicollette wears an original Neil Marek design created with hundreds of Red Bull cans.

“I chose Nicollette to be the owl mostly because of the personal connection between the two. An owl is an observer and so is a photographer. The eyes of an owl similar to a lens. A blacked out eye socket using a cream shadow set with matte powder and a burnt orange contour.� 52 BLEEP


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Cassandra wears a Carmen Marc Valvo top from Ditto Boutique Dallas. Earrings provided by Couture Rocks Fine Jewelry.

“I chose Cassandra to be my pin up girl because she has an amazing old hollywood beauty. I was inspired by the glamour of that era and I wanted to create a dramatic look accentuating the eyes and lips. Bold blues and soft peaches around brown eyes to make them pop, and a bit of glitter for fun. A kissable pout in custom cherry red.� 54 BLEEP


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RORY

FREE DOW MUSIC NLOA D

LYONS

No stranger to the international party scene; Rory Lyons has been tearing up dancefloors for years with the much acclaimed duo Cassette Jam. The guys became renowned for smashing the back doors out of Chibuku, Wax On, Metropolis and The Warehouse Project amongst other clubland institutions in the UK and then continuing to repeat the success abroad, holding down residencies at Amneisa, Space Ibiza & Ibiza Rocks A collaboration with Doorly entitled ‘Storm Cloud’ featured on the huge ‘Ibiza Rocks compilation ‘Reclaim the Dancefloor’, which undoubtably shook bass bins to within an inch of their life. Followed by another bass monster ‘Move it’ with Hot Pink Delorean, which saw Rory Lyon’s dominate the Beatport top 10 chart for 6 weeks, the track an example of the rock meets dancefloor soundclash that Cassette Jam honed so well, but this time unmistakably tinged with Rory’s unique production techniques. Now, Rory is back with a FREE DOWNLOAD for you! Head over to his Soundcloud to download “Another Homicide” right now and be sure to check out all of Rory’s music while you’re there! WWW.SOUNDCLOUD.COM/RORYLYONS BLEEP 57


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Justin Livingston took his love for fashion and turned it into a wildly successful blog. More than self-promotion, ScoutSixteen.com has become a hub for fashionistos to learn to be thrifty with their style...and their wallets. Plus, he gives stuff away. Lots of stuff. Who doesn’t love free clothes and bags?

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photos by Christina Caradona

WHERE ARE YOU FROM? love of fashion. I landed a coveted internship at Teen I was born and raised in Mississippi. As much as I love Vogue the summer after high school and the rest, as New York City, I’ll never let go of my southern roots they say, was history. - craving comfort food and good friends on a wraparound porch. WERE YOU A FASHIONABLE KID? HOW DID YOUR SENSE OF STYLE EVOLVE TO NOW? WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO NEW YORK? I’ve always been quite functional in my dressing. My love The allure of opportunity and success was quite the for the outdoors and nature has been consistent since siren. I knew I wanted to work in the fashion industry I was young so much of my style has stemmed from but wasn’t yet sure what I wanted to do. Now, five years that, even at a young age. I was no fashionisto growing later, I feel like I’ve become a bit of an everyman; I’m up – colors theory hadn’t quite been introduced to me learning new things every day! yet – but I’ve always been aware of what I like and how what I wear affects my daily activities. As I’ve grown, WHERE DID YOUR LOVE FOR FASHION ORIGINATE? I’ve become much more conscious of patterns and I’ve always been a big believer in that saying, “Fashion fabrics, but like my younger self, being comfortable fades but style is eternal,” because while I’ve had some and confident are most important. pretty life-changing experiences through the years, I’ve never quite let go of my personal style. Through WHY DID YOU START BLOGGING? generous scholarships, I was able to attend one of the There are two words that I use to describe myself: Southeast’s largest private schools. While other kids passionate and creative. I’m a lover of life and the were dropping thousands of dollars at Abercrombie biggest dreamer you’d ever meet. In December 2011, & Fitch, Ralph Lauren and Guess, I was shopping thrift I was feeling worn down and lacking a creative spark. and other discount outlets. My peers were fashionable, My friends encouraged me to start a blog to use as my but I was going to be stylish. Over the next few years, own personal style diary. While I was initially skeptical, I developed my personal style and, consequently, my I couldn’t be more excited that I took this journey. It’s


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been one of the most creatively (and professionally) new but very exciting marketplace. rewarding projects I’ve ever begun. WHAT SETS YOUR BLOG APART FROM OTHER WHERE DOES THE NAME ‘SCOUT SIXTEEN’ COME FASHION BLOGS? FROM? I’m in a field with some extremely talented and creative My plan with the site was to scout out new and people. Many of my closest friends were introduced exciting trends/brands/projects happening in the through events or blogging-related activities. I’d like industry and my personal life, while sixteen happens to think that I approach blogging in a genuine way. I to be my age when I first visited New York City. Also, try to stay as grounded as possible and use my blog my nickname from many friends and family members more as a community platform rather than a place to is “Scout,” based loosely on the fact that my energy constantly advertise myself. and mischievous personality matches the young lead in Harper Lee’s “To Kill A Mockingbird” (which also WHAT’S THE GOAL OF SCOUT SIXTEEN? happens to be my favorite book). There are big plans in the works for 2013. Scout Sixteen will be getting shoppable video content, WHY DO YOU THINK FASHION BLOGGING HAS two new online marketplaces, and major designer BECOME SUCH AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE partnerships. I won’t say too much and spoil the INDUSTRY? surprises but my readers are going to get to play I think when fashion blogs are executed honestly bigger roles in developing and contributing to Scout and with tact, it provides a great unbiased platform Sixteen’s daily content. for readers to relate to the “real-person” model. Many people tell me, “I’m almost positive we’d be friends in WHAT’S YOUR DREAM? real life.” For designers and retailers, blogs open up a To wake up every day and know I’m doing exactly major void in the advertising market. There may be a what I love. Also, to own a litter of French Bulldog 16-year-old girl in Idaho that doesn’t read magazines puppies… but that can wait. or watch fashion-related TV but she will look her favorite blog to get an update on the industry. It’s a W W W.SCOUTSIXTEEN.COM 66 BLEEP


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MY HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE? I decide my outfits based on how I feel. Usually, how I feel is determined by the weather outside. When it’s cloudy, like today, I dress a bit gloomer. Grays, blacks. The weather influences my style.

VIEW

by Katherine Morgan

BRYAN, Entertainer, 23 from Seattle, WA

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PIECE THAT YOU’RE WEARING? My shirt. I got the shirt made at an American Apparel Booth in Texas. No one else has one. It’s completely unique and I love it.

HAVE YOU ALWAYS DRESSED IN A SIMILAR FASHION? No, because everything always changes. The weather changes, so my style changes.

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WHAT IS ONE THING THAT WILL NEVER GO OUT OF STYLE? Shoes, especially Jordans.


CHRISTINA, Student, 21 from Seattle, WA

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE? I don’t really have much of a style. I dress in a simple way, very comfortable. I stole this shirt from a friend and he knows that I have it. No matter what I wear, I’m always comfortable.

WHAT IS ONE THING THAT WILL NEVER GO OUT OF STYLE? The color black.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PIECE THAT YOU’RE WEARING? I really love my Samoa bracelet. I bought them myself at the beginning of summer; June, I believe. I’m half Samoan, so it means a lot to me.

HAVE YOU ALWAYS DRESSED IN A SIMILAR FASHION? Kind of. I was more of a skater girl in high school. I wore a lot of Roxy and Vans, that kind of stuff. I just think that I mellowed my style out more.

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There’s more BLEEPing than just in the mag. Check out www.bleepmag.com for past issues and find us on Facebook and Twitter.

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bleepquiz Justin Livingston

Blogger, Trendsetter, Tastemaker

I am... shyer than most people think. I’m here because... something great is supposed to happen. What makes me happiest is... a weekend with nothing to do. The color that best represents me is... bright orange. What I hope to accomplish today is... be one step closer to my goals. My best friends are... my roommates Christina Caradona and Bonnie Barton. I can’t live without... chocolate and chapstick. Between an Olympic champion or an Oscar winner, I’d rather be... an Oscar winner. Who doesn’t like to be someone else every now and again? If I weren’t me, I’d be... Ryan Gosling. I like it best when you... smile at me in the morning. God is... whatever you want him/her/it to be. I’m hungry for... steamed kale and turkey sausage. Always. I cry… only on Extreme Makeover: Home Edition. Style means… knowing yourself and evolving creatively. I want to go... home to visit my family more often. The most obnoxious sound in the world is... my morning alarm. What makes me weak is... a European accent and bright blue eyes. At this exact moment, I’m passionate about... being a creative mastermind. I crave... crafting the perfect Scrabble word. My inspiration is… my natural surroundings. BLEEP 71


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BLEEP Magazine 301  

The February 2013 issue of BLEEP Magazine featuring Amy Lynn and the Gunshow, Scout Sixteen, Thomas Kasp and more!

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